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Notice is hereby given that a Meeting of the Community and Policy Committee will be held on:

 

Date:                      

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Wednesday, 15 March 2017

11am

Council Chambers

15 Forth Street, Invercargill

 

Community and Policy Committee Agenda

 

OPEN

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Julie Keast

 

Mayor

Gary Tong

 

Councillors

Stuart Baird

 

 

Brian Dillon

 

 

John Douglas

 

 

Paul Duffy

 

 

Bruce Ford

 

 

Darren Frazer

 

 

George Harpur

 

 

Ebel Kremer

 

 

Gavin Macpherson

 

 

Neil Paterson

 

 

Nick Perham

 

 

IN ATTENDANCE

 

Group Manager - Community and Futures

Rex Capil

 

Committee Advisor

Alyson Hamilton

 

 

 

 

Contact Telephone: 0800 732 732

Postal Address: PO Box 903, Invercargill 9840

Email: emailsdc@southlanddc.govt.nz

Website: www.southlanddc.govt.nz

 

Full agendas are available on Council’s Website

www.southlanddc.govt.nz

 

 

 


 


Community and Policy Committee

15 March 2017

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

ITEM                                                                                                                                   PAGE

Procedural

1          Apologies                                                                                                                        4

2          Leave of absence                                                                                                           4

3          Conflict of Interest                                                                                                         4

4          Public Forum                                                                                                                  4

5          Extraordinary/Urgent Items                                                                                          4

6          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               4

Reports for Recommendation

7.1       Request for Te Anau - Tako Town (Japan) Friendship Relationship                   13

Reports

8.1       Draft Significance and Engagement Policy                                                              19

8.2       Creative New Zealand Creative Communities Scheme                                           49

8.3       Venture Southland Quarterly Report - December 2016                                          51


 

1          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

2          Leave of absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

3          Conflict of Interest

 

Committee Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision-making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Public Forum

Notification to speak is required by 5pm at least two days before the meeting. Further information is available on www.southlanddc.govt.nz or phoning 0800 732 732.

 

5          Extraordinary/Urgent Items

To consider, and if thought fit, to pass a resolution to permit the committee to consider any further items which do not appear on the Agenda of this meeting and/or the meeting to be held with the public excluded.

Such resolution is required to be made pursuant to Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987, and the Chairperson must advise:

(i)         the reason why the item was not on the Agenda, and

(ii)        the reason why the discussion of this item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

(a)       that item may be discussed at that meeting if-

(i)         that item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

(b)       no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

6          Confirmation of Minutes

6.1         Meeting minutes of Community and Policy Committee, 01 February 2017


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Community and Policy Committee

 

OPEN MINUTES

 

 

 

Minutes of a meeting of Community and Policy Committee held in the Council Chambers, 15 Forth Street, Invercargill on Wednesday, 1 February 2017 at 9am.

 

present

 

Chairperson

Julie Keast

 

Mayor

Gary Tong

 

Councillors

Stuart Baird

 

 

Brian Dillon

 

 

John Douglas

 

 

Paul Duffy

 

 

Bruce Ford

 

 

Darren Frazer

 

 

George Harpur

 

 

Ebel Kremer

 

 

Gavin Macpherson

 

 

Neil Paterson

 

 

Nick Perham

 

 

IN ATTENDANCE

 

Group Manager, Community and Futures (Rex Capil), Group Manager, Environmental Services (Bruce Halligan), Group Manager, Services and Assets (Ian Marshall), People and Capability Manager (Janet Ellis), Group Manager, Customer Support (Trudie Hurst), Communications Manager (Louise Pagan) and Committee Advisor (Alyson Hamilton).

 

 

 

 

 


Adjournment of Meeting

 

Moved Cr Keast, seconded Cr Kremer  and resolved:

That the Community and Policy Committee adjourn until the conclusion of Public Forum at the Council meeting.

 

The meeting adjourned at 9.05am

 

The meeting reconvened at 10.15am

 

Councillors Baird, Dillon, Douglas, Duffy, Ford, Frazer, Harpur, Keast, Kremer, Macpherson, Paterson and Perham were present when the meeting reconvened.

 

1          Apologies

 

There were no apologies.

 

2          Leave of absence

 

There were no requests for leave of absence.

 

3          Conflict of Interest

 

There were no conflicts of interest declared.

 

4          Public Forum

 

There was no public forum

 

5          Extraordinary/Urgent Items

 

There were no Extraordinary/Urgent items.

 

6          Confirmation of Minutes

 

Resolution

Moved Cr Dillon, seconded Cr Perham  and resolved:

That the Community and Policy Committee confirms the minutes of the meeting held on 14 December 2016 as a true and correct record subject to the declaration of interest declared by Cr Frazer on item 7.1 Use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles Policy being deleted.

 


 

Reports for Recommendation

 

7.1

Draft Remission and Postponement of Rates on Maori Freehold Land Policy

Record No:         R/17/1/352

 

Policy Analyst - Robyn Rout presented this item.

 

 

Ms Rout advised this report seeks approval from the Community and Policy Committee to endorse the draft Remission and Postponement of Rates on Maori Freehold Land Policy and recommend that Council adopt the Policy at the Council meeting scheduled 22 February 2017.

Ms Rout advised the draft Remission and Postponement of Rates on Maori Freehold Land Policy was released for public consultation from 1 October 2016 to 26 November 2016.

Members noted one submission was received and was included in the report.

Ms Rout explained it is proposed that no alterations be made to the draft Policy following feedback from the submission and officers recommended that the Committee endorse the draft Policy and recommend to Council that the Policy be adopted.

Cr Douglas enquired as to the amount of properties involved.

Mrs Marrah responded there are currently 197 assessments within the Southland District of Maori Freehold land.

Mrs Marrah advised she is currently obtaining a register of Maori freehold land from the Maori Land Court with the view of a comparison so any properties not currently on the Council register are not being disadvantaged.

The Committee was also advised that staff will provide a response to the submitter that will include guidance on his eligibility of obtaining a remission in accordance with this Policy.

 

Resolution

Moved Cr Duffy, seconded Cr Ford  and resolved:

That the Community and Policy Committee:

a)         Receives the report titled “Draft Remission and Postponement of Rates on Maori Freehold Land Policy” dated 18 January 2017.

b)         Determines that this matter or decision be recognised as not significant in terms of Section 76 of the Local Government Act 2002.

c)         Determines that it has complied with the decision-making provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 to the extent necessary in relation to this decision; and in accordance with Section 79 of the Act determines that it does not require further information, further assessment of options or further analysis of costs and benefits or advantages and disadvantages prior to making a decision on this matter.

d)         Endorses the draft Remission of Rates on Maori Freehold Land Policy.

e)         Recommends that Council adopt the draft Remission of Rates on Maori Freehold Land Policy at its meeting 22 February 2017.

 

7.2

Draft Easter Sunday Shop Trading Policy

Record No:         R/16/12/19987

 

Policy Analyst - Robyn Rout presented this item.

 

 

Ms Rout advised this report seeks approval from the Community and Policy Committee to endorse the draft Easter Sunday Shop Trading Policy and recommends that Council adopt the policy at its meeting on 22 February 2017.

2        Mrs Rout advised the draft Southland District Council Easter Sunday Shop Trading Policy was released for public consultation in accordance with the Special Consultative Procedure from 21 November 2016 to 13 January 2017.

 

Members noted six submissions were received and five of them supported the draft policy.

 

The Committee noted the submissions lodged that were included in the report.

 

Ms Rout explained a minor alteration has been made to the draft policy following the receipt of submissions.

 

Ms Rout sought Committee endorsement on the revised draft policy and a recommendation to Council that the policy be adopted.

 

Cr Duffy queried whether the deletion in item 4.2 of the explanation of the shop employee right to refuse work should be retained in the policy.

 

Ms Rout responded in regard to shop employee rights the Policy currently states the Employer must comply with the provisions in the Act and the Employment Relations Act 2000.

 

Ms Rout explained the deletion allows any changes to legislation to have no effect  on the Policy.

 

 

Resolution

Moved Cr Baird, seconded Cr Perham  and resolved:

That the Committee:

a)         Receives the report titled “Draft Easter Sunday Shop Trading Policy” dated 17 January 2017.

b)         Determines that this matter or decision be recognised as not significant in terms of Section 76 of the Local Government Act 2002.

c)         Determines that it has complied with the decision-making provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 to the extent necessary in relation to this decision; and in accordance with Section 79 of the Act determines that it does not require further information, further assessment of options or further analysis of costs and benefits or advantages and disadvantages prior to making a decision on this matter.

d)         Endorses the draft Easter Sunday Shop Trading Policy, including the minor amendment made as a result of the submission process.

e)         Recommends that Council adopts the Easter Sunday Shop Trading Policy at its meeting on 22 February 2017.

 

Reports

 

8.1

Draft Stewart Island/Rakiura Visitor Levy Policy

Record No:         R/17/1/1097

 

Robyn Rout (Policy Analyst) and Louise Pagen (Communications Manager) were present for this item.

 

Ms Rout advised the report seeks approval from the Community and Policy Committee to endorse the draft Stewart Island/Rakiura Visitor Levy Policy and recommends Council adopt the draft policy at its meeting on 22 February 2017.

 

Ms Rout informed the Stewart Island/Rakiura Visitor Levy collects revenue from visitors to Stewart Island/ Rakiura through approved operators, collection agents and a collection box.

 

Members noted the amount of the levy is set out in the Stewart Island/Rakiura Visitor Levy Bylaw 2012 and is currently set at $5.00.

 

Ms Rout explained the draft Policy provides guidance on governance and administration of the Stewart Island/Rakiura Visitor Levy.  It also outlines who is liable to pay the levy as well as how the levy will be collected, administered, allocated and enforced.

 

The Committee was advised minor changes have been made to the draft Policy to align it with the Terms of Reference and Delegations that Council adopted in November 2016.

 

1           Ms Rout advised changes have also been made to improve readability and a new review time period has been set.

2            

3           Ms Rout added a more comprehensive review of the policy, including whether it is operating effectively, is scheduled to be completed 2018.

 

Cr Ford queried how the enforcement of infringement offences is to be undertaken, as infringement officers have yet to be appointed.

 

Mr Capil responded this process will be included as part of the review of the policy scheduled in 2018.

 

At this point Mrs Pagan presented correspondence from the Stewart Island Promotion Association seeking an update to the strategic priorities of the Stewart Island/Rakiura Visitor Levy Fund with the view of a change in the criteria to allow organisations the ability to apply for financial assistance for specific operational expenses.

 

The Committee requested Mrs Pagan respond to the Stewart Island Promotions Group advising a full review of this process is to be undertaken 2018.

 

NOTE: Mayor Tong entered the meeting at this point 10.10am.

 

Cr Kremer queried if a revisit of the levy amount is included in the review scheduled for 2018.   Mrs Pagen confirmed it is included in the review.

 

The Committee sought clarification on the review period as the policy states Council will review the Bylaw and Policy every 6 years commencing 2015.

 

Mrs Rout confirmed that whilst the policy states every six years it is intended to undertake a more comprehensive review of the policy, including whether it is operating effectively in 2018.

 

 

Resolution

Moved Cr Kremer, seconded Cr Ford  and resolved:

That the Community and Policy Committee:

a)         Receives the report titled “Draft Stewart Island/Rakiura Visitor Levy Policy” dated 19 January 2017.

 

b)         Determines that this matter or decision be recognised as not significant in terms of Section 76 of the Local Government Act 2002.

c)         Endorses the revised Policy and recommends that Council adopt the draft Policy at its meeting 22 February 2017.

 

8.2

Membership of Creative Communities Community Committee

Record No:         R/17/1/821

 

Communications Manager – Louise Pagan presented this item.

 

 

Mrs Pagan sought approval from the Committee to appoint seven members of the public to the Creative Communities Community Committee.

 

Mrs Pagan advised Creative NZ grants have been traditionally decided on as part of the Allocations Committee which was administered by Venture Southland on behalf of Council.

 

Mrs Pagan informed that the former Allocations Committee has been disestablished and its responsibilities are now included in the new Community and Policy Committee roles and responsibilities

 

Mrs Pagan explained under the Creative NZ agreement, the committee deciding on Creative Community Scheme grants requires members of the public to be represented on the Committee.

 

Mrs Pagan advised at a recent meeting Council approved the establishment of a Committee made up of community representatives that can decide on the grants as per the Creative Communities agreement.

 

4          The Committee was informed that advertisements for indications of interest for this Committee has been publically advertised on 2 occasions and has received seven applications, from Te Anau, Riverton, Centre Bush, Hokonui, Stewart Island, Tokanui and Riversdale areas.

5           

 

Resolution

Moved Cr Dillon, seconded Cr Ford  and resolved:

That the Community and Policy Committee:

a)           Receives the report titled “Membership of Creative Communities Community Committee” dated 16 January 2017.

b)         Determines that this matter or decision be recognised not significant in terms of Section 76 of the Local Government Act 2002.

c)         Determines that it has complied with the decision-making provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 to the extent necessary in relation to this decision; and in accordance with Section 79 of the Act determines that it does not require further information, further assessment of options or further analysis of costs and benefits or advantages and disadvantages prior to making a decision on this matter.

d)         Approves the appointment of Dawn Barry, Glenda Bell, Cheree Downes, Robina Johnston, Janice Broad, Christine O’Connor and Gwen Neave to the Creative Communities Community Committee from 1 February 2017 to 1 October 2019.

 

 

 

The meeting concluded at 10.15am              CONFIRMED AS A TRUE AND CORRECT RECORD AT A MEETING OF THE Community and Policy Committee HELD ON WEDNESDAY 1 FEBRUARY 2017.

 

 

 

DATE:...................................................................

 

 

 

CHAIRPERSON:...................................................

 

 


Community and Policy Committee

15 March 2017

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Request for Te Anau - Tako Town (Japan) Friendship Relationship

Record No:        R/17/2/2576

Author:                 Rex Capil, Group Manager Community and Futures

Approved by:       Steve Ruru, Chief Executive

 

  Decision                              Recommendation                         Information

 

  

 

Purpose

1        This report provides background information to the latest request from Tako Town (Japan) for Te Anau Community Board to consider a Friendship Relationship request.

Executive Summary

2        Te Anau Community Board forwarded a request from Fiordland College and Tako Town in Japan in late 2015 for consideration of Council’s International Relations Committee to establish some form of student and citizen exchange.

3        This request was followed up with a letter from the Southland District Council Mayor to the Mayor of Tako Town in March 2016.

4        Subsequent to this letter exchange the Mayor of Tako Town has contacted the Te Anau Community Board Chair to further consider the request and gauge interest in formalising a Friendship Relationship between Te Anau and Tako Town.

5        Te Anau Community Board has referred the request to Council for consideration of an appropriate course of action going forward.

6        The Te Anau Community Board is an unincorporated body and as such is a separate legal entity to the Southland District Council as per section 51 of the Local Government Act 2002.  In addition to its statutory role, defined in section 52, to represent the interests of the Te Anau community, the Board operates in accordance with the Southland District Council Community Board Terms of Reference approved on 26 October 2016.

7        The Te Anau Community Board is seeking direction from Council as to whether it should enter into a relationship with Tako Town given that it is outside the scope of its terms of reference.

 

Recommendation

That the Community and Policy Committee:

a)         Receives the report titled “Request for Te Anau - Tako Town (Japan) Friendship Relationship ” dated 21 February 2017.

b)         Determines that this matter or decision be recognised as not significant in terms of Section 76 of the Local Government Act 2002.

c)         Determines that it has complied with the decision-making provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 to the extent necessary in relation to this decision; and in accordance with Section 79 of the Act determines that it does not require further information, further assessment of options or further analysis of costs and benefits or advantages and disadvantages prior to making a decision on this matter.

d)         Encourages and supports the Te Anau Community Board involvement with Tako Town as part of a Friendship Relationship.

 


 

Content

Background

8        At the 26 November 2015 International Relations Committee meeting the Committee received a report requesting its consideration of a request from Tako Town (Japan) to support a student and citizens exchange programme with Te Anau.

9        As a result of this request the International Relations Committee supported the request from the Te Anau Community Board to create an exchange arrangement between Te Anau and Tako Town (Japan).

10      The Committee also supported in principle the exchange programme and agreed to pay $75.00 as Fiordland College’s first year’s subscription to the Sister Cities Programme.

11      As a follow up Mayor Tong sent a letter to Mayor Sugasawa of Tako detailing the International Relations Committee resolutions – and clearly outlined it could not be classified as Sister City relationship as this would need to be agreed between the Southland District Council and not just Te Anau.

12      However, Mayor Tong encouraged the continuation of developing and maintaining the relationships between Te Anau and Tako Town that had been established as part of student and cultural exchanges already happening.

13      The Tako Town Mayor followed this up with a further letter directly to the Te Anau Community Board Chair in August 2016. This letter primarily reinforced the desire from Tako Town (Japan) to build a stronger relationship between Tako Town and Te Anau.

14      While Tako Town would like a sister city relationship they understand this is not a possibility and have indicated to the Te Anau Community Board Chair they would be happy to develop a relationship under a different name – being a ‘Friendly Agreement’.

15      This terminology is similar to the Southland District Council International Relations Policy adopted on 4 June 2014 which describes and defines four types of relationships – being Strategic Relationship, Friendship Relationship, Fostering Relationship and One-off Co Hosting.

16      As a follow up to the letter sent in August 2016 Tako Town have contacted the recently elected Te Anau Community Board Chair for a decision on the request of Tako Town to form a Friendship Agreement with the Te Anau Community Board.

17      As an aside, Kinsaku Hirano, a manager of the Town of Tako and in charge of its International exchange program is scheduled to visit Te Anau on behalf of Mayor Sugasawa from 15th to 20th March 2017 with Tako Junior High School students.

Issues

18      The main issue is regarding the ability of the Te Anau Community Board to enter into an agreement with Tako Town with the Te Anau Community Board being an unincorporated body.

19      In this regard the Te Anau Community Board has referred this situation back to Council to provide direction and identify what relationship the Te Anau Community Board can enter into with Tako Town.

Factors to Consider

Legal and Statutory Requirements

20      Under section 51 of the Local Government Act 2002 The Te Anau Community is an unincorporated body and as such has its own legal personality separate to the Council itself. The Board is reliant, however, upon the Council for formal delegations and for the allocation of resources to enable it to perform its role, which is prescribed under section 52 of the Act.

Community Views

21      Community views for this particular request will be sourced primarily from the Te Anau Community Board as the elected representatives for the area.

Costs and Funding

22      There are no extraordinary expenditure items identified as being required if the Te Anau Community Board entered into a “Friendship Agreement” directly with Tako Town.

Policy Implications

23      Due consideration is to be given to the Southland District Council International Relations Policy.

24      In this Policy “Council notes that it should only have a role in international relations where Council’s input can encourage cultural, educational and person to person to links.”

25      The Policy also notes “Council will provide guidance regarding the nature, type, purpose and location of international relationships. Council will also lead any relationship on behalf of the District.”

Analysis

Options Considered

26      The Community and Policy Committee considers two options regarding this request – (1) to encourage and support the Te Anau Community Board becoming involved with Tako Town as part of a Friendship Relationship or (2) not to support the Te Anau Community Board becoming involved with Tako Town as part of a Friendship Relationship.

Analysis of Options

Option 1 – Encourage and support the Te Anau Community Board involvement with Tako Town as part of a Friendship Relationship.

Advantages

Disadvantages

·        Builds on existing relationships already established as part of educational and cultural exchanges between Te Anau and Tako Town.

·        Provides some formal acknowledgement of the existing relationships as identified by the Tako Town request.

·        Encourages the development of opportunities for a broader understanding for residents of Te Anau and surrounds of international relationships.

·        Clearly identifies this as an opportunity for Te Anau specifically and has support in principle from Council.

·        Responsibilities for development and implementation sit with the Te Anau Community Board.

·        Requires consideration of appropriate level of involvement and any future level of resource investment being the responsibility of the Te Anau Community Board.

 

Option 2 – Not to support the Te Anau Community Board involvement with Tako Town as part of a Friendship Relationship

Advantages

Disadvantages

·        Not require any consideration of any future level of resource requirements

·        Does not provide an opportunity for any formal involvement by the Te Anau Community Board to support the existing relationships and the Tako Town request.

 

Assessment of Significance

27      This is not considered significant in relation to Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

Recommended Option

28      It is recommended the Community and Policy Committee endorse option 1 and encourage and support the Te Anau Community Board involvement with Tako Town as part of a Friendship Relationship.

Next Steps

29      Inform the Te Anau Community Board of the Community and Policy Committee recommendation and request the Te Anau Community Board decide on its response to the request from Tako Town to consider a Friendship Relationship between Te Anau Community Board and Tako Town.

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report. 

  


Community and Policy Committee

15 March 2017

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Draft Significance and Engagement Policy

Record No:        R/17/1/1590

Author:                 Robyn Rout, Policy Analyst

Approved by:       Rex Capil, Group Manager Community and Futures

 

  Decision                              Recommendation                         Information

 

  

Purpose

1        This report presents the draft Significance and Engagement Policy for the Community and Policy Committee’s (the Committee’s) consideration.  The Committee is being asked to endorse the draft Policy for release for public consultation.

 

Executive Summary

2        The Significance and Engagement Policy enables Council and its communities to identify the degree of significance attached to particular matters, and it provides clarity about how and when communities will be engaged.

3        The draft Significance and Engagement Policy has been revised to make it clearer and easier for Council staff to apply. The revised Policy outlines a 3-step process which involves:

·     Determining significance;

·     Identifying community views; and

·     Deciding how and when to engage with the community.

4        A key revision to the policy is a change to the factors that Council would use to assess significance. This change has been made to improve usability for staff and to better align the factors with what Council is legally required to consider.

5        This report seeks the Committee’s approval to release the draft Significance and Engagement Policy for public consultation from the 25th of February until the 31st of March 2017.

 

Recommendation

That the Community and Policy Committee:

a)         Receives the report titled “Draft Significance and Engagement Policy” dated 7 March 2017.

b)         Determines that this matter or decision be recognised as not significant in terms of Section 76 of the Local Government Act 2002.

c)         Determines that it has complied with the decision-making provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 to the extent necessary in relation to this decision; and in accordance with Section 79 of the Act determines that it does not require further information, further assessment of options or further analysis of costs and benefits or advantages and disadvantages prior to making a decision on this matter.

d)         Endorses the draft Significance and Engagement Policy (attached) for release for public consultation from the 25th of February until the 31st of March 2017.

 


 

Content

Background

6        Section 76AA of the Local Government Act (2002) (the Act) requires Council to adopt a significance and engagement policy. This policy enables Council and its communities to identify the degree of significance attached to particular matters, and the policy also provides clarity about how and when communities can expect to be engaged. 

 

7        The current Significance and Engagement Policy was adopted in 2014. The Significance and Engagement Policy is reviewed each triennium in the lead up to the release of the Long Term Plan.

 

8        The Act provides a degree of flexibility on how and when councils consult on a range of matters outlined in the Act. A Significance and Engagement policy is the partner to that flexibility, in that the policy must advise the public of a Council’s “house rules” – that is how a Council will utilise the flexibility.

 

9        Part of the policy involves determining the significance attached to particular matters. Significance is a continuum – ranging from the day to day matters with a low impact, right up to those matters with a very high level of impact and significance. How the Southland District Council assesses significance, and how it determines what matters are significant, is important because it will drive how Council makes decisions, and what analysis and engagement is required by Council.

 

10      The Significance and Engagement Policy also provides guidance to staff and the community on how and when community views will be sought. When Council takes steps to identify the views and preferences held by people in the community, this will often be through an engagement process. Engagement is a wider concept than consultation. Consultation is just one of a suite of tools for engaging with the community.

 

Issues

Three-Step Process

6        The Significance and Engagement Policy has been revised, and a 3-step process has been included to determine significance, identify community views, and to determine appropriate community engagement. This change has been made to improve the clarity of the Policy for staff and members of the public, and to make it easier for staff to apply.

Factors to Assess Significance

 

Aligning with the Act

 

7        The factors to assess significance have also been revised. The Act states that the Policy should outline a Council’s approach to significance, and specify any criteria or procedures used to assess the extent to which matters are significant or may have significant consequences. Council has the choice of what factors it wants to use to assess significance.

8        The terms “significant” and “significance” are referred to a number of times in the Act, and a definition of “significance” is given. In the draft Policy, officers have aligned the factors with what this Council must legally consider when it assesses significance under the Act.

 

Expanding on the legal definition

 

9        For one of the factors in the draft Policy, officers have added more detail than what is stated under Act. The definition of “significance” in the Act refers to “the likely impact on, and likely consequences for the district or region”. Officers have added more detail to this criteria by stating “the likely impact on and likely consequences for the current and future social, economic, environmental or cultural wellbeing of the district or region”. This change has been made to prompt officers on things they should be considering when they assess the significance of a matter.

Additional factor relating to strategic assets

 

10      An additional factor has been included to assess significance that is not part of the definition of significance in the Act. This factor relates to strategic assets. Council is legally required to list its strategic assets in the Significance and Engagement Policy. A strategic asset is an asset or group of assets that Council needs to retain to achieve or promote an outcome that is important to the current or future well-being of the community. Due to the important nature of these assets, officers have included as a factor to assess significance - the likely impact on and likely consequences for the ownership or function of a strategic asset.

Clarifying how and when to engage

12      The section in the draft Policy outlining Council’s approach to engaging with its community has also been revised. Changes have been made to try and give the public clarity about how and when Council will engage. The draft Policy links significance to an appropriate level of engagement, and then for each level of engagement, a range of engagement tools is listed. The draft Policy also states that Council will remain flexible in its approach to engagement, to ensure that the most appropriate methods are used.

Legal and Statutory Requirements

13      Under section 76AA of the Act, a significance and engagement policy is required to outline:

 

·     the council’s general approach to determining significance; and

·     any criteria or procedures that are to be used by the local authority in assessing extent to which matters are significant or may have significant consequences; and

·     how the local authority will respond to community preferences about engagement, including the form of consultation that may be desirable; and

·     how the local authority will engage with communities on other matters.

As is mentioned above, significance and engagement policies also must list the assets considered by councils to be strategic assets.

 

14      Section 79 of the Act (the so-called compliance provision) enables Council to exercise its discretion about how to comply with certain requirements in sections 77 and 78 of the Act, in proportion to the significance of the matter or decision. The requirements include:

·     the degree to which your local authority identifies and assesses options in respect of each decision or matter (including the identification of costs and benefits);

·     the extent and detail of any information to be considered;

·     the extent and nature of any written record to be kept of the decision.

15      How a council assesses the significance of a matter can be challenged. The courts may (and in the past have) overturned council decisions for non-compliance with a Council’s own policy. In the event a council wanted to make a decision that would be contrary to its significance and engagement policy, it may do so, provided it follows a process set out in section 80 of the Act.

 

16      When adopting or amending a significance and engagement policy, Council must consult in accordance with section 82 of the Act, unless it considers on reasonable grounds that it has sufficient information about community interests and preferences to enable the purpose of the policy to be achieved.

 

Community Views

 

17      The proposed consultation process will allow the Committee to consider community views regarding the draft Policy.

 

18      This policy does not need to be included in the Ten Year Plan 2018-2028 and will not be included in the consultation document for the Ten Year Plan. Consultation will occur through a separate process.

 

Costs and Funding

 

19      There are no costs associated with the review of this policy, aside from the minor costs associated with staff time and consultation (advertising).

Policy Implications

 

20      If adopted, this draft Policy will result in a slightly different approach being used to assess significance. It is likely however that Council will reach similar conclusions on the level of significance of particular matters, and that community engagement will occur with similar frequency and in similar form, to what is done currently.

Analysis

Options Considered

21      Option 1 – Endorse the draft Significance and Engagement Policy (with any desired amendments) for release for public consultation.

22      Option 2 - Not endorse the draft Significance and Engagement Policy for release for public consultation, and continue to use the current policy.

Analysis of Options

Option 1 – Endorse the draft Policy with any desired changes

Advantages

Disadvantages

·        The draft Policy would enable members of the public to better understand the significance Council places on particular matters

 

 

·        The draft Policy would enable members of the public to better understand how and when Council is likely to engage

·        The draft Policy would be easier for staff to use

·        The change to the factors to assess significance would be more in line with the definition of ‘significance’ in the Act.

·        There would be minor costs associated with revising the policy, including staff time and advertising

 

 

 

·        There is a very small chance staff may interpret the draft Policy differently from the current policy, which could potentially result in changes to the frequency and form of community engagement.

 

 

Option 2 – Not endorse the draft Policy

Advantages

Disadvantages

·        There would be no additional costs to Council

·        The current policy would still provide guidance on how to assess significance and determine an appropriate level and type of engagement.

·        The current policy does not give the public clarity on the significance Council places on particular matters

·        The current policy does not give the public clarity on how and when Council is likely to engage

·        The current policy is not particularly easy for staff to use

·        The factors to assess significance in the current policy do not align with the Act, meaning that Council is required to consider both when assessing significance.  

 

Assessment of Significance

23      This policy has been assessed as having a lower level of significance.

Recommended Option

24      It is recommended that the Committee endorses the draft Policy for release for public consultation (Option 1).

Next Steps

25      If the Committee endorses the draft Significance and Engagement policy for release for public consultation, the public will be able to make submissions on the draft Policy from the 25th of February to the 31st of March 2017.

 

Attachments

a         Draft Significance and Engagement Policy

b         Current Signifiance and Engagement Policy    

 


Community and Policy Committee

15 March 2017

 

 

SOUTHLAND DISTRICT COUNCIL

SIGNIFICANCE AND ENGAGEMENT POLICY

 

 

This policy applies to:  Council, Elected members, Council staff and the general public

 

DOCUMENT CONTROL

 

Policy owner:

Chief Executive

TRIM reference number:

R/16/11/19694

Effective date:

To be confirmed

Approved by:

Council

Date approved:

To be confirmed

Next review date:

2020

CONTENTS

1            Purpose. 3

2            The General Approach. 3

3            STEP 1 – DETERMINING THE LEVEL OF SIGNIFICANCE.. 4

            Factors to Assess Significance. 4

            Strategic Assets. 4

            What to do if a matter is significant 5

4            STEP 2 – IDENTIFY COMMUNITY VIEWS.. 5

            When Council will identify community views. 5

            When it is required by legislation. 5

            When it relates to a significant matter. 5

            For some matters that are not considered significant 6

            When Council may not identify community views. 6

5            STEP 3 – DECIDING ON AN APPROACH TO COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT.. 6

            Factors to Consider. 7

            Southland District Council’s strong community focus. 7

            Legislative Considerations. 7

            Remaining flexible. 8

            The role of Elected Members. 8

            Engagement with Iwi/Maori 8

            The Level of Engagement 8

            How and when we will Engage. 9

           Table 1: Southland District Council’s Engagement Spectrum Approach. 9

6            ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES.. 10

7            ASSOCIATED DOCUMENTS.. 10

8            REVISION RECORD.. 11

9            APPENDICES.. 12

           APPENDIX 1:  SIGNIFICANCE AND ENGAGEMENT FLOWCHART.. 12

            APPENDIX 2: SPECIAL CONSULTATIVE PROCEDURE.. 13

 

 

Contents

Page


SIGNIFICANCE AND ENGAGEMENT POLICY

 

Southland District Council has developed the Significance and Engagement Policy (the Policy) to determine the significance of issues within the District, and how to align our engagement with the public based on the degree of significance of the issue.  The Policy aligns with provisions the Local Government Act (2002) (the Act).

 

1     Purpose

 

1.1       The purpose of this policy is:

·    to enable the local authority and its communities to identify the degree of significance attached to particular issues, proposals, decisions or matters; and

·    to provide clarity about how and when communities can expect to be engaged in decisions about different issues, proposals, decisions or matters; and

·    to inform Council, from the beginning of a decision-making process about

the extent of any public engagement that is expected before a particular decision is made; and

the form or type of engagement required.

 

1.2       This policy will also guide staff on:

·    the extent that options are identified and assessed; and

·    the degree benefits and costs are quantified; and

·    the extent and detail of information considered; and

·    the extent and nature of any written record kept on legal compliance; and

·    on the extent Council must consider the views and preferences of people likely to be affected by, or to have an interest in a matter;

as these decisions should be undertaken in proportion to significance of the matter.

 

2     The General Approach

 

The Council will follow a three-step process to inform decision-making:

 

Step 1 - Determine significance – the Council will use particular factors to decide if a matter is of higher or lower significance. This part of the policy also gives guidance on what to do if a matter is of high significance.

 

Step 2 – Identify community views – the Council will determine what it knows about community views and identify if there is a need for more information.

 

Step 3 – Deciding on an approach to community engagement – the level of significance and what the Council wants to know about community views will guide Council on an appropriate level of engagement, and how and when to engage. This part of the Policy provides clarity on how and when communities can expect to be engaged in different issues. It also identifies how Council will respond to community preferences about engagement.

 

 

 

 

3    STEP 1 – DETERMINING THE LEVEL OF SIGNIFICANCE

 

3.1       Significance is about measuring the degree of importance of an issue, proposal, decision, or matter. Council has to determine how people, services, facilities and infrastructure in the District will be affected. Significance is a continuum ranging from matters that have a low impact/risk and therefore low significance, right up to matters that have very high levels of impact/risk and significance.

 

3.2       During the development stages of an issue, proposal, decision or matter, significance should be considered as it will guide both the extent options should be developed, and the degree to which advantages and disadvantages are assessed. Significance should also be considered when determining the appropriate extent and type of community engagement.

 

Factors to Assess Significance

 

3.3       Council will take into account the following factors when determining the level of significance. These factors are of equal weighting. The greater the cumulative impact of the matter as assessed by these factors, the more significant the issue, proposal, decision or matter will be. Significance means the degree of importance of the matter as assessed by its likely impact on, and likely consequences for:

 

·     the current and future social, economic, environmental or cultural wellbeing of the district or region;

·     people who are likely to be particularly affected by or interested in, the issue, proposal decision or matter;

·     the capacity of Council to performs its role, and the financial and other costs of doing so;

·     the ownership or function of a strategic asset.

 

3.4       Council may also take into account knowledge it has previously gained about the community and its views on an issue to assess whether the matter has a high level of significance.

 

3.5       When determining the significance of a matter that could have a high level of significance, it is recommended that Council staff discuss the importance of the matter to Māori through Council’s partnership with Te Ao Mārama Incorporated, or to take the matter to Te Roopu Taiao forum, which is a meeting of local councils and iwi.

 

3.6       Committees of Council and elected bodies can also be used to help assess the significance of a matter.

 

Strategic Assets

 

3.7       In respect to “strategic assets”, a key consideration is whether an asset is essential to the continued delivery of an “outcome” that Council considers important for the well‑being of the community.  Decisions to transfer ownership or control of a strategic asset to or from Council cannot be made unless they are first included in the Long Term Plan.


 

3.8       For the purpose of section 76AA(3) of the Act, Council considers the following assets, or a network of assets, to be strategic assets:

·    Roading/bridge network as a whole

·    Individual water treatment plants and reticulation networks

·    Individual township sewerage treatment plants and reticulation networks

·    Individual township stormwater reticulation networks

·    Portfolio of District Reserves (Parks/Reserves)

·    Stewart Island Electricity Supply Authority

·    Te Anau Airport at Manapouri

·    Community housing as a whole

 

What to do if a matter is significant

 

3.9       If a matter is considered to be significant, reports will include a statement indicating why this conclusion was reached. The statement will include an explanation of which factors indicate the decision is significant, the potential implications of the decision, the range of community views that might exist, and whether there is a need for a further degree of community engagement before a final decision is made.

 

3.10     Where the proposal or decision is considered to be significant, the report will also include a statement addressing the appropriate observance of sections 77, 78, 79, 80, 81, 82 and 82A of the Act as applicable, together with the corresponding degree of community engagement considered.

 

4    STEP 2 – IDENTIFY COMMUNITY VIEWS

 

4.1       Step 2 involves Council identifying what it already knows about the community views on a matter, and identifying if there is a need to get more information about community views. Community views are the views and preferences of people likely to be affected by, or to have an interest in, the matter. Determining how Council will identify community views may lead to community engagement. The process of how Council will decide if it needs to seek more information to understand the views in the community is outlined in Appendix 1. In general, Council will take steps to identify community views in the circumstances described below.

 

When Council will identify community views

 

When it is required by legislation

 

4.2       The Council will consider community views when it has a legislative requirement to do so (as set out by the Local Government Act 2002, Resource Management Act 1991, Reserves Act 1977, and Land Transport Management Act 2003).  Examples of when Council will identify community views include the adoption and amendment/s to both the Long Term Plan and a bylaw, transfer of ownership of a significant strategic asset, and changes to financial policies. Council may identify community views more broadly than what is legally required.

 

When it relates to a significant matter

 

4.3       Subject to consideration of factors in paragraph 3.3 of this Policy, the Council will identify community views whenever a ‘significant decision’ needs to be made. A significant decision is one which has been identified as such under this Policy.

            Note: a ‘significant’ decision will not automatically trigger consultation or application of the Special Consultative Procedure (SCP). An outline of what Council must do when it is required to use or adopt the special consultative procedure is outlined in Appendix 4. Further information on the SCP is in sections 86, 87, and 93A of the LGA 2002.

 

For some matters that are not considered significant

 

4.4       In general, where a matter is not considered significant under this Policy, the Council is unlike to seek additional information on community views. However, in some situations where Council staff deem community involvement or notification is appropriate, informal feedback or notification processes may be followed.

 

When Council may not identify community views

 

4.5       Information is always necessary for the decision making process. However, there are times when it is not necessary, appropriate or possible to seek additional information on community views. If this is the case, Council will make this determination in accordance with the criteria below and not withstanding any legislative requirements. The Council will not identify community views when:

·    The matter is not of a nature or significance that requires consultation (LGA 2002, s82(4)(c)

·    The Council already has a sound understanding of the views and preferences of the persons likely to be affected by or interested in the matter (s82(4)(b) LGA 2002);

·    There is a need for confidentiality or commercial sensitivity (s82(4)(d) LGA 2002);

·    The costs of consultation outweigh the benefits of it (s82(4)(e) LGA 2002);

·    Engagement will not be beneficial as it will not influence the decision (for example if there is only one or very limited viable options available, there may be no benefit in engaging with the community);

·    The matter has already been addressed by the Council’s policies or plans, which have previously been consulted on;

·    An immediate or quick response or decision is needed or it is not reasonably practicable to engage;

·    Works are required unexpectedly or following further investigations on projects, already approved by the Council;

·    Business as usual - the works required are related to the operation and maintenance of a Council asset and responsible management requires the  works to take place;

·    When Council has consulted on the unchanged issue in the last 24 months.

 

4.6       Where the above listed circumstances apply and community feedback is not sought, the Council is still required to give consideration to the views and preferences of persons likely to be affected by, or to have an interest in, the matter (LGA 2002 section 78 (1)).  The LGA 2002 requires that this consideration be in proportion to the significance of the matters affected by the decision (section 79 (1)).

 

 

5     STEP 3 – DECIDING ON AN APPROACH TO COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT

 

5.1       Once Council has determined the significance of a matter and has determined it needs more information on the range of views held, Council will consider how and when it should engage with the community. Depending on the matter being considered and the stakeholders involved, the preferred method(s) or combination of engagement tools will be identified and applied to meet the goals of the specific engagement.

 

5.2       Council will respond to community preferences about engagement, including the form of consultation that may be desirable, by informing and seeking guidance from Councillors. Council will also use engagement methods that have proven over time to be effective at informing the public and generating responses.

 

5.3       There is a variety of ways in which the Council engages with the community. In this policy, the types of engagement described relate specifically to Council, Community Board and delegated decision-making. The types of engagement described are given as a guide, and Council is not limited to or by the stated methods of engagement.

 

5.4       The significance of the issue, proposal or decision will influence the extent Council explores and evaluates options and obtains the views of affected and interested parties.

 

5.5       Council will apply the principles of s82 of the Act when determining engagement. Council will select the engagement method that it considers most appropriate in the circumstance.

 

Factors to Consider

 

Southland District Council’s strong community focus

 

5.6       The Southland community is at the heart of Council’s purpose, vision and mission; therefore, engagement will reflect the need for community input into Council decision-making.

 

5.7       The Council is also keen to build on existing relationships and networks with individuals and communities, and look to extend the range of parties involved in the community engagement as appropriate. The Council will work to ensure the community is sufficiently informed to understand the issue(s) or proposal, options and impacts and has time to respond, so they are able to participate in engagement processes with confidence.

 

Legislative Considerations

 

5.8       When Council makes decisions, often legislation will prescribe the consultation and decision-making procedures required. This includes the procedures to be used for public notification, considering submissions and making decisions. Section 82(5) of the LGA 2002 says that where specific consultation is required under the LGA, or any other enactment, and if inconsistent with any s82 principle – the other provisions will prevail (to the extent of the inconsistency). Those other Acts include, among others, the Reserves Act 1977, the Biosecurity Act 1993, Land Transport Act 1998 and the Resource Management Act 1991.

 

5.9       There are a number of decisions that can only be made if they are explicitly provided for in the Council’s LTP as set out by the LGA 2002 Amendment Act 2014. These are:

 

·    to alter significantly the intended level of service provision for any significant activity undertaken by or on behalf of the Council, including a decision to commence or cease any such activity;

·    to transfer the ownership or control of a strategic asset to or from the Council.

 

5.10     In addition, Council is required at times to use a Special Consultative Procedure (SCP), as set out in section 83 of the LGA. The SCP is a prescribed process for consultation set out in the LGA. In brief, the SCP requires Council to issue and widely distribute a proposal, which is open for consultation for at least a month, and the community can provide its views. The SCP may also be used for any other decision Council wishes to consult on, and generally this will be when a matter is of high significance. The requirement or use of the SCP does not preclude the need to engage with affected communities. The use of the SCP is predominantly a reflection of the significance of an issue, which in turn identifies the need for appropriate community engagement. Schedule 2 outlines when an SCP is required, and what is required under section 83.

 

Remaining flexible

 

5.11     It is important that Council does not use a homogenous approach, and that engagement tools are appropriate to the location, significance of the issue, and community affected. Differing levels and forms of engagement may be required during the varying phases of consideration and decision-making on an issue or proposal, and for different community groups or stakeholders. The Council will review the appropriateness and effectiveness of the engagement strategy and methods as the process proceeds. There may be occasions in which the Council chooses to carry out engagement at a level higher than that indicated by the significance of the decision as part of its commitment to promote participatory democracy.

 

5.12     Council will also be open to new and developing methods of engagement through the use of technology and innovation.

 

The role of Elected Members

 

5.13     This policy recognises the role of elected representatives, both Councillors and Community Board members, as valued and recognised conduits to the communities they represent. Council, when engaging with affected or interested communities, will recognise the relationship elected members have with the location, specific communities and individuals affected by consultation or engagement initiatives. Participation of elected representatives is an essential step to consider, in light of broader community good, when initiating any project requiring engagement.

 

Engagement with Iwi/Maori

 

5.14     A strategic focus for Council is maintaining and enhancing our partnership with Maori. Council has a strong partnership with Te Ao Mārama Incorporated, and encourages openly engaging with iwi/Maori through this channel or through the Te Roopu Taiao forum.

The Level of Engagement

 

5.15     Using the International Association of Public Participation engagement spectrum as a basis[1], the method(s) of engagement adopted by the Council before it makes a decision may depend on whether or not:

 

·    The matter is of low or no significance (e.g. technical and/or minor amendments to a bylaw or Council policy) and there may be a very small group of people affected by or with an interest in the decision. Council is unlikely to engage on these matters;

·    The matter is significant only to a relatively small group of people or is of low impact to many. They should be informed about the problem, alternatives, opportunities and/or solutions and/or consulted so that any concerns, alternatives and aspirations they have are understood and considered;

·    The matter is significant not only to a small group of people particularly affected but also to a wider community that may have an interest in the decision to be made. They may be informed, consulted and/or involved to seek public input and feedback on analysis, alternatives and/or decisions.

·    For more significant matters the Council may elect to collaborate, or partner, with a community in any aspect of a decision including the development of alternatives and the identification of preferred solutions. This is more likely to occur where there is a distinct group of affected or particularly interested people.

 

5.16     Depending on the level of significance and the nature of the issue, proposal or decision being made, by using a range of engagement methods communities may be empowered to participate in the decision-making process.

 

How and when we will Engage

 

5.17     Once the appropriate level of engagement has been assessed (in accordance with paragraphs 5.15 and 5.16 above), Council will then consider the range of engagement methods that are appropriate. This process support community participation through an Engagement Spectrum Approach.

 

5.18     Council will select the method it considers appropriate in the circumstance, taking into account a range of factors, such as who is affected or who is likely to have a view. Council will remain flexible in its approach to engagement, to ensure that the most appropriate methods are used.

 

5.19     Table 1 below outlines Southland District Council’s engagement spectrum. The Table gives guidance on how and when communities can expect to be engaged in particular matters, relative to their significance. The table also gives examples of what significance has been placed on particular matters in the past, and what types of community engagement has been used for those matters. The table is also a valuable tool for Council staff to inform on the extent of public engagement that might be expected on a matter before a decision is made, and the form or type of engagement that may be required and appropriate.

 

 

Table 1: Southland District Council’s Engagement Spectrum Approach

 

 

low level of significance                                                                              high level of significance

 

Level

Inform

Consult

Involve

Collaborate

Empower

What it involves

To provide the public with balanced and objective information to assist them in understanding the problem, alternatives, opportunities and/or solutions.

To obtain public feedback on analysis, alternatives and/or decisions.

To work directly with the public throughout the process to ensure that public concerns and aspirations are consistently understood and considered.

To partner with the public in each aspect of the decision including the development of alternatives and the identification of the preferred solution.

To place final decision making is in the hands of the public.

Types of matters we might use this type of engagement for

Minor change to how Council manages groups of activities

Upgrade of a reserve area

 

 

Long Term Plan and Annual Plan where there are significant changes from the content of the LTP for that financial year.

Policies such as the Easter Sunday Shop Trading Policy and the Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Policy.

Development of options for a policy change that is deemed significant e.g. moving from land to capital value for rating purposes.

Development options for a new large capital project which has a community focus and has a large number of options e.g. Te Anau Waste Water Project

Community halls

Examples of engagement tools Council might use

Council newsletter, Weekly/daily newspapers, Community newsletters, Electronic messages (eg, email, online newsletters, social media posts), Flyers, Website, Radio.

Submissions, Hearings, Feedback processes, Surveys, Open Days

 

Woolshed meetings, Social media, Targeting existing organisations within the community eg, service clubs

 

Talking with communities, Key partnerships with existing community organisations, Hall committees

 

Community Boards, Community Development Area Subcommittees

 

When the community can expect to be involved

Council will generally advise the community when a decision is made.

Council will advise the community when a draft decision is made and generally provides the community with up to four (4) weeks to participate and respond.

Council will generally provide the community with a greater lead-in time to allow them time to be involved in the process.

Council will generally involve the community at the start to scope the issue, again after information has been collected and again when options are being considered.

Council will generally involve the community at the start to scope the issue

 

6    ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

 

Party/Parties

Roles and Responsibilities

Communications Manager, Management Team

Ensure that engagement with the community meets the degree of significance determined by Council

Council

·   Determine degree of significance of an issue

·   Determine whether or not to engage

·   Link level of significance to appropriate levels of engagement

·   Use determined level of significance to decide how much time, money and effort the Council will invest in exploring and evaluating options and obtaining the views of affected and interested parties

 

 

7    ASSOCIATED DOCUMENTS

 

Local Government Act (2002).

Southland District Council Engagement Strategy

 

8    REVISION RECORD

 

          The Policy will be reviewed at each triennial, aligned with Council elections.

 

Date

Version

Revision Description

28 January 1999

N/A

Consultation Policy

27 November 2003

R/03/7/6677

Consultation Policy

26 June 2003

R/09/9/13601

Significance Policy

28 June 2006

R/12/1/808

Significance Policy

29 October 2014

R/14/8/11821

Significance and Engagement Strategy

2017

R/16/11/19694

Significance and Engagement Strategy


 

9    APPENDICES

 

APPENDIX 1:  SIGNIFICANCE AND ENGAGEMENT FLOWCHART

 

 

 

 

 



Community and Policy Committee

15 March 2017

 

 

APPENDIX 2: SPECIAL CONSULTATIVE PROCEDURE

 

The Local Government Act 2002 requires Council to use the Special Consultative Procedure for:

·    adoption of or amendment to the LTP (including significant amendments to the Revenue and Financing Policy)

·    revocation, adoption or amendment to a bylaw

·    transfer of ownership of a significant strategic asset

 

It is important to note that formal consultation by a special consultative procedure is a structured process outlined in legislation and supported by case-law. This type of consultation still applies in some decision making processes. In other engagement processes, however, there are no explicit statutory or legal rules constraining or defining community engagement processes. The Local Government Act 2002 has given local authorities the ability to determine this as appropriate for their communities.

 

At the time of writing this policy there are a number of other acts that require use of the Special Consultative Procedure, including but not limited to:

·    Sale and Supply of Liquor Act 2012,

·    Local Government Act 1974,

·    Building Act 2004,

·    Local Government (Rating) Act 2002,

·    Psychoactive Substances Act 2013,

·    Dog Control Act 1996,

·    Waste Minimisation Act 2008,

·    Freedom Camping Act 2011,

·    Land Transport Management Act 2003

·    Biosecurity Act 1993

·    Civil Defence Emergency Management Act 2001

·    Maritime Transport Act 1994

 

Section 83 of the LGA states the requirements of the SCP. This section is included below.

 

83      Special Consultative Procedure

 

1          Where this Act or any other enactment requires a local authority to use or adopt the special consultative procedure, that local authority must -

(a)        prepare and adopt -

(i) a statement of proposal; and

(ii)        if the local authority considers on reasonable grounds that it is necessary to enable public understanding of the proposal, a summary of the information contained in the statement of proposal (which summary must comply with section 83AA of the Act; and


 

 

(b)       ensure that the following is publicly available:

(i) the statement of proposal; and

 

(ii)        a description of how the local authority will provide persons interested in the proposal with an opportunity to present their views to the local authority in accordance with section 82(1)(d) of the Act; and

(iii)       a statement of the period within which views on the proposal may be provided to the local authority (the period being not less than 1 month from the date the statement is issued); and

 

(c)        make the summary of the information contained in the statement of proposal prepared in accordance with paragraph (a)(ii) of the Act (or the statement of proposal, if a summary is not prepared) as widely available as reasonably practicable as a basis for consultation; and

 

(d)        provide an opportunity for persons to present their views to the local authority in a manner that enables spoken English, Māori, and/or New Zealand sign language interaction between the person and the local authority, or any representatives to whom an appropriate delegation has been made in accordance with Schedule 7 of the Act; and

 

(e)        ensure that any person who wishes to present his or her views to the local authority or its representatives as described in paragraph (d)

(i) is given a reasonable opportunity to do so; and

(ii)        is informed about how and when he or she may take up that opportunity.

 

2.         For the purpose of, but without limiting, subsection (1)(d), a local authority may allow any person to present his or her views to the local authority by way of audio link or audio visual link.

 

 


Community and Policy Committee

15 March 2017

 

SOUTHLAND DISTRICT COUNCIL

SIGNIFICANCE AND ENGAGEMENT POLICY

 

 

This policy applies to:  Council, Elected members, Council staff and the general public

 

 

DOCUMENT CONTROL

 

Policy owner:

Chief Executive

TRIM reference number:

r/14/8/11821

Effective date:

29 October 2014

Approved by:

Council

Date approved:

29 October  2014

Next review date:

November 2016

 

 

 

CONTENTS

 

1.           PURPOSE.. 2

2.           POLICY DETAILS.. 2

2.1         Determining Significance. 2

2.2         Strategic Assets. 3

2.3         Procedure guiding the determination of significance and engagement 4

2.4         Engagement 4

2.4.1     Methods of Engagement 4

2.4.2     When Council will Engage. 5

2.4.2     When the Council may not Engage. 6

2.5.        Special Consultative Procedure. 6

4.           ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES.. 7

5.           ASSOCIATED DOCUMENTS.. 7

6.           REFERENCES.. 7

7.           REVISION RECORD.. 8

8.          APPENDICES.. 9

APPENDIX 1:  SIGNIFICANCE AND ENGAGEMENT FLOWCHART.. 9

APPENDIX 2:  COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT SPECTRUM.. 10

APPENDIX 3:  TOOLBOX FOR ENGAGEMENT.. 11

 


SIGNIFICANCE AND ENGAGEMENT POLICY

 

1.   PURPOSE

 

Southland District Council has developed the Significance and Engagement Policy (the Policy) to determine the significance of issues within the District, and how to align our engagement with the public based on the degree of significance of the issue.  The Policy aligns with provisions the Local Government Act (2002) (the Act).

 

This policy exists to:

·              inform you about what you, the public, can expect from the Southland District Council regarding community engagement and the ways you can influence and participate in the decision-making of the Council.

·              to provide Council with a tool that guides the assessment of significance during decision-making.  A decision on significance and engagement provides direction on the consideration of community views and the level of community engagement that might be desirable to enable Council to develop a clearer understanding of community views and preferences on an issue or proposal.

 

2.   POLICY DETAILS

 

          Significance

 

2.1     Determining Significance

 

In considering whether any issue, proposal, decision or other matter is of significance under this policy Council will be guided by the following matters:

 

Criteria

Measure

The degree to which the issue affects the District

Major and/or long term effect on one or more town OR ward OR District

The degree to which the issue affects the community

Major and/or long term effect on a Demographic OR Community OR District

The degree to which the issue affects the level of service of a significant activity

Results in any major change (up or down) in levels of service including affecting access to core services

The degree to which the issue has a financial impact on Council or the rating levels of its communities

>$2,000,000 for planned expenditure (within an LTP or Annual Plan) OR >$500,000 for unplanned expenditure

The degree to which the issue has cultural relevance

Major and long term effect on an ethnicity, religion or culture

The degree to which the issue has an impact on the environment

Major and/or long-term bearing on the resource management issues of the District

 

A matter may be considered significant when one or more of the above criteria are met.


 

If an issue exceeds one or more of the above criteria measures, the matter is more likely to have a high degree of significance.  Similarly, other matters to take into account when determining significance can include the reversibility of the decision; the degree to which the decision promotes the vision, mission and/or values of Council; and the impact on rates and/or debt.

 

While this Policy sets out distinct financial thresholds, there may be financial decisions that do not trigger these thresholds but need to be considered as significant due to triggering some or all of the other criteria listed. 

 

Decisions will be made with sensitivity to a decisions potential impact on, and interest held within, the community. 

 

Generally the greater the amount of money concerned the higher the impact on the community, a higher degree of public interest, and therefore a higher degree of significance.  However, this is not necessarily definitive.  There may be some cases in which small financial transactions may attract great public interest, while some large financial transactions may accrue very little attention at all. 

 

Council may take into account knowledge it has previously gained about community opinion eg, community plans, community outcomes, previous public debate, media coverage and public submissions to assess significance.

 

When determining significance of an issue, it is recommended that Council staff discuss the importance of the issue to Māori through Council’s partnership with Te Ao Mārama Incorporated.

 

2.2       Strategic Assets

 

In respect to “strategic assets”, a key consideration is whether the assets are essential to the continued delivery of an “outcome” that Council considers important for the well‑being of the community.  Decisions to transfer ownership or control of a strategic asset to or from Council or to construct, replace or abandon a strategic asset cannot be made unless they are first included in the Long Term Plan.

 

For the purpose of section 76AA(3) of the Act, Council considers the following assets to be strategic assets:

·              Roading/bridge network as a whole.

·              Individual water treatment plants and reticulation networks.

·              Individual township sewerage treatment plants and reticulation networks.

·              Individual township stormwater reticulation networks.

·              Portfolio of District Reserves (Parks/Reserves).

·              Stewart Island Electricity Supply Authority.

·              Te Anau Airport at Manapouri.

·              Community housing as a whole.

·              Invercargill Head office and Area Offices.


 

2.3       Procedure guiding the determination of significance and engagement

 

The following will be applied:

·              If the decision is considered to be significant, reports will include a statement indicating why the matter is considered to be significant.  This statement will include an explanation of which assessment criteria had been triggered, the potential implications of the decision, the range of community views that might exist and whether there is a need for a further degree of community engagement before a final decision is made.

·              Assessments will be conducted in accordance with the relevant section of this Policy and will require the application of professional judgement.

·              Council staff will be responsible for assessing whether or not engagement is required and if so the degree of engagement that will be undertaken. 
These staff will be guided firstly by legislation and secondly by the significance of the matter.

·              Where the proposal or decision is considered to be significant, the report will also include a statement addressing the appropriate observance of sections 77, 78, 80, 81, 82 and 82A of the Act as applicable, together with the corresponding degree of community engagement considered.

 

2.4       Engagement

 

The Southland community is at the heart of Council’s purpose, vision and mission; therefore, engagement will reflect the need for community input into Council decision-making.

 

The level of engagement undertaken will reflect the level of significance Council applies to an issue.  For example, an issue that has a high degree of significance will require a high level of engagement with the public.  The method of engagement will differ for each issue depending on location, level of significance, and community preferences.

 

Engagement provides an opportunity for the public to express a view on the decision or proposal being considered by the Council.  The community views expressed through an engagement process will be considered and taken into account, along with other information such as costs and benefits, legislative requirements and technical advice.  Engagement may not necessarily result in a win/win situation, complete agreement or consensus.  However, engagement should allow all relevant views and options to be identified and then considered before a decision is made.

 

Community engagement can allow for an exchange of information, points of view and options for decisions between affected and interested people and decision-makers before a decision is made.

 

It does not mean that the decision will be delegated to those involved in the engagement process.  It means that the decision made will have been informed and improved by the public’s involvement.

 

2.4.1    Methods of Engagement

 

Many methods of engagement can be used by Council, subject to the degree of significance of the issue.  It is essential that Council does not use a homogenous approach to engagement, and utilises engagement tools appropriate to the location, significance of the issue, and community affected.

A broad spectrum of engagement is found in Appendix 2:  Community Engagement Spectrum; however, this is a guideline to approaching engagement and does not limit Council to these methods or degree of engagement.
Similarly, Appendix 3:  Toolbox for Engagement guides methods of engagement currently undertaken; however, Council is not limited to these methods of engagement.

 

When engaging with the community, Council should consider the varied interest groups within society, including but not limited to: cultural and ethnic groups, the whole District, specific communities, wards, Community Boards, Community Development Area Subcommittees, youth, older generations, businesses, and specific interest groups.

 

Committees of Council and elected bodies are to be used as part of Council’s engagement network, to advocate on behalf of their communities to Council on Council issues including policy and decision-making.  They are also the first point of call for Council and Council staff to assess the degree of interest and engagement a community may have with an issue, as part of determining the significance of the issue.

 

Council should be informing, consulting with, involving, collaborating and/or empowering residents and ratepayers to be engaged with Council decision-making.

 

Council will be open to new and developing methods of engagement through the use of technology and innovation.

 

2.4.2    When Council will Engage

 

Council will apply the principles of s82 of the Act when determining engagement.
See Appendix 1:  Significance and Engagement Flowchart for process guidelines. Council will endeavour to use easy-to-understand, clear and plain English tools to engage with the community.

(a)   When legislation requires that consultation be undertaken:

 

The Council will consult when it has a legislative requirement to consult (as set out by the Local Government Act 2002, Resource Management Act 1991, Reserves Act 1977, Land Transport Management Act 2003).  Examples of these areas are: the adoption and amendment/s to the Long Term Plan; adoption and amendment/s to a deemed significant bylaw; transfer of ownership of a significant strategic asset; and changes to financial policies. The Council will undertake these consultation processes in accordance with the legislative requirements guiding them, as a minimum.  The Council may choose to consult further depending on the degree of significance of the matter being considered and notwithstanding the legislative requirements.

 

(b)   When a significant proposal or decision is being considered:

 

Subject to consideration of factors under section 2.1 of this policy, the Council will look to undertake what it considers to be an appropriate form of engagement whenever a ‘significant decision’ needs to be made.

A significant decision is one which has been identified as such under this Policy. Note: a ‘significant’ decision will not automatically trigger application of the Special Consultative Procedure (SCP). For more information about the SCP refer to the LGA 2002 s83, 86, 87 and 93A


 

(c)   For some matters that are not considered significant:

In general, where a matter is not considered significant under this Policy, formal consultation will not be undertaken.  This is consistent with clauses 2.6 (a) and 2.6 (d) of this Policy.  However, in some situations where Council staff deem community involvement or notification is appropriate, informal feedback or notification processes may be followed.

 

2.4.3    When the Council may not Engage

 

Information is always necessary for the decision making process.  However, there are times when it is not necessary, appropriate or possible to engage the community on a matter or decision.  The Council may also choose not to consult on a matter and if so will make this determination in accordance with the criteria below and not withstanding any legislative requirements.

The Council will not engage when:

(a)        The matter is not of a nature or significance that requires consultation (LGA 2002, s82(4)(c); or

(b)        The Council already has a sound understanding of the views and preferences of the persons likely to be affected by or interested in the matter (s82(4)(b) LGA 2002); or

(c)        There is a need for confidentiality or commercial sensitivity (s82(4)(d) LGA 2002); or

(d)   The costs of consultation outweigh the benefits of it (s82(4)(e) LGA 2002); or

(e)        The matter has already been addressed by the Council’s policies or plans, which have previously been consulted on; or

(f)        An immediate or quick response or decision is needed or it is not reasonably practicable to engage or

(g)        Works are required unexpectedly or following further investigations on projects, already approved by the Council; or

(h)        Business as usual - the works required are related to the operation and maintenance of a Council asset and responsible management requires the  works to take place; or

(i)         When Council has consulted on the unchanged issue in the last 24 months.

 

Where the above listed circumstances apply and consultation is not to be undertaken, the Council is still required to give consideration to the views and preferences of persons likely to be affected by, or to have an interest in, the matter (LGA 2002 section 78 (1)).  The LGA 2002 requires that this consideration be in proportion to the significance of the matters affected by the decision (section 79 (1)).

 

2.5.      Special Consultative Procedure

 

1.         Where this Act or any other enactment requires a local authority to use or adopt the special consultative procedure, that local authority must—

(a)        prepare and adopt—

(i)         a statement of proposal; and

(ii)        if the local authority considers on reasonable grounds that it is necessary to enable public understanding of the proposal, a summary of the information contained in the statement of proposal (which summary must comply with section 83AA of the Act; and

(b)        ensure that the following is publicly available:

(i)         the statement of proposal; and

(ii)        a description of how the local authority will provide persons interested in the proposal with an opportunity to present their views to the local authority in accordance with section 82(1)(d) of the Act; and

(iii)       a statement of the period within which views on the proposal may be provided to the local authority (the period being not less than 1 month from the date the statement is issued); and

(c)        make the summary of the information contained in the statement of proposal prepared in accordance with paragraph (a)(ii) of the Act (or the statement of proposal, if a summary is not prepared) as widely available as reasonably practicable as a basis for consultation; and

(d)        provide an opportunity for persons to present their views to the local authority in a manner that enables spoken English, Māori, and/or New Zealand sign language interaction between the person and the local authority, or any representatives to whom an appropriate delegation has been made in accordance with Schedule 7 of the Act; and

(e)        ensure that any person who wishes to present his or her views to the local authority or its representatives as described in paragraph (d)

(i)         is given a reasonable opportunity to do so; and

(ii)        is informed about how and when he or she may take up that opportunity.

2.         For the purpose of, but without limiting, subsection (1)(d), a local authority may allow any person to present his or her views to the local authority by way of audio link or audio visual link.

 

4.   ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

 

Party/Parties

Roles and Responsibilities

Communications and Governance Manager, Management Team

Ensure that engagement with the community meets the degree of significance determined by Council

Council

Determine degree of significance of an issue

 

5.   ASSOCIATED DOCUMENTS

 

Local Government Act (2002).

 

6.   REFERENCES

 

IAP2 (2007), Spectrum of Public Participation sourced from http://c.ymcdn.com/sites/www.iap2.org/resource/resmgr/imported/IAP2%20Spectrum_vertical.pdf on 14 August 2014.

 


 

7.   REVISION RECORD

 

          The Policy will be reviewed at each triennial, aligned with Council elections.

 

Date

Version

Revision Description

28 January 1999

N/A

Consultation Policy

27 November 2003

R/03/7/6677

Consultation Policy

26 June 2003

R/09/9/13601

Significance Policy

28 June 2006

R/12/1/808

Significance Policy


 

8.       APPENDICES

 

APPENDIX 1:  SIGNIFICANCE AND ENGAGEMENT FLOWCHART

 

 

 

 

 



Community and Policy Committee

15 March 2017

 

APPENDIX 2:  COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT SPECTRUM

 

This diagram details how Council may engage with the public based on the level of significance. Both significance and engagement are flexible along the spectrum, and Council is not limited to these methods of engagement with the public.


Community and Policy Committee

15 March 2017

 

APPENDIX 3:  TOOLBOX FOR ENGAGEMENT

 

Council currently uses the following methods of engagement. Council may continue to use these methods of engagement, but is not limited to these guiding tools when engaging with the public:

 

Inform

·              Council newsletter,

·              Weekly/daily newspapers,

·              Community newsletters,

·              Electronic messages (eg, email, online newsletters, social media posts),

·              Flyers,

·              Website,

·              Radio.

 

Consult

·              Submissions,

·              Hearings,

·              Feedback processes,

·              Surveys,

·              Open Days.

 

Involve

·              Woolshed meetings,

·              Social media,

·              People’s panels,

·              Targeting existing organisations within the community eg, service clubs.

 

Collaborate

·              Talking with communities,

·              Key partnerships with existing community organisations,

·              Hall committees.

 

Empower

·              Community Boards,

·              Community Development Area Subcommittees.

 


Community and Policy Committee

15 March 2017

sdclogo

 

Creative New Zealand Creative Communities Scheme

Record No:        R/17/2/3110

Author:                 Bronwyn Affleck, Administration Manager

Approved by:       Rex Capil, Group Manager Community and Futures

 

  Decision                              Recommendation                         Information

 

  

Creative Communities Community Committee

1        Following the appointment of the Creative New Zealand Creative Communities Scheme - Community Committee at the Community and Policy Committee meeting, held 1 February 2017, the newly appointed Committee, chaired by Cr Julie Keast, met on 8 February 2017.

2        It was agreed five members present would constitute a quorum.

 

3        It was agreed that one-off applications, outside of the usual funding round, could be considered with discussion and decisions via email.

 

Grants Awarded

Organisation/Name

Amount

Project

Southland Art Society

$1,004.00

Adam Portraiture Award Exhibition.

Jodi Wright - Southland Buskers Festival

$500.00

‘Clown Workshops’ in conjunction with the Southland Buskers Festival.

Anna Cannon

$745.00

‘Music Premiere’ featuring new music with New Zealand themes and influences.

Riverton Community Arts Centre

$1,025.00

EVOKE – a contemporary jewellery and sculpture exhibition.

Stewart Island Promotion Assn                                               

$2,979.00

Film and photography workshops for beginners and experiences practitioners.

Connected Media Charitable Trust

$638.00

Free one-day film making workshop, in Invercargill, in July/August 2017.

Southern District Arts Trust

$600.00

Annual ‘Edge of the World’ exhibition.

Southern District Arts Trust

$1,000.00

Theatre restaurant production “Once a Knight is Never Enough”.

Strings of Southland Charitable Trust

$449.00

Fiddle, ukulele and guitar workshops for primary, secondary and adult students

Annie Bourque

$1,520.00

Three workshops including photography and ceramics to be held in Waikaia.

Venture Southland – Arts Festival 2017

$2,500.00

2017 Arts Festival shows on tour in the District.

Venture Southland - Gap Filler Forum & Workshops

$600.00

‘Gap Filler Forum’, workshops providing practical ways to tap into creative energy and get people involved in creating their neighbourhoods and communities.

 

Recommendation

That the Community and Policy Committee:

a)         Receives the report titled “Creative New Zealand Creative Communities Scheme” dated 7 March 2017.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report. 

 


Community and Policy Committee

15 March 2017

sdclogo

 

Venture Southland Quarterly Report - December 2016

Record No:        R/17/2/3427

Author:                 Hunter Andrews, Communications Manager Venture Southland

Approved by:       Rex Capil, Group Manager Community and Futures

 

  Decision                              Recommendation                         Information

 

  

 

Venture Southland Quarterly Report

1        Update for the committee on progress of Venture Southlands projects and activities.

 

Recommendation

That the Community and Policy Committee:

a)         Receives the report titled “Venture Southland Quarterly Report - December 2016” dated 8 March 2017.

 

 

Attachments

a         Venture Southland Quarterly Report - December 2016    

 


Community and Policy Committee

15 March 2017

 

QUARTERLY REPORT

Second Quarter 2016/17

This report contains a complete breakdown of Venture Southland’s Business Plan Key Objectives/Performance Measures for 2016/17. Each measure has a commentary and a status provided; green for completed, orange for ongoing and red indicating work is yet to start.

 

Additional information may be provided at the end of each section or as an appendix.   

 

Some highlights contained within this report

 

Digital Survey complete – 214 responses received.  Internet speed test complete and submission made to Rural Broadband Initiative/ Ultra-Fast Broadband/ Mobile Black Spot Fund Crown Fibre process.

MOU signed with MBIE outlining collaborative approach forward between MBIE and Venture Southland. The MOU is consistent with the Southland Labour Market Strategy, Youth Futures Initiative and enables the implementation of The Regional Labour Market and Settlement activities. 

Paper submitted to Electricity Authority aimed at promoting equitable transmission pricing and the associated benefits for Southland. The document included coordinated submissions from Southland stakeholders.

Southland secured the Ultimate Waterman event (1 – 9 April 2017) which will be filmed as a 3 part documentary by Red Bull Media House and available online free to a worldwide audience. Location scouting and promotional support are being provided. 

The Southern Regional International Education Strategy has been completed. The document was been sent to Education New Zealand for feedback and was presented to the Southern Education Alliance Governance Group for feedback and approval on the 21 November 2016 prior to the Southern Regional Development Strategy launch on the 30 November 2016.

A funding provision agreement has been entered into between Education New Zealand (ENZ) and Venture Southland for three years.


 

Annual Regional Statistics

Priority Area: Increase in Population – SOURCE: 2013 CENSUS

Population

97,300

+3961                                                                

UP ON 2006 CENSUS

 

 

 

 

Population Over 65

16.1%

+0.4%

 

NZ: 14.6%      

 

Priority Area: Increase in Regional GDP - SOURCE: MBIE 2016

 

GDP Per Capita

$50,119

-10.5%

NZ: $52,953

 

 

 

 

 

Regional GDP

$4.9 billion

-9.90%

 

 

Priority Area: Increase in Number of New Businesses – SOURCE: MBIE

 

Business Units

13947

 

 

 

 

 

New Businesses

1173

 

 

Priority Area: Increase in Job Opportunities – SOURCE: MBIE MAR 2016

 

 

 

 

 

NZ

Numbers employed

56,300

+200

 

 

 

 

 

 

Participation Rate

74.7%

-1.7%

 68.9%

 

 

 

 

 

Unemployment Rate

5%

0.4%

 5.7%

 

 

 

 

 

NEET Rate (youth not in employment, education and training)

13.4%

-0.7%

 11.6%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Priority Area: Increase in Household Income – SOURCE: MBIE MAR 2016

 

 

 

 

 

NZ

Mean Household Income

$84,836

-2.4%

$91,198

 

 

 

 

 

Mean Weekly Earnings

$880

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mean Weekly Rent

$226

 

$406

 

 

 

 

 

Mean House Value

$220,788

4.8%

$568,681

 

 

 

 

 

Deprivation Index

5

-

 

NZ: 5.4

 

 

 

 

 

Household Internet Access

71.6%

-

 

76.8%

 


 

Priority Area: Increase in Number Visitor Nights and Occupancy Rate

SOURCE: STATISTICS NZ COMMERCIAL ACCOMODATION MONITOR YEAR END OCTOBER 2016

 

 

 

 

Visitor Numbers

Southland Guest Nights RTO

8.6%

 437,342

 

 

 

 

International Guest Nights

26.3%

 143,209

 

 

 

 

Domestic Guest Nights

1.6%

 294,134

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fiordland Guest Nights RTO

13.9%

 608,155

 

 

 

 

International Guest Nights

19.4%

 433,064

 

 

 

 

Domestic Guest Nights

2.2%

 175,091

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

YEAR END DECEMBER 2016

 

 

 

Southland Total Spend

3.9%

$391,000,000

 

 

 

 

Fiordland Total Spend

14.9%

$217,000,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Overall Southland Occupancy Rate

34.9%

Increased from 33.4%

 

 

 

 

Overall Invercargill Occupancy Rate

39.44%

Decreased from 41.03%

 

 

 

 

Excluding holiday parks

43.5%

 

 

 

 

 

Overall Fiordland Occupancy Rate

40.5%

Increased from 36.6%

 


 

KEY INITIATIVES

 

Section 1:    Regional Strategies, Assessments and Advocacy

As a regional organisation Venture Southland is able to act in the best interests of the region as a whole, rather than being confined by traditional council boundaries. This is evident when preparing and facilitating strategies, assessments and advocating on the region’s behalf.

 

Key Objectives/Performance Measures

 

Successfully facilitate the completion of:

 

 

Status

Notes

1.1

Southland Cycling Strategy

 

ONGOING

Draft document complete - undergoing stakeholder consultation.

1.2

Southland Visitor Strategy

YET TO

START

Awaiting recommendations from Councils. RFP prepared.

1.3

Community Organisation and Volunteers Futures Project

ONGOING

The project brief has been finalised by SDC and the project is on schedule. Currently in the community consultation phase. See 10.1

1.4

Swimming Pool Heating Assessments

COMPLETE

Pool heating assessments have been completed for eight identified pools. A generic report providing a summary of the findings for use by any pool committee, is currently being finalised. Work overlaps to Section 4, Energy Efficiency & Section 10 Community Development.

1.5

Regional Export Value Research

ONGOING          

Working with Statistics NZ to develop tools that will allow this to occur.

1.6

Provision of support and advice towards the development of cycle ways in Gore

COMPLETE

A range of support provide to Gore District Council and the local community.

 

Funding of $20,000 approved from Impetus Fund.

1.7

Facilitate a stakeholder’s meeting to progress the Southland Museum and Art Gallery redevelopment

YET TO START

Working alongside SMAG, ICC and Southland Regional Heritage Committee to investigate and progress the project.

 

1.8

Support Sport Southland in the creation of a Southland Sport and Recreation Strategy

ONGOING

Initial discussions held with Sport Southland. 

1.9

Southland Perception Study

ONGOING

Preparation for conducting the perception study has begun.


 

Support the implementation of the following:

 

 

 

Status

Notes

1.10

Southland Regional Development Strategy

ONGOING

Venture Southland prepared extensive information that was included in the preparation of the strategy.

 

Venture Southland participated and serviced the following strategy action teams: Vibrant Urban Centres, Destination Attraction and Tourism, Inclusive communities, New Industries, Broadband and Education.

1.11

Southland Regional Labour Market Strategy 2014-2031

ONGOING

MOU signed with MBIE outlining collaborative approach forward between MBIE and Venture Southland.

 

The MOU is consistent with the Southland Labour Market Strategy, Youth Futures Initiative and enables the implementation of The Regional Labour Market and Settlement activities. 

 

Action plan developed focusing on local workforce skill development, attraction and retention to the region. To be delivered by new Regional Labour Market Coordinator.

1.12

Southland Digital Strategy

ONGOING

Digital Survey complete – 214 responses received.  Internet speed test complete and submission made to Rural Broadband Initiative/ Ultra-Fast Broadband/ Mobile Black Spot Fund Crown Fibre process.

 

Digital Strategy action plan review commenced.

1.13

Southland Regional Heritage Research 2016

COMPLETE

Research has been completed and Venture Southland are currently working alongside the Southland Regional Heritage Committee to finalise the document and assess implementation options.

1.14

Southern NZ Cruise Destination Strategy 2016

COMPLETE

Strategy complete and implementation options currently being assessed considering wider sector happenings- cruise network, key actions and resources.

1.15

Catlins Tourism Strategy Review 2016

COMPLETE

Strategy complete and implementation underway alongside Catlins Coast Inc. Opportunities to partner with Lotteries also being investigated.

1.16

Around the Mountains Cycle Trail Business and Marketing Plan

ONGOING

Continued activity of promotions in coordination with the NZCT (New Zealand Cycle Trail), ATMCT (Around the Mountains Cycle Trail), trail operators and Southland District Council.

 

 

1.17

Creative New Zealand’s Regional Arts Pilot 2016-17

 

 

ONGOING

Creative NZ project commenced with governance group, planned activities and resources attributed.

1.18

Electricity Authority submitted to on cheaper public network pricing

COMPLETE

Paper submitted to Electricity Authority aimed at promoting equitable transmission pricing and the associated benefits for Southland. The document included coordinated submissions from Southland stakeholders.

1.19

Participate in the Milford Opportunities Project

ONGOING

Awaiting direction from SDC.

 

Ongoing visitor and visitor flow monitoring has been undertaken and reported. Visitor satisfaction social media monitoring has been undertaken.

 

Section 2:   Diversification of Southland’s Economy

Venture Southland works to identify opportunities for investment which are complementary with the regional economy and ensure they are promoted to relevant domestic and international markets. Opportunities include silica, oat based health and wellness foods, aquaculture, oil, gas and lignite exploration, tourism and satellite tracking.

 

Venture Southland’s role is to investigate the potential of these opportunities. Some of the projects are ongoing. It is important to have relevant and up to date information available so that when the time is right, an investor will take up the opportunity.

 

Key Objectives/Performance Measures

 

Successfully facilitate the completion of:

 

 

Status

Notes

2.1

Facilitate six investment opportunities

ONGOING

Investment profiles completed for Oats opportunity and Curio Bay Heritage Centre. Proposal for Singapore Airforce Training Base compete. Promotion continues of Awaura and Lochiel Ground Stations and Earth AdVantage concept. Silica opportunity report and profile completed – no further action until silica pricing strengthens. 

2.2

Aerial Magnetic & Radio Surveys completed and data available

to Stakeholders

ONGOING

First portion of survey work completed. Second component is in progress.  The southern Southland area commissioned by ICC, SDC, GDC and ES has been completed ahead of schedule, during the 2015 – 2016 summer period.  An RFP is currently being prepared to undertake interpretation of this data.

2.3

Deliver services to 5 international satellite and space

organisations

ONGOING

Ongoing assistance to Planet, European Space operations Centre, Spire Global and Spaceflight, with assistance being given to Kronsberg Satellite for a new groundstation. Currently negotiating with European Space Agency arrangement for a further 5 years. Outcome expected next quarter

2.4

Aquaculture - target water space identified and environmental investigations

commenced

ONGOING

Spaces have been identified – awaiting feedback and direction from stakeholders for any further actions.

2.5

Identify film opportunities for the region

ONGOING

Working with Film Otago Southland to promote film opportunities for the region.

 

Southland secured the Ultimate Waterman event (1 – 9 April 2017) which will be filmed as a 3 part documentary by Red Bull Media House and available online free to a worldwide audience. Location scouting and promotional support are being provided. 

 

Section 3:   Business Service Efficiency and Competitiveness

Venture Southland offers business services to Southland businesses, such as business advice referral services, funding support, and facilitating mentoring services. This is to ensure Southland businesses are operating as efficiently as possible and to encourage research and development and innovation.

 

In addition, Venture Southland runs specific business efficiency services such as Lean Manufacturing and Dairy Lean “Farm Tune” and facilitates business innovation programmes such as new product development workshops and digital enablement training.

 

Programmes delivered through business services enables extension of existing businesses and industry.

 

Key Objectives/Performance Measures

 

3.1     Facilitate the Regional Business Partner Programme

 

Status

Notes

$200,000 in funding allocated to Southland businesses

ONGOING

$120,000 allocated for first half of contract – on target.

50 Mentor Client Matches

ONGOING

25 matches made Year-to-Date – Increase in requests anticipated in 1st quarter 2017.

 

Southland has maintained its rating as an ‘A’ mentor agency

Complete 140 Client Assessments

ONGOING

92 – on target. Increased numbers expected in early 2017

Train 50 mentors

ONGOING

5 new Mentors trained in November. Adding to the total of 54. New programme targeting Community Mentors is currently being investigated

 

3.2     Coordinate and promote business efficiency through Lean Management and          Lean Dairy in Southland

 

Status

Notes

Deliver Lean Management training to seven businesses

COMPLETE

Lean Management Cluster Programme has been completed with 6 businesses participated in the six month programme after the 7th decided to withdraw due to other commitments.

 

The average increase in business efficiency gains following the completion of the programme is 25%

 

Interest in the 2017 programme is high. With registrations currently being taken for the March start date.

 

Further programmes have been developed to meet the growing demand of smaller businesses. These programmes include a stand-alone Process Improvement Programme and Workplace Management course.

Deliver Dairy Lean to 12 farms

ONGOING

Interest in the programme continues to be high. Venture Southland is currently working with DairyNZ to leverage off the success of the Southland programme to develop a sustainable national delivery model. The national programme is currently being peer reviewed by Venture Southland and support will be provided for local delivery.

30 Businesses attend other lean support initiatives including

site-visits, networking and the Southland Lean Forum

ONGOING

Health checks completed in November, with additional Health checks planned for February. Site visit to Tiwai was held in November, with 40 people attending.

 

3.3     Development of a report identifying gaps within Invercargill business/industry       and tourism and what is needed to fill those gaps

 

Status

Notes

Deliver four Research and Development and innovation

events/programmes

COMPLETE

Four workshops delivered on Design Thinking – with over 40 business attending.

 

Workshops Delivered:

·         New product development

·         Design thinking

·         Practical application of design thinking tools

·         Integrating product development into day to day business

 

Section 4:   Energy Efficiency

Venture Southland has a number of projects that aim to promote energy efficiency and alternative fuel sources in Southland. This is one of the ways Venture is promoting business efficiency and competitive advantages.

 

Key Objectives/Performance Measures

 

 

Status

Notes

4.1

Switch 0.15 PJ of boiler capacity to wastewoodfuel

 

 

 

 

 

 

ONGOING

Project is progressing well with five months remaining.  There are 3 high priority engagements ongoing. 

 

The Grants Programme closed to feasibility studies in December, with two studies and one trial completed in the last quarter.

31 March is the deadline for capital grants.

 

The final conference of the programme is planned for April 2017.

4.2

Facilitate a professional development programme in partnership with EECA and The Bio Energy Association of New

Zealand

ONGOING

First programme delivered in Wellington. South Island workshop planned for April.

4.3

Complete trial of methane recovery on dairy farms

 

New Zealand’s first dairy pond methane recovery and generation system has been commissioned and early issues are being worked through. Third party monitoring to be undertaken during 2016/17 season.

 

Section 5:   Attracting and Retaining Skilled Workforce

Southland, like other regions, is facing a workforce shortage due to an aging population.  For business to grow, skilled staff are required.  Venture Southland is active in attracting migrants to the region, and also ensuring the skilled workers remain in the region.  Without people, new businesses and new industries can-not develop, and existing industries cannot be extended.

 

In 2014 Venture Southland commissioned the Southland Region-al Labour Market Assessment from the University of Waikato, to provide insight into the expected labour market conditions in Southland for 2014 to 2031.  The assessment used historical population data to project future labour supply and demand.

 

Overall the report highlighted the need for the Southland region to develop plans to increase its labour supply to meet the projected demand.  Southland is not alone with this challenge, which highlights the importance of implementing a strategy now to minimise the impact in an increasingly competitive market.

 

The Southland Regional Development Strategy has also set a population target of 110,000, an increase of 13,000 from the current population.

 

Venture Southland host MBIE support personal on a monthly basis and also hosts the immigration stakeholder meetings in conjunction with MBIE.

 

Key Objectives/Performance Measures - Successfully facilitate the completion of:

 

 

Status

Notes

5.1

Identify with employers, industry groups and Immigration New Zealand (MBIE) initiatives to support migrant attraction and retention

ONGOING

Venture Southland and MBIE are working with a range of employers to assist with migrant retention and attraction.

 

Specific work being undertaken with the dairy sector around pathways to residency. Survey of dairy farm owners was completed by DairyNZ at the end of 2016 asking about potential impacts of immigration changes on migrant work forces. Venture Southland is coordinating a survey of migrants on the same topic to enable a full understanding of potential social and economic impacts of changes to immigration policy.

5.2

Work with Education New Zealand for pathways to employment

ONGOING

Pathways to employment is one of the six strategy goals and work is ongoing through Southern Education Alliance.

5.3

Work with the Relationship Manager at (MBIE) to assist with joint initiatives for migrant retention

ONGOING

MOU signed with MBIE to establish joint development of programmes that support migrant retention.

 

Work currently underway to develop a regional development agreement. Action plan currently being developed as the basis of a regional partnership agreement.

5.4

Deliver 2 management skills workshops, based on regional workforce need where there is a gap in the market

COMPLETE

Delivered digital enablement workshop 2015 and retail workshop 2016.

5.5

Complete and circulate welcome to Southland packages to new employers and other sectors

COMPLETE

Complete and available online.

 

Further update of materials and additional information being undertaken in partnership with MBIE.

5.6

To have 11 youth employment programmes operating in Southland

ONGOING

Southland Youth Futures continues to work with employers to develop pathways for youth employment, this includes supporting existing programmes and develop new programmes as required.

 

Dates for employer talks to schools is now completed. Planning underway for site visits and Year 12/employer ‘speed dating’ programme.

5.7

To have trained 30 'youth friendly' employers in the region

ONGOING

Nine foundation youth friendly employers established, a further 25 identified or partially through training. Reach of this programme is currently being expanded to meet increased demand on services.

5.8

To have all secondary schools in Southland actively participating in the Southland Youth Futures

COMPLETE

All Southland secondary schools engaged.

 

 

Planning underway for 2017 delivery.

 

Section 6:   International Education

Key Objectives/Performance Measures - Successfully facilitate the completion of:

 

 

Status

Notes

6.1

Review and update the Regional International Education Strategy with Education New Zealand

COMPLETE

The Southern Regional International Education Strategy has been completed. The document was been sent to Education New Zealand for feedback and was presented to the Southern Education Alliance Governance Group for feedback and approval on the 21 November 2016 prior to the Southern Regional Development Strategy launch on the 30 November 2016.

 

 

6.2

Implementation of the Regional International Education Partnership Programme

ONGOING

Inaugural meeting of the Southern Education Alliance was held on the 21 November 2016

 

A funding provision agreement has been entered into between Education New Zealand (ENZ) and Venture Southland for three years.

6.3

Establish an International Education Governance Group for Southland.

COMPLETE

An inaugural Education Governance Group has been established – through an invitation sent by the Chair of SoRDS.

6.4

The appointment of a Southland Education Alliance (SEA) coordinator

ONGOING

A job description and recruitment process underway to recruit for the Southern Education Alliance (SEA) coordinator.

6.5

Align regional education opportunities to Education New Zealand’s vision for continued growth of international education

COMPLETE

The Draft Southern Regional International Education Strategy has been aligned to Education New Zealand’s vision. The establishment of a Regional Partnership Programme will support the development and growth of international education in Southland in early 2017.

 

Section 7:   Destination Promotion

While Venture Southland and Destination Fiordland’s approach aligns with being Regional Tourism Organisations (RTOs) and is promotion, marketing and industry focussed, it is becoming more and more evident that there is a need for an integrated approach across the community development, business, tourism and events teams.  There is also a need to ensure appropriate infrastructure development which aligns with the tourist experience proposition and this requires collaboration with Councils and other providers.

 

The Venture Southland work programme approach consists of seven key work programmes as listed below and these are delivered by the two RTOs (Venture Southland and Destination Fiordland) as well as the Invercargill i-SITE.

 

Key Objectives/Performance Measures - Media Engagement

 

 

Status

Notes

7.1

Generate 52 media pieces with 18 media famils

ONGOING

59 media pieces published in Q2

7 media famils conducted (media experiencing tourism product and locations). 

 

Please see Appendix A for a detailed list. Individual articles can be provided on request.

 

Develop Trade Channels

 

 

Status

Notes

7.2

Engage with 105 IBO/wholesale/trade agents through a minimum of four Trade Shows presenting regional profile and product offerings of 60 Southland operators

ONGOING

261+ engagements BoNZ (Best of New Zealand)

 

Attended 2 trade shows.

2017 trade manual in development.

Further Information regarding Develop Trade Channels provided in appendix B

7.3

Participate in eight International Marketing Alliance activities and develop three trade itineraries/campaigns

ONGOING

2 International Marketing Alliances (IMA) activities undertaken.

 

6 trade itinerary prepared.

 

Marketing and Promotional Campaigns

 

 

Status

Notes

7.4

18 campaigns facilitated as part of annual programme

ONGOING

10 campaigns executed (15 to date) see additional notes below.

7.5

Create tourism marketing packages with a specific focus on the Chinese Market

ONGOING

Chinese Market Marketing:

·         Social Media - Weibo/WeChat

·         China Pay - implemented at Invercargill i-SITE

·         SkyKiwi Media partnering with Funshare for product promotion

·         Facilitated translation of destination and operator information

·         Trade Itinerary  - Pure Southern Land distributed in China and Taiwan with SOUTH (Christchurch Airport Alliance)

 


 

Additional Notes:

Marketing and Promotional Campaigns executed:

1.       TravelTalk Pure Southern Land (Australia Trade)

2.       TNZ South Island Journeys (Australia)

3.       Australia Classic Motorcycling

4.       NZME Classic Southland (Auckland, Wellington, Christchurch)

5.       Southlandnz.com rejuvenation

6.       Southland Visitor Guide 2017 (National)

7.       Southern Scenic Route Consumer promotion (Canterbury)

8.       Home and Living Promotion (Otago)

9.       World Shearing and Woolhandling Championship promotion

10.     12 days of Xmas promotion

 

Marketing and Promotional Campaigns Pending:

1.       On Your Doorstep (Local)

2.       Bluff Oyster and Food Festival & Air NZ (National)

3.       The Life

4.       AA On your Bike  (Domestic Special Interest)

5.       AA Road Trips (Domestic Touring)

6.       Tourist Times (International Touring)

7.       ATMCT Brochure / Map

 

Digital Marketing

 

 

Status

Notes

7.6

Growth of consumer/trade digital databases (+5%), social media community (+12%) and website traffic (+8%)

ONGOING

Digital database + 3,846 (+42%).

Social media community + 2,698 (+5%).

Website Traffic (36% of target).

 

Specific breakdown provided in appendix C.

7.7

120 operators, 24 destination events, and 24 events articles listed online through Southlandnz.com and Newzealand.com

ONGOING

·         Operators (354)

·         Events (30% - 2 + 5)

·         Articles (69)

 

Engagement with Industry

 

 

Status

Notes

7.8

Facilitate three regional tourism workshops and engage with 100 tourism operators within the Southland region

COMPLETE

5 workshops held in “Winter Workshop Series” with 96 participants overall.

7.9

Participate in nine national tourism activities (including Tourism New Zealand, RTONZ; TIANZ; SOUTH, i-SITE and TEC)

ONGOING

2 national tourism meetings (9 in total to date)


 

Additional Notes: October- December 2016 activity breakdown:

 

1.       October - ICC, Invercargill Community - Anderson House Project

2.       October - December - Invercargill i-SITE operations review

3.       October - Operator Meetings - ILT, SGCC,Tussock Country, BDT, Humpridge Jet,         Folster Gardens

4.       October - CBD projects

5.       October - Northern Southland event development - DownRiver Dash, WRT

6.       October - IMA meeting (INV)

7.       October - Western Southland product development - Clifden

8.       October - TNZ and Qualmark

9.       October - Community Hui on Events and Alcohol

10.     October - Air NZ partnering - regional marketing meeting

11.     October - What's on Invers channel development

12.     October - December Cruise strategy development with General Travel, IDNZ

13.     November - ATMCT Official Partner Programme

14.     November - TourismConnect (Auckland)

15.     November - Meeting with Destination Queenstown, Hauraki Trail Reps, Mayor of

16.     November - Operator meetings - Real Journeys, ILT, BRTW, Riverton Lodge, Mohua

17.     November - TIA Tourism Summit (Wellington)

18.     November - South Catlins Promotions Group

19.     November - Southern Institute of Technology Tourism Advisory

20.     November - Stewart Island Promotions Association

21.     December - Westpac Business Awards Committee

22.     December - Destination Fiordland Networking

23.     December - Operator meetings - Stewart Island Backpackers. Scenic Sights, BDT,        ILT, BRTW

 

Product Development

 

 

Status

Notes

7.10

Undertake research to identify gaps for tourism product in Invercargill and Western Southland and research into current Southland visitor characteristics and behaviour

ONGOING

Integrative framework draft prepared to undertake research and development into current Southland visitor characteristics and behaviour with implementation underway.  Understanding market insights from 7.12 important part of this objective.

7.11

Assist with the development of four new trade ready tourism sector products

ONGOING

·         Three trade products assisted with

·         8 businesses assisted with feasibility and concept development

·         Two Tourism Growth Fund applications out of four assisted are proceeding through the process to the next stage.

7.12

Statistics, Market Insights and Analysis

ONGOING

·         Two generic monthly reports completed, uploaded on VS website and distributed via tourism and business newsletters

·         Nine individual reports prepared as requested (inc. Milford Sound Monitoring Report, two Stewart Island reports, Curio Bay market analysis, Fiordland analysis, report for SIT and Emergency Management Southland)

 

Visitor Information

 

 

Status

Notes

7.13

Undertake review of operations with growth of total sales income by 14% per annum

ONGOING

 

Jul – Dec 2015

Jul – Dec 2016

% Change

Retail Sales

$14,199

$14,782

4.1%

 

Commissions

 

$37,339

$39,130

4.8%

Advertising Revenue

$24,366

$29,584

21.40%

Ticket Sales  Commissions

$2,639

$3,588

36.0%

 

Additional revenue yet to be invoiced. Expected to be in-line with previous year.

 

Staff dealt with 1960 other non-financial enquiries in this quarter which averages to about 32 per day.  These can vary in length depending on the complexity and visitors can often use this information to book themselves online after seeing a consultant.

 

7.14

Development of the Invercargill i-SITE review findings for the consideration of the associated visitor information network requirements across the region

COMPLETE

Review complete and initial changes implemented.

 

Additional Notes:

Tourism New Zealand and i-SITE NZ have just released the latest Deloittes report which analyses comparable i-SITEs across a number of metrics so you can see how each i-SITE performs against others of a similar size and location.  The key finding from this year’s report show that total turnover, revenue and profitability before funding are all up on 2015 (see Appendix D for further information).  People are definitely booking online but still using information centres.  It is thought that this might be also reflecting the strong Free and Independent Travel market.

 

The Market Economics report from last year is still the best measure of the wider indirect benefits

 

•        For every $1 transacted in an i-SITE there is a direct influence of a further $4.05 in          spending direct with suppliers

•        For every $1 transacted in an i-SITE there is a direct influence of a further $1.48 in          spending direct with suppliers which wouldn’t have taken place without i-SITE      involvement

•        For every $1 provided by Councils in funding, the network returns on average $8.70 in    GDP

 

Successfully facilitate the completion of:

 

 

Status

Notes

 

7.15

Investigate the strategic and operational issues and opportunities for the region associated with combining the Destination Fiordland and Venture Southland Regional Tourism Organisation functions

YET TO

START

SDC has suggested the investigation be delayed at this stage.

Bobbi

 

Additional Notes:

 

Destination Fiordland Key Activities:

Fiordland experienced an extremely busy last quarter of 2016.  November and December were particularly busy with many accommodation establishments displaying No Vacancy signs.  October Commercial Accommodation figures show a 20% increase in total guest nights for the month of October 2016 compared with October 2015. Figures for November and December are not available yet.  There was a growth in Tourism Spend of 15% for the year ending December 2016 to $217m compared with 2015.  This percentage growth was the 2nd biggest out of all the RTOs in New Zealand (second to Wanaka).  (Source MBIE)

Section 8:   Conference Attraction

Venture Southland collaborates with local event organisers to promote the Southland region and its facilities as conference destination. To promote the region Venture Southland positions Invercargill specifically as a value based destination, with world class facilities and differentiated propositions (including food, heritage, entertainment and recreation. The wider Southland region is positioned as an accessible incentive destination to complement the facilities found in the major centres of Invercargill, Gore and Te Anau.

 

For more detail see Appendix G.

 

Key Objectives/Performance Measures - Successfully facilitate the completion of:

 

 

Status

Notes

8.1

Prospect 50 conference opportunities, undertaking 12 bids to attract 6 additional conferences

 

 

ONGOING

27 to date

 

See additional notes below for more detail

8.2

Represent the region through 4 events/activities and industry channels

ONGOING

Staff attending Meetings 2016 (Auckland)

 

Convene South (Christchurch)

 

2016/17 Professional Conference Organisers (PCO) family

See additional notes for more detail.

 

Undertake an investigation of Southland destinations (Te Anau and Gore) as potential conference destinations

ONGOING

Site inspections of conference venues in Te Anau and Gore

 

Additional Notes:

Conference Prospects and Conference Support

 

Pending Conferences:

1.       NZ Dairy Awards – May 2018 (confirmed)

2.       The Fun Family Expo – May 2017 (confirmed)

3.       Safe Systems Conference – March 2017 (confirmed)

4.       Southern Rural Fire Dinner – June 2017 (confirmed)

5.       LandSar National Conference – June 2018 ( re bidding for 2020)

6.       Pipe Bands Association – March 2019 (presenting in March at the Nelson event)

7.       Fonterra Regional Shareholders – May 2017 (still pending)

8.       Dan Davin (NZ Short Story) – September 2017 (confirmed)

9.       Young Farmer of the year - July 2018 (Final stages – still pending)

10.     NZ Electricians Conference – October 2017 (prospect)

11.     NZ Airports Regional Conference – 2020 (prospect)

12.     NZ Farm Environment Trust May 2017 (confirmed)

13.     APICULTURE National Conference 2018 or 2020 (new GM appointment, will discuss     in Feb)

14.     Top 10 Holiday Park Conference 2019 (meeting in Feb)

15.     Motor Home Association Conference 2018 (meeting Southland representatives)

16.     International Cities, Town Centres and Communities 2019  (working on funding      avenues)

 

Conference Support:

1.       Lions Club (100 years) – March 2017

2.       NZ Farm Environment Trust - May 2017

3.       National Showcase for Balance Farm Environment Awards - May 2017

4.       Rural NZ Women – November 2017

5.       NZ Family Budgeting Services – November 2017

6.       CATE – November 2017

7.       NZ Dairy Awards - May 2018

 

Venture & ILT to target Wellington Associations & PCO’s

The current list is 186 organisations

 

Proposed PCO Famil:

8.       Soltius New Zealand Limited – Company Conference February 2017

9.       Promote Ltd – Transport Conference 2018

10.     Orbit Tauranga – Stewart Island big draw card

11.     Events 4 You – Medical Conferences

12.     akB Conference Mang – Refresh of venue facilities

13.     Cievents – Christchurch based

14.     Dinamics – Queenstown Research Week Conference August 2017

15.     Gilpin Travel – Auckland based

16.     Orange Exchange – Queenstown based

 

Section 9:   Events

Southland is known for high quality events which add diversity, vibrancy and a sense of well-being to the region’s residents and ratepayers. Venture Southland believes that events are an important aspect of our approach to develop and promote Southland as an attractive place to live, study, work and visit. We run a number of events but support an even larger number of events with a variety of support, resources and expertise.

 

Key Objectives/Performance Measures - Successfully facilitate the completion of:

 

 

Status

Notes

9.1

Facilitate events that generate spectatorship of 40,000 per annum and support other regional events with spectatorship of 40,000 per annum

ONGOING

9,000 facilitated (20,000  to date)

3,000 supported (14,000 to date)

9.2

Three event impact assessments undertaken to investigate the social and economic benefits

ONGOING

1 complete, 2 in development

9.3

52 promotional activities undertaken across various media, trade, campaign and digital programmes

ONGOING

6 undertaken to date (see 7.3, 7.5)

9.4

Facilitate two workshops to investigate opportunities to cluster with event organisers and provide event planning advice to other community events

YET TO

START

Investigating an events forum alongside Sport Southland

Working with Sport Southland who is the key agency on Healthy Families forum (Events and Alcohol)

 

9.5

Provide marketing support to 32 events per through marketing initiatives such as website, social media, competitions, design, publishing and sponsorship advice

 

 

ONGOING

Ongoing support being provided

9.6

Investigate the feasibility of two new regional events

YET TO

START

Working on proposals for Air NZ with ILT, Chamber of Commerce and Invercargill Airport

9.7

Development of a platform for reviewing and planning coordination of events across the region

ONGOING

Internal build of events website undergoing

9.8

Created a Tourism / Events calendar combining all Invercargill facilities.

ONGOING

Calendar live on www.southlandnz.com

9.9

Establishment and/or further development of two events in the Southland region

ONGOING

WSWHC, Heritage Month, DownRiver Dash

 

Section 10:   Community Development

Southland is known for its strong and vibrant communities which contribute to a quality of life not found elsewhere. Venture South-land, by way of its funding agreement with Southland District Council is proud to play a part in supporting local communities and maintaining this proud Southland community spirit, particularly in rural areas.

 

The approach is twofold and relies on a relationship approach of working alongside local people and groups (at their pace and where they live/in their neighbourhoods) and secondly partnering with Councils, community funders and other stakeholders on a range of projects and initiatives. The projects are many and varied. These activities support the outcomes of making rural Southland a desirable place to live, grow up, run a business, raise a family and enjoy a safe and satisfying life.

 

The work programme undertaken by Venture Southland reflects this approach and it can be split into four main areas: building community capacity and capability, community planning, local community initiatives and community funding. It is also acknowledged that there is close alignment between the SDC Community and Futures group and the Venture Southland Community Development team. This will be reflected with the collaborative approach progressing on a number of projects, some of which are detailed in the key objectives and listed as Council priorities.

 

Key Objectives/Performance Measures - Community Capacity and Capability Building

 

 

Status

Notes

10.1

Facilitate and deliver the Community Organisation and Volunteer Futures Project

ONGOING

Community consultation is nearing completion and work has begun on the analysis and preparation of the report on the findings.

10.2

In partnership with SDC implement the findings of the Community Organisation and Volunteer Futures Project stocktake and gap analysis by leading two community sector future projects.

YET TO

START

The Community Organisation and Volunteers Futures project (above) is required to be completed before two community sector projects can be identified.

10.3

Initiate a district wide community facility stocktake with intent to develop future facility planning protocols and guidelines

ONGOING

Work has begun on updating the facilities database.  Planning is underway for the second stage of the project – consulting with facility operators.  Stage three of the project is consultation with users of the facilities and will begin once stage two is completed.

10.4

Deliver a series of workshops to be held throughout Southland to educate the local community about a relevant issue i.e. Health and Safety for community groups

YET TO

START

The workshop series are planned for quarter 3 and 4 of the financial year.

 

Community Planning

 

 

Status

Notes

10.5

In partnership with SDC assist with the further development of the SDC community planning approach to link in with the implementation of the Southland Regional Development Strategy and the SDC Community and Futures group’s work associated with the Community Futures project

ONGOING

Venture Southland is continuing to partner with SDC to develop the community planning approach to link in with The Southland Regional Development Strategy

 

Projects such as the Volunteers Future research are important in understanding how the community can cope with increasing the population of Southland alongside other labour work issues.

10.6

Support SDC to develop and deliver a Stewart Island/Rakiura Community Facilities project – to include an assessment of current facility provision and the future facility provision requirements of public community facilities for Stewart Island/Rakiura

ONGOING

Contractor has been engaged.  Project underway.  Community consultation due to commence in first week in February.

10.7

Facilitate individual project planning for identified communities which align with SDC and community priorities

ONGOING

Project planning advice provided to a number of groups including local community boards and CDA subcommittees, Catlins Coast Inc, South Catlins Development Trust, Northern Southland Community Resource Centre Trust, Wyndham Rugby Club, Southland Heritage and Building Preservation Trust, Rakiura Heritage Centre Trust, Wyndham and Districts Historical Society, Fiordland Housing Group, Switzers Waikaia Museum.

 

10.8

Facilitate the implementation of the Curio Bay Tumu Toka Vision, including the Natural Heritage Centre development, camp ground upgrade, DOC and SDC infrastructure upgrades

ONGOING

Venture Southland’s involvement and facilitation continues with input from business, tourism and community teams:

·         MBIE funding applications prepared for Trust and SDC

·         SDC waste water project is in implementation phase, the DOC carpark and walking track project is to due to be completed in Feb and the Heritage Centre development and camping ground upgrade are on schedule.

·         Process to identify an investment partner continues as well as business modelling

 

 

 

10.9

Support SDC Community Futures approach by providing community organisations with appropriate:

 

• Project planning advice and coordination

• Project funding advice

• Volunteer training programmes

ONGOING

·         Project planning advice provided to 20 groups including Catlins Coast Inc, Northern Southland Community Resource Centre Trust; Wyndham Rugby Club; Rakiura Heritage Centre Trust; Te Anau Housing

·         40 groups worked alongside regarding funding advice including Switzers Waikaia Museum Inc; Southland Heritage and Building Preservation Trust and Winton Memorial Hall and Fiordland Housing Group.

 

See Appendix E for a further snapshot and more detailed lists of groups worked alongside can be provided on request.

10.10

Support the delivery and implementation of the findings from the SDC’s Service and Public Facility Provision in Wyndham Project

COMPLETE

Research undertaken alongside SDC and key stakeholders.

 

Report prepared and submitted to SDC early July 2016.

 

Additional Notes: Local Initiatives

 

 

Status

Notes

10.11

A minimum of 100 community groups assisted to support and lead their own development and community projects; which align with District priorities and regional and national initiatives

ONGOING

In this 3 month period, worked alongside 50 groups in a variety of roles. A selection below:

·         Otautau Flowers, Quilts and Crafts Day

·         Wyndham Rugby Club & Menzies Rugby club

·         Wyndham and Districts Historical Society

·         Catlins Coast Incorporated

·         Gorge Road Country Club

·         Southland Heritage and Building     Preservation Trust

·         Otautau Skatepark

·         Lumsden Heritage Trust

·         Mossburn Information Kiosk

·         Winton Skate Park

·         Moores Reserve Combined Sports Complex Trust

·         Central Southland Vintage Machinery Club

·         Fiordland Housing Group

·         Brydone Community Centre

·         Thornbury Vintage Tractor and Implement Club

 

 

Additional Notes: Community Funding

 

 

Status

Notes

 

10.12

A minimum eight funds administered on behalf of SDC/SRHC/ John Beange Fund/Sport NZ/Creative Communities NZ/Wyndham Charitable Trust/Stewart Island Rakiura Visitor Levy over two rounds per annum

ONGOING

The majority of these funds are administered through two rounds a year, March and September, with the remainder having one allocation per year. 

 

More information can be provided in the next quarter’s report.

 

Bobbi

 

Additional Notes:

Ongoing support still provided to access funding for the restoration of war memorials.  Recent support has been provided to Mandeville, Quarry Hills, Winton and Wallacetown memorials.

 

Full list of projects can be provided upon request but a snapshot as below:

-    Wallacetown Memorial gates

-    Winton Memorial gates

-    Edendale Vintage Machinery Club

-    Catlins Coast

-    Tokanui Pool

-    Gorge Road Jubilee committee

-    Winton Maternity Centre

-    Blackmount Community Pool

-    Orawia Community Centre

-    Water Treatment Course

-    Otautau Museum

-    Otautau New Life Church

-    Mossburn Playcentre

-    Mossburn Senior Citizens

-    Tuatapere Bushmans Museum

 

Listed below are the priority projects contained in the letters of expectation received by Venture Southland from council stakeholders.

 

Next to each priority is the reference number or comment or both, indicating where work is being undertaken towards fulfilling the requirements outline in the letters of expectation.

 

Regional joint projects:

 

Project

Section/Comment

Supporting the implementation of the regional development strategy as lead by the Mayoral Forum.

1.10

Production of economic data at a regional and territorial local authority level in time for the councils’ planning processes.

Conducted meetings with Council staff several times to discuss and align wherever possible

Development of a platform for reviewing and planning coordination of events across the region (if not completed in the 2015-2016 financial year).

9.7

Visitor experience product and packaging development opportunities progressed with up to four new initiatives advanced to support ‘trade ready commissionable’ product across the region.

7.11

Establishment and/or further development of two events in the Southland region.

9.6

Development of the Aeromagnetic Geological Survey project data for councils, industry and community to access and utilise.

2.2

Support the Southland Regional Heritage Committee to lead the Southland Museum Network Concept Design and Development Project as initiated by the Southland Mayoral Forum.      

1.13

ICC priority re Southland Museum and Art Gallery

Development of the Invercargill i-SITE review findings for the consideration of the associated visitor information network requirements across the region.

7.14

Investigate the strategic and operational issues and opportunities for the region associated with combining the Destination Fiordland and Venture Southland Regional Tourism Organisation functions.

7.15

Maintain an advocacy role to support the resource allocation of the Southland Digital Strategy and associated implementation requirements.

1.12

Participate in the Milford Opportunities Project (subject to the project receiving suitable external resource allocation and the possibility of Venture Southland reallocating internal resource).

1.19

Participate in the Service Delivery Review process for Tourism and Economic Development for all councils as per Section 17A of the Local Government Act 2002.

Currently on hold – ICC SDC

 

SDC community development specific projects:

 

Project

Section/Comment

Implementation of the Around the Mountains Cycle Trail business strategy and associated operational structure review requirements.

1.15

Facilitate community planning opportunities as a result of the follow up to the Community Futures Project research (specifically Ohai and Nightcaps initially).

10.1, 10.2 and 10.9

Report on the Community Organisation Needs Assessment Review findings, produce a community Human Asset Mapping inventory and develop a community organisation resource bank (SDC to develop the project brief).

Upon feedback from SDC this activity has evolved and is covered by 10.1, 10.2, 10.7 and 10.9 

Participate in a review of the level of support that is provided to community groups following completion of the Community Organisation Needs Assessment Review (SDC to develop the project brief).      

See above

Support the delivery and implementation of the findings from the SDC’s Service and Public Facility Provision in Wyndham Project.      

10.10

Lead the project design, development and delivery for an assessment of the future provision requirements for public community facilities for Stewart Island/Rakiura (SDC to develop the project brief).

10.6

Initiate a district-wide Community Facility Stocktake and develop Future Facility Planning Protocols and Guidelines (SDC to develop the project brief).

10.3

Further development of the Community Planning approach to link in with the development of the Regional Development Strategy and the SDC Policy Development work associated with the Community Futures Project. (SDC to develop the project brief).      

10.5 and 10.8

Develop, design and deliver a SDC Community Leadership Programme to support community volunteer development and community organisation capability and capacity building.  (SDC to develop the project brief).

Upon consultation with SDC findings deferred until 2017/18.

 

1.3 will provide scope for this project

 

Invercargill City Council specific projects:

 

Project

Section/Comment

Develop a report that identifies the gaps within Invercargill business / industry and tourism and identifies what is needed to fill the gaps. 

3.3, 7.10 and 7.12

Create tourism marketing packages with a specific focus on the Chinese Market. (It is Council’s intention that these packages will be able to be presented to representatives of our Sister City, Suqian.)

7.5

Create a Tourism / Events calendar combining all Invercargill facilities.  (This will enable events to be strategically placed throughout the year and assist in avoiding clashes).

9.7

Facilitate a stakeholder’s meeting to progress the Southland Museum and Art Gallery Redevelopment project.     

1.7

 

Appendix A:

 

Further Information Media Engagement Section 7.1: “Generate 52 media pieces with 18 media famils”

 

Media Results

1.       Media Result - Wilderness Magazine, Nic Low, Tramping the Maori Way, Fiordland,        Southland - October 2016

2.       Media Result - AA Regional Travel Guide 2017, Inside Cover Advert, Bill RIchardson      Transport World, Catlins, Stewart Island - October 2016

3.       Media Result - Tourism New Zealand Media, Cream of the Crop: New Zealand's Top      Stops for Dairy Delights, Seriously Good Chocolate Company - October 2016

4.       Media Result - Arrival Magazine, Southland, Bluff, Wheels, Water, Wilderness, Wildlife    - October 2016

5.       Media Result - KiaOra Magazine, AirNZ, Tour of Southland, Event listing - October         2016

6.       Media Result - Tourist Times, Southland, Western Southland, Eastern Southland,   Invercargill, Gore - October 2016

7.       Media Result - NZ Today magazine, Southern Dash for Cash, Jacqui Madelin, Around    the Mountains Cycle Trail - October 2016

8.       Media Result - Manawatu Guardian, Monument Mania, Bluff Link, Esk St Umbrella,        Colac Bay - October 2016

9.       Media Result - Our NZ Escape, TVNZ, Fiordland and Southland - October 2016

10.     Media Result - The Shed magazine, Recreating Nature, Sue Allison, Stewart Island,        Pounamu Carving - October 2016

11.     Media Result - Stuff.co.nz, Adele Redmond, Brando Yelavich to polish off Wildboy          journey with Stewart Island - October 2016

12.     Media Result - Drive Australia, Andrew Maclean, Great Drive, Southern Scenic Route - October 2016

13.     Media Result - Stuff.co.nz, World Famous in NZ, Bill Richardson Transport World,           Invercargill - October 2016

14.     Media Result - Hauraki Radio, Brando Yelavich, Wildboy, Stewart Island - October          2016

15.     Media Result - Scoop.co.nz, Burt Munro Challenge, Bluff Hill Climb, Classic Motorcycle Mecca - October 2016

16.     Media Result - Hauraki Rail Trail Newsletter, Around the Mountains Cycle Trail -    October 2016

17.     Media Result - KiaOra Magazine, Burt Munro Challenge, Event listing - November          2016

18.     Media Result - KiaOra Magazine, Coastal Gems, Marine Reserves, Ulva Island,    Stewart Island - November 2016

19.     Media Result - Wilderness Magazine, 7 Life-lessons from the trail, Bluff - November        2016

20.     Media Result - Traveltalk magazine Australia, Jon Underwood, Keeping the Drive alive, Invercargill - November 2016

21.     Media Result - Tourism New Zealand Media, How to explore nature and help save it,      Wairaurahiri Jet, Ulva Island Tours, Stewart Island - November 2016

22.     Media Result - NZ Herald, Great NZ Summer Road Trip guide, Southland - November   2016

23.     Media Result - Tourism New Zealand Media, Ultimate spring magic at New Zealand's     top waterfalls, Purakaunui Falls, The Catlins - November 2016

24.     Media Result - Tourism New Zealand Media, Guy Martin to open Classic Motorcycle      Mecca in Invercargill - November 2016

25.     Media Result - NZ Herald, Wildboy’s new adventure, Stewart Island - November 2016

26.     Media Result - Great NZ Summer road trip, Southland, Southern Scenic Route, the        Catlins, Invercargill, Western Southland - November 2016

27.     Media Result - TV3 Story, British star revs up Invercargill’s Classic Motorcycle Mecca,   Guy Martin, Burt Munro Challenge - November 2016

28.     Media Result - Manawatu Standard, Burt’s Challenge a boon for business, Southland      tourism - November 2016

29.     Media Result - Tourist TImes, Gore, Western Southland, Invercargill, Southland,    Stewart Island - November 2016

30.     Media Result - Otago Daily times, Speed and the people, Burt Munro Challenge,    Invercargill - November 2016

31.     Media Result - Huanyingsouth.nz, Chinese Language, Southland, Tuatara, Riverton,       Gore, Bill Richardson - November 2016

32.     Media Result - Huanyingsouth.nz, Chinese Language, Catlins, Purakaunui Falls, the        Catlins - November 2016

33.     Media Result - NZ Herald Travel, Eleanor Ainge Roy, Gore a town by any other name - November 2016

34.     Media Result - Jinghua, China, Guide to destinations to taste oysters in New Zealand,     Bluff,           Southland, Stirling Point - November 2016

35.     Media Result - Otago Daily Times, Burt Munro Challenge draws more to race -      November 2016

36.     Media Result - Elveliu, China, How to have a big meal while no needing to worry about   weight, Bluff Oyster and Food Festival, Southland - November 2016

37.     Media Result - Advocate South, Burt Munro Challenge - November 2016

38.     Media Result - Hotel Magazine, Heartland Hotel Croydon, Gore, Ascot Park Hotel,          Invercargill - November 2016

39.     Media Result - Southland Times, Strong local and national following for racing event,      Burt Munro Challenge - November 2016

40.     Media Result - Media Result - North & South magazine, Steve Nally, Invercargill    Brewery - December 2016

41.     Media Result - North & South magazine, Gone to the dog, Dog Island, Stewart Island -    December 2016

42.     Media Result - Wilderness magazine, Wildboy takes on Stewart Island, Brando       Yelavich - December 2016

43.     Media Result - Media Result - KiaOra Magazine, Down River Dash, Around the     Mountains Cycle Trail, Event listing - December 2016

44.     Media Result - Media Result - Regional News - Connecting Wellington, South Island is    open for business, Southland Museum and Art Gallery, Bluff Oyster & Food       Festival, World Shearing Champs, Edendale Crank Up, Southland Heritage Month -       December 2016

45.     Media Result - Tourist Times Newspaper, East and West Southland, Invercargill,    Southland, Bluff, Stewart Island - December 2016

46.     Media Result - NZ Today Magazine, Around the Mountains Cycle Trail, Northern   Southland - December 2016

47.     Media Result - NZ Today Magazine, Finding a place on the tourism map, Room to          Roam, Northern Southland, Welcome Rock Trails, Stu's Fly Fishing, Garston,           Around the Mountains   Cycle Trail, Lumsden - December 2016

48.     Media Result - NZ Life & Leisure Magazine, Insiders Guide 2017, Coastal Southland,      Events, Invercargill, Bluff, Riverton, Queens Park, Southland Museum and Art           Gallery, BRTW, CMM,           Burt Munro - December 2016

49.     Media Result - TNZ China, Three Ways to Explore New Zealand Oysters, Oyster Cove Bluff,           Invercargill Ocean Seafood Restaurant, South Seas Hotel - December 2016

50.     Media Result - Southland Express, Janette Gellatly, Burt's 'one hell of a week' as   always, Burt Munro Challenge - December 2016

51.     Media Result -Tourism New Zealand Media, TNZ, 17 reasons to visit New Zealand in      2017, Bluff Oyster Festival, Pete's Dragon, Southland - December 2016

52.     Media Result - NZ Herald News, Southland, Moonshine and myth, Eleanor Ainge Roy,   Gore, Hokonui Moonshine Museum, December 2016

53.     Media Result - Stuff.co.nz, Stewart island visitor numbers grow over winter period,          Stewart Island - December 2016

54.     Media Result - Seven Sharp Video, You guys are so sneaky, the epic Christmas    surprise for an adventurer as he emerges from the bush, Wildboy, Stewart Island -      December 2016

55.     Media Result - Arrival Magazine, Food and Drink, Bluff Oysters - December 2016

56.     Media Result - Arrival Magazine, Southland, Savour the South, Classic Motoring,   Water Adventures, Wilderness and Wildlife, Invercargill Brewery, Seriously Good      Chocolate, Blue   River Dairy, Burt Munro, Bill Richardson, Stewart Island - December      2016

57.     Media Result - Driven.co.nz, NZ Herald, 5 reasons Invercargill should be officially named the Classic Motoring Capital of NZ, Transport World, Classic Motorcycle       Mecca, Burt Munro, E Hayes - December 2016

58.     Media Result - Stuff.co.nz, Milford Sound welcomes fourth-largest cruise ship in the        world, 'like a mobile Gore', Stewart Island, Bluff, Fiordland - December 2016

59.     Media Result - Tourism New Zealand Media, Be the first to see the light of 2017 in           New Zealand, Oban, Stewart Island, South Seas Hotel - December 2016

 

Media Famils

1.       Media Famil - NZ Herald, October 2016

2.       Media Famil - BackpackerGuide.NZ, October/November 2016

3.       Media Famil - China National Geographic, November 2016

4.       Media Famil - Australian Motorcycle News, November 2016

5.       Media Famil - Classic Restos, November 2016

6.       Media Famil - Wildboy, November 2016

7.       Media Famil - NZ Herald, December 2016

 

Media Famils Pending: Great Adventurers Programme (Asia Travel TV), Destinations Magazine, KiaOra Air NZ inflight magazine, Zeit.de and laviva.com (German Travel writer),

 

Appendix B: Further Information regarding Develop Trade Channels (Section 7.2)

 

1.       17-22 July 2016: International Marketing Alliance (IMA) representation. Best of NZ   Roadshow with Tourism NZ and 7 other NZ suppliers.  Opportunity to train and interact          with over 460 travel sellers (230 companies) and 50 wealthy consumers.  4 Cities, 13           events, 5 days.

2.       2-5 August 2016: Lower South Island Trade Days.  Enterprise Dunedin, Waitaki,          Central Otago, Destination Fiordland run event.  74 travel sellers (31 companies)         plus   Tourism NZ trade team attended.  3 Southland operators represented.

3.       August 2016: IMA activation in Jet Star magazine. 

4.       20/21 August: Hosted Crystal Cruises Famil to Stewart Island

5.       3-4 September 2016: Hosted Flight Centre Famil.  10 travel sellers from around   Australia plus Tourism NZ host.  Met at Clifden Bridge, down Western Southern         Scenic Route (SSR) to Invercargill.  6 Operators visited.

6.       24-25 September 2016: Hosted i-SITE Conference Famil in conjunction with Real         Journeys (RJs). Attended by 17 i-SITE staff, 3 RJs hosts.

7.       Shanghai Donghu International Travel Service - Southland added to itinerary

8.       Enjoy Holiday - Southland added to itinerary

9.       Funshare - Southland added to itinerary and added to OTA (Online Travel Agent)   platform

10.     DSFF (Chinese social network) - Southland added to itinerary

11.     RRUU Chinese social network) -  added to OTA platform

12.     Taiwan Joyful Travel - Southland added to itinerary

 

Appendix C: Social Media Destination Promotion

 

Channel

Current Total Likes/ Followers/ Subscribers - As at 31/12/2016

Total Followers/ Subscribers 

as at June 30 2016

Total Reach July 1 2015 - June 30 2016

Total New Followers/

Subscribers

Oct 1 2016 - Dec 31 2016 (This Quarter)

Total Reach

Oct 1 2016 - Dec 31 2016 (This Quarter)

Newsletter Databases

13,064

9,218

N/A

3,846

N/A

Facebook Southland NZ

33,740

33,359

5,377,565

36

218,478

Instagram Southland NZ

20,256

12,926

N/A (Instagram Analytics not yet released)

1,856

65,371

Twitter Southland NZ

3,332

3,177

60,611

65

35,300

Facebook Invercargill i-Site

2,861

1,698

144,151

741

231,101

Total

73,253

60,378

N/A

6,544

N/A

 

Channel: southlandnz.com

Data sourced from Google Analytics

Sessions

 

Users

 

Pageviews

 

Year: July 1 2015 - June 30 2016

47,804

38,471

115,727

Quarter 1: July 1 2016 - Sep 30 2016

10,426

8,588

25,288

Quarter 2: Oct 1 2016 - Dec 31 2016 (New site launch 28/11/16)

18,641

15,713

48,854

Annual/Quarterly Target

51,628/12,907

 

 

Sources:

Southland Industry Event Calendar

http://www.southlandnz.com/Visit/Things-to-Do

http://www.southlandnz.com/Visit/Events

http://www.newzealand.com/us/southland/

http://www.newzealand.com/us/events/ 



[1] International Association of Public Participation [IAP2]. (2007). IAP2 Spectrum of Public Participation. Retrieved from http://c.ymcdn.com/sites/www.iap2.org/resource/resmgr/imported/IAP2%20Spectrum_verti cal.pdf on 2 January 2017.