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Notice is hereby given that a Meeting of the Community and Policy Committee will be held on:

 

Date:                      

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Wednesday, 5 April 2017

11.30am

Council Chambers

15 Forth Street, Invercargill

 

Community and Policy Committee Agenda

 

OPEN

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Julie Keast

 

 

Mayor Gary Tong

 

Councillors

Stuart Baird

 

 

Brian Dillon

 

 

John Douglas

 

 

Paul Duffy

 

 

Bruce Ford

 

 

Darren Frazer

 

 

George Harpur

 

 

Ebel Kremer

 

 

Gavin Macpherson

 

 

Neil Paterson

 

 

Nick Perham

 

 

IN ATTENDANCE

 

Group Manager, Community and Futures

Rex Capil

 

Committee Advisor

Alyson Hamilton

 

 

 

 

Contact Telephone: 0800 732 732

Postal Address: PO Box 903, Invercargill 9840

Email: emailsdc@southlanddc.govt.nz

Website: www.southlanddc.govt.nz

 

Full agendas are available on Council’s Website

www.southlanddc.govt.nz

 

 

 


 


Community and Policy Committee

05 April 2017

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

ITEM                                                                                                                                   PAGE

Procedural

1          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

2          Leave of absence                                                                                                           5

3          Conflict of Interest                                                                                                         5

4          Public Forum                                                                                                                  5

5          Extraordinary/Urgent Items                                                                                          5

6          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

Reports for Resolution

7.1       Venture Southland Draft Business Plan 2017 - 2018                                               13

Reports

8.1       Corporate Performance Framework Project                                                            57

8.2       Community Governance Project and Representation Review Update                 75


 

1          Apologies

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

2          Leave of absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

3          Conflict of Interest

 

Committee Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision-making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Public Forum

Notification to speak is required by 5pm at least two days before the meeting. Further information is available on www.southlanddc.govt.nz or phoning 0800 732 732.

 

5          Extraordinary/Urgent Items

To consider, and if thought fit, to pass a resolution to permit the committee to consider any further items which do not appear on the Agenda of this meeting and/or the meeting to be held with the public excluded.

Such resolution is required to be made pursuant to Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987, and the Chairperson must advise:

(i)         the reason why the item was not on the Agenda, and

(ii)        the reason why the discussion of this item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

(a)       that item may be discussed at that meeting if-

(i)         that item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

(b)       no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

6          Confirmation of Minutes

6.1         Meeting minutes of Community and Policy Committee, 15 March 2017


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Community and Policy Committee

 

OPEN MINUTES

 

 

 

Minutes of a meeting of Community and Policy Committee held in the Council Chambers, 15 Forth Street, Invercargill on Wednesday, 15 March 2017 at 11am.

 

present

 

Chairperson

Julie Keast

 

Mayor

Gary Tong

 

Councillors

Stuart Baird

 

 

Brian Dillon

 

 

John Douglas

 

 

Paul Duffy

 

 

Bruce Ford

 

 

Darren Frazer

 

 

George Harpur

 

 

Ebel Kremer

 

 

Gavin Macpherson

 

 

Neil Paterson

 

 

IN ATTENDANCE

 

Chief Executive (Steve Ruru) Group Manager, Community and Futures (Rex Capil), Group Manager, Services and Assets (Ian Marshall), Communications Manager (Louise Pagan) and Committee Advisor (Alyson Hamilton).

 

 

 

 

 

 


1          Apologies

 

An apology for non-attendance has been lodged by Councillor Perham and an apology for lateness from Councillor Baird.

 

Resolution

Moved Cr Paterson, seconded Cr Dillon  and resolved:

That the Community and Policy Committee accept the apology for non-attendance from Councillor Perham and lateness from Councillor Baird.

 

2          Leave of absence

 

There were no requests for leave of absence.

 

3          Conflict of Interest

 

There were no conflicts of interest declared.

 

4          Public Forum

 

There was no public forum.

 

5          Extraordinary/Urgent Items

 

There were no Extraordinary/Urgent items.

 

6          Confirmation of Minutes

 

Resolution

Moved Cr Macpherson, seconded Cr Frazer  and resolved:

That the Community and Policy Committee confirm the minutes of the meeting held on Wednesday 1 February 2017 as a true and correct record of that meeting.

 

Reports for Recommendation

 

7.1

Request for Te Anau - Tako Town (Japan) Friendship Relationship

Record No:         R/17/2/2576

 

Rex Capil (Group Manager, Community and Futures) presented this item.

Mr Capil advised the purpose of the report is to provide background information to the latest request from Tako Town (Japan) for the Te Anau Community Board to consider a Friendship Relationship request.

 

Mr Capil advised the Te Anau Community Board forwarded a request from Fiordland College and Tako Town in Japan in late 2015 for consideration of Council’s International Relations Committee to establish some form of student and citizen exchange.

 

Mr Capil informed this request was followed up with a letter from the Southland District Council Mayor to the Mayor of Tako Town in March 2016.

Member noted that subsequent to this letter exchange the Mayor of Tako Town has contacted the Te Anau Community Board Chair to further consider the request and gauge interest in formalising a Friendship Relationship between Te Anau and Tako Town.

 

Mr Capil advised the Te Anau Community Board has referred the request to Council for consideration of an appropriate course of action going forward.

 

Mr Capil explained the Te Anau Community Board is an unincorporated body and as such is a separate legal entity to the Southland District Council as per section 51 of the Local Government Act 2002.  In addition to its statutory role, defined in section 52, to represent the interests of the Te Anau community, the Board operates in accordance with the Southland District Council Community Board Terms of Reference approved on 26 October 2016.

 

Further to this the Te Anau Community Board is seeking direction from Council as to whether it should enter into a relationship with Tako Town given that it is outside the scope of its terms of reference.

 

Members queried the location and population of Tako Town.  Councillor Kremer responded the town is situated outside Tokyo and has a population of approximately 15,000 persons.

 

In discussing this issue the Committee agreed to support the Te Anau Community Board request to enter into a friendship relationship with Tako Town and were informed by Mr Capil a report to confirm Council support is to be forwarded to the next meeting of the Te Anau Community Board.

 

 

 

Resolution

Moved Cr Kremer, seconded Cr Duffy  and resolved:

That the Community and Policy Committee:

a)         Receives the report titled “Request for Te Anau - Tako Town (Japan) Friendship Relationship ” dated 21 February 2017.

b)         Determines that this matter or decision be recognised as not significant in terms of Section 76 of the Local Government Act 2002.

c)         Determines that it has complied with the decision-making provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 to the extent necessary in relation to this decision; and in accordance with Section 79 of the Act determines that it does not require further information, further assessment of options or further analysis of costs and benefits or advantages and disadvantages prior to making a decision on this matter.

d)         Encourages and supports the Te Anau Community Board involvement with Tako Town as part of a Friendship Relationship.

 


 

Reports

 

8.1

Draft Significance and Engagement Policy

Record No:         R/17/1/1590

 

Robyn Rout (Policy Analyst) presented this report

Ms Rout advised the report seeks approval from the Community and Policy Committee to consider and endorse the draft Significance and Engagement Policy for release for public consultation.

 

Ms Rout explained the Significance and Engagement Policy enables Council and its communities to identify the degree of significance attached to particular matters, and it provides clarity about how and when communities will be engaged.

 

Members noted the draft Significance and Engagement Policy has been revised to make it clearer and easier for Council staff to apply. The revised Policy outlines a 3-step process which involves:

 

§  Determining significance

§  Identifying community views

§  Deciding how and when to engage with the community

 

Ms Rout advised a key revision to the policy is a change to the factors that Council would use to assess significance.  Ms Rout added this change has been made to improve usability for staff and to better align the factors with what Council is legally required to consider.

 

Ms Rout also advised this report sought approval from the Committee to release the draft Significance and Engagement Policy for public consultation from the 18 March until the 21 April 2017.

 

Councillor Duffy suggested some minor amendments to the draft policy document. These being;

 

Engagement with Iwi/Maori…openly engaging with iwi/Maori through this channel and through the Te Roopu Taiao forum.

 

Methods of engagement…delete woolshed meetings.

 

 

 

Resolution

Moved Mayor Tong, seconded Cr Dillon  and resolved:

That the Community and Policy Committee:

a)         Receives the report titled “Draft Significance and Engagement Policy” dated 7 March 2017.

b)         Determines that this matter or decision be recognised as not significant in terms of Section 76 of the Local Government Act 2002.

c)         Determines that it has complied with the decision-making provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 to the extent necessary in relation to this decision; and in accordance with Section 79 of the Act determines that it does not require further information, further assessment of options or further analysis of costs and benefits or advantages and disadvantages prior to making a decision on this matter.

 

d)         Endorses the draft Significance and Engagement Policy for release for  public consultation from the 18 March 2017 to 21 April 2017, subject to the amendments agreed to at this meeting.

 

Councillor Baird arrived at this point - 11.20am

 

8.2

Creative New Zealand Creative Communities Scheme

Record No:         R/17/2/3110

 

Rex Capil (Group Manager, Community and Futures) presented this item.

 

Mr Capil advised the report provides an update on grants awarded at a recent meeting of the newly appointed Creative New Zealand Creative Communities Scheme - Community Committee.

 

Mr Capil explained the Creative Communities Committee is managed by Venture Southland staff who will provide an update to this Committee following a funding round.

 

 

Resolution

Moved Mayor Tong, seconded Cr Harpur  and resolved:

That the Community and Policy Committee:

a)         Receives the report titled “Creative New Zealand Creative Communities Scheme” dated 7 March 2017.

 

8.3

Venture Southland Quarterly Report - December 2016

Record No:         R/17/2/3427

 

Paul Casson (Chief Executive, Venture Southland) presented this item.

 

Mr Casson advised the report contains a complete breakdown of Venture Southland’s Business Plan Key Objectives/Performance Measures for the second quarter of 2016/17.

 

Mr Casson outlined highlights within the report. These included:

 

§  Digital Survey complete – 214 responses received.  Internet speed test complete and submission made to Rural Broadband Initiative/ Ultra-Fast Broadband/ Mobile Black Spot Fund Crown Fibre process.

 

§  Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) signed with Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment (MBIE) outlining a collaborative approach forward between MBIE and Venture Southland. The MOU is consistent with the Southland Labour Market Strategy, Youth Futures Initiative and enables the implementation of The Regional Labour Market and Settlement activities. 

 

 

 

§  Paper submitted to Electricity Authority aimed at promoting equitable transmission pricing and the associated benefits for Southland. The document included coordinated submissions from Southland stakeholders.

 

§  Southland secured the Ultimate Waterman event (1 – 9 April 2017) which will be filmed as a 3 part documentary by Red Bull Media House and available online free to a worldwide audience. Location scouting and promotional support are being provided. 

 

§  The Southern Regional International Education Strategy has been completed. The document was been sent to Education New Zealand for feedback and was presented to the Southern Education Alliance Governance Group for feedback and approval on the 21 November 2016 prior to the Southern Regional Development Strategy launch on the 30 November 2016.

 

§  A funding provision agreement has been entered into between Education New Zealand (ENZ) and Venture Southland for three years.

 

Councillor Douglas enquired as to the aerial magnetic survey and whether it is going to plan.

 

Mr Casson responded the first portion of survey work is completed and the second component is in progress.  Mr Casson added the southern Southland area commissioned by Invercargill City Council, Southland District Council, Gore District Council and Environment Southland has been completed ahead of schedule and a report is currently being prepared to undertake interpretation of this data.

 

Councillor Duffy referred to the statistic of 13.4% of youth not in employment, education or training and whether this is a concern.  Mr Casson responded the statistics are correct and advised this is a New Zealand wide-issue and cited a variety of reasons i.e. distance, location, drugs, alcohol, substance abuse etc.

 

Members were advised of a proposal for the Singapore Airforce Training being based in Southland, Mr Casson advised this proposal has been declined and relocated to the Royal New Zealand Air Force base in Ohakea.

 

Mr Capil reinforced Mr Casson’s comments regarding the partnership with Venture Southland and Southland District Council (SDC) to assist with the further development of the SDC community planning approach to link in with the implementation of the Southland Regional Development Strategy; and the SDC Community and Futures Group’s work associated with the Community Futures project.

 

Mr Casson circulated an update on Wood Energy South for the Members information.

 

 

Resolution

Moved Cr Douglas, seconded Cr Macpherson  and resolved:

That the Community and Policy Committee:

a)         Receives the report titled “Venture Southland Quarterly Report - December 2016” dated 8 March 2017.

 

 

 

 

 

The meeting concluded at 11.40am              CONFIRMED AS A TRUE AND CORRECT RECORD AT A MEETING OF THE Community and Policy Committee HELD ON WEDNESDAY 15 MARCH 2017.

 

 

 

 

 

DATE:...................................................................

 

 

 

CHAIRPERSON:...................................................

 

 


Community and Policy Committee

5 April 2017

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Venture Southland Draft Business Plan 2017 - 2018

Record No:        R/17/3/6231

Author:                 Rex Capil, Group Manager Community and Futures

Approved by:       Steve Ruru, Chief Executive

 

  Decision                              Recommendation                         Information

 

  

 

Purpose

1        To enable the Community and Policy Committee to consider and provide feedback on behalf of Council on the draft Venture Southland Business Plan 2017 – 2018.

Executive Summary

2        Each year Venture Southland develops a Business Plan detailing its proposed activities, key performance indicators and budget.

3        The Business Plan is required to be developed in accordance with the Venture Southland Agreement 2014- 2017 and the letter of expectation sent by combined owner councils and the letter of expectation sent by Southland District Council regarding the Community Development priority projects which are specific to the Southland District Council.

4        The Agreement outlines the information to be included in the Business Plan and the process to be followed as it is developed.

 

Recommendation

That the Community and Policy Committee:

a)         Receives the report titled “Venture Southland Draft Business Plan 2017 - 2018” dated 28 March 2017.

b)         Determines that this matter or decision be recognised as not significant in terms of Section 76 of the Local Government Act 2002.

c)         Determines that it has complied with the decision-making provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 to the extent necessary in relation to this decision; and in accordance with Section 79 of the Act determines that it does not require further information, further assessment of options or further analysis of costs and benefits or advantages and disadvantages prior to making a decision on this matter.

d)         Endorse the Venture Southland draft Business Plan 2017 – 2018 with any agreed amendments/additions.

 


 

Content

Background

5        The Venture Southland Draft Business Plan 2017 - 2018 is required to be developed in accordance with the Venture Southland Agreement 2014 – 2017.

6        As part of the agreed process Council provided its letter of expectation specifically relating to Community Development priority projects for the Southland District Council to Venture Southland dated 11 November 2016.

7        Southland District Council also contributed to a combined letter of expectation by owner Councils regarding regional priority projects provided to Venture Southland on 21 December 2016.

8        The letters of expectation were prepared following input from various discussions and a Venture Southland hosted workshop with combined Council representatives on 12 September 2016 and a combined council workshop hosted at Southland District Council on 20 October 2016.

9        The Venture Southland Draft Business Plan 2017 – 2018 was submitted to Southland District Council in late January following a Venture Southland Joint Committee Workshop held on 24 January 2017.

10      The Community and Policy Committee is requested to consider and provide feedback on the draft with the intent that this be provided to Venture Southland for finalisation of the Venture Southland Business Plan and commitment of each of the owners to Venture Southland by 30 May 2017.

Issues

11      There is an opportunity for the Community and Policy Committee to consider and provide feedback to Venture Southland on the draft Business Plan 2017 – 2018.

12      There are no clearly identifiable issues to highlight.

13      It is acknowledged it is important that Venture Southland retains some flexibility and ability to reallocate existing resource during 2017 – 2018 as the SoRDS projects and associated delivery requirements become clearer.

Factors to Consider

Legal and Statutory Requirements

14      Venture Southland is a Joint Committee of the Invercargill City Council, Gore District Council and Southland District Council. As such it is not a legal entity in its own right but rather its performance and deliverables are undertaken in the name of its ‘shareholder or owner’ Councils.

15      Venture Southland is required to comply with the legislative framework within which the three shareholder or owner Councils operate including the Local Government Act 2002. It is also required to operate in accordance with the Venture Southland Agreement 2014 – 2017.

Community Views

16      Community views have not been sought specifically regarding the Venture Southland draft Business Plan 2017 – 2018.

Costs and Funding

17      The proposed Venture Southland budget for delivery of the proposed services is outlined in the draft Business Plan.

18      The proposed Southland District Council funding level of $1.742 million is consistent with the 2015 -2025 Long Term Plan and remains at the same level as 2016 – 2017.

Policy Implications

19      Under the Venture Southland Heads of Agreement there is a requirement for Venture Southland to prepare a Business Plan that sets out the proposed activities and budget.

20      On request of owner Councils Venture Southland has produced a Business Plan detailing the Work Areas and identifying for each the project description, work programme, timeframe, funding/resource allocation and the aim/measure to be achieved.

Analysis

Options Considered

21      There are two options to consider – (1) endorse the draft Venture Southland Business Plan 2017 – 2018 with any agreed amendments/additions or (2) Not endorse the Venture Southland draft Business Plan 2017 – 2018.

Analysis of Options

Option 1 – Endorse the Venture Southland draft Business Plan 2017 – 2018 with any agreed amendments/additions

Advantages

Disadvantages

·        Allows the plan to be finalised.

·        Provides support and endorsement for the work programme identified with Venture Southland in 2017 – 2018.

·        Provides clarity and direction for Venture Southland from Southland District Council for its work programme in 2017 – 2018.

·        Promotes consistency with the regional priority projects and community development projects as detailed in the Letters of Expectation provided to Venture Southland by Council.

·        There are no disadvantages in endorsing the draft plan as presented.

 

Option 2 – Not endorse the Venture Southland draft Business Plan 2017 - 2018

Advantages

Disadvantages

·        There are no advantages in this approach.

·        Provides no clarity or direction for Venture Southland as a Joint Committee of the Southland District Council.

Assessment of Significance

22      This is not considered as significant in terms of the Southland District Council Significance and Engagement Policy.

Recommended Option

23      The Community and Policy Committee endorse the Venture Southland draft Business Plan 2017 – 2018 with any agreed amendments/additions.

Next Steps

24      Once the Committee has considered this report officers will inform Venture Southland of the Committee’s decision.

 

Attachments

a         Venture Southland Business Plan 2017 2018    

 


Community and Policy Committee

05 April 2017

 

 

Venture Southland Business Plan 2017/18 Work Programme

 

“Empowering the Region”

 

 

 

What is Venture Southland?

Established in 2001, Venture Southland is a joint committee of councils. This unique model is known throughout New Zealand as a positive example of regional co-ordination and co-operation. We promote the benefits of an integrated approach with community organisations working together, and leveraging support and resources. The business, destination marketing, events and conferences, and community development teams collaborate on many projects to maximise benefits.

 

Venture Southland is funded through contributions from our stakeholders Invercargill City, Southland District and Gore District Councils and from contributions from Community Trust of Southland and Environment Southland. As a regionally coordinated body, Venture Southland is able to access significant external project funding not normally available to local authorities.

 

Mission Statement

Working with people and organisations to enhance the prosperity and quality of life of Southlanders.


 

Executive Summary

This document outlines the 2017-18 programme of work for Venture Southland. It is in response to the three council stakeholders’ priorities and specific projects that contribute to making Southland one of the most attractive and prosperous areas in New Zealand. This document provides detail on what initiatives are to be undertaken, how it is to be resourced and the benefits for Southland and its people.


This document comprises the following major initiatives which summarise the areas of work:

Regional Strategies, Assessments and Advocacy

As Venture Southland is a joint committee of Invercargill City, Southland District and Gore District Councils the focus is on the region in its entirety, providing a voice for the region.  A key to providing this voice is the relationships Venture Southland has been able to build with Central Government, international and national bodies, funding organisations, industries and communities.  Focus projects for 2017-18 relate to the Southland Visitor Strategy 2017-2022 and Southland Digital Strategy.  The update of the Southland Visitor Strategy will provide overall direction for the development of tourism for Southland and ensure opportunities are maximised. Work on the Southland Digital Strategy is to ensure Southland gets sufficient resources allocated to improve connectivity including cellular coverage, and rural and urban broadband.

Destination Development

This is a new section in the 2017-18 work programme.  Its inclusion recognises the importance of developing Southland as a destination for tourists, students, prospective migrants and investors, without overlooking the need to retain Southland’s current residents.  Key areas are the implementation of the Southland Cycling and Cruise Strategies which seek to increase visitors to the region, and the development of the Curio Bay Tumu Toka Natural Heritage Centre.  The Curio Bay Tumu Toka Natural Heritage Centre is a key project within the Catlins Tourism Strategy and seeks to add trade commissionable product to the Catlin’s area.

Diversification of Southland’s Economy

Venture Southland identifies opportunities to diversify Southland’s economy, investigate its potential and where applicable, seek investment to make it happen. The opportunities must complement what is already here. Some areas of focus are the continued development of the Awarua Satellite Tracking Station, where Venture Southland coordinates Earth observation contracts with international partners. The interpretation of the aerial magnetic survey, which mapped the region in 2016 will allow new and existing businesses to make informed decisions.

 

 

Business Services, Efficiency and Competitiveness

Venture Southland provides support and services to the Southland business community to encourage efficient practices. This ranges from the coordination of Lean Manufacturing and Dairy Lean (Farm Tune) to the delivery of the Regional Business Partner Programme, and the Business Mentors Programme. These programmes provide access to New Zealand Trade & Enterprise capability training vouchers on a matched basis. Workshops on innovation and innovative processes will be developed and delivered in 2017-18, building on previous programmes.  These are critical for Southland businesses to be competitive. Venture Southland also coordinates research and development projects through Callaghan Innovation.

 

Attracting and Retaining a Skilled Workforce

In 2015, the organisation commissioned the Southland Regional Labour Market Assessment in order to best predict the region’s workforce requirements up until 2031. The assessment indicated that the region would require 12,000 additional employees by 2031.  In 2016 Venture Southland signed a memorandum of understanding with the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment to build on current strategies to attract and retain skilled workers.  This includes the Southland Youth Futures programme which has now been operating for three years.  Southland Youth Futures focuses on putting Southland youth into primary sector employment. Workforce activities will focus on utilising local workforce where possible, but will include a domestic and international attraction programme through marketing Southland to visitors, which is included in Destination Promotion.


International Education

Venture Southland works in partnership with Southland schools and the Southern Institute of Technology as part of the Southern Education Alliance to promote Southland as a quality educational destination to education agents, parents and students. In 2016 Venture Southland became the contracted agency responsible to deliver the Regional Partner Programme with Education New Zealand, which will set key goals for the development and implementation of the Southern International Education Strategy.   A large part of the attraction of International Students is through marketing Southland to visitors, which is included in Destination Promotion.

 

Destination Promotion

Venture Southland and Destination Fiordland (as the region’s Regional Tourism Organisations) are focused on maximising the benefits of increasing the number of visitors to the region by undertaking various promotional initiatives including digital material, brochures; trade, special interest, and local campaigns; and events.  

Destination attraction focuses on identifying diverse markets and local product offerings to attract visitors, which includes groups such as leisure travellers, corporate travellers, students, migrants, special interest travellers, cruise passengers, event and conference attendees.

Relationships with industry, other regions through International Marketing Alliances, Tourism New Zealand, the Regional Tourism Organisation network (RTONZ), Tourism Industry Association New Zealand, Tourism Export Council and i-SITE network activities are critical to ensuring Southland is promoted nationally and internationally. 

Events

Southland has many quality events in the region which add diversity, vibrancy and lift community spirit. Venture Southland coordinates and supports numerous events of all sizes throughout the region including ILT Kidzone, Southland Festival of the Arts, Southland District Council Holiday Programme and provides support to the annual Burt Munro Challenge.  A focus for the 2017-18 year is to develop an approach and platform to align planning, coordinating and funding for events in Southland.

 

Community Development

Southland has strong and thriving rural communities which contribute towards a quality of life. Venture Southland supports the Southland District Council to provide assistance and support for these communities through a varied range of projects and initiatives. The organisation conducts stakeholder engagement, administrates funds on behalf of SDC, Southland Regional Heritage Committee, and others and also provides support for local community groups with community funding planning and advice.  Many of the key projects for 2017-18 are yet to be scoped fully but aim to build capability and capacity in the community.

 

Information

All activities included in the 2017-18 work programme are subject to change based on changing priorities or direction from Venture Southland’s stakeholders.  This includes the implementation of the Southland Regional Development Strategy.

All activities included in the work programme include staff time.  This has not been allocated to each specific activity due to the considerable number of initiatives that overlap and some initiatives are not fully scoped.

Cost allocations beside each initiatives below do not include overheads of the organisation.  The amount allocated to each initiative are shown as a separate line in the budget section of the initiative.

The work programme is accurate at the time of preparation based on the indicative regional priority areas in the joint letter of expectation received 21 December 2016, but is subject to change.

 

Financial Information

Budgeted Statement of Financial Performance for the 2017/18 Year

                                                                                                                                           $000’s

Income                                                                                                                         Budget

Invercargill City Council                                                                                              1,806

Southland District Council                                                                                         1,742

Gore District Council                                                                                                          58

Environment Southland                                                                                                   20

Total Stakeholder Funding                                                                                       3,626

 

Other Income

Other Income                                                                                                                1,413

Interest                                                                                                                                  48

Invercargill i-SITE                                                                                                              131

Total Other Income                                                                                                     1,592

Total Income                                                                                                                  5,218

 

Expenses                                                                                                                                                    External funding                   Council Contribution

Community Development                                                                                            798                                              63                           735

Tourism                                                                                                                            1,567                                           239                        1,328

Events                                                                                                                                   935                                           452                           483

Business Development                                                                                              1,893                                           788                        1,105

Regional Strategies & Assessments                                                                            80                                              50                              30

Total Expenses                                                                                                              5,273                                        1,592                        3,681

                                                                                                                                                      

Net Surplus/(Deficit)                                                                                                    (55)                                            Nil                          (55)


 

Budgeted Statement of Comprehensive Revenue and Expenditure

                                                                                                                                       2015/16                                  2016/17                                  2017/18

                                                                                                                                          Actual                                    Budget                    Budget

                                                                                                                                           $000’s                                      $000’s                                      $000’s

Income                                                                                                                                       

Council Funding                                                                                                             3,478                                        3,569                        3,606

 

Grants                                                                                                                                     50                                                 -                                 -

Project Revenue                                                                                                              474                                           495                           381

Other Income                                                                                                                1,048                                           969                        1,183

Interest                                                                                                                                  40                                              30                              48

Total Operating Income                                                                                                                             5,090                                        5,063                                        5,218

 

Expenses                                                                                                                                                                                     

Project Expenditure                                                                                                        303                                           285                           226

Operating Expenditure                                                                                              4,731                                        4,775                        5,047

Exchange Loss                                                                                                                        4                                                 -                                 -

Total Expenses                                                                                                              5,038                                        5,060                        5,273

                                                                                                                                                      

Net Surplus/(Deficit)                                                                                                        52                                                3                          (55)

 

 


 

Budgeted Statement of Financial Position

                                                                                                                                       2015/16                                  2016/17                                  2017/18

                                                                                                                                          Actual                                    Budget                    Budget

Equity and Reserves                                                                                                                        $000’s                                      $000’s                                      $000’s

Accumulated Funds                                                                                                     1,049                                           430                           543

Total Equity                                                                                                                     1,049                                           430                           543

 

Assets                                                                                                                                         

Current Assets

Cash and cash equivalents                                                                                           729                                        1,423                           184

Trade and other receivables                                                                                        330                                           300                           300

Prepayments                                                                                                                       62                                                7                                                7

Inventories                                                                                                                              5                                                5                                5

Investments                                                                                                                   1,500                                                 -                        1,250

Total Current Assets                                                                                                                               2,626                                        1,735                                        1,746

 

Non Current Assets

Property, plant and equipment                                                                                 187                                              65                           180

Intangible assets                                                                                                                   7                                              20                                7

Total Non Current Assets                                                                                             194                                              85                           187

Total Assets                                                                                                                    2,820                                        1,820                        1,933

 

Liabilities                                                                                                                                                                                     

Current Liabilities                                                                                                                   

Trade and other payables                                                                                             720                                           440                           440

Employee entitlements                                                                                                 226                                           200                           200

Income in advance                                                                                                          825                                           750                           750

Total Liabilities                                                                                                             1,771                                        1,390                        1,390

                                                                                                                                                                                                         

Net Assets                                                                                                                       1,049                                           430                           543

1.      Regional Strategies, Assessments and Advocacy

Venture Southland is uniquely positioned as it is not confined by traditional council boundaries and is tasked to look at the regional picture.  This includes the planning and development of strategies and ensuring that there is a clear pathway forward for the region aligning with local and central government and the wider industry and community.

 

Prioritisation of key projects across the region allows for efficient and appropriate allocation of resource as well as successful implementation.

 

Venture Southland advocates on behalf of the region and continues to work closely with central government and the wider community and industry for the benefit of Southland.

 

Note: This section only includes the preparation of strategies.  Where the implementation of a strategy transitions into business as usual, it is presented on the appropriate section of the work programme, such as Southland Cycling Strategy, Southland Cruise Strategy, Southland Energy Strategy, and the Southland Labour Market Strategy.

 

Budget information

 

$80,000 of expenditure is budgeted for this initiative, offset by $50,000 of revenue.

Summarised as follows:

·        Direct expenditure*1                                                                       $30,000

·        Investigation, Assessment and Impetus*2     $50,000  (expenditure and revenue)

·        Staff time and overheads for Regional Strategies, Assessments and Advocacy are included under the specific initiatives throughout this work             programme. 

*1         shown in funding column below

*2              Expenditure is budgeted to be allocated from the $200,000 funding received from the Community Trust of Southland for the internally contestable        Investigation, Assessment and Impetus fund.  This is for budgeting purposes only, and will depend on project funding approved by the Joint     Committee throughout the year.  It is offset by the corresponding revenue of an equal amount.

 


 

 

Description

Work Programme 2017/18

Timeframe

Funding/Resource

Aim/Measure

1.1

Maintain and develop key relationships

Venture has relationships with many local, national and international organisations. 

These include:

Ongoing

Staff time only

Develop key relationships to ensure cohesive planning and make sure Southland is well represented at a national level.

·           Invercargill City Council

·           Southland District Council

·           Gore District Council

·           Community Trust of Southland

·           Environment Southland

·           Local MP’s

·           Southland Chamber of Commerce

·           Southern Scenic Route Steering Committee

·           Regional Tourism Organisations New Zealand (RTONZ)

·           New Zealand Trade and Enterprise

·           Immigration New Zealand

·           Business Mentors New Zealand

·           Mataura Licensing Trust

·           Murihiku Arts Incubator

·           Ngāi Tahu

·           Otago Southland Employers Association

·           Creative New Zealand

·           Southland Regional Heritage Committee

·           Economic Development Association New Zealand

 

·           Clutha District Council

·           Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment

·           Callaghan Innovation

·           Education New Zealand

·           Invercargill Licensing Trust

·           Local Government New Zealand

·           Tourism New Zealand

·           i-SITE New Zealand

·           Destination Fiordland

·           International Marketing Alliances

·           Air New Zealand

·           Lotteries Commission

·           International Space agencies

·           Southern Institute of Technology

·           Dairy NZ

·           Federated Farmers

·           Cruise NZ

·           Tourism In Aotearoa (TIA)

·           Conference Incentive NZ

·           Film Otago Southland Trust

 

1.2

Support the implementation of the Southland Regional Development Strategy Action Plan

Details of support required to be advised by Council.  This may result in some other planned activities being replaced, scoped differently or priorities changed.

Ongoing

Staff time and within existing budgets or additional funding will be sought

These will be determined as details of the projects are finalised

1.3

Southland Visitor Strategy 2017-2022

Work alongside industry, community, Councils and stakeholders to update the current visitor strategy. This will provide overall direction for the development of tourism for Southland and will align with other planning documents such as Council plans, marketing plans, Catlins, Cruise, Cycling, Heritage and Events Strategies.    

June 2018

Staff time and $40,000 funding approved from internal Investigation, Impetus and Assessment Fund. Potentially additional Central Government funding

Strategy completed

 

Implementation plan developed which will identify priorities and resource required.

1.4

Southland Digital Strategy

Maintain an advocacy role to ensure Southland is allocated sufficient resource to improve connectivity.

 

Continue to seek improvement of mobile cellular coverage, and rural and urban broadband deployment.

 

Ongoing

Staff time only

n/a

1.5

Southland Regional Heritage

Support the Southland Regional Heritage Committee to plan, promote and develop heritage regionally.  Key projects include the investigation of a regional heritage storage facility and support the review of the Heads of Agreement and heritage rate.

Ongoing

Staff time only

Support provided

1.6

Regional advocacy

Advocate on behalf of Southland, for example:

·        electricity pricing methodology;

·        digital connectivity;

·        rural broadband initiative;

·        sufficient road taxation distribution for              infrastructure upkeep and enhancement

 

·        other national issues related to tourism a             and community

Ongoing

Staff time only

Advocacy provided as required

1.7

Regional response to Central Government tenders and submissions

Proactively monitor the need for additional strategies or assessments to ensure Southland is represented at a national level.

Ongoing

Staff time only

Number of opportunities identified and responses made

1.8

Invercargill Central Business District

Prioritise objectives set by the Councils for the redevelopment of the Invercargill central business district (CBD) in collaboration with other stakeholders.  Integrate current initiatives for business support programmes to local businesses.

Ongoing

Staff time only

TBC

1.9

Statistics

Provide statistics to assist Venture Southland’s stakeholders to make informed decisions

Ongoing

Staff time and $30,000

Timely and appropriate information is available internally and for Venture Southland’s stakeholders

         
2       Destination Development

There are a number of exciting new projects and initiatives which will contribute to Southland’s goal of attracting 10,000 new people by 2025.  One of the areas of focus is developing Southland as a destination for tourists, students, prospective migrants and investors, without overlooking the need to retain Southland’s current residents.

The Destination Development section of the business plan overlaps with almost all other sections and truly reflects the integrated approach of Venture Southland. It consists of a number of projects which will aim to develop Southland as a destination, including international education, attraction and retention of a skilled workforce and commissionable trade tourism products.

Venture Southland has been and will continue to be instrumental in laying the foundations for a number of tourism projects, contributing in a number of ways from facilitating feasibility studies and investigation (including the provision of market insights and data) through to project planning and working alongside community and central government funders to attract external funding and investment.

International Education and Attraction and Retention of a Skilled Workforce are shown as separate sections due to the scale of these activities.

Budget information

 

$425,000 of expenditure is budgeted for this initiative, offset by $37,000 of revenue.

Summarised as follows:

·        Staff time and staff related overheads           $218,000

·        Direct expenditure*1                                               $1,000

·        Allocation of indirect overheads*2                     $173,000

·        Investigation, Assessment and Impetus*3     $33,000  (expenditure and revenue)

·        Other revenue                                                           $4,000

 

 

*1           This is a general budget to be used for incidental expenditure as the need arises and therefore isn’t shown on the table below

*2              This is an allocation for budgeting purposes of the organisation-wide overheads including rent, computer costs, and administration staff.  These costs             are mostly fixed and do not vary as priorities change.

*3              Expenditure is budgeted to be allocated from the $200,000 funding received from the Community Trust of Southland for the internally contestable        Investigation, Assessment and Impetus fund.  This is for budgeting purposes only, and will depend on project funding approved by the Joint     Committee throughout the year.  It is offset by the corresponding revenue of an equal amount.

                  

 

Description

Work Programme 2017/18

Timeframe

Funding/Resource

Aim/Measure

2.1

Market analysis and statistics

Work alongside Statistics New Zealand and Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment to source and interpret statistics and market insights which assist with encouraging investment and new business opportunities as well as sourcing external funding for projects (e.g. through Tourism Growth Partnership funding applications)

These include:

·        Visitor satisfaction social media monitoring

·        Visitor flows including stop over locations and              destination of travellers.

·        Other visitor monitoring

 

Ongoing

Staff time and $30,000 is budgeted for statistics under Regional strategies, Assessments and Advocacy that overlap with this section

Information provided as required to allow informed decision making

 

Quarterly economic indicators report.

 

Monthly tourism key market indicators report.

2.2

Market Insights Data Project

Work alongside Air New Zealand, Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment to identify and test key regional themes for Southland Identity.

Ongoing

Staff time and external funding from the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment

Summary report with recommendations on how to integrate destination development and attraction initiatives

2.3

International education

This is a significant area of focus and is therefore shown as a separate section.

Ongoing

See Section 6: International Education

See Section 6: International Education

2.4

Attraction and retention of a skilled workforce

This is a significant area of focus and is therefore shown as a separate section.

Ongoing

See Section 5: Attraction and Retention of a skilled workforce

See Section 5: Attraction and Retention of a skilled workforce

2.5

Regional Event Strategy and development

This is a significant area of focus and is therefore shown as a separate section.

 

Ongoing

See Section 8: Events

See Section 8: Events

2.6

CBD Redevelopment

Assist Invercargill City Council with the inner city rejuvenation project including making Invercargill more campervan friendly.

Ongoing

Staff time only

Support as required

2.7

Southland Cycling Strategy

Support the implementation of the findings and key projects determined from the strategy alongside Councils and the wider community.  Note this overlaps with the Around the Mountains Cycle Trail, Cycle Fiordland and Gore Cycling Project

Ongoing

Staff time only

Establish implementation framework and priorities alongside Councils

2.8

Southern NZ Cruise Strategy

Review regional impact and growth forecasts

 

Support the implementation of the cruise strategy alongside key stakeholders.  This strategy aims to not only attract more cruise ships and gain more value from their visit but also looks at it as an opportunity to attract visitors to return to Southland for future visits. The provision of appropriate infrastructure is also a key focus.

Ongoing

Staff time only

Complete regional impact assessment

 

Establish regional cruise forum

 

Work with Southland District Council to evaluate infrastructure provisions

2.9

Catlins Tourism Strategy 2016-2026

Work alongside Catlins Coast Inc, the wider community, Clutha and Southland District Councils, DOC and iwi to implement the key findings of this strategy and ensure that this area is developed appropriately according to what the community and environment can handle.

 

 

 

 

 

Ongoing

Staff time only

Assist in the appointment of project coordinator and the implementation of prioritised projects

2.10

Curio Bay Tumu Toka Natural Heritage Centre

Continue providing integral support with facilitating the implementation of the Curio Bay Tumu Toka Vision, including the Natural Heritage Centre development, camp ground upgrade, DOC and Southland District Council infrastructure upgrades.

 

Support includes business advice, project planning and management, support to access funding, financial advice and support, and project development support

 

Ongoing

Staff time only

Support provided to South Catlins Development Trust

2.11

Southland Museum and Art Gallery

Support the Invercargill City Council and Southland Museum Art Gallery Board to investigate options for the Southland Museum and Art Gallery including tourism trade commissionable product development opportunities related to a potential Kakaporium, Tuatarium and natural life museum redevelopment and a new art gallery facility.

Ongoing

Staff time only

Feasibility assessment(s) undertaken for projects including potential funding sources

2.12

Anderson Park

Work alongside Invercargill City Council to implement findings from the feasibility study undertaken in 2016 which aim to identify future opportunities for this facility.

June 2018

Staff time only

Support provided

2.13

Tourism industry capability building

Continue to provide training and resources to up-skill the tourism sector in specific tourism disciplines including digital marketing, trade channel management, event delivery and product development

Ongoing

Staff time only

Hold 4 workshops building capability of current and future tourism operators

2.14

MBIE Regional Mid-Sized Tourism Facilities Fund

Assist council staff to prepare and support applications for this fund in its two funding rounds per annum – aligns with overall goal to develop sustainable infrastructure to support a growing tourism industry.

 

 

Ongoing

Staff time only

Support two applications

2.15

MBIE Tourism Growth Partnership Fund

Work alongside industry, key stakeholders and Councils to identify projects which may be eligible for this fund and assist with the preparation of funding applications and business plans.

Ongoing

Staff time only

Support applications (number dependent on operator applications)

2.16

Around the Mountains Cycle Trail operational requirements

Act as Southland District Council agent in delivering marketing and promotion support, coordinating the Official Partner Programme in the community and supporting event delivery and promotion on the trail.

 

Ongoing

Staff time only

Market the Around the Mountains Cycle Trail as part of destination promotion

2.17

Around the Mountains Cycle Trail interpretation project

Work alongside Southland District Council and the local community to develop interpretation alongside the trail which aims to educate cyclists and enhance their overall experience.

June 2018

Staff time and $50,000 (funded Southland District Council)

Implementation of interpretation plan


 

3.      Diversification of Southland’s Economy

Venture Southland works to identify opportunities for investment which are complementary with the regional economy and ensure they are promoted to relevant domestic and international markets. Venture Southland’s role is to investigate the potential of these opportunities to broaden Southland’s economic base.

 

This area is significant to reduce Southland’s dependency on a narrow range of industries.  This also creates jobs through the formation of new industries and within the support services.

 

Some of the projects are ongoing. It is important to have relevant and up to date information available so that when the time is right, an investor will take up the opportunity.

 

Budget information

 

$609,000 of expenditure is budgeted for this initiative, offset by $207,000 of revenue.

Summarised as follows:

·        Staff time and staff related overheads                                     $356,000

·        Direct expenditure*1                                                                        $65,000

·        Allocation of indirect overheads*2                                              $171,000

·        Revenue relating to Awarua and Lochiel Ground Stations            $180,000

·        Investigation, Assessment and Impetus*3                               $17,000  (expenditure and revenue)

·        Other revenue                                                                                    $10,000

 

 

*1         Shown in funding column below

*2              This is an allocation for budgeting purposes of the organisation-wide overheads including rent, computer costs, and administration staff.  These costs             are mostly fixed and do not vary as priorities change.

*3              Expenditure is budgeted to be allocated from the $200,000 funding received from the Community Trust of Southland for the internally contestable        Investigation, Assessment and Impetus fund.  This is for budgeting purposes only, and will depend on project funding approved by the Joint     Committee throughout the year.  It is offset by the corresponding revenue of an equal amount.

 


 

 

Description

Work Programme 2017/18

Timeframe

Funding/Resource

Aim/Measure

3.1

Aeromagnetic Geological Survey

Finalise the interpretation of data for council, industry and community to provide information to make informed decisions.

 

Review the potential to reduce the earthquake risk profile in areas of Southland.  This has implications for the insurance and risk costs of Southlanders.

 

Provide detailed mapping of Southland’s deep water aquifers, minerals and geographic structures.

December 2017

Staff time and $50,000 allocated from Venture Southland’s reserves but not included in the 2017/18 budget, and $50,000 from the internally contestable Investigation, Impetus and Assessment fund in prior years

Completion of the interpretation

 

Information is accessible, able to be used to make decisions

3.2

Awarua and Lochiel Ground stations

Manage the Awarua and Lochiel Ground stations

 

Promote the services offered to satellite and space organisations to expand opportunities

 

Promote Southland business as contractors with the necessary skills to assist international partners of the earth observation station.

Ongoing

Staff time and $180,000 of revenue offset by

$25,000 of expenditure.

 

Deliver services to five satellite and space organisations

3.3

Identify film opportunities for the region

Continue to support the Film Otago-Southland Trust to promote and develop local film industry opportunities, capacity and capability.

Ongoing

Staff time and $20,000

Identify additional film opportunities for Southland

 

Aim for 52 production days for the year.

3.4

Promote opportunities for investment

Promote opportunities for investment in Southland.

 

Examples include health and wellness foods, minerals, aquaculture, value added production and digital infrastructure.  Some of these are investment ready.

 

Venture Southland continues to maintain ongoing  monitoring of potential investment opportunities

Ongoing

Staff time and $20,000

Facilitate six significant investment opportunities. 

3.5

Tourism product development

Provide advice and support to develop tourism product including the implementation of strategies such as the Southland Cruise Strategy, Catlins Tourism, Around the Mountains Cycle Trail business and marketing plan

 

Provide advice and support to develop tourism channels

 

See Destination Development and Regional Strategies, Assessments and Advocacy sections

Ongoing

See Section 7. Destination Development and Regional Strategies, Assessments and Advocacy sections

New tourism products identified, evaluated and discussed with businesses and communities.

 

Assist in bringing eight new tourism products to the market

 


 

4.      Business Service Efficiency and Competitiveness

 

Venture Southland offers business services to Southland businesses, such as business advice referral services, funding support, and facilitating mentoring services as part of the national Regional Business Partner Programme with New Zealand Trade and Enterprise, Callaghan Innovation and Business Mentors New Zealand.

 

This support ensures Southland businesses are operating as efficiently as possible, and are therefore competitive in the marketplace.  Venture Southland has a range of services including Lean Manufacturing, Lean Dairy (Farm Tune) and workshops to drive efficiency.  This is especially important given the labour market challenges highlighted in the Southland Labour Market Strategy.

 

Innovation and the development of innovative processes are critical to the ongoing competitiveness of Southland businesses.  Venture Southland is able to support businesses through the Callaghan Research and Development funding.  Processes and programmes will continue to be developed to support Southland businesses with innovation and development.

 

Budget information

 

$617,000 of expenditure is budgeted for this initiative, offset by $352,000 of revenue.

Summarised as follows:

·        Staff time and staff related overheads                                                 $266,000

·        Direct expenditure*1                                                                                     $103,000

·        Allocation of indirect overheads*2                                                           $248,000

·        Regional Business Partner Programme revenue                               $206,000

·        Lean Manufacturing and Dairy programme revenue                       $141,000

·        Other revenue                                                                                                $5,000

 

 

*1         shown in funding column below

*2              this is an allocation for budgeting purposes of the organisation-wide overheads including rent, computer costs, and administration staff.  These costs             are mostly fixed and do not vary as priorities change.


 

 

Description

Work Programme 2017/18

Timeframe

Funding/Resource

Aim/Measure

4.1

Facilitate the Regional Business

Partner Programme

Facilitate the New Zealand Trade and Enterprise capability training vouchers on a 50/50 matched basis

Ongoing

Staff time and $10,000 of expenditure offset by income generated of $206,000

$200,000 in funding allocated to Southland businesses

Business mentor training and promotion

 

Venture Southland recruits and trains mentors who pass on their experiences and advice to matched business operators

Ongoing

50 mentor client matches

 

Train 50 mentors

Callaghan Innovation Research and Development fund

Ongoing

$250,000 allocated

Business assessments

Ongoing

Complete 140 client assessments

4.2

Innovation support and programmes

Develop and deliver a range of workshops and programmes designed to assist businesses to implement innovative thinking and new product development

Ongoing

Staff time only

Deliver workshops as a need is identified

4.3

Business training and support

Training and support is provided to business and not for profit groups.  Focus areas include:

·Retail

·Digital enablement

·Export market development

Ongoing

Staff time only

Deliver training as a need is identified

4.4

Business survey analysis

 

Assess business confidence and challenges businesses faced from the information collected in the 2016/17 survey

 

Venture Southland uses the information collected to determine priority areas that require attention and resource allocation within the Southland business community

 

 

Ongoing

Staff time only

Survey completed with a confidence level of 95% +/-4%

 

Completed by May 2018

4.5

Coordinate and promote business efficiency

through  Lean Management and Lean Dairy in Southland

Promote Lean methodology and facilitate workshops to improve the efficiency of Southland businesses

 

 

 

Ongoing

Staff time and $93,000 of expenditure, offset by Income generated $141,000

Deliver Lean Management training to seven businesses

Deliver Dairy Lean to 12 farms

30 Businesses attend other Lean support initiatives including site-visits, networking and the Southland Lean Forum

4.6

Methane recovery

Continue to investigate the opportunity for capturing methane from effluent ponds and converting it to energy.

 

Continue methane recovery trial on a Southland dairy farm

 

Measure and assess the biological, thermal, electrical and economic benefits

Ongoing

Staff time only

Complete the trial of methane and report performance.

 

Once completed, promote the system to farmers and process industries to support the wider uptake of these technologies

 


 

5.      Attracting and Retaining a Skilled Workforce

 

Southland, like other regions, is facing a workforce shortage due to an aging population. For business to grow, skilled staff are required. Venture     Southland is active in attracting migrants to the region, and also ensuring the skilled workers remain in the region. Without people, new businesses and new industries cannot develop, and existing industries cannot be extended.

 

Venture Southland signed a memorandum of understanding in 2016 with the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment, and Immigration New Zealand based on prior initiatives and collaboration to build on regional migrant settlement and retention strategies.  This memorandum of understanding assists in the implementation of the Southland Labour Market Strategy.

 

Budget information

 

$196,000 of expenditure is budgeted for this initiative, offset by $92,000 of revenue.

Summarised as follows:

·        Staff time and staff related overheads*1                                 $89,000

·        Direct expenditure*2                                                                        $20,000

·        Allocation of indirect overheads*3                                              $70,000

·        Funding from MBIE for Southland Youth Futures                 $70,000                                                            

·        Investigation, Assessment and Impetus*4                               $17,000  (expenditure and revenue)

·        Other revenue                                                                                    $5,000

 

 

*1         Shown in funding column below

*2              Funding out of Venture Southland reserves, which was approved in 2016 hasn’t been included in the 2017/18 budget.  This funding covers a labour market staff position until December 2016.

*3              this is an allocation for budgeting purposes of the organisation-wide overheads including rent, computer costs, and administration staff.  These costs             are mostly fixed and do not vary as priorities change.

*4              Expenditure is budgeted to be allocated from the $200,000 funding received from the Community Trust of Southland for the internally contestable        Investigation, Assessment and Impetus fund.  This is for budgeting purposes only, and will depend on project funding approved by the Joint     Committee throughout the year.  It is offset by the corresponding revenue of an equal amount.

 

 

 

Description

Work Programme 2017/18

Timeframe

Funding/Resource

Aim/Measure

5.1

Implement Southland Labour Market Strategy

Develop programmes to:

·        Utilise existing work force skills

·        Up-skill existing and future work force

·        Retain skills within the community

·        Attract skills as required

 

With particular focus on:

·        Increasing female participation in the              workforce

·        Increasing workforce participation of those              over 55 years

·        Migration – both domestic and international

 

Work with the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment, and Immigration New Zealand to implement the Southland Labour Market Strategy

 

Map future job requirements to align tertiary education, secondary schools and other training organisations

 

Assess and review promotional material

Ongoing

Staff time and $20,000

 

Funding for staff has been confirmed until December 2017, and additional funding is to be sourced

Link Southlanders with employment opportunities within the region

 

Link employment opportunities to migrant attraction programmes

 

Programmes and initiatives undertaken to promote Southland to potential migrants (domestic and international)

 

Investigation undertaken to assess future job requirements for Southland

 

Source additional funding to allow the continuation of this programme

5.2

Southland Youth Futures – Invest in Youth

Encourage employers to employ youth and youth to consider primary sector employment through the Invest in Youth Campaign

 

Organise a range of events for employers to present to schools to raise student awareness of employment opportunities in Southland

 

Work with employers to ensure they provide an environment that provides the best opportunities for youth to succeed in the workplace via the Employer Excellence programme, including mentoring and training

 

Continue to work with employers to develop pathways for youth employment, this includes supporting existing   programmes and develop new ones as required.

Ongoing

$70,000pa external funding received from the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment to cover staff and other costs (funding secured for two years)

Deliver in-school programmes to over 1200 secondary students across Southland

 

Deliver 12 site visit days allowing students to experience a variety of industries and workplaces

 

Have over 30 ‘youth friendly’ employers in the region

5.3

Build partnerships to drive migrant attraction and retention

Identify with employers, industry groups and

Immigration New Zealand (Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment) initiatives to

support migrant attraction and retention

Ongoing

Staff time only

Liaise with Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment to develop programmes to meet regional need

 

Work with the Relationship Manager at Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment to assist with joint initiatives for migrant retention

Ongoing

Staff time only

Work with MBIE and businesses to develop a retention programme aimed at assisting the successful settlement of accompanying spouses.

Ongoing

Staff time only

5.4

Rural migrant working and newcomers project – also see Community Development

Work with Southland District Council to develop a rural Southland networking and community support initiative.  (Brief and scope to be determined)

 

 

TBC

TBC

Brief to be scoped and objectives determined

5.5

Promote migration to visitors

Undertake a pilot project in partnership with Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment, to investigate the potential to transition visitors into migrants using the i-Site network

Ongoing

Funding to be sourced

Pilot programme undertaken

 

5.6

Pathways to employment

Work with Education New Zealand, local education providers and industries to provide pathways for graduating international students into employment. Attracting and retaining a skilled workforce is one of the six key strategic goals identified in the Southern Regional International Education Strategy in order to contribute to the key shortages in Southland and New Zealand’s workforce. Employment will provide opportunities for international students to create a new home in Southland for themselves and their families.

Ongoing

Staff time only

Programmes developed to meet regional need

 

 


 

6.      International Education

Venture Southland administers the Education New Zealand Regional Partnership Programme for Southland.  This is designed to support the development and growth of international education in selected regions of New Zealand. It is a partnership and collaboration between international education providers, local educational groups, local government, economic development agencies, and the international education industry. Over the past decade the international education sector in Southland has developed increasingly with significant investment, relationship building, direct marketing and delegations overseas. These initiatives have resulted in a steady growth in international student numbers in the Southland region.

 

Budget information

 

$157,000 of expenditure is budgeted for this initiative, offset by $100,000 of revenue.

Summarised as follows:

·        Staff time and staff related overheads                                     $78,000

·        Direct expenditure*1                                                                        $20,000

·        Allocation of indirect overheads *2                                             $59,000

·        Funding from Education New Zealand                                                   $100,000

 

*1         shown in funding column below

*2              this is an allocation for budgeting purposes of the organisation-wide overheads including rent, computer costs, and administration staff.  These costs             are mostly fixed and do not vary as priorities change.

 

 

 

Description

Work Programme 2017/18

Timeframe

Funding/Resource

Aim/Measure

6.1

Support Southland education providers

Partner with Education New Zealand (ENZ) to develop the implementation phase of the Southern Education Strategy. 

 

 

Administration of the strategy to be provided by Venture Southland

 

 

Establish the Southern Education Alliance (SEA) Governance group which will be influential in providing direction on the implementation of the strategy

 

Set targets for the region based on current market trends

 

Ongoing

$100,000 pa of external funding from Education New Zealand.  This includes funding to employ a person to administer the strategy.  (funding for three years)

 

 

Establish the overarching regional organisation – Southern Education Alliance (SEA) – which any education provider can be part of.

Appointment of an International

Co-ordinator located within

Venture Southland.

 

SEA Governance Group is formally established in the region.

 

Develop targets for the next twelve months and report to governance group quarterly.

 

Achieve targets and growth.

Promote Southland as a destination for students.   This incorporates the Destination Development and Destination Promotion sections of this work programme.

 

Develop generic marketing collateral, aligned to the Southland Visitor Strategy and Southland Labour Market Strategy

 

Ongoing

Part of the $100,000 above will be applied to marketing.  For budget purposes this is $20,000 but is to be confirmed.

Develop marketing collateral for the education sector

 

Facilitate the development Southern Education Alliance website

Develop branding for Southern

Education Alliance.

         
7       Destination Promotion

Venture Southland is focused on maximising the regional benefits of increasing the number of tourists for the region. Promotion of the region nationally and internationally through consistent marketing and communication to strengthen the Southland brand is essential to drive demand, alongside product development which gives reasons to spend more and stay longer.  Venture Southland will continue to build Southland as a destination and the evolution of the Southland identity to market to New Zealand and the world, which in turn attracts visitors that support the private and public operations in the region.

 

Partnerships that have been developed over numerous years are essential to promote Southland.  This is through marketing alliances where different organisations or regions pool financial and human resources to leverage greater promotional opportunities, or through relationships developed at a national level within entities that include Tourism New Zealand, Tourism in Aotearoa, Air New Zealand, Cruise New Zealand, RTONZ, CINZ, and DOC.

 

Destination promotion within Venture Southland includes Attraction and Retention of a Skilled Workforce and International Education. However, as these are significant areas of focus, these are presented in sections 5 and 6 respectively.

 

Budget information

 

$1,455,000 of expenditure is budgeted for this initiative, offset by $239,000 of revenue.

Summarised as follows:

·        Staff time and staff related overheads                                                       $239,000 (excludes Invercargill i-SITE and Destination Fiordland)

·        Direct expenditure*1                                                                        $311,000

·        Allocation of indirect overheads*2                                              $383,000

·        Invercargill i-SITE (includes staff) *1                                             $254,000

·        Destination Fiordland (includes staff) *1                                   $235,000

·        Revenue from the Invercargill i-SITE                                          $130,000

·        Recoveries from Destination Fiordland                                    $66,000                                                            

·        Investigation, Assessment and Impetus*3                               $33,000  (expenditure and revenue)

·        Other revenue                                                                                    $10,000

 

 

*1         Shown in funding column below

*2              This is an allocation for budgeting purposes of the organisation-wide overheads including rent, computer costs, and administration staff.  These costs             are mostly fixed and do not vary as priorities change.

*3              Expenditure is budgeted to be allocated from the $200,000 funding received from the Community Trust of Southland for the internally contestable        Investigation, Assessment and Impetus fund.  This is for budgeting purposes only, and will depend on project funding approved by the Joint     Committee throughout the year.  It is offset by the corresponding revenue of an equal amount.

 

 

 


Description

Work Programme 2017/18

Timeframe

Funding/Resource

Aim/Measure

7.1

Marketing and promotional campaigns

Develop and deliver promotion activities using integrated tools (brand, digital, print and broadcast) with specifically defined target audiences. Activities include:

·        On Your Doorstep promotions

·        National campaign (to be determined)

·        Social influencers promotions

·        Tourism New Zealand promotions

·        Southern Scenic Route

·        Pure Southern Lands/Generous Southern Coast              promotions

·        Air NZ Partnership promotions

·        Event promotions

·        Southland Visitor Guide

·        Brochure distributions

·        Electronic distribution marketing

·        Around the Mountains Cycle Trail promotions              and official partner programme

 

See details of specific media, trade and digital promotions below

 

 

 

 

Ongoing

Staff time and $241,000

18 campaigns facilitated as part of annual programme

7.2

Tourism publicity and media engagement

 

 

Develop relationships and opportunities with media to market Southland via constructive media commentary in print, digital and broadcast.

Partners include:

·        Tourism New Zealand Media Programme

·        TVNZ, Sky, Fairfax Media, NZME & MediaWorks

·        Specialised media channels for target markets              (particularly web, blog, social media and              magazines)

 

Ongoing

Staff time and $10,000

Generate 96 media pieces

 

Coordinate 18 media famils

7.3

Tourism supply and trade development

Develop relationships and opportunities with tourism trade channel partners and connect with local operators.

Key trade programmes include:

·        New Zealand and offshore Inbound operators

·        Cruise New Zealand

·        Conference and Incentives New Zealand

·        i-SITE network

·        Tourism Industry Association trade (including              TRENZ)

·        Tourism New Zealand trade

·        Regional Tourism Organisations New Zealand              (RTONZ) trade

·        Christchurch International Airport Ltd (SOUTH)              trade

 

Ongoing

Staff time and $18,000

Engage with 200 agents

 

Attend minimum of four trade shows

 

Present regional profile and product offerings of 70 Southland operators

 

Coordinate 10 trade famils

 

Participate in eight international marketing alliance activities

 

Develop three trade itineraries

 

 

7.4

Digital Marketing

Maintain and develop the regional profile of Southland via platform and content management:

·        Southland NZ websites (including Gore NZ,              Invercargill NZ and Southern Scenic Route)

·        Search engine optimisation

 

·        Southland NZ social media platforms and              engagement

·        Third party digital platforms (including              newzealand.com and other sector channels)

·        Consumer, trade and industry affiliates database       management for electronic marketing initiatives

·        Content acquisition and distribution

Ongoing

Included in marketing and promotional campaigns

Top three ranking for regional searches

 

Growth of website traffic (+10%)

Growth of operator listing on Southlandnz to 420 (+19%)

 

Growth of consumer/trade/ industry databases (+8%)

 

Growth of social media engagement (+12%)

7.5

Marketing via Destination Fiordland

Venture Southland provides staff and operational funding for Destination Fiordland, who generate their marketing budget from their members.

Ongoing

Expenditure of $235,000 is offset by reimbursements from Destination Fiordland of $66,000

n/a

7.6

Southland promotional merchandise

Design, sourcing and distribution of Southland merchandise for promotion, including gifts for dignitaries, trade partners and regional events and activities

 

 

 

 

Ongoing

Staff time and $10,000

n/a

7.7

Visitor Information

Manage the Invercargill i-SITE including implementing the review undertaken in 2016/17

 

Promote the regions attractions, events, accommodation and activities to visitors

 

Generate revenue via commission, retail and advertising sales

 

Investigate role as information service for students and migrants

Ongoing

Revenue of $130,000 offset by $254,000 of expenses

Grow revenue 8%

7.8

Promote Southland as a conference destination and support potential conferences

Develop relationships with national conference sector (including  Professional Conference Organisers) and local conference sector providers

 

Provision of bid support information

 

Coordinate the conference incentive fund

Ongoing

Staff time and $32,000

Prospect 50 conference opportunities, undertaking 12 bids to attract six additional

Conferences

 

Represent the region through four events, activities and industry channels

 


 

8.      Events

Southland is known for high quality events which add diversity, vibrancy and a sense of well-being to the region’s residents and ratepayers. Venture Southland believes that events are an important aspect of our approach to develop and promote Southland as an attractive place to live, study, work and visit.

 

In 2016 Venture Southland developed an events strategy which identified the need to look at events from a regional perspective and this is reflected in this year’s work programme.  For example, different events have specific benefits so there will be more focus on scheduling and clustering events together and on how to inform the public when they are on.    Other areas from the events strategy are included in the work programme below.

 

Budget information

 

$935,000 of expenditure is budgeted for this initiative, offset by $452,000 of revenue.

Summarised as follows:

·        Staff time and staff related overheads                                          $280,000

·        Direct expenditure*1                                                            $421,000

·        Allocation of indirect overheads*2                                  $234,000

·        Funding and ticket sales*1                                                  $440,000

·        Other revenue                                                                       $12,000

 

 

*1         Shown in funding column below.  Budgets for each event are subject to change as further details are known.  All events aim to break-even.    All figures     relating to events are indicative only.

*2              This is an allocation for budgeting purposes of the organisation-wide overheads including rent, computer costs, and administration staff.  These costs             are mostly fixed and do not vary as priorities change.

 

 


 

 

Description

Work Programme 2017/18

Timeframe

Funding/Resource

Aim/Measure

8.1

Delivery and support of events

Examples of these include those listed below, but other significant events may arise through the year.

·        ILT Kidzone Festival

·        Burt Munro Challenge

·        Southland Festival of the Arts

·        Matariki Festival

·        Southland District Council Holiday              Programme

·        Summer Sounds and Waitangi Day Concert

·        Southland Buskers Festival

·        Shakespeare in the Park

·        KidsCan Santa Run

 

Venture will continue to support a number of groups holding their own events in order to build capability

Ongoing

Staff time and $382,000 of event management and support costs, offset  by revenue of $440,000 offset

 

creative projects support of $15,000

 

Note: All events aim to break-even by sourcing external funding. 

Generate spectatorship in excess of 40,000 per annum

 

 

8.2

Grow and promote the Southland events calendar

Work alongside council, event organisers and community groups to identify new events, and assist with the development and implementation (where resource allows)

 

Ensure regular communication and promotion of the regional events calendar at southlandnz.com and an industry events calendar

 

Undertake event promotion for iconic and significant events

Ongoing

Staff time only

Develop new events in the Southland Region

 

Regular distribution and promotion of the newsletter

 

Provide marketing support to 32 events

8.3

Events funding

Develop an approach and platform for aligning, planning, coordinating and funding events in the region

 

Ongoing

Staff time only

Approach and process identified and implemented

8.4

Facilitate event capability development

Support event organisers to build capacity within the events sector

Ongoing

Staff time only

Provide support to 12 regional events

8.5

Economic and social impact assessment

Work with key stakeholders to establish a process to identify and prioritise key events to be evaluated in order to understand the economic and social impact.

 

Ongoing

Staff time plus tools which are budgeted under statistics

Economic and/or social impact assessments to be completed where a need is identified

8.6

Building event capability

Support event organisers on a range of events to build capability within the events sector.  This includes event planning, sponsorship, delivery advice, and marketing support (through marketing initiatives such as website, social media and competitions)

Ongoing

Staff time and $24,000

Provide marketing support to 32 events

 

52 promotional opportunities undertaken

 

Advice and support to a wide range of events

 

 

 


 

9.      Community Development

Southland is known for its strong and vibrant communities which contribute to a quality of life. Venture Southland supports the Southland District Council in supporting local communities to maintain a proud Southland community spirit, particularly in rural areas.  The approach is twofold and relies on a relationship approach of working alongside local people and groups and partnering with Councils, community funders and other stakeholders on a range of projects and initiatives.

There is a close relationship between the Southland District Council Community and Futures group and Venture Southland’s Community Development team. Venture Southland’s Community Development team helps to deliver Southland District Council’s priorities and support Council on a range of projects and initiatives. 

The 2017-18 work programme builds on key projects completed in the previous year and detailed briefs for new projects listed below are yet to be fully scoped. Scoping of these projects will be undertaken alongside the Southland District Council to establish objectives, timeframes and resource requirements.  Note: Depending on the scope of these projects, some priorities may change

Budget information

 

$798,000 of expenditure is budgeted for this initiative, offset by $63,000 of revenue.

Summarised as follows:

·        Staff time and staff related overheads                                                       $408,000

·        Direct expenditure*1                                                                        $36,000

·        Allocation of indirect overheads*2                                              $304,000

·        Investigation, Assessment and Impetus*3                               $50,000  (expenditure and revenue)

·        Other revenue                                                                                    $13,000

 

*1         shown in funding column below

*2              This is an allocation for budgeting purposes of the organisation-wide overheads including rent, computer costs, and administration staff.  These costs             are mostly fixed and do not vary as priorities change.

*3              Expenditure is budgeted to be allocated from the $200,000 funding received from the Community Trust of Southland for the internally contestable        Investigation, Assessment and Impetus fund.  This is for budgeting purposes only, and will depend on project funding approved by the Joint     Committee throughout the year.  It is offset by the corresponding revenue of an equal amount.

 


 

Community Development is split into the following sections:

Community Capacity and Capability Building        $10,000

 

Description

Work Programme 2017/18

Timeframe

Funding/Resource

Aim/Measure

9.1

Community Organisation and Volunteer Sector

project

Southland District Council to develop the project brief and confirm the scope this project.

 

The project aims to prioritise and implement the key findings determined from the research undertaken in 2016-2017

By June 2018

Staff time plus a share of $10,000

Key findings prioritised and implemented

9.2

Community Facilities Project

Southland District Council to develop the project brief and confirm the scope this project.

 

The project aims to prioritise and implement the key findings determined from the research undertaken in 2016-2017.

By June 2018

Staff time plus a share of $10,000

Key findings prioritised and implemented

 

Community Planning                                                      $10,000

 

Description

Work Programme 2017/18

Timeframe

Funding/Resource

Aim/Measure

9.3

Southland District local community sustainability strategic approach

 

Southland District Council to develop the project brief and confirm the scope of this project.

The project aims to develop and deliver a district wide approach to community projects prioritisation, community organisation support, funding prioritisation and community partnership delivery of services approach.

 

By June 2018

Staff time plus a share of $10,000

Approach successfully

developed and

delivered

9.4

Community futures and community leadership

plans

Southland District Council to develop the project brief and confirm the scope of this project.

 

The project aims to support the Southland District Council Community Partnership leaders with the development and preparation of these plans for each Community Board and CDA Sub Committee

By June 2018

Staff time plus a share of $10,000

Plans successfully developed

9.5

Community Education

Deliver a series of workshops to be held throughout Southland to educate the local community about a relevant issue or topic

By June 2018

Staff time plus a share of $10,000

Successful delivery of a series of workshops

 

 

Local Initiatives                                                            $16,000

 

Description

Work Programme 2017/18

Timeframe

Funding/Resource

Aim/Measure

9.6

Local Community Project Support

Support for local communities and their projects provided.  Note that many of these projects are identified in regional plans and strategies and a range of support is provided (funding advice; project planning, support and coordination) as required and as resources allow

Ongoing

Staff time plus a share of $16,000

A minimum of 100 community groups assisted to support and lead their own community projects which align with District priorities and regional and national initiatives.

 

 

 

Please note that there are four projects as outlined in the Southland District Council Letter of Expectation which are detailed in other sections of this Business Plan.

Project/Initiative                                                                               Section

Rural Migrant Worker and Newcomers Project                                              Attraction and Retention of a Skilled Workforce

MBIE Regional Mid-Sized Tourism Facilities Fund                                          Destination Development

Cycle Strategy Implementation                                                                             Destination Development

Around the Mountains Cycle Trail Operational Requirements                 Destination Development and Destination Promotion

 

 

 


Community and Policy Committee

5 April 2017

sdclogo

 

Corporate Performance Framework Project

Record No:        R/17/3/6324

Author:                 Rex Capil, Group Manager Community and Futures

Approved by:       Steve Ruru, Chief Executive

 

  Decision                              Recommendation                         Information

 

  

 

Background

1        The Corporate Performance Framework Project has been identified as an important strategic project to assist Council in delivering its strategic objective of being a dynamic, effective and efficient Council.

2        The Corporate Performance Framework Project is an area of work the Strategy and Policy team have been tasked with developing and delivering.

3        Strategy and Policy staff have undertaken a considerable amount of background work over the past 18 months in defining the project and developing the project scope.

4        This has involved giving due consideration to what Council operates as now, how it’s corporate performance work is undertaken, including a stocktake of systems and processes that exist and a corresponding gap analysis.

5        This work has culminated in the development of the Corporate Performance Framework Project Discussion Document – March 2017.

 

6        This Discussion Document has been considered by the Executive Leadership Team and is now being presented to the Community and Policy Committee for its consideration, feedback and endorsement.

 

Where to from here?

7        Following consideration of the Community and Policy Committee it is intended to progress the implementation of the new Framework over an extended period of time.

8        There is a significant amount of work to be undertaken over the next 18 months to develop the next stages of this project and implement and effective Corporate Performance Framework for the organisation.

9        An implementation plan and timeframes will be the next stage of the project development and due to human resource constraints in the Strategy and Policy team it is intended to engage an external contractor to deliver the implementation plan on a specific project basis.

 

 

Recommendation

That the Community and Policy Committee:

a)         Receives the report titled “Corporate Performance Framework Project” dated 27 March 2017.

 

b)         Endorses the Southland District Council Corporate Performance Framework Discussion Document – March 2017.

 

c)         Supports the further development required to progress the implementation of the new Framework in 2017 – 2018.

 

Attachments

a         Corporate Performance Framework Discussion Document - March 2017    

 


Community and Policy Committee

05 April 2017

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

sdc_print

 

 

Corporate Performance Framework

Project

 

 

 

 

 

Discussion Document

 

March 2017


Community and Policy Committee

05 April 2017

 

                                                                                                                                                     

1          Project Introduction.

2          What is a Corporate Performance Framework..........................................................

3             Components of Corporate Performance Framework. 4

4             Key Terms Definitions - Summary. 9

5             Systems Development and Key Points for Consideration. 10

6          Communication and Engagement 12

7          Implementation and Timeframes. 13

 

 


Community and Policy Committee

05 April 2017

 

1          PROJECT INTRODUCTION

1.1       The Corporate Performance Framework (CPF) project has been identified as an important strategic project to assist Council in delivering the priority goal of

A dynamic, effective and efficient Council

We are an innovative industry leader who is respected and trusted by our stakeholders. We provide value for money.

1.2       The Southland District Council (SDC) needs to undertake a significant amount of work over a reasonable period of time (18 months) to develop and implement an effective CPF.

1.3       SDC requires the development of an effective CPF that is appropriate to SDC in support of effective planning, delivery, reporting, evaluating and creating accountabilities for performance. 

1.4       The CPF Project will support the design and implementation of business improvement process and core systems to drive accountabilities and monitoring of performance and achievement against objectives.

1.5       The CPF must be the single source of reference for any SDC Corporate Performance discussion.

1.6       The Corporate Performance cycle requires the SDC to define:

            Direction – what we want to achieve

            Deliverables - how we intend doing it

            Review – what have we achieved and how well have we done it

            Revision – what should we do next or how should we do it.

1.7       Council should develop its CPF in accordance with legislative requirements. The Local Government Act 2002 and Amendment Act 2010 provides local authorities powers to decide what activities to carry out, how they will carry them out and how they measure their performance in delivering their activities.

1.8       A CPF is specific to each local authority and should reflect SDC priorities related to the district and local communities.

 

           


 

2       WHAT IS A CORPORATE PERFORMANCE FRAMEWORK?

2.1       The Corporate Performance Framework aligns Council’s intended direction (expressed through Mission, Vision, Strategic Objectives/Goals) to the activities and outcomes delivered by teams and individuals.

2.2       An effective CPF acts as a ‘thread’ that supports staff in recognising what they do, how they do it and why they do it fits with Council’s overall vision and objectives – in essence what we are here for to serve the Southland district.

2.3       This acknowledges an effective CPF represents an integrated organisational performance management approach.

2.4       The CPF represents and sets out how the performance ‘thread’ weaves throughout the organisation to link organisational direction with individual roles and responsibilities.

2.5       A CPF should represent the organisation’s vision and direction and be the main mechanism for the Council to inform

·    The range, quality, quantity, and effect of the activities it intends to provide

·    Why it is providing these services

·    How it will be providing these services

·    The result or outcomes achieved by the council activities.

2.6       To be successful a CPF must inform the operational environment and structure of Council.

2.7     A systematic CPF integrated approach follows a cycle:

 

2.8       A CPF represents the planning and reporting requirements for the corporate performance of Council

1.   The Planned Effect

                   Direction – what we want to achieve

                   Deliverables - how we intend doing it

2.   The Reporting Mirror

                   Review – what have we achieved and how well have we done it

                   Revision – what should we do next or how should we do it.

2.9       In practice it means ensuring that service performance information and reporting clearly describes actual achievement/progress against the planned activities.

2.10     Key performance issues for Council need to relate to Health and Safety, Risk Management - reputation and legislation compliance and Key Strategic Objectives

2.11     It means there is a need to have service performance information systems and controls developed and implemented to ensure alignment of planned outcomes to reported deliverables.

 

 

 


 

3          COMPONENTS OF CORPORATE PERFORMANCE FRAMEWORK

3.1       A CPF defines the internal and external components of the corporate performance and the relationship between them.

3.2       It explicitly illustrates the connections and alignment of Council’s direction to its deliverables.

3.3       The CPF represents external components and internal components of Council’s business.

            External Facing Deliverables

3.4       In very short form this is what Council delivers to/with our communities – external customer and community oriented.

3.5       This is the ‘contract’ Council has with its communities, residents, ratepayers in terms of what it says it is going to deliver with the revenue collected and resource allocated to deliver it.

3.6       It is developed from identifying Community Aspirations – identifying why Council is involved.

3.7       The community aspirations are used to assist in developing and defining Councils direction by articulating a Vision, Mission, Strategic Objectives/Goals – identifying what Council is wanting to achieve.

3.8       This flows into and informs the Activities, Levels of Service and Projects/Programmes Council will deliver in order to deliver on the Council direction and subsequently the community aspirations – identifying how it will deliver by way of Activity Management Plans (AMPs).

3.9       In order to deliver the Activities, Levels of Services and Projects/Programmes the resource allocation (human and financial) required to achieve and deliver the outcomes forms part of the planning process.

3.10     Principally the four Groups of Council deliver the External Facing Deliverables – Services and Assets, Environmental Services, Customer Support, Community and Futures.

            Internal Business Support Deliverables

3.10     In very short form this is the organisation business support/enablers that allow the Council to deliver the external facing deliverables – internal customer and organisational oriented.

3.11     These internal services will reflect and be based on delivering the Community Aspirations, Vision, Mission, Strategic Objectives/Goals.

3.12     These internal services and support activities resource the external facing deliverables to enable/allow the activities, services, and projects to be delivered.

3.13     Principally the People and Capability, Financial Services and Information Management teams deliver the Internal Business Support Deliverables – but there is some cross over with Customer Support and Community and Futures Groups.

Documents that form part of the CPF

3.14     The CPF as the title suggests – is a framework which represents the corporate performance – or performance of Council.

3.15     To this end Council’s performance and the framework for such is represented by documentation which details the associated and required plans and related reports.

3.16     The documentation produced for the period of time in question should reflect and be consistent across all layers of planning and reporting for the organisation. When content is prepared once it should therefore be completed for all layers required for that planning and reporting cycle as per the CPF – subject to amendments approved as part of the review and revision process.

3.17     The 10 Year Long Term Plan (10 Year LTP) is Council’s document describing its external facing deliverables.

3.18     A 10 Year Internal Business Support Plan (10 Year IBSP) should also be produced as a document to reflect and describe the internal facing deliverables to support the delivery of the Ten Year LTP.

3.17     To incorporate and align the External Facing Deliverables (Ten Year LTP) with the Internal Business Support Deliverables (Ten Year IBSP) for the corresponding period Council should combine these and produce a 10 Year Organisation Strategic Plan (10 Year OSP).

3.18     The Ten Year LTP is then operationalised with a three year focus and the Annual Plan (AP) produced for each of those three years in the cycle represents the current year identified and confirmed activities, levels of service and projects/programmes – so the Annual Plan represents the annual external facing deliverables for the particular year – primarily these should be identified in the Activity Management Plans (AMPs) produced for the 10 Year LTP.

3.19     To align this process for the Ten Year IBSP and operationalise it with a three year focus then each of the internal service providers will need to synchronise the planning on an Annual Plan basis for each of the same three years in the cycle - so the Annual Internal Business Support Plan (AIBSP) represents the annual internal business support deliverables for the particular year – primarily these should be identified in the AMPs produced for the 10 Year IBSP.

3.20     To incorporate and align the Annual Plan (External Facing Deliverables) with the Annual Internal Business Support Plan for the particular year Council should combine these to produce an Annual Organisation Business Plan (AOBP)


 

3.21     The Annual Organisation Business Plan should literally be a compilation of the AMPs and Annual Team Plans (ATP) from across the organisation – which detail the annual external facing deliverables and internal business support deliverables developed by each of the respective teams who have the responsibility for the activity, levels of service or project/programmes.

3.22     As a consequence Annual Individual Staff Performance Plans (AISPP) should relate to and reflect the deliverables identified in the ATP.

3.23     In a table form this can be summarised as

External

+

Internal

=

Corporate

10 Year Long Term Plan (compilation of AMPs)

+

10 Year Internal Business Support Plan (compilation of AMPs)

=

10 Year Organisation  Strategic Plan

(for Council)

Annual Plan

+

Annual Internal Business Support Plan

=

Annual Organisation Business Plan

(for ELT)

Annual Team Plans

+

Annual Team Plans

=

Annual Organisation Business Plan

(ELT)

Annual Individual Staff Performance Plans

+

Annual Individual Staff Performance Plans

=

Annual Team Plans

(for Managers)

 

3.23     A successful CPF will require the 10 Year Organisation Strategic Plan to be completed comprehensively – as the rest of the Plans and Reports that form part of the CPF should cascade from this.

3.24     If a 10 Year Plan is comprehensive and covers off the identified priorities to fulfil the Community Aspirations, Vision, Mission, Strategic Objectives/Goals for the first three year cycle of that 10 Year Plan period then each of the Annual Plans and as a result the Annual Team Plans and Annual Individual Staff Performance Plans produced for the three year cycle should replicate what is in the 10 Year Plan – with variations and revisions only as a response to external factors.

3.25     Therefore the 10 Year Plan is the source document for the CPF process and consequently how the performance of the organisation is measured.

3.26     To assist with the development and implementation of this approach – plan templates will need to be developed for

·    AMPs

·    AOBP

·    ATP

·    AISPP

3.27     Each of the Planning Documents will have a corresponding Report Document aligned which will detail what has been achieved to what was planned to be achieved by way of the agreed measure (KPI) as outlined in the respective Plan

3.28     The definition and detail of information to make up the content of the respective plans and reports is to be determined and incorporated as part of the project implementation roll out and template development for such.

3.29     So to summarise -

Plan

Report

Annual Plan

Annual Report – for Council

3 x 4 monthly updates for periods July – October and November – February and March – June and Annual Report being a compilation for the annual period – for Council

Annual Organisation Business Plan

Organisation Business Reports = 3 x 4 monthly updates for periods July – October and November – February and March – June

Annual Organisation Business Report =  being a compilation for the annual period – for ELT

Annual Team Plan

Team Reports = 3 x 4 monthly updates for periods July – October and November – February and March – June

Annual Team Report = being a compilation for the annual period – for Managers

Annual Individual Performance Plan

Annual Performance Appraisal and Performance Development

 

4       KEY TERMS DEFINITIONS - SUMMARY

4.1       Corporate Performance Framework – an umbrella term that describes the approach for the methodologies, metrics, processes and systems used to monitor and manage the business performance of the organisation.

4.2       Community Aspirations – Views from the community identifying areas of focus and aspirational values important for the future well being of the district.

4.3       Mission – the business we are in and what we are here to do.

4.4       Vision – our direction and where we want to be.

4.5       Values – the way in which we conduct our business.

4.6       Strategic Objectives/Goals – the core key areas of focus that set the business priorities to deliver on the Council direction.

4.7       Strategy – a 10+ year plan for a particular area of interest or business function.

4.8       Activities – a service provided to external customers by or on behalf of Council.

4.9       Levels of Service – describe the standard of service and what our customers get for their money.

4.9       Projects and Programmes – specific work items that are required to deliver the services the Council is committed to delivering.

4.11     10 Year Organisation Strategic Plan – combination of 10 Year Long Term Plan (external deliverables) and 10 Year Internal Business Support Plan (internal deliverables).

4.12     10 Year Long Term Plan – sets out Council’s intentions through Activity Management Plans detailing what it will do, how it will do it, how it will allocate resource, who will pay, levels of service it will provide and how it will measure the quality and effectiveness of its activities.

4.13     10 Year Internal Business Support Plan – specific to particular internal business functions with AMPs informing a number of internal support activities as enablers to supporting the delivery of activities, projects and programmes.

4.14     Annual Organisation Business Plan – specific year combination of Annual Plan and Annual Internal Organisation Business Plan.

4.15     Annual Plan – specific year outline of what it will do, how it will do it, how it will allocate resource, who will pay, levels of service it will provide and how it will measure the quality and effectiveness of its activities based on the 10 Year LTP.

4.16     Annual Internal Organisation Business Plan – specific year internal support activities to be delivered by a specific internal business function.

4.17     Annual Team Plan – combination of specific year Activity Management Plans and Individual Performance Plans.

4.18     Annual Individual Performance Plan – sets out how each individual staff member is expected to contribute and priority projects to deliver in a specific year.

4.19     Annual Report – the reporting mirror of the Annual Plan produced for Council.

4.20     Annual Organisation Business Report – the reporting mirror of the Annual Organisation Business Plan produced for ELT.

4.21     Annual Team Report – the reporting mirror of the Annual Team Plan for Managers.

4.22     Individual Performance Appraisal – the reporting mirror for the annual Individual Performance Plan.

5          SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT AND KEY POINTS FOR CONSIDERATION

5.1       A key component of this project will be to communicate and engage with staff so they understand the importance of an effective and successful CPF and how it assists in them fulfilling their roles and responsibilities more effectively and efficiently – the thread concept.

5.2       Based on the IAP2’s Public Participation Spectrum it is important to inform and involve.

5.2       It is also important to ensure the organisation as a whole uses common language and a consistent approach in the development, delivery and implementation of the project.

5.3       As with any organisation wide change – we must require accountability and performance to match = Attitude, Behaviour, Consequence.

5.4       It is important we approach this project with a future focus and illustrate the gains with it – not dwell on the losses that some may perceive because ‘we have always done it this way’ approach.

5.5       So some key messages (the promise) for consideration:

·    An effective CPF allows us all to be have the same view/ideology as the janitor at NASA - when asked what he did – ‘I am putting a man on the moon’ – it provides all of us with a sense of COMMON PURPOSE.

·    A CPF gives us that sense of purpose and means we have to be disciplined in defining our direction, vision, mission, strategic objectives so we then know what is expected to deliver and why and how.

·    The promise - Do it once do it right

·    The promise - CPF is the thread that aligns and links us as one

·    The promise - It will avoid duplication of ongoing planning and reporting requirements as part of your job.

·    The promise - Must be the single source of reference for any SDC Corporate Performance discussion.

·    The promise - For the CPF to work we all need to be involved and be its champion – to ensure consistency and we deliver as one for one.

·    The promise - Systems and software must be developed and implemented that do what are required and do what we say they will do.

·    The promise - Systems and software tools will enable and ensure the CPF to be operationalised

5.6       It will raise some questions that will need to be dealt with as part of the development and implementation – like

·    How do we ensure agreed measures are appropriate, relevant and meaningful – from a quality and quantity perspective?

·    How will the Report documents and associated outcomes reflect this so they are appropriate, relevant and meaningful?

·    How/where does the current Council Management Report and Council Report to Community Boards/CDAs fit?  Is it necessary?

·    How does the financial forecasting process align?

·    How does the ‘Project Machine’ align?

·    How do the local projects align in relation to District priorities?

·    Plus many, many, many other questions and points for consideration

5.7       In order for the CPF to have meaning as intended the organisation needs to identify the requirements and ensure its systems and processes support and not conflict with the CPF. 

5.8       It is important the Core Systems Review and Business Improvement Plan led by the CIO are in sync and vice versa with the CPF Project.

5.9       Systems and process alignment will require and involve refining and/or redeveloping of a number of individual and department planning and accompanying monitoring and reporting processes.

5.10     To achieve this alignment it is important templates are produced for the respective documents so to ensure clarity and provide consistency.

 


 

6          COMMUNICATION AND ENGAGEMENT

6.1       As mentioned it is important the CPF project is understood by staff and important to the organisation’s future focus

6.2       Direct stakeholders include

            Staff – linking the high level strategic objectives of the organisations strategies to what staff do on a day to day basis is an important step. ELT has an important role in providing the clear line of sight – consistently and regularly.

            Elected Members – a key customer of the monitoring and reporting mirror.

            Our Public – the primary function of the CPF is to align SDC’s service delivery to its community. Our public therefore are our key customer of the outcomes and results of the CPF.

6.3       The Communications and Engagement team will be required to prepare a Communication and Engagement Plan for this project.

6.4       It is important our Communication and Engagement Plan takes our staff on this collective journey.

 

 


 

7          IMPLEMENTATION AND TIMEFRAMES

7.1       There are a number of key milestones that are required to be achieved over the next 18 month period.

7.2       There is an opportunity to use the LTP 2018-2028 process to introduce some of the core thinking and approach to designing, developing and implementing the CPF for a 1 July 2018 introduction. This will need careful consideration however so not to create a sense of being ‘swamped’ with more, more, more in the planning and reporting space.

7.3       This will also be reliant on resourcing – and whether the CPF Project is undertaken by the yet to be appointed Strategy Development Manager (currently advertised) or if it will be outsourced to an external contractor to be delivered on a specific project basis.

7.4       An implementation plan and timeframes will be confirmed once we are further down the track in the appointment of the Strategy Development Manager and/or Project Contractor.

7.5       Also of significance is where and how the CPF Project fits with the delivery and implementation of the Core Systems Review and Business Improvement Plan. This will be developed in conjunction with the CIO to develop an aligned approach of these projects so the projects are in sync and inform each other along the journey of delivery and implementation.

 


Community and Policy Committee

5 April 2017

sdclogo

 

Community Governance Project and Representation Review Update

Record No:        R/17/3/6379

Author:                 Rex Capil, Group Manager Community and Futures

Approved by:       Steve Ruru, Chief Executive

 

  Decision                              Recommendation                         Information

 

  

Purpose

1        The purpose of this report is to provide an update and seek formal endorsement of the process being followed to complete the Community Governance Project and the Representation Review to be undertaken in 2017 – 2018.

Executive Summary

2        The Community Governance Project has been identified by Council as an important strategic project to assist Council in delivering its priority goals of:

·    A dynamic, effective and efficient Council

·    The Southland Way – empowering our communities

·    Growing our communities.

3        The Representation Review project is a requirement under the Local Electoral Act 2001.

4        There are three processes that form the representation review project

·    A review of the electoral system

·    A review of Maori representation

·    A review of representation arrangements.

5        The Community Governance Project and associated background work undertaken over the past 18 months and the community engagement to be undertaken over the next nine months assists with providing background information and a context for the Representation Review project.

6        The Community Conversations held across the district in 2016 and the Community Development Area Sub Committee election meetings held throughout March 2017 have also provided an opportunity for further input, feedback and discussions around these complementary projects.

7        A Community Governance Project – Elected Representative Working Group has previously been established during the last triennium. It is recommended this Working Group be reconvened as per the attached updated Terms of Reference and membership reconfirmed for the duration of the Community Governance Project and Representation Review project.

8           The other attachment to this report provides an overview of the Community Governance project approach and alignment to the Representation Review to be undertaken in 2017 – 2018.

Recommendation

That the Community and Policy Committee:

a)         Receives the report titled “Community Governance Project and Representation Review Update” dated 28 March 2017.

b)         Determines that this matter or decision be recognised as not significant in terms of Section 76 of the Local Government Act 2002.

c)         Determines that it has complied with the decision-making provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 to the extent necessary in relation to this decision; and in accordance with Section 79 of the Act determines that it does not require further information, further assessment of options or further analysis of costs and benefits or advantages and disadvantages prior to making a decision on this matter.

d)         Endorses the continued development of the Community Governance Project to assist in informing and aligning with the Representation Review Project.

 

e)         Endorses the process and timeline for the formal Representation Review Project to be delivered in 2017 – 2018.

f)          Approves the continuation of the Community Governance Project – Elected Representative Working Group as per the updated Terms of Reference March 2017.

g)         Reconfirms the membership of the Community Governance Project – Elected Representative Working Group to be;

-     Mayor Gary Tong

-     Cr Julie Keast

-     Cr Brian Dillon

-     Cr Ebel Kremer

-     Andre Bekhuis

-     Pam Yorke

-     Brian McGrath

-     Pam Naylor

 


 

Content

Background

9        The Community Governance Project has been identified by Council as an important strategic project to assist Council in delivering its priority goals of:

·    A dynamic, effective and efficient Council

·    The Southland Way – empowering our communities

·    Growing our communities.

10      The Representation Review project is a requirement under the Local Electoral Act 2001.

11      The Community Governance Project has been underway for over 18 months and provides significant background information to inform the Representation Review.

12      The overall review intent focuses on developing the community governance and representation framework to work more effectively and efficiently for Council and its communities.

13      It is important to recognise there are two projects that will complement each other – the Community Governance Review project and the Representation Review project.

14      The working premise of the community governance review is that there is a desire and commitment to make the future governance structure work best for the Southland district, by ensuring strong district decisionmaking while empowering local communities to participate in decisionmaking processes that reflect the needs and requirements of the district’s diverse communities.

15      It is acknowledged that if council is committed to local community representatives contributing to the council decisionmaking processes effectively and efficiently there is a need for change.

16      Continuing to operate under the current structures and processes will incur many of the costs and complexities of local government shared governance, but too few of the benefits for the future requirements.

17      The community governance review and representation review projects are aimed at enhancing community involvement so council governance structures are fit for the future and fit for purpose.

18      The representation review project is also aimed at ensuring there is fair and effective representation across the district.

Issues

Community Governance

19      It is important to consider community governance and how this might best be provided in the context of the need for Council to provide strong leadership during what will be a challenging period in the district’s and wider region’s development. This includes the need to consider differing levels of growth between different communities (a ‘two speed’ economy), resulting infrastructure demand and supply challenges and other community future pressures.

20      There have been recent instances where the effectiveness of the current governance structures have been questioned. These include, for example, the revised Community Board and Community Development Area Sub Committee Terms of Reference and various points raised throughout the Community Development Area Sub Committee election meetings.

21      Many of the points raised in fact relate to current governance structures operating as part of the Council governance structure and therefore being required to operate as per the Local Government Act 2002, Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987, Local Electoral Act 2001 amongst others.

22      This has highlighted the need to further develop the discussion about the most appropriate legal status and structure required for local community governance entities. An important issue to consider when identifying the most appropriate legal status and structure is related to what is the function and purpose required of community governance entities in the future.

23      Ultimately, the conversation should focus on what structures might provide the best opportunity for the community to have effective input to setting the direction for Council and the broader district. It is important that the structures that Council uses are both fit for purpose and fit for the future. Form follows function.

24      Community involvement and community input are the underlying principles Council and communities are trying to achieve in developing a community governance structure that will be fit for the future.

25      The principles of ‘participatory democracy’ support a high level of community involvement and input from those who have the skills and knowledge to assist with decision-making and not relying on involvement purely from a representative democracy perspective or being an elected representative per se.

26      This means how people participate and are involved in decisionmaking processes may be different going forward.

27      This may challenge the traditional democratic elected representative model and encourage participatory democracy to support increased involvement in local decisionmaking processes. It is on this premise that SoRDS Action Teams operated and functioned effectively.

28      A future community governance approach should be considered as a way of Council breaking down a perceived ‘council-centric approach’ to a revised approach in which it is facilitating a collaborative focus and promoting wider community input to achieve agreed community outcomes.

29      It requires consideration be given to a shift in focus of community governance organisations having a limited scope defined by narrow geographic boundaries to community governance entities with roles and responsibilities to govern wider communities of interest (much broader than a single village).

30      Improved engagement is a key focus for Council and having people participate from communities is the primary driver for effective community governance in the future.

31      For local entities to be successful in their roles in representing the community the Council’s community engagement and community leadership functions require high calibre input, advice and support to ensure community input and involvement is fostered and operates effectively.

Representation

32      Local representation is important to reflect the diversity of communities across the district and is important for local issues being progressed.

33      Again recent Community Development Area Sub Committee election meetings have raised various points requiring further development relating to representation. There is a lack of consistency in approach and no common rationale with regards to the boundaries of the community governance entities established to represent local residents and ratepayers.

34      There are large areas of the district and people within these areas who are currently not represented by any local community governance entity.

35      There are also various discrepancies in multiple boundary alignments – a common example highlighted by local community members relates to the local CDA rating boundary and Community Centre Levy boundaries.

36      While shared and complementary decisionmaking is the ideal there can be some confusion created if the roles and powers of the two sets of governors (District Council and local Community – be it Community Boards or CDAs) are not clearly identified.

37      In broad terms the Council has responsibility for policies, strategies and plans, district wide initiatives, setting rates and local entities have oversight of range of local activities and local rates recommendations.

38      It could be interpreted that the role of Councillors is unclear which creates a degree of uncertainty. It can be argued that on the one hand Councillors are expected to act in the interests of the District, while on the other hand they are there to represent the constituents of their wards – making for an inherent tension in their roles. This can also put them in conflict with local governance entities when local interests are at odds with the district ones.

39      Operational practices can also create tensions – procurement of local activities is guided by the Council (by most part through delegations to staff). Taking opportunities to leverage Council’s scale can be in conflict with tailored local solutions.

40      Also while it is important that local decisionmaking is empowered, the nature of making good district decisions is that localism will sometimes be surrendered to a district prerogative. The local entity input role can lead to tension in these cases.

Factors to Consider

Legal and Statutory Requirements

41      There are no legal or statutory requirements for the Community Governance project.

42      The Representation Review project is a requirement under the Local Electoral Act 2001.

43      There are three processes that form the representation review

·    A review of the electoral system

·    A review of Maori representation

·    A review of representation arrangements.

 

44      Specifically –

·    A review of the electoral system is required to be undertaken prior to each triennial election (sections 27 – 34 of the Local Electoral Act 2001), and this review must be undertaken by 12 September 2017,  with a mandatory public notice required by 19 September 2017;

·    A review of Maori representation (sections 19Z – 19ZH of the Local Electoral Act 2001) and is optional. Should a resolution to introduce Maori representation be made, this must be completed by 23 November 2017, with public notice required by 30 November 2017

·    A review of representation requirements is required to be undertaken at least once every six years (sections 19A – 19Y Local Electoral Act 2001) and such a review must now be undertaken by Council between 1 March 2018 and 31 August 2018.

 

Community Views

45      Community views will be sought throughout the community governance and representation reviews. A thorough and inclusive internal and external engagement process will ensure community views are considered throughout the development of the Community Governance project.

46      As part of this project a Community Governance Project – Elected Representative Working Group has previously been established during the last triennium. It is recommended this Working Group be reconvened as per the attached Terms of Reference and membership reconfirmed for the duration of the Community Governance Project and Representation Review project.

47      The Community Governance project approach and timeline is detailed in the attachment to this report. A significant amount of community engagement to inform this project is to occur between May – November 2017.

48      The key rationale and objective is for the Community Governance project to assist with providing background information and a context for the Representation Review project. The Representation Review project approach and timeline is also detailed in the attachment to this report.

49      The Representation Review process will involve identifying various scenarios (based on the legal requirements of identifying communities of interest, and fair and effective representation) for consideration and recommend an initial proposal for public comment.

50      The representation review’s initial proposal cannot be formally resolved by Council any earlier than 1 March 2018, although informal consideration and community engagement and discussion can occur earlier as part of the development phase. This is where the Community Governance Review project aligns with the Representation Review project.

51      Council will undertake consideration of public submissions to the Council’s initial Representation Review proposal to then recommend a final proposal for consultation in August 2018.

52      The submission period closes for the final proposal by 8 October 2018 for submissions to be heard and a final proposal confirmed by 19 November 2018. There is a one month appeals/objection period and if required a determination is made by the Local Government Commission by no later than 11 April 2019.

Costs and Funding

53      The costs for the Representation Review have been budgeted as part of the Council/Councillors cost centre in the 2017 – 2018 Annual Plan.

Policy Implications

54      In undertaking the Community Governance Review and Representation Review reviews there are no current policy implications to consider. 

55      There may be policy implications as a result of the implementation requirements depending on the findings and final determination.

Analysis

Options Considered

56      The two options for the Committee to consider are to (Option 1) endorse the continued development of the Community Governance Review project and alignment with the Representation Review or (Option 2) not endorse the continued development of the Community Governance Review project and only support the completion of the Representation Review project to be undertaken in 2017 – 2018.

Analysis of Options

Option 1 – Endorses the continued development of the Community Governance Review project and alignment with the Representation Review project to be undertaken in 2017 – 2018

Advantages

Disadvantages

·        Assists in fulfilling Council’s strategic objectives

·        Ensures Council fulfils its statutory and legal requirements of completing a Representation Review in 2018

·        Assists in Council and its communities addressing the significant representation issues identified with regards effective and fair representation across the district as a whole

·        Assists Council in actively engaging with its communities and involving communities and stakeholders in developing a community governance approach fit for purpose and fit for the future

·        There are no disadvantages

 


 

Option 2 – Does not endorse the continued development of the Community Governance Review project and only supports the completion of Representation Review project to be undertaken in 2017 – 2018.

 

Advantages

Disadvantages

·        Simplifies the process so it solely fulfils the statutory and legal obligations required of Council.

·        Council creates limitations on the scope of the projects and Council does not engage as fully as it can with its communities and stakeholders in looking at the issues and options available.

·        Does not allow Council and communities to consider a fit for future community governance and representation model which promotes effectiveness and fairness.

·        Limiting in considering the community governance approach solely from a representation lens and not giving due consideration to wider community governance issues and opportunities suitable and appropriate for the future.

 

Assessment of Significance

57      This project is not considered significant in relation to Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

Recommended Option

58      It is recommended the Community and Policy Committee endorse the continued development of the Community Governance Review project and alignment with the Representation Review project to be undertaken in 2017 – 2018

Next Steps

59      If the Community and Policy Committee endorse the approach as detailed then Officers will implement the Community Governance project process and engage an external contractor to initiate the Representation Review project process and undertake the work required.

 

Attachments

a         Community Governance Project - Elected Representative Working Group Terms of Reference

b         Community Governance Project - Future Approach and alignment with Representation Review    

 


Community and Policy Committee

05 April 2017

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

sdc_print

 

 

Southland District Council

 

 

 

Community Governance Project - Elected Representative Working Group

 

Terms of Reference

 

March 2017


Community and Policy Committee

05 April 2017

 

                                                                                                                                                     

1             INTRODUCTION..

2             WHAT DO WE MEAN BY COMMUNITY GOVERNANCE.. 2

3             CURRENT SITUATION – POLITICAL STRUCTURE AND REPRESENTATION.. 2

4             GUIDING PRINCIPLES.. 4

5             PROJECT SCOPE.. 5

6             ROLE OF ELECTED REPRESENTATIVE WORKING GROUP.. 5

7          METHODOLOGY AND TIMELINE.. 5

8          MEMBERSHIP……………………………………………………….………………………5

9          REMUNERATION……………………………………………….…………………………..6

10        OFFICER SUPPORT…………………………………………………..……………………6

 

 

 

 


Community and Policy Committee

05 April 2017

 

1          INTRODUCTION

1.1       There are a host of challenges and opportunities facing Council - delivering services, greater community aspirations, financial constraints, engaging communities, various consultation and communication platforms, forming new partnerships, stakeholder collaborations, multi-agency delivery, rapidly evolving technologies and changing socio economic demographics.

 

1.2       The community engagement and political structures that have evolved since 1989 have served the SDC communities well - a key question is will they serve our communities as well in the next 20 years?  The needs, aspirations and make up of our communities and associated pressures and tensions means Council needs to look at how best to serve and engage with its communities going forward.

 

1.3       It is not about what we have done previously being wrong or having failed - quite the opposite - it is about what we need to be doing looking forward building on the success of the past.

 

 

2       WHAT DO WE MEAN BY COMMUNITY GOVERNANCE

2.1       We have an opportunity to consider Southland District Council in relation to:

·                      The service delivery role it plays to broader roles concerned with strengthening community leadership and steering local and regional opportunities with a greater strategic focus

·                      Council expanding its role from a main focus related to infrastructure service delivery and regulatory compliance to a new approach concerned with community wide outcomes.

 

2.2       Community Governance can be described as a way Council is breaking down perceived organisational boundaries within communities to a revised approach in which it is facilitating a collaborative approach to achieve community outcomes. It’s a new way of Council connecting with its communities.

 

2.3       Community governance applies to collective issues that require the cooperation of multiple stakeholders and parties - eg, residents, business, voluntary not for profit sector, public sector agencies, local government.

 

2.4       It means literally governance exercised by the communities themselves, rather than for them or to them.

 

2.5       It requires a shift in thinking from a focus on governing organisations to governing communities - not necessarily defined within historical boundaries or service delivery jurisdictions.

 

2.6       It also involves a shift from a focus on a representative democracy model to a participatory democracy model. This provides a focus for members of the community being involved and making a contribution.

 

2.7       This project provides an opportunity for Council to occupy a central and leading role with local communities beyond its traditional roles.

 

 

2.8     Common elements involve:

·                      Focus on citizens and communities

·                      Multiple roles played by council

·                      Inter-agency collaboration

·                      Strategic or long term thinking

·                      Creation of a community vision and a pathway to deliver on that vision

·                      Inclusiveness

·                      Strong localist orientation

 

2.9       Community governance emphasises the concept of empowerment and identification of Council as an enabling organisation with a greater external orientation in supporting its communities.

 

3     CURRENT SITUATION - POLITICAL STRUCTURE AND REPRESENTATION

 

3.1       Council

The Southland District Council political structure consists of a mayor and 12 councillors.

Council is responsible for representing the district, developing and approving Council policy, deciding on expenditure and funding requirements, monitoring Council performance and employing the chief executive. The chief executive, in turn, employs all other staff.

 

Southland District Council was established in 1989 when New Zealand local government was reorganised. Various councils, including the Wallace County Council, Southland County Council, Stewart Island County Council and Winton Borough Council, were amalgamated to create the Southland District Council, which inherited all the assets and services, including the roading and bridges network, water and waste services in the urban areas, health and building inspections and planning.

 

Council now manages about 5,000 km of roads, 13 urban water supplies, 11 rural water supplies, 17 sewerage schemes, 34 cemeteries, community halls, 69 community housing units, 10 libraries and one mobile library service, 150 reserves and parks, and more.

 

Its role not only encompasses the management and improvement of physical assets such as roads and bridges, but also the Southland communities' social, economic, cultural and environmental interests.

 

Council is a strong advocate on behalf of Southland and continues to represent the district with central government agencies on matters such as health, community services, funding policies, education, youth and migration matters.

 

3.2       Wards

Following a representation review in 2012 Southland District Council is divided into five wards

·                      Mararoa Waimea (three councillors)

·                      Stewart Island Rakiura (one councillor)

·                      Waiau Aparima (three councillors)

·                      Winton Wallacetown (three councillors)

·                      Waihopai Toetoes (two councillors).

3.3       Community Boards, Community Development Area Subcommittees and other Subcommittees

Council actively promotes local input into decision-making through its eight community boards - Stewart Island/Rakiura, Winton, Wallacetown, Edendale-Wyndham, Otautau, Riverton/Aparima, Te Anau, Tuatapere - and its 19 community development area subcommittees - Athol, Balfour, Browns, Limehills/Centre Bush, Colac Bay, Dipton, Garston, Gorge Road, Lumsden, Manapouri, Mossburn, Nightcaps, Ohai, Orepuki, Riversdale, Thornbury, Tokanui, Waikaia, Woodlands.

 

Council also operates a CCO which is the Milford Community Trust and other subcommittees include the Stewart Island Jetties Subcommittee, the Riverton Harbour Board, and 3 Rural Water Supply Subcommittees.

 

 

 

Ward

(5)

 

Community Board

(8)

 

CDA

(19)

Mararoa Waimea - 7215

Te Anau - 3402

Athol - 85

Balfour - 135

Garston - 111

Lumsden - 483

Manapouri - 181

Mossburn - 150

Riversdale - 375

Waikaia - 102

Stewart Island Rakiura - 384

Stewart Island-Rakiura - 354

 

Waiau Aparima - 7767

 

Otautau - 1272

Riverton-Aparima - 1518

Tuatapere - 1518

 

Colac Bay - 80

Nightcaps - 294

Ohai - 296

Orepuki - 44

Thornbury - 85

Winton Wallacetown - 8874

 

Winton - 3168

Wallacetown - 933

Browns - 240

Limehills-Centre Bush - 309

Dipton - 491

Waihopai Toetoes - 5399

 

Edendale-Wyndham - 2469

Gorge Road - 545

Tokanui - 97

Woodlands - 118

 

Table 3‑1:  District Representation by Population- Current

 


 

4          GUIDING PRINCIPLES

4.1       Effective community governance reflects an ability to balance District issues as a whole and the specifics related to local communities.

 

4.2       Key guiding principles to assist in developing a direction and position relating to:

 

-     Minimum standards of service delivery across the District.

-     Consistency of representation across the District.

-     Effective and efficient service delivery.

-     Multi agency partnerships and collaboration opportunities.

-     Development of approaches that meet the District needs.

-     Understanding the wider communities of interest approach - with localism being important.

-     Being future focussed – and being appropriate for the next 20+ years.

-     Linkage to Council’s community planning approach.

-     Defining the purpose and function of community governance roles and responsibilities in relation to the Council and community requirements.

-     Understanding the principles of representative democracy versus participatory democracy.

-     Financial implications and affordability.

4.3       Community views are important to this project.

4.4       An important process in developing this project is to ensure that there is significant engagement during the project design and development stages.

4.5       This will involve ensuring there is an opportunity for public participation throughout the life of this project.

4.6       This will involve various degrees of engagement across the public participation spectrum, including but not limited to:

-           Inform - provide the public with balanced information to assist in understanding the topic, issues and options and opportunities.

-           Consult - obtain public feedback on analysis, alternatives and/or decisions.

-           Involve - work directly with key stakeholders throughout the process to ensure that community views and aspirations are consistently understood and considered.

-           Collaborate - partner with key stakeholders to discuss, as required, the development of alternatives and the identification of a preferred approach.

 

5          PROJECT SCOPE

5.1       Consideration to the community governance definition, current situation – political structure and representation, community planning, future opportunities and challenges.

 

5.2       Gain feedback from stakeholders including staff, elected representatives, residents and ratepayers, other regional and community organisations

 

5.3       Development of Community Governance Proposal Paper to be presented to Council

 

5.4       Community Governance Proposal to inform the Representation Review

 

5.6       Development of an Implementation Plan to assist with the development of the agreed approach

 

5.7       Development of standard policies and procedures to ensure that Council has a consistent approach for the agreed Community Governance structure.

 

 

6          ROLE OF ELECTED REPRESENTATIVE WORKING GROUP

6.1     The Elected Representative Working Group role is to:

-           Provide feedback and inform points for consideration, the development of issues and options and governance requirements and opportunities for Council and District communities.

-           Provide feedback on draft discussion documents produced throughout the project development.

-           Assist and support the stakeholder and community engagement process.

-           Review the final daft Community Governance Proposal document.

6.2       It is anticipated the Elected Representative Working Group will meet up to four times throughout the life of this project, dates to be confirmed but suggested timing:

Ø  May 2017.

 

Ø  November 2017.

 

Ø  March 2018.

 

Ø  August 2018.


 

7          METHODOLOGY AND TIMELINE

7.1       It is important a thorough and inclusive internal and external engagement and concept development process is undertaken. 

 

7.2       The suggested approach and is presented:

 

Report to Community and Policy Committee meeting providing an update and suggested approach moving forward

5 April 2017

Community Governance Project – Elected Representative Working Group Council Workshop

-       Project Update and introduction of key principles and key points and development of roles and responsibilities in engagement process

-       Overview of process and project requirements

-       Draft Future Approach - Community Governance Structure 2019 and beyond discussion document

-       Discussion on community governance requirements vs. representation requirements

By 5 May 2017

Community Board and CDA Chairs Meeting        

Introduction of key principles and key points

10 May 2017

Development of draft Terms of Reference and delegations for proposed Community Boards and Community Governance entities

June 2017

Stakeholder engagement

·              Community Board/CDA meetings

·              Venture Southland, Department of Conservation, Community Trust of Southland, Southland Chamber of Commerce, Southern DHB,
NZ Police, Ministry of Social Development Southern Region, Ministry of Education Southern Region, Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment et al

July - November 2017

Community engagement

·              Incorporate as a topic for part of Council’s Community Conversations programme

November 2017

Community Governance Project – Elected Representative Working Group Council Workshop

November 2017

Final Draft Community Governance Proposal completed to support the Representation Review project

December 2017

Final Draft Community Governance Proposal paper to Council for endorsement and inclusion in the Representation Review process

January 2018

Proposal available to inform the Representation Review process

February 2018

Representation Review process undertaken

March - August 2018

Development of standard policies and procedures and operational structures to ensure that Council has a consistent approach for the agreed Community Governance structure

2019

Implement the agreed Community Governance structure for the 2019 Local Government Elections

October 2019

 

 

8     Membership

8.1       The Working Group membership is to be derived from

·    Mayor

·    Councillors x 3

·    Community Board Chairs x 2

·    CDA Chairs x 2

 

9     Remuneration

9.1       Working Group members will receive travel reimbursement expenses as per existing Council policy.

 

 

10   Officer Support

10.1     Officer support for the project will be provided by the Group Manager Community and Futures and Governance and Democracy Manager or delegates. 

 


 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

sdc_print

 

 

Community Governance Project

 

 

 

 

 

Background for the Representation Review 2017 - 2018

 

 

March 2017


Community and Policy Committee

05 April 2017

 

                                                                                                                                                     

1          PROJECT INTRODUCTION.. .

2          PROCESS TO DATE................................................................................................... 3

3             CONTEXT – WHAT DO WE MEAN BY COMMUNITY GOVERNANCE.. 5

4             CURRENT SITUATION – POLITICAL GOVERNANCE STRUCTURE AND REPRESENTATION   6

5             ISSUES AND OPPORTUNITIES.. 8

6          CURRENT SNAPSHOT - COMMUNITY GOVERNANCE – 2019 AND BEYOND.. 10

7          WHAT DOES LOCAL REPRESENTATION LOOK LIKE NOW? – ‘THE MAP’ 11

8          COMMUNITY GOVERNANCE PROJECT AND TIMELINE…………………………..12

9          REPRESENTATION REVIEW PROJECT AND TIMELINE….………………………..13

 

 

 

 


Community and Policy Committee

05 April 2017

 

1          PROJECT INTRODUCTION

1.1       The Community Governance Project has been identified by Council as an important strategic project to assist Council in delivering the three priority goals of

(a)       A dynamic, effective and efficient Council

We are an innovative industry leader who is respected and trusted by our stakeholders. We provide value for money.

(b)       Growing our communities

Working with other agencies to support the region in a co-ordinated and integrated way. Southland leads the way in local government and having a co-ordinated approach to investment

(c)       The Southland Way - Empowering our communities

We help our communities help themselves and we work in partnership with them.

1.2       There are a host of challenges and opportunities facing Council – included but not limited to

-     Consistent levels of service delivery,

-     Increased community aspirations,

-     Financial constraints and affordability issues,

-     Engagement with communities,

-     Variety of consultation and communication platforms,

-     Formation of new partnerships and maintenance of existing partnerships,

-     Stakeholder collaborations,

-     Multi-agency alignment and delivery,

-     Rapidly evolving technologies and

-     Changing socio economic demographics

-     Fair and effective representation.

1.3       The community governance and political structures that have evolved since 1989 have served the Southland District communities well - a key question is will they continue to serve the communities as well in the next 20 years? 

1.4       The needs, aspirations and make up of our communities and associated changes means Council needs to consider how best to serve and engage with its communities going forward.

1.5       It is not about what Council has done previously being wrong or having failed - quite the opposite - it is about what Council needs to be doing looking forward and building on the success of the past.

1.6       The following are key guiding principles to assist in developing a direction and position for a community governance structure:

-     Minimum standards of service delivery across the District.

-     Consistency of representation across the District.

-     Effective and efficient service delivery.

-     Multi agency partnerships and collaboration opportunities.

-     Development of a structure that meets the District needs.

-     Understanding the wider communities of interest approach - with localism remaining important.

-     Being future focussed – and being appropriate for the next 20+ years.

-     Linkage to Council’s community planning approach.

-     Defining the purpose and function of community governance roles and responsibilities in relation to the Council and community requirements.

-     Understanding the principles of representative democracy versus participatory democracy.

-     Financial affordability and organisational efficiency and effectiveness.


 

2       PROCESS TO DATE

2.1       Community views are important to this project.

2.2       In developing this project it is important to ensure that there is significant engagement during the project design, development and delivery stages.

2.3       This will involve various degrees of engagement across the public participation spectrum, including but not limited to:

-           Inform - provide the public with balanced information to assist in understanding the topic, issues and options and opportunities.

-           Consult - obtain public feedback on analysis, alternatives and/or decisions.

-           Involve - work directly with key stakeholders throughout the process to ensure that community views and aspirations are consistently understood and considered.

-           Collaborate - partner with key stakeholders to discuss, as required, the development of alternatives and the identification of a preferred approach.

2.4       The Community Governance Review Project development has now reached the next stage for further engagement so to develop the concept accordingly.

2.5       In getting to this point the following steps and milestones have been achieved:

-     Discussion at Council’s Strategic Direction Workshop - January 2015

-     Discussion at Executive Leadership Team Strategic Direction Workshop - April 2015

-     Discussion at Staff Forum - June 2015

-     Community Governance Project - Issues and Options paper prepared and presented at Council Workshop - June 2015.

-     Initial engagement with Community Boards and CDAs – 25 of 28 meetings attended – August to December 2015

-     Staff Project Working Group – Feedback meeting – September 2015

-     Elected Representative Working Group – Feedback meeting – November 2015

-     Draft Future Opportunities Discussion Paper developed – January 2016

-     Discussion of Draft Future Opportunities Discussion Paper at Council Workshop – May 2016

-     Development of suggested approach with consideration to Council’s indicative position – September to December 2016

-     Discussion of Community Governance Project – Future Approach at Council Workshop – February 2017

2.6       The next stage is to deliver on an agreed implementation and engagement approach and to initiate this for the next phase of the Community Governance project and ensuring alignment with the Representation Review.

 

2.7       It should be also noted various changes have been introduced throughout 2015-2017 which support and assist the implementation and introduction of the future direction operational approach. These include – but not limited to –

            -      Introduction of the Community Leadership Cluster concept for Northern        Southland.

            -      Development and implementation of the revised Community Board and CDA Terms of Reference for the 2016-2019 triennium.

            -      Development and introduction of the revised Community Board Meeting Agenda for the 2016-2019 triennium.

            -      Development and introduction of the revised approach to the Community Board and CDA Sub Committee Terms of Reference for the 2016-2019 triennium to reflect the SDC Organisation Structure following the Organisation Redesign completed in 2015.

            -      A ‘new’ Council Committee Structure introduced in November 2016 to reflect the SDC Organisation Structure following the Organisation Redesign completed in 2015.

            -      Introduction of the Community Planning approach – involving wider communities of interest and a three staged process – including local community governance elected representatives; stakeholder and community organisation involvement; and wider whole of community involvement.

 

3       CONTEXT - WHAT DO WE MEAN BY COMMUNITY GOVERNANCE

3.1       The Southland District Council has an opportunity to consider its community governance structure in relation to:

-     The community leadership role it plays in strengthening community partnerships and steering local and regional opportunities with a greater strategic focus

-     Council expanding its role from an infrastructure service delivery provider and regulatory compliance agency to a community leadership role with a focus on collaboration with other agencies to deliver enhanced community outcomes

-     Council ensuring its representation approach reflects the three key factors of communities of interest, effective representation and fair representation.

3.2       Community Governance can be described as a way Council is breaking down a perceived ‘council-centric’ approach to service delivery within communities to a revised approach in which it is facilitating a collaborative approach to achieve community outcomes. It’s another way of Council connecting with its communities.

3.3       Community governance applies to collective issues that require the cooperation of multiple stakeholders and parties - eg, residents, business, voluntary not for profit sector, public sector agencies, local government.

3.4       It means literally governance exercised with the communities themselves, rather than for them or to them.

3.5       It requires a shift in thinking from a focus on governing organisations with a limited scope to governing wider communities of interest (much broader than a single village/township) - not necessarily defined within historical boundaries or service delivery jurisdictions.

3.6       It also involves a shift from a focus on a representative democracy model to a participatory democracy model. This provides a focus for members of the community being involved and making a contribution.

3.7       This project provides an opportunity for Council to occupy a central and leading role with local communities beyond its previous traditional roles.

3.8       Common elements involve:

-     Focus on people and communities

-     Multiple roles played by council

-     Inter-agency collaboration

-     Strategic or long term thinking

-     Creation of a community vision and a pathway to deliver on that vision

-     Inclusiveness

-     Localism

3.9       Community governance emphasises the concept of empowerment and identification of Council as an enabling organisation with a greater external orientation in supporting its communities.

4          CURRENT SITUATION - POLITICAL GOVERNANCE STRUCTURE AND REPRESENTATION

4.1       The Southland District Council political governance structure consists of a mayor and 12 councillors plus eight community Boards and 19 Community Development Area sub-committees. 

4.2       In effect there are 175 elected representatives involved in community governance for the Southland District Council.

Council

4.3       Council is responsible for representing the district, developing and approving Council policy, deciding on expenditure and funding requirements, monitoring Council performance and employing the chief executive. The chief executive, in turn, employs all other staff.

4.4       Southland District Council was established in 1989 when New Zealand local government was reorganised. Various councils, including the Wallace County Council, Southland County Council, Stewart Island County Council and Winton Borough Council, were amalgamated to create the Southland District Council, which inherited all the assets and services, including the roading and bridges network, water and waste services in the urban areas, health and building inspections and planning.

4.5       Council now manages about 5,000 km of roads, 13 urban water supplies, 11 rural water supplies, 17 sewerage schemes, 34 cemeteries, community halls, 69 community housing units, 10 libraries and one mobile library service, 150 reserves and parks, and more.

4.6       Its role not only encompasses the management and improvement of physical assets such as roads and bridges, but also the Southland communities' social, economic, cultural and environmental interests.

4.7       Council is a strong advocate on behalf of Southland and continues to represent the district with central government agencies on matters such as health, community services, funding policies, education, youth and migration matters.

            Wards

4.8       Following a representation review in 2012 Southland District Council is divided into five wards

·                      Mararoa Waimea (three councillors)

·                      Stewart Island Rakiura (one councillor)

·                      Waiau Aparima (three councillors)

·                      Winton Wallacetown (three councillors)

·                      Waihopai Toetoes (two councillors).

 

              

Community Boards, Community Development Area Subcommittees and other Subcommittees

4.9       Council actively promotes local input into decision-making through its eight community boards - Stewart Island/Rakiura, Winton, Wallacetown, Edendale-Wyndham, Otautau, Riverton/Aparima, Te Anau, Tuatapere - and its 19 community development area subcommittees - Athol, Balfour, Browns, Limehills/Centre Bush, Colac Bay, Dipton, Garston, Gorge Road, Lumsden, Manapouri, Mossburn, Nightcaps, Ohai, Orepuki, Riversdale, Thornbury, Tokanui, Waikaia, Woodlands.

 

4.10     Council also operates a CCO which is the Milford Community Trust and other subcommittees include the Stewart Island Jetties Subcommittee, the Riverton Harbour Board, and 3 Rural Water Supply Subcommittees.

 

 

Ward

(5)

 

Community Board

(8)

 

CDA

(19)

Mararoa Waimea - 7215

Te Anau - 3402

Athol - 85

Balfour - 135

Garston - 111

Lumsden - 483

Manapouri - 181

Mossburn - 150

Riversdale - 375

Waikaia - 102

Stewart Island Rakiura - 384

Stewart Island-Rakiura - 354

 

Waiau Aparima - 7767

 

Otautau - 1272

Riverton-Aparima - 1518

Tuatapere - 1518

 

Colac Bay - 80

Nightcaps - 294

Ohai - 296

Orepuki - 44

Thornbury - 85

Winton Wallacetown - 8874

 

Winton - 3168

Wallacetown - 933

Browns - 240

Limehills-Centre Bush - 309

Dipton - 491

Waihopai Toetoes - 5399

 

Edendale-Wyndham - 2469

Gorge Road - 545

Tokanui - 97

Woodlands - 118

 

Table 4‑1:  District Representation by Population - Current

 


 

5          ISSUES AND OPPORTUNITIES

5.1       During 2015 - 2017 there have been numerous opportunities provided to introduce the Community Governance project and receive feedback – from the Council, Community Boards, Community Development Area subcommittees, Elected Representative and Staff Working Groups, Community Conversations, CDA Election Meetings and various media articles.

5.2       The feedback identified various issues and opportunities which support the rationale for this review and identified there is a clear appetite for change.

5.3       The issues identified have provided a direction and focus to support the opportunities able to be achieved in developing a structure which best suits the Southland District in the future.

5.4       The following is a summation of the consistent issues and opportunities identified throughout the consultation phase.

5.5       Issues and opportunities identified include ensuring the

·                      Structure should reflect wider communities of interest and geographic areas

·                      Structure should maintain the opportunity for local input and liaison.

·                      Community governance entities should have clearly defined roles and responsibilities.

·                      Meeting agendas and order papers should be consistent and formatted so to provide a framework to include all Council related activities plus wider community (external to Council) related activities.

·                      Structure should assist Council to align and link local matters to district and regional initiatives in a seamless and transparent way.

·                      Structure assists Council in providing some standardisation of service delivery across the District while supporting local communities.

·                      Management of existing financial reserves is considered, dealt with appropriately and transparent.

·                      Rating requirements for the community governance entities reflect the wider communities of interest and the local township/village requirements.

·                      Ability to strike a local rate is maintained.

·                      Community governance model fosters and encourages participation and local community leadership (participatory democracy) while at the same time supports geographic representation (representative democracy).

·                      Promotion of a district wide approach for Community Boards to support consistency of service delivery and levels of service.

·                      Opportunity for strategic positioning and alignment in the district to flow on to support local community development.

 

5.6       There is much discussion and work being undertaken within the sector on how local authorities can best adapt and adopt to the changing environments in which they operate.

5.7       These discussions are generally based around why change is needed and how to manage change so the change is not seen as a loss by the communities but is actually a gain for them.

5.8       There is also the view that it is best to be introduce the required change ourselves rather than have it introduced to us or for us.

5.9       It is in this context the following are included to support this approach and guide further thinking around the issues and opportunities

5.10     The demanding citizen – PWC Article July 2013

Our view is that tomorrow’s public body will need to act quite differently from today’s due to seismic shifts that are occurring in society – as set out in the table below

From…

To…

Citizen under control

Citizen in control

Governing for citizens

Governing with citizens

Organisation silos

Organisation networks

Government as service provider

Government as service facilitator/broker/commissioner

Government owning inputs and processes

Governments and communities owning outcomes

Measuring outputs

Measuring outcomes

Forced collaboration based on enforcement

Mutual collaboration based on trust

Trust in the ‘strong leader’

Trust in each other, the ‘servant leader’

 


 

6          CURRENT SNAPSHOT - COMMUNITY GOVERNANCE – 2019 AND BEYOND


7          WHAT DOES LOCAL REPRESENTATION LOOK LIKE NOW?

‘THE MAP’

8          COMMUNITY GOVERNANCE PROJECT AND TIMELINE

8.1       The overall direction and approach relies on a political will and a political desire to make change, be serious about making change and advance this opportunity with a future focus.

8.2       It is important a thorough and inclusive internal and external engagement process continues. 

8.3       The updated approach and timeline follows:

Report to Community and Policy Committee meeting providing an update and suggested approach moving forward

5 April 2017

Community Governance Project – Elected Representative Working Group Council Workshop

-       Project Update and introduction of key principles and key points and development of roles and responsibilities in engagement process

-       Overview of process and project requirements

-       Draft Future Approach - Community Governance Structure 2019 and beyond discussion document

-       Discussion on community governance requirements vs. representation requirements

By 5 May 2017

Community Board and CDA Chairs Meeting        

Introduction of key principles and key points

10 May 2017

Development of draft Terms of Reference and delegations for proposed Community Boards and Community Governance entities

June 2017

Stakeholder engagement

·              Community Board/CDA meetings

·              Venture Southland, Department of Conservation, Community Trust of Southland, Southland Chamber of Commerce, Southern DHB,
NZ Police, Ministry of Social Development Southern Region, Ministry of Education Southern Region, Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment et al

July - November 2017

Community engagement

·              Incorporate as a topic for part of Council’s Community Conversations programme

November 2017

Community Governance Project – Elected Representative Working Group Workshop

November 2017

Final Draft Community Governance Proposal completed to support the Representation Review project

December 2017

Final Draft Community Governance Proposal paper to Council for endorsement and inclusion in the Representation Review process

January 2018

Proposal available to inform the Representation Review process

February 2018

Representation Review process undertaken

March - August 2018

Development of standard policies and procedures and operational structures to ensure that Council has a consistent approach for the agreed Community Governance structure

2019

Implement the agreed Community Governance structure for the 2019 Local Government Elections

October 2019

 

 


 

9          REPRESENTATION REVIEW PROJECT AND TIMELINE

9.1       The Community Governance Project and associated background work and community engagement undertaken over the past 18 months assists with providing background information and a context for the Representation Review project.

9.2       The Representation Review project is a requirement under the Local Electoral Act 2001.

9.3       There are three processes that form the representation review project

(i)    a review of the electoral system

(ii)   a review of Maori representation

iii)    a review of representation arrangements.

9.4     Specifically –

(i)         a review of the electoral system is required to be undertaken prior to each triennial election (sections 27 – 34 of the Local Electoral Act 2001), and this review must be undertaken by 12 September 2017,  with a mandatory public notice required by 19 September 2017;

(ii)        a review of Maori representation (sections 19Z – 19ZH of the Local Electoral Act 2001) and is optional. Should a resolution to introduce Maori representation be made, this must be completed by 23 November 2017, with public notice required by 30 November 2017

(iii)       a review of representation requirements is required to be undertaken at least once every six years (sections 19A – 19Y Local Electoral Act 2001) and such a review must now be undertaken by Council between 1 March 2018 and 31 August 2018.

9.5       Council will engage an external contractor to assist with and facilitate the undertaking of the representation review for Council. The process will be initiated in April 2017 and is expected to be completed over an 18 month time period to meet statutory requirements.

9.6       The following table details the legislative requirements and review timeline to be undertaken.