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Notice is hereby given that a Meeting of the Community and Policy Committee will be held on:

 

Date:                      

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Wednesday, 17 May 2017

11am

Council Chambers

15 Forth Street, Invercargill

 

Community and Policy Committee Agenda

 

OPEN

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Julie Keast

 

 

Mayor Gary Tong

 

Councillors

Stuart Baird

 

 

Brian Dillon

 

 

John Douglas

 

 

Paul Duffy

 

 

Bruce Ford

 

 

Darren Frazer

 

 

George Harpur

 

 

Ebel Kremer

 

 

Gavin Macpherson

 

 

Neil Paterson

 

 

Nick Perham

 

 

IN ATTENDANCE

 

Group Manager - Community and Futures

Rex Capil

 

Committee Advisor

Alyson Hamilton

 

 

 

 

Contact Telephone: 0800 732 732

Postal Address: PO Box 903, Invercargill 9840

Email: emailsdc@southlanddc.govt.nz

Website: www.southlanddc.govt.nz

 

Full agendas are available on Council’s Website

www.southlanddc.govt.nz

 

 

 


Terms of Reference – Community and Policy Committee

 

The Community and Policy Committee is responsible for:

·                 Assessing and providing advice to Council on:

-      Key strategic issues affecting the District and Council;

-      Community development issues affecting the District and Council;

-      The service needs of the District’s communities and how these needs might best be met;

-      Resource allocation and prioritisation processes and decisions.

·                 Developing and recommending strategies, plans and policies to the Council that advance the Council’s vision and goals, and comply with the purpose of the Local Government Act.

·                 Monitoring the implementation and effectiveness of strategies, plans and policies.

·                 Developing and approving submissions to government, local authorities and other organisations.

·                 Advocating Council’s position on particular policy issues to other organisations, as appropriate.

·                 Considering recommendations from Council’s Subcommittees and make decisions where it has authority from Council to do so, or recommendations to Council where a Council decision is required.

 

The Community and Policy Committee is also responsible for community partnerships and engagement.  This includes:

·                 Monitoring the progress, implementation and effectiveness work undertaken by Venture Southland in line with the Venture Southland Heads of Agreement and specific Service Level Agreement between Southland District Council and Venture Southland.

·                 Allocations of grants, loans, scholarships and bursaries in accordance with Southland District Council policy. 

·                 International relations. 

·                 Developing and overseeing the implementation of Council’s community engagement and consultation policies and processes. 

 

The Community and Policy Committee shall have the following delegated powers and be accountable to Council for the exercising of these powers:

 

(a)       Approving all submissions made by Southland District Council to other councils, central government and other bodies.

 

(b)       To approve scholarships, bursaries, grants and loans within Council policy and annual budgets. 

 

(c)       Monitor the performance of Venture Southland in the delivery against its Business Plan and Council’s letter of expectation. 

 

The Community and Policy Committee has authority to consider and make recommendations to Council regarding strategies, policies and plans.


Community and Policy Committee

17 May 2017

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

ITEM                                                                                                                                   PAGE

Procedural

1          Apologies                                                                                                                        7

2          Leave of absence                                                                                                           7

3          Conflict of Interest                                                                                                         7

4          Public Forum                                                                                                                  7

5          Extraordinary/Urgent Items                                                                                          7

6          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               7

Reports for Resolution

7.1       Community Initiatives Fund Financial Report and Application Summary           15

7.2       District Heritage Fund Financial Report and Application Summary                     27

7.3       SportNZ Rural Travel Fund Financial Report and Application Summary - May 2017                                                                                                                                       31

7.4       Additional Community Initiatives Fund Application for Consideration                37

Reports for Recommendation

8.1       Use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles Policy                                                                 39

8.2       Draft Significance and Engagement Policy                                                              57

Reports

9.1       Southland District Council Creative New Zealand Creative Communities Scheme Grants Awarded May 2017                                                                                         75

9.2       Financial and Reserve Contribution Fund Financial Report to 31 March 2017   77

9.3       Community Futures 2040                                                                                            79

9.4       Community Organisation and Volunteer Futures Sector Research                     93

9.5       Venture Southland Quarterly Report March 2017                                                 193   

Public Excluded

Procedural motion to exclude the public                                                                            233

C10.1  Milford Opportunities Update                                                                                  233  


 

1          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

2          Leave of absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

3          Conflict of Interest

 

Committee Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision-making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Public Forum

Notification to speak is required by 5pm at least two days before the meeting. Further information is available on www.southlanddc.govt.nz or phoning 0800 732 732.

 

5          Extraordinary/Urgent Items

To consider, and if thought fit, to pass a resolution to permit the committee to consider any further items which do not appear on the Agenda of this meeting and/or the meeting to be held with the public excluded.

Such resolution is required to be made pursuant to Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987, and the Chairperson must advise:

(i)         the reason why the item was not on the Agenda, and

(ii)        the reason why the discussion of this item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

(a)       that item may be discussed at that meeting if-

(i)         that item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

(b)       no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

6          Confirmation of Minutes

6.1       Meeting minutes of Community and Policy Committee, 05 April 2017


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Community and Policy Committee

 

OPEN MINUTES

 

 

Minutes of a meeting of Community and Policy Committee held in the Council Chambers, 15 Forth Street, Invercargill on Wednesday, 5 April 2017 at 11.30am.

 

present

 

Chairperson

Julie Keast

 

Mayor

Gary Tong

 

Councillors

Brian Dillon

 

 

John Douglas

 

 

Paul Duffy

 

 

Bruce Ford

 

 

Darren Frazer

 

 

George Harpur

 

 

Gavin Macpherson

 

 

Nick Perham

 

 

IN ATTENDANCE

 

Chief Executive (Steve Ruru) Group Manager, Community and Futures (Rex Capil), Group Manager, Services and Assets (Ian Marshall), Communications Manager (Louise Pagan), Governance and Democracy Manager, (Clare Sullivan) and Committee Advisor (Alyson Hamilton).

 

 

 

 

 


1          Apologies

 

Moved Cr Macpherson, seconded Cr Duffy and resolved:

That the Community and Policy Committee accept the apologies from Councillor’s Baird, Kremer and Paterson.

 

2          Leave of absence

 

There were no requests for leave of absence.

 

3          Conflict of Interest

 

There were no conflicts of interest declared.

 

4          Public Forum

 

There was no public forum.

 

5          Extraordinary/Urgent Items

 

There were no Extraordinary/Urgent items.

 

6          Confirmation of Minutes

 

Resolution

Moved Cr Dillon, seconded Cr Douglas  and resolved:

That the minutes of Community and Policy Committee meeting held on 15 March 2017 be confirmed as a true and correct record subject to an amendment to Item 8.3 Venture Southland Quarterly Report relating to …”the Singapore Airforce Training proposal is still being considered as well as a proposal for Singapore Airforce training to be based in Ohakea…”.

 

Reports  for Resolution

 

7.1

Venture Southland Draft Business Plan 2017 - 2018

Record No:         R/17/3/6231

 

Rex Capil (Group Manager, Community and Futures) was in attendance and introduced the report.

Paul Casson (Chief Executive, Venture Southland), Steve Canny (Group Manager, Business and Strategic Projects) and Bobbi Brown (Group Manager, Events Tourism and Community) updated the Committee on the draft Venture Southland business plan 2017-2018 seeking Community and Policy Committee consideration and feedback on behalf of Council on the draft Business Plan.

Mr Casson informed each year Venture Southland develops a Business Plan detailing its proposed activities, key performance indicators and budget.

 

Mr Casson explained the Business Plan is required to be developed in accordance with the Venture Southland Agreement 2014- 2017 and as part of the agreed process Council provided its letter of expectation specifically relating to Community Development priority projects to Venture Southland.

Mr Casson further explained Council also contributed to a combined letter of expectation by owner councils regarding regional priority projects provided to Venture Southland.

 

Members noted Venture Southland is a Joint Committee of the Invercargill City Council, Gore District Council and Southland District Council, as such it is not a legal entity in its own right but rather its performance and deliverables are undertaken in the name of its “shareholder or owner” Councils.

 

The Committee was advised the proposed Southland District Council funding level of $1.742 million is consistent with the 2015-2025 Long Term Plan and remains at the same level as 2016-2017.

 

Mr Casson advised that on request of the owner Councils, Venture Southland has produced a Business Plan detailing the Work Areas and identifying for each the project description, work programme, timeframe, funding/resource allocation and the aim/measure to be achieved.

 

Mr Canny updated the Committee on Southland Youth Futures which is continuing to work with employers to develop pathways for youth employment, supporting existing programmes and developing new programmes as required.

 

Mr Canny responded to queries from the committee relating to Southern New Zealand Cruise Strategy, forestry investigation, business efficiency gains through the Lean Management Programme and clarification on productivity per employee with statistics provided through the gross domestic product (GDP).

 

Following discussion on the options presented to the Committee it was agreed to endorse the Venture Southland draft Business Plan 2017-2018 as presented.

 

 

 

Resolution

Moved Cr Ford, seconded Cr Douglas  and resolved:

That the Community and Policy Committee:

a)         Receives the report titled “Venture Southland Draft Business Plan 2017 - 2018” dated 28 March 2017.

b)         Determines that this matter or decision be recognised as not significant in terms of Section 76 of the Local Government Act 2002.

c)         Determines that it has complied with the decision-making provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 to the extent necessary in relation to this decision; and in accordance with Section 79 of the Act determines that it does not require further information, further assessment of options or further analysis of costs and benefits or advantages and disadvantages prior to making a decision on this matter.

d)         Endorse the Venture Southland draft Business Plan 2017 – 2018 as presented.

 


 

Reports

 

8.1

Corporate Performance Framework Project

Record No:         R/17/3/6324

 

Rex Capil (Group Manager, Community and Futures) presented the report.

 

Mr Capil advised Corporate Performance Framework Project has been identified as an important strategic project to assist Council in delivering its strategic objective of being a dynamic, effective and efficient Council.

 

Mr Capil explained Strategy and Policy staff have undertaken a considerable amount of background work over the past 18 months in defining the project and developing the project scope.

 

The Committee noted this has involved giving due consideration to how Council operates now, how its corporate performance work is undertaken, including a stocktake of systems and processes that exist and a correspondence gap analysis.

 

Mr Capil advised this work has culminated in the development of the Corporate Performance Framework Project Discussion Document - March 2017 attached to this report, which has been considered by the Executive leadership Team and is now being presented to the Community and Policy Committee for its consideration, feedback and endorsement.

 

Mr Capil informed following consideration of the Community and Policy Committee it is intended to progress the implementation of the new Framework over an extended period of time.

 

Mr Capil added there is a significant amount of work to be undertaken over the next 18 months to develop the next stages of this project and implement an effective Corporate Performance framework for the organisation.

 

The Committee was advised an implementation plan and timeframes will be the next stage of the project development and Mr Capil explained due to human resource constraints in the Strategy and Policy team it is intended to engage an external contractor to deliver the implementation plan on a specific project basis.

 

Mr Capil highlighted key points within the discussion document which included the corporate performance framework, communication, engagement, implementation and timeframes that are required to be achieved over the next 18-month period.

 

Mayor Tong expressed appreciation at the work undertaken by staff on this project to date.

 

 

Resolution

Moved Mayor Tong, seconded Cr Perham  and resolved:

That the Community and Policy Committee:

a)         Receives the report titled “Corporate Performance Framework Project” dated 27 March 2017.

 

 

b)         Endorses the Southland District Council Corporate Performance Framework Discussion Document – March 2017.

 

c)         Supports the further development required to progress the implementation of the new Framework in 2017 – 2018.

 

8.2

Community Governance Project and Representation Review Update

Record No:         R/17/3/6379

 

Rex Capil (Group Manager, Community and Futures) presented the report.

 

Mr Capil advised the purpose of this report is to provide an update and seek formal endorsement of the process being followed to complete the Community Governance Project and the Representation Review to be undertaken in 2017 – 2018.

 

Mr Capil informed the Community Governance Project has been identified by Council as an important strategic project to assist Council in delivering its priority goals of:

 

§  A dynamic, effective and efficient Council

§  The Southland Way – empowering our communities

§  Growing our communities

 

3        The Committee noted the Representation Review project is a requirement under the Local Electoral Act 2001.

 

Mr Capil advised there are three processes that form the representation review project. These being;

 

§  A review of the electoral system

§  A review of Maori representation

§  A review of representation arrangements

 

Mr Capil advised the Community Governance Project and associated background work undertaken over the past 18 months and the community engagement to be undertaken over the next nine months assists with providing background information and a context for the Representation Review project.

 

Mr Capil explained the Community Conversations held across the district in 2016 and the Community Development Area Subcommittee election meetings held throughout March 2017 have also provided an opportunity for further input, feedback and discussions around these complementary projects.

 

Mr Capil advised the Community Governance Project – Elected Representative Working Group was previously established during the last triennium. Mr Capil suggested this Working Group be reconvened as per the updated Terms of Reference and membership reconfirmed for the duration of the Community Governance Project and Representation Review project.

 

The Committee noted an overview of the Community Governance project approach and alignment to the Representation Review to be undertaken in 2017 – 2018 is provided for members information.

 

 

 

 

Resolution

Moved Cr Douglas, seconded Cr Frazer  and resolved:

That the Community and Policy Committee:

a)         Receives the report titled “Community Governance Project and Representation Review Update” dated 28 March 2017.

b)         Determines that this matter or decision be recognised as not significant in terms of Section 76 of the Local Government Act 2002.

c)         Determines that it has complied with the decision-making provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 to the extent necessary in relation to this decision; and in accordance with Section 79 of the Act determines that it does not require further information, further assessment of options or further analysis of costs and benefits or advantages and disadvantages prior to making a decision on this matter.

d)         Endorses the continued development of the Community Governance Project to assist in informing and aligning with the Representation Review Project.

 

e)         Endorses the process and timeline for the formal Representation Review Project to be delivered in 2017 – 2018.

f)          Approves the continuation of the Community Governance Project – Elected Representative Working Group as per the updated Terms of Reference March 2017.

g)         Reconfirms the membership of the Community Governance Project – Elected Representative Working Group to be;

§  Mayor Gary Tong

§  Cr Julie Keast

§  Cr Brian Dillon

§  Cr Ebel Kremer

§  Andre Bekhuis

§  Pam Yorke

§  Brian McGrath

§  Pam Naylor

 

 

The meeting concluded at 11.40am              CONFIRMED AS A TRUE AND CORRECT RECORD AT A MEETING OF THE Community and Policy Committee HELD ON WEDNESDAY, 5 APRIL 2017.

 

 

 

DATE:...................................................................

 

 

 

CHAIRPERSON:...................................................

 


Community and Policy Committee

17 May 2017

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Community Initiatives Fund Financial Report and Application Summary

Record No:        R/17/5/9140

Author:                 Bronwyn Affleck, Administration Manager

Approved by:       Rex Capil, Group Manager Community and Futures

 

  Decision                              Recommendation                         Information

 

  

Community Initiatives Fund financial report and summary of applications received in the funding round closing 31 March 2017.

1        Grant recommendations provided for review and approval.

 

Purpose

2        The Southland District Council Community Initiatives is available for the development of:

Community facilities or amenities including: community centres / halls/ War Memorials, local reserves and picnic areas, playgrounds, walkways and tracks, sports fields, swimming pools, changing room facilities. Sport and recreational opportunities. Community programmes, activities or events.

3        $100,000 available for distribution per annum.

 

Recommendation

That the Community and Policy Committee:

a)         Receives the report titled “Community Initiatives Fund Financial Report and Application Summary” dated 11 May 2017.

 

b)         Approve the allocation of funds for the Community Initiatives Fund as per the attached schedule including any amendments made during the review.

 

 

Attachments

a         Community Initiatives Fund Financial Report and Summary of Applications received in the Funding Round closing 31 March 2017    

 


Community and Policy Committee

17 May 2017

 

Community Initiatives Fund Financial Report

 

 

 

 


Community Initiatives Fund

 

Application Summaries

 

Funding Available $55,144                                            Total of Recommendation $45,256

 

1

Alzheimers Society Southland Inc

 

Request assistance towards the purchase of a second hand van.  The Education Advisor has developed a new Cognitive Stimulation Therapy programme which required working in group settings with clients.  For the programme to work effectively it is important to have the ability to transport clients, their family/whanau and carers to activities in a variety of locations.

 

Total Project Cost         $45,000

 

 

 

Amount Requested       $10,000

Recommendation

Nil

 

2

Dipton Community Baths Trust

 

Request assistance towards costs associated with replacing the roof on the Dipton Community Baths.

 

Total Project Cost         $44,000

 

 

 

Amount Requested       $3,000

Recommendation

$3,000

 

3

Edendale Scouts

 

Request assistance towards costs associated with repairing the Den's leaking roof and replacing old and dangerous heaters with heat pumps.  The kitchen is in bad repair and there is little storage for tents, kayaks and other gear.   Once renovated the facility will be available to the community for functions, meetings etc.

 

Total Project Cost         $18,402

 

 

 

Amount Requested       $2,000

Recommendation

$2,000

 

4

Friends of Lumsden School

 

Request assistance towards the purchase of octagonal picnic tables.  As well as being used by students for lunch breaks they will be used for family events, at weekends and throughout the holidays.

 

Total Project Cost         $2,180

 

 

 

Amount Requested       $1,000

Recommendation

$750

 


5

Gorge Road Swimming Pool

 

Request assistance towards the purchase of a new roller for the pool cover.

 

Total Project Cost         $2,759

 

 

 

Amount Requested       $2,000

Recommendation

$1,000

 


 

6

Lions Club of Lumsden

 

Request assistance towards costs associated with erecting display noticeboards at the three entrances to the Lumsden township to inform community happenings, safety warnings, street/road closures, social/sporting events etc.  This is a Lions Centennial project.

 

Total Project Cost         $4,793

 

 

 

Amount Requested       $2,793

Recommendation

$1,200

 

Request Lions Club to liaise with the Lumsden Community Board

 

7

Makarewa Squash Club

 

Request assistance towards costs associated with having an architect draw up concepts/designs for a new building and including two additional squash courts.  The drawings once approved will be used for costs estimates/quotes and funding applications.

 

Total Project Cost         $6,030

 

 

 

Amount Requested       $3,015

Recommendation

$1,500

 

8

Milford Community Trust

 

Request assistance towards the purchase of a tennis net, basketball tower and associated freight costs.  The Milford Community Trust recently built a new sports court at Milford School for the use of the 250+ residents.  This is the only recreational area.  It is intended to develop a picnic and provide outdoor exercise equipment as funding allows.

 

Total Project Cost         $2,357

 

 

 

Amount Requested       $2,357

Recommendation

$1,000

 

9

Mossburn School

 

Request assistance towards costs associated with re-roofing the old pool building to ensure it is weather proof.  It is intended to transform this space into an indoor sports area where indoor cricket, soccer, table tennis, gymnastics etc can be held.  This multi-use area will be utilised by the school and will be available to community groups outside school hours at no cost.    

 

Total Project Cost         $46,000

 

 

 

Amount Requested       $5,000

Recommendation

$3,000

 


10

New Zealand Red Cross - Invercargill Branch

 

Request assistance towards costs associated with running the New Zealand Red Cross Young Humanitarians programme within the Southland District.   The programme provides an opportunity for young people to experience hands on volunteering in their communities, learn about low-level emergency preparedness, develop positive relationships with their peers and others.

 

Total Project Cost         $1,300

 

 

 

Amount Requested       $1,300

Recommendation

Nil

 


 

11

Northern Southland Amateur Swimming Club

 

Request assistance towards costs associated with creating a secure storage area for platforms, lane ropes and general swimming gear.

 

Total Project Cost         $3,000

 

 

 

Amount Requested       $1,000

Recommendation

$1,000

 

12

Northern Southland Community Pool Trust

 

Request assistance towards the purchase of a new thermal blanket and reel system.

 

Total Project Cost         $35,470

 

 

 

Amount Requested       $2,500

Recommendation

$2,500

 

13

Northern Southland Community Resource Centre Charitable Trust

 

Request assistance towards costs associated with bringing a guest speaker to the Northern Southland area and also towards the purchase of a truck load of compost for the raised vegetable beds.

 

Total Project Cost         $1,400

 

 

 

Amount Requested       $1,000

Recommendation

$750

 

14

Oreti Plains Community Hall

 

Request assistance towards costs associated with replacing the hall's tables and chairs.

 

Total Project Cost         $4,463

 

 

 

Amount Requested       $3,963

Recommendation

$1,200

 

15

Otautau Community Board

 

Request assistance towards costs associated with relocating/repurposing the church bell from the Otautau Presbyterian Church, which closed recently, to the Otautau Cemetery.

 

Total Project Cost         $11,188

 

 

 

Amount Requested       $1,500

Recommendation

$1,500

 


16

Otautau Museum Trust

 

Request assistance towards roof repairs to the Museum building, formerly the Courthouse.  The Museum is open every Sunday afternoon and also for special functions and by request.  The Museum has an extensive collection of photographs and artefacts from the area.

 

Total Project Cost         $19,602

 

 

 

Amount Requested       $2,000

Recommendation

$2,000

 

17

Otautau Skate Park Committee

 

Request assistance towards costs associated with a skate park development.  It is proposed that the skate park will be adjacent to the BMX track on the main road in Otautau.  This is a well-used recreational area.

 

Total Project Cost         $20,334

 

 

 

Amount Requested       $2,000

Recommendation

$2,000

18

Rakiura Heritage Trust

 

Request assistance towards costs associated with holding a Titi Exhibition at Labour Weekend 2017.  The Exhibition will focus on the cultural importance of the mutton-birding tradition to the Stewart Island Maori.

 

Total Project Cost         $1,500

 

 

 

Amount Requested       $850

Recommendation

$850

 

19

Riverton Baths Society

 

Request assistance towards costs associated with removing and replacing the old ventilation system from two changing rooms and the installation of an efficient and economical to run system.

 

Total Project Cost         $3,260

 

 

 

Amount Requested       $3,000

Recommendation

$1,200

 

20

Riverton/Aparima Community Board

(a)

Request assistance towards the re-print of the Riverton Heritage brochure.  The brochure is a popular resource for tourists and visitors to the region, giving them a comprehensive guide to the heritage sites in the area.  Content will be reviewed prior to re-print to ensure all information is accurate and up to date.

 

Total Project Cost         $1,706

 

 

 

Amount Requested       $706

Recommendation

$706

 

 

(b)

Request assistance towards costs associated with the purchase and installation of a basketball and netball hoops at the Taramea Bay recreation area.

 

Total Project Cost         $2,274

 

 

 

Amount Requested       $1,000

Recommendation

$750

 

 

 

 

21

Riverton Heritage & Tourist Centre Trust

 

Request assistance towards costs associated with replacing three large interpretation/information panels which are situated outside Te Hikoi to provide information and encourage visitors to go through the Museum.

 

Total Project Cost         $1,800

 

 

 

Amount Requested       $1,000

Recommendation

$600

 

22

South Coast Environment Society

(a)

Request assistance towards coordinator costs to complete resource kits and educational brochures to enable the programme to be launched Southland wide.

 

Total Project Cost         $2,500

 

 

 

Amount Requested       $1,500

Recommendation

Committee to Discuss


 

(b)

Request assistance towards tutor travel and material costs to ensure all Southlanders can access the courses on a range of self-sufficiency and self-reliance models which will save them money and be empowering to both individuals and communities.

 

Total Project Cost         $3,500

 

 

 

Amount Requested       $2,000

Recommendation

Committee to Discuss

 

23

Southern Reap Incorporated

 

Request assistance towards tutor and crèche costs associated with providing the NCEA4U courses for parents and caregivers.

Further information to be provided at meeting.

 

Total Project Cost         $30,355

 

 

 

Amount Requested       $9,600

Recommendation

Committee to Discuss

 

24

Southland District Council - Stewart Island Library

 

Request assistance towards costs associated with applying UV filter film to protect books and furnishings.

 

Total Project Cost         $1,600

 

 

 

Amount Requested       $1,600

Recommendation

$800

 

25

Southland Heritage & Building Preservation Trust

 

Request assistance towards costs associated with the development of an interpretation concept plan for Kohi Kohi Cottage (Riverton).    The Cottage is in the final stages of restoration and the next part of the project is establishing the interpretation content that will go on-site to tell its story.

 

Total Project Cost         $5,000

 

 

 

Amount Requested       $1,000

Recommendation

$1,000

 

 

 

 

26

Stewart Island Community Centre

 

Request assistance towards costs associated with moving the boiler from the middle of the building to a safer purpose built extension on the outside of the building.  The current waste oil burner is in good condition and can be satisfactorily re-used with a new 120kw hydraulic boiler and wall mounted fan coiled radiator.  The current hot air circulating heating system is inefficient and needs to be replaced urgently before there is further deterioration in the building from retained moisture.

 

Total Project Cost         $22,240

 

 

 

Amount Requested       $12,240

Recommendation

$2,500

 

27

Taki Rua Productions Society Inc

 

Request assistance towards venue costs associated with the Invercargill performance of Tiki Taane Mahuta at the Civic Theatre in June 2017.

 

Total Project Cost         $9,160

 

 

 

Amount Requested       $4,000

Recommendation

Nil

 

 

28

Te Anau Lions

 

Request assistance towards costs associated with building an information kiosk and the information panels for the Linwood Park Cemetery in Te Anau.

 

Total Project Cost         $6,385

 

 

 

Amount Requested       $2,000

Recommendation

$1,500

 

29

The Parenting Place - Attitude Youth Division

 

Request assistance towards costs associated with delivering a programme that encourages mental and emotional resilience and to help prevent youth suicide, teen pregnancy, drug and alcohol abuse and a low sense of worth.  The quality programme challenges students to think by giving them the info5mation they needs to make well-informed decisions about their futures.  Attitude presenters will be in Southland in August 2017 and April 2018 and will deliver 22 presentations to over 1,000 students.  Presentation to be held: Aparima x2, Central Southland College x4, Fiordland College x 3, Menzies College x 4, Northern Southland College x3, Waiau Area School x3, Winton Primary School x1, Halfmoon Bay School x2.

 

Total Project Cost         $30,110

 

 

 

Amount Requested       $2,296

Recommendation

$2,000

 

30

Thornbury Vintage Tractor & Implement Club Inc

 

Request assistance towards costs associated with hosting the New Zealand National Ploughing Championships in Thornbury in April 2018.  Costs include: Traffic Management plans, toilet and shower facilities, security, First Aid, sound system, marquee, advertising and promotion.

 

Total Project Cost         $20,450

 

 

 

Amount Requested       $2,500

Recommendation

$2,500

 

31

Venture Southland for ILT Kidzone Festival

 

Request assistance towards subsidising the cost of bus transport to and from the ILT Kidzone Festival from various locations around the Southland District.  The subsidy enables the costs to attendees to be keep at $2.00pp for the return trip.

 

Total Project Cost         $286,100

 

 

 

Amount Requested       $1,800

Recommendation

$1,800

 

32

Waimumu Exhibition

 

Request assistance towards hall hire costs associated with holding the 8th annuals arts and crafts exhibition in the Waimumu Te Tipua Hall which will run from 12 - 16 May 2016.

 

Total Project Cost         $9,258

 

 

 

Amount Requested       $1,500

Recommendation

Nil

 

33

Western District Country & Variety Music Club Inc

 

Request assistance towards costs associated with providing a bus from Dunedin to Tuatapere to bring country music artists and supporters from Dunedin, Balclutha and Gore Clubs to the annual Hoedown at Tuatapere held in the Waiau Town and Country Club on 11 June 2017.

 

 

Total Project Cost         $2,150

 

 

 

Amount Requested       $1,150

Recommendation

$800

 

 

 

 

34

Winton Community Centre

 

Request assistance towards costs associated with providing six information sessions (one a week) for senior community members.  The success of last year’s sessions and requests for more has prompted this application.  Topics being explored include: Fall prevention, Awarua Synergy/ Warm Homes, Age Concern, Disability Resource Centre.

 

Total Project Cost         $950

 

 

 

Amount Requested       $750

Recommendation

$750

 

35

Winton Croquet Club

 

Request assistance towards costs associated with painting, wallpapering and replacing the curtains at the Clubrooms and purchasing a microwave oven.

 

Total Project Cost         $3,375

 

 

 

Amount Requested       $2,000

Recommendation

$1,000

 

36

Tokanui Lions / Scouts

 

Request assistance towards costs associated with upgrading the Scout Den.

 

Total Project Cost         $1,800

 

 

 

Amount Requested       $900

Recommendation

$600

 

37

Woodlands Primary School – Riparian Planting Committee

 

Request assistance towards developing stage two of the riparian planting programme which includes: further planting, a path, signage explaining the project, picnic tables, nesting boxes and bird feeders.

 

Total Project Cost         $9,000

 

 

 

Amount Requested       $2,000

Recommendation

$1,500

 

39

Garston Gun Club

 

Awaiting further information – to be provided at the meeting.

 

Total Project Cost         $

 

 

 

Amount Requested       $

Recommendation

$

 


Community and Policy Committee

17 May 2017

sdclogo

 

District Heritage Fund Financial Report and Application Summary

Record No:        R/17/5/9159

Author:                 Bronwyn Affleck, Administration Manager

Approved by:       Rex Capil, Group Manager Community and Futures

 

  Decision                              Recommendation                         Information

 

  

District Heritage Fund financial report and summary of applications received in the funding round closing 31 March 2017

1        Recommendations provided for review and approval.

 

Purpose

2        The Southland District Heritage Fund is to support the conservation of heritage collections and encourage the development and application of professional museum standards to heritage collections held within the Southland District Council boundaries.  The Fund is available to assist with the day-to-day running of local museums, heritage centres or similar type organisations.

3        $60,000 available for distribution per annum.

 

Recommendation

That the Community and Policy Committee:

a)         Receives the report titled “District Heritage Fund Financial Report and Application Summary” dated 11 May 2017.

 

b)         Approve the allocation of funds for the District Heritage Fund as per the attached schedule including any amendments made during the review.

 

 

Attachments

a         District Heritage Fund Financial Report and Summary of Applications - March 2017    

 


Community and Policy Committee

17 May 2017

 

District Heritage Fund - Financial Report to 31 March 2017

 


District Heritage Fund

 

Application Summaries

 

 

Funding Available $37,128                                        Total of Recommendation $24,680

 

1

Central Southland Vintage Machinery Club

 

Request assistance towards operational costs including:  power, insurance, rates, stationery and postage.

 

Total Project Cost         $9,000

 

 

 

Amount Requested       $5,400

Recommendation

$5,400

 

2

Fiordland Vintage Machinery Museum Inc

 

Request assistance towards operational costs including:  insurance, power, rates, postage and stationery and accounting fees.

 

Total Project Cost         $8,800

 

 

 

Amount Requested       $7,000

Recommendation

$5,280

 

3

Otautau Museum Trust

 

 

Request assistance towards operational costs including: internet costs, power, office, equipment and stationery.

 

Total Project Cost         $4,320

 

 

 

Amount Requested       $

Recommendation

$2,500

 

4

Rakiura Heritage Trust

 

Request assistance towards operational costs including: administration costs, audit fees, insurance, electricity and phone charges.

 

Total Project Cost         $19,504

 

 

 

Amount Requested       $13,000

Recommendation

$11,500

 

5

Waikawa Museum

 

Request assistance towards operational costs to cover the shortfall from the last application (November 2016) where we applied for $10,538 and received $7,500.

 

Total Project Cost         $3,070

 

 

 

Amount Requested       $3,070

Recommendation

Nil

Not eligible to apply until November 2017

 

 

 


Community and Policy Committee

17 May 2017

sdclogo

 

SportNZ Rural Travel Fund Financial Report and Application Summary - May 2017

Record No:        R/17/5/9185

Author:                 Bronwyn Affleck, Administration Manager

Approved by:       Rex Capil, Group Manager Community and Futures

 

  Decision                              Recommendation                         Information

 

  

SportNZ Rural Travel Fund financial report and summary of applications received in the funding round closing 31 March 2017.

1        Recommendations provided as per the funding formula based on the number of kilometres travelled, for review and approval.

 

Purpose

2        The SportNZ Rural Travel Fund is to assist with transport costs associated with participating in regular local competitions. Sports clubs and school based clubs with young people aged between 5 – 19 years are eligible to apply.

3        $13,000 available for distribution per annum.

 

Recommendation

That the Community and Policy Committee:

a)         Receives the report titled “SportNZ Rural Travel Fund Financial Report and Application Summary - May 2017” dated 11 May 2017.

 

b)         Approve the allocation of funds for the SportNZ Rural Travel Fund as per the attached schedule including any amendments made during the review.

 

 

Attachments

a         SPORTNZ Rural Travel Fund Financial Report and Application Summary    

 


Community and Policy Committee

17 May 2017

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SPORT NZ Rural Travel Fund

Application Summary

 

Funding Available $7,843                                                     Total of Recommendations $7,025

 

1

Aparima College –  Basketball & Clay Bird Shooting Teams

 

Request assistance towards travel costs associated with participating in regular local competition.

       Kms = 11,650

Recommendation as per travel formula

$1,000

 

2

Aurora College – Rugby – 15% of players from SDC  area

 

Request assistance towards travel costs associated with participating in regular local competition.

         Kms = 1,800

Recommendation as per travel formula

$75

 

3

Central Southland College - Clay Bird Shooting Teams

 

Request assistance towards travel costs associated with participating in regular local competition.

         Kms = 4,200

Recommendation as per travel formula

$750

 

4

Fiordland Athletics Club

 

Request assistance towards travel costs associated with participating in regular local competition.

        Kms = 5,000+

Recommendation as per travel formula

$1,000

 

5

Makarewa Squash Club

 

Request assistance towards travel costs associated with participating in regular local competition.

        Kms = 5,700

Recommendation as per travel formula

$750

 

6

Northern Southland College – Rugby, Hockey, Basketball

 

Request assistance towards travel costs associated with participating in regular local competition.

        Kms = 4,600

Recommendation as per travel formula

$750

 

 

 

7

Northern Southland College – Young Farmers Agri Kids Team Grand Final

 

Request assistance towards travel costs associated with participating in regular local competition.

        Kms = 2,440

Recommendation as per travel formula

Nil

8

Riverton Athletics Club

 

Request assistance towards travel costs associated with participating in regular local competition.

        Kms = 5,000+

Recommendation as per travel formula

$750

 

9

Southland Girl’s High School - 30% of players from SDC  area

 

Request assistance towards travel costs associated with participating in regular local competition.

        Kms = 3,272

Recommendation as per travel formula

$225

 

10

Tokanui Netball Club

 

Request assistance towards travel costs associated with participating in regular local competition.

        Kms = 4,200

Recommendation as per travel formula

$750

 

11

Verdon College – Rugby Boys & Girls Teams – 30% of players from SDC  area

 

Request assistance towards travel costs associated with participating in regular local competition.

        Kms = 3,200

Recommendation as per travel formula

$225

 

12

Winton Football Club Inc

 

Request assistance towards travel costs associated with participating in regular local competition.

        Kms = 5,400

Recommendation as per travel formula

$750

 


Community and Policy Committee

17 May 2017

sdclogo

 

Additional Community Initiatives Fund Application for Consideration

Record No:        R/17/5/9724

Author:                 Bronwyn Affleck, Administration Manager

Approved by:       Rex Capil, Group Manager Community and Futures

 

  Decision                              Recommendation                         Information

 

  

Lumsden Swimming Pool Mural Project

1        Request assistance towards costs associated with the design and painting of a mural on the Lumsden swimming pool walls.  Costs include: paints and brushes, promotion, mural design and artist fee (for 9 days).

Total Project Cost: 1,725

Amount Requested: $900                                                                      Recommendation: $600

 

Recommendation

That the Community and Policy Committee:

a)         Receives the report titled “Additional Community Initiatives Fund Application for Consideration” dated 11 May 2017.

 

b)         Approve a grant from the Community Initiatives Fund to enable the project to proceed prior to the next funding round.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report. 

  


Community and Policy Committee

17 May 2017

sdclogo

 

Use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles Policy

Record No:        R/17/4/7951

Author:                 Robyn Rout, Policy Analyst

Approved by:       Ian Marshall, Group Manager Services and Assets

 

  Decision                              Recommendation                         Information

 

  

Purpose

1        This report outlines the feedback that has been received on the draft Use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) Policy and discusses how that feedback has been considered and incorporated.

Executive Summary

2        The draft Use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Policy is a policy that generally allows UAVs (such as drones) to be flown on or above Council owned or controlled land. There are some situations where flying UAVs is restricted, and in these situations, Council approval is required.

3        Three submissions were received on the draft Policy, which raised a number of suggestions. As a result, some minor amendments have been made to the draft Policy. 

4        This report advises the Community and Policy Committee (the Committee) to endorse the Policy and recommend to Council that the Policy be adopted (with any other desired amendments).

 

Recommendation

That the Community and Policy Committee:

a)         Receives the report titled “Use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles Policy” dated 4 May 2017.

b)         Determines that this matter or decision be recognised as not significant in terms of Section 76 of the Local Government Act 2002.

c)         Determines that it has complied with the decision-making provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 to the extent necessary in relation to this decision; and in accordance with Section 79 of the Act determines that it does not require further information, further assessment of options or further analysis of costs and benefits or advantages and disadvantages prior to making a decision on this matter.

d)         Endorses the draft “Use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Policy”.

e)         Recommends that Council adopt the revised Use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Policy.

 


 

Content

Background

5        New rules introduced by the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) came into effect on 1 August 2015. The rules require people to obtain approval before operating UAVs on or above other people’s land. As a land owner, Council can now choose its approach to UAVs.

 

6        Early last year a draft Policy was presented to the Policy Review Committee. The draft Policy generally permits the operation of UAVs on or above Council land, however there are situations where UAV use is restricted, and in these circumstances, written approval from Council must be obtained. The Policy Review Committee endorsed the draft Policy and staff then engaged with Community Boards and Community Development Area Subcommittees to identify any areas where flying should be prohibited or restricted. No further areas were identified.

7        At the end of last year the Committee then endorsed the draft Policy for release for public consultation, and public feedback was sought through December and January of this year.

Issues

8        Through the consultation process three submissions were received, and these submissions suggested a number of changes to the draft Policy. A copy of the submissions has been included as Attachment A. Two of the submitters supported the draft Policy, and the other submitter neither supported nor opposed it.

Definition Section

 

9        One submitter suggested that UAVs under 250g should not be included in the definition of an ‘Unmanned Aerial Vehicle’, as they felt UAVs under 250g are essentially toys and have a limited range of around 30 meters. Officers have elected not to alter the definition in the draft Policy to incorporate this suggestion. As lightweight UAVs could cause injury, unnecessary distraction and be a nuisance, which is what the Policy is trying to prevent, officers felt lightweight UAVs should be included in the Policy.

General Criteria Section

10      Two submitters were also in favour of Council having a system where operators of UAV become registered with us. It was suggested this could include operators having to confirm and sign that they have read and understood the CAA Rules and Council’s Policy. Officers believe that as the Policy is enabling and generally permits UAVs to be flown, it is unnecessary to have a registration system.

11      One submitter thought having a map of all land owned and controlled by Council (so the land this Policy relates to), would be helpful for users. This submitter was also hoping Council’s UAV Policy could be integrated into an online resource called ‘Airshare’, which outlines where you can and cannot fly a drone in New Zealand. Officers agree that having these resources available would be helpful, but that due to the nature of the restricted areas in the draft Policy (such as use being restricted within 50 metres of livestock, or within 50 metres of any building on Council land), it would not be practical to illustrate this on a web mapping system. The size of the restricted areas, such as a cemetery or a formed road, would be so small on a picture map covering all of Southland that it would make such a fixed scale map unhelpful.

12      A submitter has also raised that the operators of UAVs should wear a high visibility vest to help notify other park users of the UAV. Officers support this suggestion as wearing a high visibility vest will make the UAV operator more noticeable to other members of the public, making it easier know who to approach to raise any concerns. This submission has been incorporated into the draft Policy. The draft Policy has been included as Attachment B, and amendments are shown in red.

 

Restrictions Section

13      One submitter has also raised that they would like to see the Policy give clear direction on how members of the public should get Council’s approval for flying UAVs in restricted circumstances, by way of an email address or an online form. Guidance was also given on what the form should include. Officers believe that when the Policy is formally adopted and on the Council’s website, there should be a link with the Policy to an online application form. When the form is submitted, this would then automatically be sent to Council. The online form would be easily accessible and give guidance to applicants, making sure all of the required information is provided. Slightly more detail has been added to the paragraph about requesting approval from Council, to highlight that approval will not always be given. 

14      It was also raised that Council owned toilets and camping sites need to be added as restricted areas. Officers believe that UAV flight is already restricted in those areas as UAVs cannot be flown around other open space users, or around buildings. 

15      It has also been raised that there may be issues with too many UAVs operating at once. Under the original draft Policy, if one user was operating their UAV and another user then came into the area, the first user would then have to immediately ground their UAV. To remedy this and for safety reasons, an amendment has been made to the Policy that a UAV operator cannot fly within 100 metres of another UAV operator, unless they get Council approval.

16      A submitter also felt that signage will be needed in some areas where UAVs may aggravate wildlife or threaten sensitive habitats. If UAV use becomes a problem over particular areas of Council owned or controlled land, signage outlining the Policy is definitely an option. 

Prohibited Areas

17      Submitters also felt the Policy should stress, where possible, that UAV users also have to comply with Parts 101 and 102 of the CAA rules. A reminder is given in the General Criteria section that Council policy must be followed in addition to the CAA rules. Officers believe it would not be appropriate to further relay the CAA rules in Council Policy, and that UAV users are responsible for ensuring they abide by all of the other rules.

18      Reporting incidents and near misses

Feedback identified that there should only be a requirement to report incidents or near misses of a reasonably serious nature (not minor incidents relating to trees etc). Officers have altered the language of the Policy accordingly. A request was also made to specify where incidents and near misses should be reported. A link will be made available with the draft Policy, on the website.

 

Factors to Consider

Legal and Statutory Requirements

19      Council is empowered to adopt a position by the CAA rules. The CAA has power to enforce its rules (including permission and conditions of land owners) using mechanisms ranging from warnings and infringements to prosecutions. In the event of a breach of the policy, Council staff would report any incident to the CAA.

 

Community Views

20      The consultation process has captured a range of community views on this draft Policy.

Costs and Funding

21      There are no costs associated with implementing the Use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles Policy. A small amount of staff time will be taken up processing requests to fly UAVs in restricted situations and in dealing with reports received on incidents and near misses. Staff time may also be spent dealing with breaches of the Policy or breaches of approvals given for UAV use in restricted circumstances. Any enforcement action would be referred to the CAA, so it would not require staff time.

 

Policy Implications

22      If the Use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles Policy is adopted, members of the public will be permitted to fly UAVs on or above Council owned or controlled land, unless it is one of the restricted situations outlined in the draft Policy. In restricted situations, Council approval must be obtained.

23      If adopted, the Policy will be referred to in Council’s Reserves Management Policy. 

Analysis

Options Considered

24      Two options have been considered regarding Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. These are:

·   Option 1 – Endorsing the revised ‘Use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Policy’ (with amendments as required by the Committee. The revised Policy considers the feedback received through submissions.

·   Option 2 – Not proceeding with a policy.

Analysis of Options

Option 1 – Endorsing the revised Policy (with amendments as required by the Committee)

Advantages

Disadvantages

·        The revised Policy takes into consideration feedback that has been received from UAV users in the District.

·        The approach in the Policy would be manageable and would provide restrictions in specific areas (eg cemeteries and playgrounds) and situations (eg no use permitted during sporting activities).

·        The approach considers the rights of both UAV users and other users of public spaces. 

·        A small amount of staff time will be taken up dealing with applications, breaches, and reporting.

 

Option 2 – Not proceeding with a Policy

Advantages

Disadvantages

·        This option would provide flexibility and discretion to respond to local community concerns.

·        The public will not know Council’s approach to UAV, and it may result in a number of requests being made to Council. This would take up staff time.

·        Request to use UAVs over Council land would be processed on an ad hoc basis.

·        This option may not create consistency and may result in the perception that Council is not being impartial. 

·        Providing consent on a case-by-case basis without general criteria results in more work for Council staff.

 

Assessment of Significance

25      This matter is assessed as having a lower level of significance. It is not affecting a large number of people or stakeholders or a specific community. Council’s ability to make decisions in relation to UAV use are established by CAA rules and the proposed approach is generally permissive.         

Recommended Option

26      It is recommended that the Committee proceed with Option 1 - Endorsing the revised draft Policy with any amendments as required by the Committee.

Next Steps

27      If the Committee endorses the revised draft Policy, the draft Policy will then be presented to Council to be formally adopted.

 

Attachments

a         Submissions on draft Use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Policy 2017

b         Draft Use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Policy    

 


Community and Policy Committee

17 May 2017

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Community and Policy Committee

17 May 2017

 

SOUTHLAND DISTRICT COUNCIL

 

USE OF UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLES POLICY

 

 

This policy applies to: 

 

DOCUMENT CONTROL

 

Administered by:

Strategic Manager (Property)

TRIM reference number:

r/15/12/22465

Effective date:

«type date»

Approved by:

Council

Date approved:

«type date»

Next review date:

«type date»

 

 

CONTENTS

 

1.            PURPOSE.. 1

2.            DEFINITIONS AND ABBREVIATIONS.. 1

3             BACKGROUND.. 2

4.            POLICY DETAILS.. 2

4.1         General Criteria. 2

4.2         Restrictions. 2

4.3         Prohibited Areas. 2

4.4         Enforcement 3

5.            ASSOCIATED DOCUMENTS.. 3

6.            REVISION RECORD.. 3

 

 


Community and Policy Committee

17 May 2017

 

USE OF UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLES POLICY

 

 

1.   PURPOSE

 

This policy sets out the conditions for use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) on Council owned or controlled land. 

 

 

2.   DEFINITIONS AND ABBREVIATIONS

 

Term

Meaning

Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV)

The term UAV covers all electric powered remote controlled model aircraft, including the type commonly referred to as “drones” that are capable of vertical take-off and landing and small hand-launched gliders less than 1.5 metre wing span. 

 

UAVs are also known as drones, Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems and Unmanned Aerial Systems.  

 

The term UAV does not include the following:

·              Fixed wing electric-powered model aircraft greater than 1 metre wing span.

·              All fixed - winged model aircraft that are internal combustion engine (petrol) powered.

·              Gliders greater than 1.5 metre wing span and bungee-launched gliders.

·              Single rotor helicopters that are electric powered or internal combustion engine (petrol) powered.

·              Jet powered models.

 

Civil Aviation Authority Rules / CAA rules

Civil Aviation Rules are set by the Minister of Transport.  The rules are divided into parts.  The two parts relevant to UAVs are:

·              Part 101: Gyrogliders and Parasails, Unmanned Aircraft (including Balloons), Kites, and Rockets - Operating Rules, and

·              Part 102: Unmanned Aircraft Operator Certification.

 

 

3    BACKGROUND

 

Under rules introduced by the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) on 1 August 2015, Council can grant or decline consent for the use of UAVs on property that it owns or controls.  This policy establishes criteria for UAV use over Council owned and controlled land in the Southland District. 

 

 

4.   POLICY DETAILS

 

4.1 General Criteria

In addition to the CAA rules, the following criteria apply to the use of UAVs over land or property owned or controlled by Southland District Council.  They do not apply to the use of UAVs by Southland District Council. 

 

Operators of UAVs must:

·              Comply with the Office of the Privacy Commissioner guidance on preserving peoples’ personal privacy by not flying over other people or adjoining private property without their consent.

·              Be courteous of other park users, who often are there for the quiet enjoyment of Council’s parks, reserves and open spaces.

·              Wear a high visibility vest.

 

4.2 Restrictions

Operators do not need approval to use UAVs over land or property owned or controlled by the Southland District Council except in the following situations:

·              Over a sports field if in use by others, or within 50 metres of any organised activity taking place in a reserve or Council controlled open space.

·              Over or above Council owned or controlled cemeteries, commercial forestry or formed roads.

·              Over or within 50 metres of other users of open spaces.  If another open space user moves within this range, the UAV user must immediately land their UAV.

·              Over or within 50 metres of any building on Council land or any playground equipment or swimming pool.

·              Within 50 metres of livestock, wildlife or sensitive wildlife habitats. If livestock or wildlife move within this range, the UAV user must immediately land their UAV.

·              Within 50 metres of a reserve boundary where residential housing or stock farming adjoins.

·              Within 100 metres of another UAV user.

 

Written Council approval must also be obtained for any organised event involving the use of UAVs.

 

If requested to cease operations by Council officers operators must land their UAV immediately.

 

If the Council owned land or property is held under a lease or licence from Council, or there is an organised event taking place, the applicant must obtain written approval from the lessee, licensee or the event organiser, prior to seeking approval from Council. Operators of UAVs must comply with any additional conditions imposed by the lessee, licensee or event organiser.

 

Council’s approval can be sought by making a written request to Council’s property department. Council will notify the applicant about whether or not approval has been granted. If a request to fly a UAV in a restricted situation is declined, Council will outline the reasons why.

 

4.3 Prohibited Areas

There are some areas where the use of UAVs is prohibited unless written approval has been granted by Council.  These areas are:

·              There are no prohibited areas.

 

4.4 Reporting incidents and near misses

UAV users must report all incidents and near misses of a significant nature (such as those involving people and property (including animals, buildings and power lines) to Southland District Council. This obligation also extends to other reserve users involved in any incident or near miss relating to UAV use.

 

4.5 Enforcement

Any breach of the above conditions could result in termination of your permission to fly unmanned aircraft over Council land.

 

Council will report breaches to the Civil Aviation Authority, which may result in infringements or prosecution. 

 

 

5.   ASSOCIATED DOCUMENTS

 

•      Civil Aviation Authority Rules and Guidelines: http://www.caa.govt.nz/rpas/

•      Southland District Council District Reserves Management Policy

 

 

6.   REVISION RECORD

 

Date

Version

Revision Description

«Type Date»

«Version»

«Revision»

«Type Date»

«Version»

«Revision»

«Type Date»

«Version»

«Revision»


Community and Policy Committee

17 May 2017

sdclogo

 

Draft Significance and Engagement Policy

Record No:        R/17/4/8939

Author:                 Robyn Rout, Policy Analyst

Approved by:       Rex Capil, Group Manager Community and Futures

 

  Decision                              Recommendation                         Information

 

  

 

Purpose

1        This report requests that the Community and Policy Committee (the Committee) endorses the draft Significance and Engagement Policy and recommends to Council that the draft Policy be adopted.

 

Executive Summary

2        The Significance and Engagement Policy enables Council and its communities to identify the degree of significance attached to particular matters, and it provides clarity about how and when communities will be engaged. The draft Significance and Engagement Policy is clearer and easier to understand than Council’s current Policy. The draft Policy outlines a 3-step process which involves:

·     Determining significance;

·     Identifying community views; and

·     Deciding how and when to engage with the community.

3        The draft Policy was put out for consultation in March and April this year, but no submissions were received. This report advises the Committee to endorse the Policy and recommend to Council that the Policy be adopted (with any other desired amendments).

 

Recommendation

That the Community and Policy Committee:

a)         Receives the report titled “Draft Significance and Engagement Policy” dated 2 May 2017.

b)         Determines that this matter or decision be recognised as not significant in terms of Section 76 of the Local Government Act 2002.

c)         Determines that it has complied with the decision-making provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 to the extent necessary in relation to this decision; and in accordance with Section 79 of the Act determines that it does not require further information, further assessment of options or further analysis of costs and benefits or advantages and disadvantages prior to making a decision on this matter.

d)         Endorses the draft Significance and Engagement Policy.

e)         Recommends to Council that the draft Significance and Engagement Policy be adopted.

 


 

Content

Background

4        Section 76AA of the Local Government Act (2002) (the Act) requires Council to adopt a significance and engagement policy. This policy enables Council and its communities to identify the degree of significance attached to particular matters, and the policy also provides clarity about how and when communities can expect to be engaged.

 

5        Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy is reviewed each triennium in the lead up to the release of the Long Term Plan.

 

6        The draft Significance and Engagement Policy would introduce a new 3-step process. The first part of the Policy involves determining the significance attached to particular matters. The factors to assess significance have been revised, and these are now more in line with the Act. How Council assesses significance, and how it determines what matters are significant, are important because it drives how Council makes decisions, and what analysis and engagement is required by Council.

7        The second part of the draft Policy involves identifying community views. In the draft Policy, Council would determine what it knows about community views and identify if there is a need for more information.

8        The last part of the draft Policy provides guidance to staff and the community on how and when community views would be sought. Levels of significance are linked to an appropriate level of engagement, and then for each level of engagement, a range of engagement tools is listed.

9        The draft Significance and Engagement Policy was presented to the Committee in March this year. At that time the draft Policy was endorsed and released for public consultation. The public was notified that Council was seeking community feedback by an advertisement being placed in the Southland Times, and by having a copy of the draft Policy on the Council’s website.

Issues

10      No submissions were made on the draft Policy, so officers are not aware of any concerns or changes that need to be made.

Factors to Consider

Legal and Statutory Requirements

11      Under section 76AA of the Act, a significance and engagement policy is required to outline:

·     Council’s general approach to determining significance; and

·     any criteria or procedures are to be used by Council in assessing the extent to which matters are significant or may have significant consequences; and

·     how Council will respond to community preferences about engagement, including the form of consultation that may be desirable; and

·     how Council will engage with communities on other matters; and

·     a list of Council’s strategic assets.

 

14      Section 79 of the Act enables Council to exercise its discretion about certain requirements (including how to comply with certain requirements in sections 77 and 78 of the Act), in proportion to the significance of the matter or decision. For example the significance of a matter impacts:

·     the degree to which Council must identify and assess options in respect of each decision or matter (including the identification of costs and benefits);

·     the extent and detail of any information to be considered;

·     the extent and nature of any written record to be kept of the decision.

 

15      If Council wanted to make a decision that would be contrary to its Significance and Engagement Policy, it may do so, provided it follows a process set out in section 80 of the Act.

 

16      When adopting or amending a significance and engagement policy, Council must consult in accordance with section 82 of the Act, unless it considers on reasonable grounds that it has sufficient information about community interests and preferences to enable the purpose of the policy to be achieved.

 

Community Views

17      Members of the public have been given an opportunity to present their views on the draft Policy.

Costs and Funding

18      There are no significant costs associated with adopting or implementing the draft Policy.

Policy Implications

19      If adopted, this draft Policy will result in a slightly different approach being used to assess significance. It is likely however that Council will reach similar conclusions on the level of significance of particular matters, and that community engagement will occur with similar frequency and in similar form, to what is done currently.

Analysis

Options Considered

20      Option 1 – Endorse the draft Significance and Engagement Policy (with any desired amendments) and recommend to Council that the draft Policy be adopted.

21      Option 2 - Not endorse the draft Significance and Engagement Policy and continue to use the current policy.

Analysis of Options

Option 1 – Endorse the draft Policy with any desired changes

Advantages

Disadvantages

·        The draft Policy would enable members of the public to better understand the significance Council places on particular matters

·        The draft Policy would enable members of the public to better understand how and when Council is likely to engage

·        The draft Policy would be easier for staff to use

·        The change to the factors to assess significance would be more in line with the definition of ‘significance’ in the Act.

·        Staff will have to learn to apply a new policy

·        There is a very small chance staff may interpret the draft Policy differently from the current policy, which could potentially result in changes to the frequency and form of community engagement.

 

 

Option 2 – Not endorse the draft Policy and continue to use the current Policy

Advantages

Disadvantages

·        Staff would not have to learn to apply a new policy.

·        The current Policy would still provide guidance on how to assess significance and determine an appropriate level and type of engagement.

·        The current policy does not give the public clarity on the significance Council places on particular matters

·        The current policy does not give the public clarity on how and when Council is likely to engage

·        The current policy is not particularly easy for staff to use

·        The factors to assess significance in the current policy do not align with the Act, meaning that Council is required to consider both when assessing significance.  

 

Assessment of Significance

22      This decision is assessed as having a lower level of significance.

Recommended Option

23      It is advised that the Committee endorses the draft Significance and Engagement Policy (with any desired amendments) and recommends to Council that the Policy be adopted (Option 1).

Next Steps

24      If the Committee endorses the draft Policy and recommends it is adopted, the draft Policy will then be presented to Council to be formally adopted.

 

Attachments

a         Draft Significance and Engagement Policy    

 


Community and Policy Committee

17 May 2017

 

SOUTHLAND DISTRICT COUNCIL

SIGNIFICANCE AND ENGAGEMENT POLICY

 

 

This policy applies to:  Council, Elected members, Council staff and the general public

 

DOCUMENT CONTROL

 

Policy owner:

Chief Executive

TRIM reference number:

r/16/11/19694

Effective date:

To be confirmed

Approved by:

Council

Date approved:

To be confirmed

Next review date:

2020

CONTENTS

1             PURPOSE.. 2

2             THE GENERAL APPROACH.. 2

3             STEP 1 - DETERMINING THE LEVEL OF SIGNIFICANCE.. 3

            Factors to Assess Significance. 3

            Strategic Assets. 3

            What to do if a matter is significant 4

4             STEP 2 - IDENTIFY COMMUNITY VIEWS.. 4

            When Council will identify community views. 4

            When it is required by legislation. 4

            When it relates to a significant matter 4

            For some matters that are not considered significant 5

            When Council may not seek additional information on community views. 5

5             STEP 3 - DECIDING ON AN APPROACH TO COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT. 5

            Factors to Consider 6

            Southland District Council’s strong community focus. 6

            Legislative Considerations. 6

            Remaining flexible. 7

            The role of Elected Members. 7

            Engagement with Iwi/Māori 7

            The Level of Engagement 7

            How and when we will Engage. 8

            Table 1: Southland District Council’s Engagement Spectrum Approach. 9

6             ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES.. 10

7             ASSOCIATED DOCUMENTS.. 10

8             REVISION RECORD.. 10

9             APPENDICES.. 11

APPENDIX 1:  SIGNIFICANCE AND ENGAGEMENT FLOWCHART. 11

APPENDIX 2:  SPECIAL CONSULTATIVE PROCEDURE.. 12

 


SIGNIFICANCE AND ENGAGEMENT POLICY

 

Southland District Council has developed the Significance and Engagement Policy (the Policy) to determine the significance of issues within the District, and how to align our engagement with the public based on the degree of significance of the issue.  The Policy aligns with provisions the Local Government Act (2002) (the Act).

 

1          PURPOSE

 

1.1       The purpose of this policy is:

 

·      to enable the local authority and its communities to identify the degree of significance attached to particular issues, proposals, decisions or matters; and

·      to provide clarity about how and when communities can expect to be engaged in decisions about different issues, proposals, decisions or matters; and

·      to inform Council, from the beginning of a decision-making process about

the extent of any public engagement that is expected before a particular decision is made; and

the form or type of engagement required.

 

1.2       This policy will also guide staff on:

 

·      the extent that options are identified and assessed; and

·      the degree benefits and costs are quantified; and

·      the extent and detail of information considered; and

·      the extent and nature of any written record kept on legal compliance; and

·      on the extent Council must consider the views and preferences of people likely to be affected by, or to have an interest in a matter;

 

as these decisions should be undertaken in proportion to significance of the matter.

 

 

2          THE GENERAL APPROACH

 

The Council will follow a three-step process to inform decision-making:

 

Step 1 - Determine significance - the Council will use particular factors to decide if a matter is of higher or lower significance.  This part of the policy also gives guidance on what to do if a matter is of high significance.

 

Step 2 - Identify community views - the Council will determine what it knows about community views and identify if there is a need for more information.

 

Step 3 - Deciding on an approach to community engagement - the level of significance and what the Council wants to know about community views will guide Council on an appropriate level of engagement, and how and when to engage. This part of the Policy provides clarity on how and when communities can expect to be engaged in different issues. It also identifies how Council will respond to community preferences about engagement.

 


 

3    STEP 1 - DETERMINING THE LEVEL OF SIGNIFICANCE

 

3.1       Significance is about measuring the degree of importance of an issue, proposal, decision, or matter. Council has to determine how people, services, facilities and infrastructure in the District will be affected. Significance is a continuum ranging from matters that have a low impact/risk and therefore low significance, right up to matters that have very high levels of impact/risk and significance.

 

3.2       During the development stages of an issue, proposal, decision or matter, significance should be considered as it will guide both the extent options should be developed, and the degree to which advantages and disadvantages are assessed. Significance should also be considered when determining the appropriate extent and type of community engagement.

 

Factors to Assess Significance

3.3       Council will take into account the following factors when determining the level of significance. These factors are of equal weighting. The greater the cumulative impact of the matter as assessed by these factors, the more significant the issue, proposal, decision or matter will be. Significance means the degree of importance of the matter as assessed by its likely impact on, and likely consequences for:

 

·        the current and future social, economic, environmental or cultural wellbeing of the district or region;

·        people who are likely to be particularly affected by or interested in, the issue, proposal decision or matter;

·        the capacity of Council to performs its role, and the financial and other costs of doing so;

·        the ownership or function of a strategic asset.

 

3.4       Council may also take into account knowledge it has previously gained about the community and its views on an issue to assess whether the matter has a high level of significance.

 

3.5       When determining the significance of a matter that could have a high level of significance, it is recommended that Council staff discuss the importance of the matter to Māori through Council’s partnership with Te Ao Mārama Incorporated, or to take the matter to Te Roopu Taiao forum, which is a meeting of local councils and iwi.

 

3.6       Committees of Council and elected bodies can also be used to help assess the significance of a matter.

 

Strategic Assets

3.7       In respect to “strategic assets”, a key consideration is whether an asset is essential to the continued delivery of an “outcome” that Council considers important for the well‑being of the community.  Decisions to transfer ownership or control of a strategic asset to or from Council cannot be made unless they are first included in the Long Term Plan.

 

3.8       For the purpose of section 76AA(3) of the Act, Council considers the following assets, or a network of assets, to be strategic assets:

·              Roading/bridge network as a whole.

·              Individual water treatment plants and reticulation networks.

·              Individual township sewerage treatment plants and reticulation networks.

·              Individual township stormwater reticulation networks.

·              Portfolio of District Reserves (Parks/Reserves).

·              Stewart Island Electricity Supply Authority.

·              Te Anau Airport at Manapouri.

·              Community housing as a whole.

 

What to do if a matter is significant

3.9       If a matter is considered to be significant, reports will include a statement indicating why this conclusion was reached.  The statement will include an explanation of which factors indicate the decision is significant, the potential implications of the decision, the range of community views that might exist, and whether there is a need for a further degree of community engagement before a final decision is made.

 

3.10     Where the proposal or decision is considered to be significant, the report will also include a statement addressing the appropriate observance of Sections 77, 78, 79, 80, 81, 82 and 82A of the Act as applicable, together with the corresponding degree of community engagement considered.

 

 

4    STEP 2 - IDENTIFY COMMUNITY VIEWS

 

4.1       Step 2 involves Council identifying what it already knows about the community views on a matter, and identifying if there is a need to get more information about community views. Community views are the views and preferences of people likely to be affected by, or to have an interest in, the matter.  Determining how Council will identify community views may lead to community engagement.  The process of how Council will decide if it needs to seek more information to understand the views in the community is outlined in Appendix 1.  In general, Council will take steps to identify community views in the circumstances described below.

 

When Council will identify community views

 

When it is required by legislation

4.2       The Council will consider community views when it has a legislative requirement to do so (as set out by the Local Government Act 2002, Resource Management Act 1991, Reserves Act 1977, and Land Transport Management Act 2003).  Examples of when Council will identify community views include the adoption and amendment/s to both the Long Term Plan and a bylaw, transfer of ownership of a significant strategic asset, and changes to financial policies.  Council may identify community views more broadly than what is legally required.

 

When it relates to a significant matter

4.3       Subject to consideration of factors in paragraph 3.3 of this Policy, the Council will identify community views whenever a ‘significant decision’ needs to be made.
A significant decision is one which has been identified as such under this Policy. Note: a ‘significant’ decision will not automatically trigger consultation or application of the Special Consultative Procedure (SCP).  An outline of what Council must do when it is required to use or adopt the special consultative procedure is outlined in Appendix 4. Further information on the SCP is in sections 86, 87, and 93A of the LGA 2002.


 

For some matters that are not considered significant

4.4       In general, where a matter is not considered significant under this Policy, the Council is unlike to seek additional information on community views.  However, in some situations where Council staff deem community involvement or notification is appropriate, informal feedback or notification processes may be followed.

 

When Council may not seek additional information on community views

 

4.5       Information is always necessary for the decision making process. However, there are times when it is not necessary, appropriate or possible to seek additional information on community views. If this is the case, Council will make this determination in accordance with the criteria below and not withstanding any legislative requirements. The Council will not identify community views when:

·      The matter is not of a nature or significance that requires consultation (LGA 2002, s82(4)(c)

·      The Council already has a sound understanding of the views and preferences of the persons likely to be affected by or interested in the matter (s82(4)(b) LGA 2002);

·      There is a need for confidentiality or commercial sensitivity (s82(4)(d) LGA 2002);

·      The costs of consultation outweigh the benefits of it (s82(4)(e) LGA 2002);

·      Engagement will not be beneficial as it will not influence the decision (for example if there is only one or very limited viable options available, there may be no benefit in engaging with the community);

·      The matter has already been addressed by the Council’s policies or plans, which have previously been consulted on;

·      An immediate or quick response or decision is needed or it is not reasonably practicable to engage;

·      Works are required unexpectedly or following further investigations on projects, already approved by the Council;

·      Business as usual - the works required are related to the operation and maintenance of a Council asset and responsible management requires the  works to take place;

·      When Council has consulted on the unchanged issue in the last 24 months.

 

4.6       Where the above listed circumstances apply and community feedback is not sought, the Council is still required to give consideration to the views and preferences of persons likely to be affected by, or to have an interest in, the matter (LGA 2002 section 78 (1)).  The LGA 2002 requires that this consideration be in proportion to the significance of the matters affected by the decision (section 79 (1)).

 

 

5     STEP 3 - DECIDING ON AN APPROACH TO COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT

 

5.1       Once Council has determined the significance of a matter and has determined it needs more information on the range of views held, Council will consider how and when it should engage with the community. Depending on the matter being considered and the stakeholders involved, the preferred method(s) or combination of engagement tools will be identified and applied to meet the goals of the specific engagement.

5.2       Council will respond to community preferences about engagement, including the form of consultation that may be desirable, by informing and seeking guidance from Councillors. Council will also use engagement methods that have proven over time to be effective at informing the public and generating responses.

 

5.3       There is a variety of ways in which the Council engages with the community. In this policy, the types of engagement described relate specifically to Council, Community Board and delegated decision-making. The types of engagement described are given as a guide, and Council is not limited to or by the stated methods of engagement.

 

5.4       The significance of the issue, proposal or decision will influence the extent Council explores and evaluates options and obtains the views of affected and interested parties.

 

5.5       Council will apply the principles of s82 of the Act when determining engagement. Council will select the engagement method that it considers most appropriate in the circumstance.

 

Factors to Consider

 

Southland District Council’s strong community focus

 

5.6       The Southland community is at the heart of Council’s purpose, vision and mission; therefore, engagement will reflect the need for community input into Council decision-making.

 

5.7       The Council is also keen to build on existing relationships and networks with individuals and communities, and look to extend the range of parties involved in the community engagement as appropriate. The Council will work to ensure the community is sufficiently informed to understand the issue(s) or proposal, options and impacts and has time to respond, so they are able to participate in engagement processes with confidence.

 

Legislative Considerations

 

5.8       When Council makes decisions, often legislation will prescribe the consultation and decision-making procedures required. This includes the procedures to be used for public notification, considering submissions and making decisions. Section 82(5) of the LGA 2002 says that where specific consultation is required under the LGA, or any other enactment, and if inconsistent with any s82 principle – the other provisions will prevail (to the extent of the inconsistency). Those other Acts include, among others, the Reserves Act 1977, the Biosecurity Act 1993, Land Transport Act 1998 and the Resource Management Act 1991.

 

5.9       There are a number of decisions that can only be made if they are explicitly provided for in the Council’s LTP as set out by the LGA 2002 Amendment Act 2014.
These are:

·      to alter significantly the intended level of service provision for any significant activity undertaken by or on behalf of the Council, including a decision to commence or cease any such activity;

·      to transfer the ownership or control of a strategic asset to or from the Council.


 

5.10     In addition, Council is required at times to use a Special Consultative Procedure (SCP), as set out in section 83 of the LGA.  The SCP is a prescribed process for consultation set out in the LGA. In brief, the SCP requires Council to issue and widely distribute a proposal, which is open for consultation for at least a month, and the community can provide its views.  The SCP may also be used for any other decision Council wishes to consult on, and generally this will be when a matter is of high significance.  The requirement or use of the SCP does not preclude the need to engage with affected communities.  The use of the SCP is predominantly a reflection of the significance of an issue, which in turn identifies the need for appropriate community engagement.  Schedule 2 outlines when an SCP is required, and what is required under Section 83.

 

Remaining flexible

5.11     It is important that Council does not use a homogenous approach, and that engagement tools are appropriate to the location, significance of the issue, and community affected. Differing levels and forms of engagement may be required during the varying phases of consideration and decision-making on an issue or proposal, and for different community groups or stakeholders. The Council will review the appropriateness and effectiveness of the engagement strategy and methods as the process proceeds. There may be occasions in which the Council chooses to carry out engagement at a level higher than that indicated by the significance of the decision as part of its commitment to promote participatory democracy.

 

5.12     Council will also be open to new and developing methods of engagement through the use of technology and innovation.

 

The role of Elected Members

5.13     This policy recognises the role of elected representatives, both Councillors and Community Board members, as valued and recognised conduits to the communities they represent. Council, when engaging with affected or interested communities, will recognise the relationship elected members have with the location, specific communities and individuals affected by consultation or engagement initiatives. Participation of elected representatives is an essential step to consider, in light of broader community good, when initiating any project requiring engagement.

 

Engagement with Iwi/Māori

5.14     A strategic focus for Council is maintaining and enhancing our partnership with Maori. Council has a strong partnership with Te Ao Mārama Incorporated, and encourages openly engaging with iwi/Maori through this channel or through the Te Roopu Taiao forum.

 

The Level of Engagement

5.15     Using the International Association of Public Participation engagement spectrum as a basis[1], the method(s) of engagement adopted by the Council before it makes a decision may depend on whether or not:

 

·      The matter is of low or no significance (eg, technical and/or minor amendments to a bylaw or Council policy) and there may be a very small group of people affected by or with an interest in the decision.  Council is unlikely to engage on these matters;

·      The matter is significant only to a relatively small group of people or is of low impact to many. They should be informed about the problem, alternatives, opportunities and/or solutions and/or consulted so that any concerns, alternatives and aspirations they have are understood and considered;

 

·      The matter is significant not only to a small group of people particularly affected but also to a wider community that may have an interest in the decision to be made. They may be informed, consulted and/or involved to seek public input and feedback on analysis, alternatives and/or decisions.

 

·      For more significant matters the Council may elect to collaborate, or partner, with a community in any aspect of a decision including the development of alternatives and the identification of preferred solutions. This is more likely to occur where there is a distinct group of affected or particularly interested people.

 

5.16     Depending on the level of significance and the nature of the issue, proposal or decision being made, by using a range of engagement methods communities may be empowered to participate in the decision-making process.

 

How and when we will Engage

5.17     Once the appropriate level of engagement has been assessed (in accordance with paragraphs 5.15 and 5.16 above), Council will then consider the range of engagement methods that are appropriate. This process support community participation through an Engagement Spectrum Approach.

 

5.18     Council will select the method it considers appropriate in the circumstance, taking into account a range of factors, such as who is affected or who is likely to have a view. Council will remain flexible in its approach to engagement, to ensure that the most appropriate methods are used.

 

5.19     Table 1 below outlines Southland District Council’s engagement spectrum. 
The table gives guidance on how and when communities can expect to be engaged in particular matters, relative to their significance. The table also gives examples of what significance has been placed on particular matters in the past, and what types of community engagement has been used for those matters. The table is also a valuable tool for Council staff to inform on the extent of public engagement that might be expected on a matter before a decision is made, and the form or type of engagement that may be required and appropriate.

 

Low level of significance

 

High level of significance

Level

Inform

Consult

Involve

Collaborate

Empower

What it involves

To provide the public with balanced and objective information to assist them in understanding the problem, alternatives, opportunities and/or solutions.

To obtain public feedback on analysis, alternatives and/or decisions.

To work directly with the public throughout the process to ensure that public concerns and aspirations are consistently understood and considered.

To partner with the public in each aspect of the decision including the development of alternatives and the identification of the preferred solution.

To place final decision making is in the hands of the public.

Types of matters we might use this type of engagement for

Minor change to how Council manages groups of activities

Upgrade of a reserve area

 

 

Long Term Plan and Annual Plan where there are significant changes from the content of the LTP for that financial year.

Policies such as the Easter Sunday Shop Trading Policy and the Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Policy.

Development of options for a policy change that is deemed significant e.g. moving from land to capital value for rating purposes.

Development options for a new large capital project which has a community focus and has a large number of options e.g. Te Anau Waste Water Project

Community halls

Examples of engagement tools Council might use

Council newsletter, Weekly/daily newspapers, Community newsletters, Electronic messages (eg, email, online newsletters, social media posts), Flyers, Website, Radio.

Submissions, Hearings, Feedback processes, Surveys, Open Days.

 

Local meetings, Social media, Targeting existing organisations within the community eg, service clubs.

 

Talking with communities, Key partnerships with existing community organisations, Hall committees.

 

Community Boards, Community Development Area Subcommittees.

 

When the community can expect to be involved

Council will generally advise the community when a decision is made.

Council will advise the community when a draft decision is made and generally provides the community with up to four (4) weeks to participate and respond.

Council will generally provide the community with a greater lead-in time to allow them time to be involved in the process.

Council will generally involve the community at the start to scope the issue, again after information has been collected and again when options are being considered.

Council will generally involve the community at the start to scope the issue

Table 1: Southland District Council’s Engagement Spectrum Approach

 


 

6        ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

 

Party/Parties

Roles and Responsibilities

Communications Manager, Management Team

Ensure that engagement with the community meets the degree of significance determined by Council

Council

·     Determine degree of significance of an issue

·     Determine whether or not to engage

·     Link level of significance to appropriate levels of engagement

·     Use determined level of significance to decide how much time, money and effort the Council will invest in exploring and evaluating options and obtaining the views of affected and interested parties.

 

 

7    ASSOCIATED DOCUMENTS

 

Local Government Act (2002).

Southland District Council Engagement Strategy

 

 

8    REVISION RECORD

 

          The Policy will be reviewed at each triennial, aligned with Council elections.

 

Date

Version

Revision Description

28 January 1999

N/A

Consultation Policy

27 November 2003

R/03/7/6677

Consultation Policy

26 June 2003

R/09/9/13601

Significance Policy

28 June 2006

R/12/1/808

Significance Policy

29 October 2014

R/14/8/11821

Significance and Engagement Strategy

2017

R/16/11/19694

Significance and Engagement Strategy


 

9    APPENDICES

 

APPENDIX 1:  SIGNIFICANCE AND ENGAGEMENT FLOWCHART

 

 

 

 

 



Community and Policy Committee

17 May 2017

 

APPENDIX 2:  SPECIAL CONSULTATIVE PROCEDURE

 

The Local Government Act 2002 requires Council to use the Special Consultative Procedure for:

·        adoption of or amendment to the LTP (including significant amendments to the Revenue and Financing Policy)

·        revocation, adoption or amendment to a bylaw

·        transfer of ownership of a significant strategic asset

 

It is important to note that formal consultation by a special consultative procedure is a structured process outlined in legislation and supported by case-law. This type of consultation still applies in some decision making processes. In other engagement processes, however, there are no explicit statutory or legal rules constraining or defining community engagement processes. The Local Government Act 2002 has given local authorities the ability to determine this as appropriate for their communities.

 

At the time of writing this policy there are a number of other acts that require use of the Special Consultative Procedure, including but not limited to:

·        Sale and Supply of Liquor Act 2012,

·        Local Government Act 1974,

·        Building Act 2004,

·        Local Government (Rating) Act 2002,

·        Psychoactive Substances Act 2013,

·        Dog Control Act 1996,

·        Waste Minimisation Act 2008,

·        Freedom Camping Act 2011,

·        Land Transport Management Act 2003

·        Biosecurity Act 1993

·        Civil Defence Emergency Management Act 2001

·        Maritime Transport Act 1994.

 

Section 83 of the LGA states the requirements of the SCP.  This section is included below.

 

83        Special Consultative Procedure

 

1             Where this Act or any other enactment requires a local authority to use or adopt the special consultative procedure, that local authority must -

(a)           prepare and adopt -

(i) a statement of proposal; and

(ii)           if the local authority considers on reasonable grounds that it is necessary to enable public understanding of the proposal, a summary of the information contained in the statement of proposal (which summary must comply with section 83AA of the Act; and

 

(b)    ensure that the following is publicly available:

(i) the statement of proposal; and

(ii)           a description of how the local authority will provide persons interested in the proposal with an opportunity to present their views to the local authority in accordance with section 82(1)(d) of the Act; and

(iii)          a statement of the period within which views on the proposal may be provided to the local authority (the period being not less than 1 month from the date the statement is issued); and

(c)           make the summary of the information contained in the statement of proposal prepared in accordance with paragraph (a)(ii) of the Act (or the statement of proposal, if a summary is not prepared) as widely available as reasonably practicable as a basis for consultation; and

 

(d)           provide an opportunity for persons to present their views to the local authority in a manner that enables spoken English, Māori, and/or New Zealand sign language interaction between the person and the local authority, or any representatives to whom an appropriate delegation has been made in accordance with Schedule 7 of the Act; and

 

(e)           ensure that any person who wishes to present his or her views to the local authority or its representatives as described in paragraph (d)

(i)  is given a reasonable opportunity to do so; and

(ii)           is informed about how and when he or she may take up that opportunity.

 

2.             For the purpose of, but without limiting, subsection (1)(d), a local authority may allow any person to present his or her views to the local authority by way of audio link or audio visual link.

 


Community and Policy Committee

17 May 2017

sdclogo

 

Southland District Council Creative New Zealand Creative Communities Scheme Grants Awarded May 2017

Record No:        R/17/5/9286

Author:                 Bronwyn Affleck, Administration Manager

Approved by:       Rex Capil, Group Manager Community and Futures

 

  Decision                              Recommendation                         Information

 

  

Creative Communities Scheme Community Committee

1        The Creative Communities Scheme Community Committee met on 2 May 2017 to consider applications received in the funding round closing 31 March 2017.

 

Grants Awarded

2   

Applicant

Project

Amount Awarded

1

Southland Competitions Society

Annual Performing Arts Competitions

$1,000

2

Southland Art Foundation

Exhibition

$1,206

3

Southland Workers Education Assn

Workshops in conjunction with the Riversdale Arts Event

$3,160

4

Southland Museum & Art Gallery

Matariki

$1,325

5

Invercargill Repertory Society

Production of Calendar Girls

$1,000

6

Riverton Heritage and Tourist Centre

Tamatea/Dusky Sound exhibition and workshop

Withdrawn

7

Toi Rakiura Arts Trust

Arts on Tour: Andrew London Trio

$281

8

Studio Seed - Lumsden

Mural painting

$500

9

Jay Coote

Matariki celebrations—star dome

$400

10

Murihiku Maori and Pasifika Cultural Trust

Performing arts workshops for youth

$2,500

11

Southern REAP Inc

Korawai weaving workshops

$1,555

12

Waimumu Exhibition

Exhibition

$1,000

13

Jazz Time Dance – Paul Horo

Infinity Dance Workshops

Sui May and Ellis Chow

$500

Total Available for Distribution $15,113

Total Awarded

$14,427

 

 

Recommendation

That the Community and Policy Committee:

a)         Receives the report titled “Southland District Council Creative New Zealand Creative Communities Scheme Grants Awarded May 2017” dated 11 May 2017.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report. 

 


Community and Policy Committee

17 May 2017

sdclogo

 

Financial and Reserve Contribution Fund Financial Report to 31 March 2017

Record No:        R/17/5/9415

Author:                 Bronwyn Affleck, Administration Manager

Approved by:       Rex Capil, Group Manager Community and Futures

 

  Decision                              Recommendation                         Information

 

  

 

Financial and Reserve Contribution Fund financial report to 31 March 2017

1        There are no applications or project requests for funding to this Fund in the application round closing 31 March 2017

 

Recommendation

That the Community and Policy Committee:

a)         Receives the report titled “Financial and Reserve Contribution Fund Financial Report to 31 March 2017” dated 5 May 2017.

 

Attachments

a         Financial and Reserve Contribution Fund Financial Report to 31 March 2017    

 


Community and Policy Committee

17 May 2017

 


Community and Policy Committee

17 May 2017

sdclogo

 

Community Futures 2040

Record No:        R/17/4/8615

Author:                 Rex Capil, Group Manager Community and Futures

Approved by:       Steve Ruru, Chief Executive

 

  Decision                              Recommendation                         Information

 

  

A View Towards our Community Futures 2040

Purpose

1        The purpose of this report is to continue to build on the conversations and future thinking work that has started to be undertaken by this Council.

2        This report aims to make Councillors aware in more detail of some of the topics associated with the future thinking necessary. It also provides information to assist in developing an initial understanding of why there is a need to invest in this work.

3        It is anticipated further detail and discussion documents will be developed as the thinking evolves which will be submitted for consideration as part of the LTP 2018 – 2028 development and associated resource allocation requirement discussions.

 

Introduction

4        There is a lot of discussion – nationally, regionally and locally – about future pressures, future opportunities and future decisions required to ensure our communities are sustainable, affordable to live in and are fit for purpose to deliver on expectations for an appropriate and acceptable level of service from a quality of life perspective.

5        Over recent years and specifically with regards to the 2016-2019 triennium the Southland District Council has committed to being proactive and to front foot such issues and the opportunities that they might create.

6        Council has expressed an interest and a desire to having the courageous conversations with its communities and playing a leadership role with, for and on behalf of the communities it serves. This doesn’t mean that the conversations are going to be easy. It doesn’t necessarily mean decisions are going to necessarily be accepted by all.

7        When significant change is afoot it is important to acknowledge and accept that equitable solutions are not in fact equal solutions. There is a difference between equitable and equal. We need to define what we mean by ‘equitable’ within our business.

8        Many may consider 2040 to be out of reach when considering future challenges and opportunities – but to provide some context this is seven trienniums from this one – the same number that Cr Dillon will have served at the completion of this triennium from 1998-2019. This provides a sense of realism to the thinking that 21 years is not long term in the context of local government planning.

9        Thinking 20+ years into the future requires us to get out of our own ‘world view’ and imagine a future beyond ourselves when many of us will be retired or handing over the reins to our successors.

10      Thinking of the kinds of communities our children and grand-children will inherit requires us to think of the various scenarios and possibilities available in the future.

11      But thinking 20+ years into the future is also difficult. The human brain is ‘hard wired’ for pattern recognition and ‘what we know’. And patterns, by their nature, are based on events that have already happened and the behaviours that we have become accustomed to accept.

12      The Southland District Council is positioning itself to front foot and be best prepared for having the courageous conversations required. As Futurist Stephen Yarwood stated recently – “if we are going to apply the last 20 years experiences to plan for the district’s future - there is a view we are best to move on

13      But it takes work and planning. As the Chinese proverb states – “The best time to plant a tree was twenty years ago. The second best time is now.” Being a resilient community and district means investing now, to be future ready.

 

Current Context and Relevance

14      There is a lot of interest in this space – with much international and national work being undertaken.  Below is a sample list of some examples of readings and discussions highlighting the community futures thinking:

 

·    LGNZ – July 2016 – The 2050 challenge: future proofing our communities. http://www.lgnz.co.nz/our-work/publications/the-2050-challenge-future-proofing-our-communities/

·    The NZ Initiative – 2015 – The Local Formula – myths, facts & challenges – Jason Krupp and Bryce Wilkinson https://nzinitiative.org.nz/insights/reports/the-local-formula/

·    Maxim Institute – 2017 – Growing beyond growth – rethinking the goals of regional development in NZ – Julian Wood http://www.maxim.org.nz/growing-beyond-growth/

·    McKinlay Douglas Ltd – March 2013 – The future direction of Local Government – what it means for rural and provincial NZ – Peter McKinlay http://www.mdl.co.nz/site/mckinley/Local%20government-future-rural%20and%20provincial%20New%20Zealand.pdf

·    Linkedin – Dec 2016 – Five maps that reveal new truths about America’s Megaregions https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/five-maps-reveal-new-truths-americas-megaregions-bruce-upbin

·    Bernard Salt – 2006 – The Big Picture – life, work and relationships in the 21st century

·    Paul Spoonley – 2016 – Rebooting the regions – why low or zero growth needn’t mean the end of prosperity

·    PWC – July 2016 – Connecting the dots – Local Government Infrastructure Matters http://www.pwc.co.nz/PWC.NZ/media/pdf-documents/government/pwc-connecting-the-dots-local-government-and-infrastructure-matters-july-2016.pdf

·    SOLGM – August 2016 – Building community resilience https://www.solgm.org.nz/Category?Action=View&Category_id=1258

·    Stuff – March 2017 – Tough choices ahead for small town NZ – Libby Wilson, Debbie Jamieson and Joanne Carroll http://www.stuff.co.nz/business/89940608/tough-choices-ahead-for-small-town-new-zealand

·    Newshub – March 2017 – It’s time to stop propping up small town NZ – Ryan Bridge http://www.newshub.co.nz/home/new-zealand/2017/03/ryan-bridge-it-s-time-to-stop-propping-up-small-town-nz.html

·    NZ Herald – March 2016 – Why are migrants snubbing NZ’s regions? – Lincoln Tan http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=11569008

·    Stuff – July 2016 – Pubs forced to reinvent themselves – Chris Hutching http://www.stuff.co.nz/business/82383752/Pulling-pints-and-serving-a-pie-no-longer-enough-for-pubs

·    NZ Herald – January 2016 – Where the cheapest houses in NZ are – Lane Nichols http://www.nzherald.co.nz/business/news/article.cfm?c_id=3&objectid=11566597

·    Stuff – March 2016 – NZ regions have to adapt or face a ‘fairly dismal future’ warns academic Paul Spoonley – Joanne Carroll http://www.stuff.co.nz/business/84888305/Rural-regions-have-to-adapt-or-face-a-fairly-dismal-future-says-academic-Paul-Spoonley

·    Stuff – March 2016 – Shamubeel Eaqub: land planning key to saving towns http://www.stuff.co.nz/business/opinion-analysis/78273585/Shamubeel-Eaqub-land-planning-key-to-saving-towns

·    Stuff – March 2016 – Westpac closures reflect bigger trend affecting small town NZ – John Bisset http://www.stuff.co.nz/business/industries/83464715/westpac-closures-reflect-bigger-trend-affecting-small-town-new-zealand

·    Stuff – August 2015 – Migrant workers may save South Island towns in decline – Tess McClure http://www.stuff.co.nz/the-press/business/the-rebuild/71495784/Migrant-workers-may-save-South-Island-towns-in-decline

·    RadioNZ – January 2017 – NZers not mixing with new migrants enough http://www.radionz.co.nz/news/national/321789/nzers-not-mixing-with-new-migrants-enough-community-group

·    Economist – January 2017 – Japanese Demography - Desperately seeking young people http://www.economist.com/news/asia/21713868-there-arent-many-and-cities-are-growing-desperate-desperately-seeking-young-people

·    Linkedin – February 2017 – Communities are living systems. Don’t engage them with dead strategies and plans https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/communities-living-systems-dont-engage-them-dead-plans-lynne-wardle

·    NZ Herald – November 2016 – Feeding Asia’s Thirst for Milk – Bloomberg http://www.nzherald.co.nz/the-country/news/article.cfm?c_id=16&objectid=11741772

·    Economist – April 2017 - Fading echoes: East Germany is running out of people - http://www.economist.com/news/finance-and-economics/21720578-rest-country-and-large-swathes-europe-will-face-similar-problems?cid1=cust/ddnew/n/n/n/20170411n/owned/n/n/nwl/n/n/ap/Daily_Dispatch/email&etear=dailydispatch

·    NZ Herald – April 2017 – Top source countries for migrant workers are not Asian - http://www.nzherald.co.nz/front-page-top-stories/news/article.cfm?c_id=698&objectid=11842859&ref=CE-NZH-DND-AM

·    Radio NZ – April 2017 – Sea level prone homes set for insurance cutoff -  http://www.radionz.co.nz/news/national/329709/sea-level-prone-homes-set-for-insurance-cutoff

·    NZ Herald - May 2017 – The Great Tourism Squeeze: Squeeze on the Government to ease tourism pressure - http://www.nzherald.co.nz/front-page-top-stories/news/article.cfm?c_id=698&objectid=11844832&ref=CE-NZH-DND-AM

 

15      It is also worth noting that Council’s Group Manager Community and Futures is a member of the SOLGM Sector Policy and Outlook Working Party – which is tasked with providing input and feedback to futures thinking in the sector at a national level.

16      A simple conclusion from the above examples of readings and discussions happening in this space is that the issues ‘of the future’ in fact are real, in fact are happening around us now, and shouldn’t necessarily be seen as future issues anymore. They are today’s topics of tomorrow.

17      This work is not about predicting the future – but it is about being aware of the future and being prepared accordingly.

18      The LGNZ Conference 2017 to be held in July picks up on this future focus with the theme for this year’s conference being ‘creating pathways to 2050: liveable spaces and loveable places.’ Topics to be covered include

·    Building communities from the ground up: strengthening local democracy and engagement.

·    Community faces: how people are shaping the future.

·    Building tomorrow’s places 2050: the role of technology.

·    Creating tomorrow’s places 2050: attracting inward investment to boost local economy.

·    Liveable spaces and loveable places: community infrastructure.

·    Sustainable development 2050: inspired action to build great communities.

·    Looking after tomorrow’s places 2050: meeting our nation’s water needs.

·    Future proofing our communities.

 

Snapshot of Topics for Future Consideration

19      The following is a snapshot of topics with summary points detailing challenges and opportunities for future consideration. The topics are presented in no particular order of priority or significance but this snapshot is an attempt to identify ‘top of mind’ points for consideration.

20      The information has been sourced from a wide range of papers and readings and is intended to be a starting point for thinking and as a lead in for further work to be undertaken over the short term from now to 2020.

Demographic Trends

21      The two most significant trends are population ageing and rural depopulation.

22      Ageing will increasingly affect demand for services, transport and connection networks, and housing patterns. An ageing population will generally place greater demands on health services. There will also be different needs for education, recreation, retail and community services.

23      Rural depopulation means that many of our village and local communities’ population numbers are static or reducing. A combination of out migration and more deaths than births is increasingly resulting in declining populations in rural areas. This has implications for affordable levels of service.

24      Rural depopulation, along with population ageing, will make it harder for the maintenance of key infrastructure and services because of a diminishing rating base and a higher proportion of the population on lower incomes.

25      Declining amenities and services over time make it more difficult for people remaining to satisfy needs locally, meaning that they need to travel to larger centres for services and facilities.

26      Depopulation can therefore be self-reinforcing – decline creates conditions that increase the potential for decline.

27      It is important to note that in many ways we are just seeing the start of rural depopulation which is projected to increase over time. In saying this there are other areas of the district with population growth requiring increased servicing and infrastructure needs.

28      The ‘two speed’ economy of the district poses significant challenges – and reinforces that equity and equality are two different considerations.

29      Changing migration patterns and ethnic diversity will continue to change the characteristics, values and needs of the district population.

Central Government Influence

30      Government continues its focus on economic growth: growing exports, improving infrastructure, improving productivity, attracting investment, increasing labour skills and supporting high value, knowledge intensive business.

31      Regional economic development has been focussed on as a priority – and SoRDS is an example of a project and process supported by central government with investment in diversification of Southland’s economy – specifically aquaculture, primary sector and agriculture, tourism, international education and skills training.

32      Government is still seeking improvement in efficiency and effectiveness of local government, and promoting the ease of doing business. The discussion around the delivery and transfer of core services and functions raise many opportunities and challenges for local government.

33      There is a clear requirement to consider the purpose and role of local government – especially with regards to local representation and what this means as compared to being a local service delivery provider and how these align – or not?

34      Increasingly the private sector and other alternative delivery structures are being considered as potential partners to support public servicing and infrastructure provision delivery.

Natural Hazard Risks

35      Natural hazard risk is increasing due to climate change (increasing storm intensity and potential for coastal erosion).

36      There is an increased emphasis on hazard management since the Christchurch and Kaikoura earthquakes.

37      Climate change risks continue to develop with impacts on infrastructure, insurance, farming, water supply, biodiversity needing addressed. In recent years the understanding and acceptance of the reality of climate change has increased.

38      Climate change has the most potential to affect the general wellbeing of the district, particularly over the medium/long term. Short term effects include storm, flood, drought effects on the economy and in some cases human safety. Longer term there will be effects on biosecurity risk, ecosystems and biodiversity, viability of agricultural products, coastal erosion and coastal hazards.

Technological Change

39      Computers, the internet and smartphones are now old technology.

40      New technologies are rapidly arising that will change the way we live and work – such as drones, robotics, artificial intelligence, virtual reality et al.

41      It is a commonly held view – the future is here.

42      A recent NZIER analysis noted that half of all jobs in New Zealand are at risk of technological displacement over the next three decades. Most job losses will be in areas staffed by the less qualified and skilled workforce.

43      New technologies will also create jobs but these are likely to be in smaller numbers and for more skilled workers.

44      New ways of generating, accessing and analysing data are providing new opportunities to understand all manner of subject matter.

45      Internationally the number of electric vehicles on roads is increasing at an accelerating rate. Driverless car technology is also developing rapidly, with aspects of the technology already in many new cars.

46      The Ministry for Primary Industries Strategic Intentions 2015-2020 report notes that new technologies are providing new opportunities for primary producers to bring greater precision to their production and harvesting systems, improve their productivity and to understand and service customers.

47      However, new technology can also be a threat to farming. There has been an increase in researchers and start-ups focusing on synthetic production of milk and protein.

48      Technological advancement has also assisted communities to replace a passive relationship with council with a dynamic one filled with new possibilities, obligations and consequences. Technology in the next twenty years will have a transformative effect on how residents interact with council, what they expect from council, and what they can provide to council.

49      Technology can be a great enabler allowing real time, two way engagement and improving the relationship between council and residents.

Economic Trends

50      Southland’s economy and associated economic activity remains stable – but variant due to the global and national externalities which impact on economic activity and indicators.

51      International and national economic trends strongly influence the district, including patterns of trade, tourism, commodity production, GDP and currency.

52      The global economy is changing rapidly – with the commonly held belief that the nineteenth century was the British century, the twentieth century the American century and the twenty first century is the Asian century.

 

53      At a regional level , in nominal terms (unadjusted for inflation), Southland’s economy with data sourced from Stats NZ is assessed as:

·    From 2011–16 the Southland economy increased 3.7 percent (well below the national average of 23.8 percent). During this period, Southland’s contribution to GDP fell 0.4 percentage points to 2.0 percent.

·    In 2014, Southland’s GDP increased 13.5 percent, benefiting from a 50.9 percent increase in the agriculture industry (mainly dairy cattle farming).

·    In 2015, Southland’s economy decreased 5.8 percent, reflecting a decline in the value of agricultural production (mainly dairy cattle farming) of 46.4 percent. This fall was partly offset by increases in several other industries, particularly manufacturing.

·    In 2016, Southland’s GDP decreased 1.0 percent due to a further fall in the agriculture industry.

 

Graph, Gross Domestic Product, By Region, Year ended March 2016.

 

54      In considering the Southland district’s well-being it is important to consider it based on overall socio economic factors. Inequality is increasing in New Zealand and the implications for Southland need to be considered as part of the overall future planning and thinking required.

55      A 2015 International Monetary Fund report stated that “Widening income inequality is the defining challenge of our time”. OECD figures show that New Zealand’s inequality has been growing faster than most with 50% of the population owning 3.8% of the wealth compared to 10% of the population having more than 50% of the wealth. Wealth inequality in New Zealand is about two to three times higher than income inequality.

56      The IMF report stated that growing inequality reduces a country’s growth with the problem being that the middle class has relatively less disposable money which means less money is circulated to grow the economy.

Environmental Considerations

57      Southland’s natural environment provides tremendous benefits and opportunities on several levels. Easy access to pristine wilderness and good air quality support a high quality of life for Southlanders which are shared with increasing numbers of visitors.

58      It is important environmental considerations are considered as part of the future conversations to be had and environmental limits are not compromised. Water quality, soil quality and biodiversity are all important considerations along with increasing demand for water.

59      It is important any decline in the district’s natural capital and associated ecosystem services are important considerations in future decisionmaking. Especially when considering greenhouse gas emissions are increasing, pollution of freshwater is spreading over a wider area and the country’s biodiversity is under threat.

60      Local Government NZ has launched a new piece of work to create a comprehensive framework that brings freshwater issues and water infrastructure into a coherent policy. “Water 2015” will develop a framework for water that coherently integrates freshwater quality and quantity, standards, rights and allocation, land use, three waters infrastructure, cost and affordability, and funding.

Intergenerational Shifts

61      As societal changes take hold and intergenerational influencers change, the impact on how communities function, are governed and make decisions will change accordingly. It is a global trend that the level of trust in institutions and governments is decreasing.

62      Changes in 2014 to the Local Government Act 2002 require local authorities to be more strategic in their approach to delivering services. The new requirements encourage local authorities to seek efficiencies and improve arrangements for service delivery.

63      In particular, equipping elected representatives with the information and skills to make decisions about appropriate and affordable infrastructure and service delivery in a changing environment for the future is critical.

64      Communities’ and people’s values, needs and wants are becoming more differentiated due to increasing ethnic and cultural and intergenerational diversity and wealth and income inequality.

65      There is an increasing emphasis placed on sustainability practices with a priority on seeking reductions in energy use, waste production and an increasing understanding of living within environmental limits and reducing environmental damage.

66      Consumer expectations and behaviours are changing rapidly. People are increasingly buying on line – requiring instant service and being able to access the best price for the product they want.

67      Social media means that consumers are more empowered with information on products, having the ability to talk back and the ability to spread opinion. Consumer expectations for safety, sustainability, traceability, quality, suitability and product genuineness are increasing.

 

Next Steps

68      Being realistic and responsible and considering the future challenges and opportunities now means Council is being responsible and is preparing the ground for decisions to be made in 2021 and beyond.

69      To this end there is some ‘big picture analytics’ type work that needs to be undertaken to assist in informing the courageous conversations required to be had and to inform with data, insights and futures thinking decisions that will need to be made.

70      This ‘big picture analytics’ type work will also assist in developing Council’s position on various long term related challenges and opportunities which in turn will provide a clear strategic direction and position statements which will be used by activity managers to inform and populate activity management plans for future service delivery and levels of service provided with communities.

71      The work programme is still to be developed but is to be based on future scenario planning and also forecasting from data insights allowing analytical modelling with a future focus.

72      The following key or core themes (in no particular order) are identified for specific work to be undertaken for the Southland district to be defined, scoped and completed by December 2018 – to primarily inform the 2021 LTP process and development and subsequent political decisions.

 

Macro to Micro Analytics and Forecasting

a.   Data Stocktake

With consideration of the areas of interest requiring insights and data to inform future decisions:

 

-     An assessment of what data exists

-     Who holds or is the source of the data?

-     Availability and accessibility of the data

-     Partner with Environment Southland on similar and related data requirements projects.

 

b.   Population and demographics

Consideration of future scenarios to gain an understanding what Southland district communities (of interest) will look like including data analysis of:

 

-     Demographics

-     Age structure

-     Ethnicity

-     Educational qualifications

-     Income assessment

-     Employment by sector

-     Households and dwellings

-     Socio economic assessment including deprivation index levels.

 

c.   Socio Economic Indicators – what do they say and mean for Southland district.

Using standard socio economic indicators:

 

-     What is the current picture painted for Southland district – as a whole and for different communities within the District?

-     What is the forecasted picture painted for Southland district – as a whole and for different communities within the District?

 

d.   Southland district core industries – what is the now and what is the future?

Consideration of future scenarios for the Southland ‘primary sector big’ industries - Dairy, Sheep and Beef, forestry etc including:

 

-     Method of delivery

-     Ownership structures

-     Land use patterns

-     Technological influencers

-     Quantitative assessment of number of farms, size of farms, number of employers

-     Economists view on the outlook for these primary sector big industries for Southland – giving consideration to the net impact for Southland comparative impact with the rest of NZ

 

e.   Tourism

Consideration of future scenarios relating to:

 

-     What is the tourism/visitor sector?

-     How big is the sector in comparison to other sectors in Southland?

-     What economic activity is classified tourism and how does this equate to FTE employment in the tourism/visitor sector? Can this be broken down by sub sector or industry classification?

-     What is Southland baseline Tourism information – what are employment levels, contribution to regional GDP?

-     What do we define as a visitor and how do we collect the data?

-     How much economic activity is measured and how by way of traditional methods e.g. CAM – and how much is not re VFR, AirBNB, Freedom Camping, Camper Vans etc?

-     What and how are measures appropriate for future forecasts?

-     From an economist perspective what are the upside/benefits related to projections for the tourism sector and conversely what are the risks/disbenefits of such?

-     What are the implications for SDC as local government provider re infrastructure, funding and revenue policy and rates affordability?

-     Visitor number projections

-     Visitor market assessment – source, type and flow

-     Relationship of domestic and international visitor trends and influencers

-     Identified risks

-     Sector vulnerabilities

-     District and local implications – infrastructure and planning requirements

 

f.    Environmental drivers

Consideration of and implications of global and national drivers and policy statements relating to:

 

-     Land and Water

-     Clean Air

-     Fresh Water

-     Climate Change

 

g.   Transport and connectivity

Consideration of future modes of transport and transport requirements relating to product demand:

 

-     Demand analysis and purpose for local transport network

-     Future of the state highway network

-     Combined network requirements and what will this look like

-     Economic modelling requirements and regional development drivers of demand

-     Implications of people vs. product assessment

-     Implications on health, education, social service delivery

 

h.   Affordability and rating

Consideration of the socio economic profile of the district and different Southland communities:

 

-     Rating levels and the ability to afford and pay

-     A profile of ratepayers

-     Analysis of the proportion of household income spent on rates

-     District and local funding models

-     Policy implications.

 

 

Recommendation

That the Community and Policy Committee:

a)         Receives the report titled “Community Futures 2040” dated 11 May 2017.

 

b)         Endorses the approach to undertake the ‘big picture research and analytics’ work to inform the associated work programme as part of the 2018-2028 LTP consultation process.

 

c)         Endorses the approach to proceed with scoping the next stage planning and implementation requirements post the initial ‘big picture research and analytics’ work and to report back to this Committee once scoped.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report. 

 


Community and Policy Committee

17 May 2017

sdclogo

 

Community Organisation and Volunteer Futures Sector Research

Record No:        R/17/4/8254

Author:                 Michelle  Stevenson, Community Partnership Leader

Approved by:       Rex Capil, Group Manager Community and Futures

 

  Decision                              Recommendation                         Information

 

  

Purpose

1        The purpose of this report is to submit to the Committee the Community Organisation and Volunteer Futures Sector Research, commissioned by Southland District Council to be undertaken as part of the Letter of Expectation to Venture Southland Community Development.  The report, completed by Venture Southland in March 2017 is in response to a project brief provided by Council in August 2016.

Executive Summary

2        The purpose of this research was to investigate the not-for-profit Community Organisation and Volunteer sector in the Southland District in order to gain an understanding of the current situation and identify future opportunities, and to determine the level of service in the Southland district from the not-for-profit sector.

3        Service provision at a community level can be categorised into four areas; central government, local government, private enterprise and not for profit sector – or a combination of some or all.

4        The not-for-profit sector is a significant service delivery arm in the Southland district.  Services range from Community Organisations delivering Central Government contracts to groups run entirely by volunteers, and cover a wide range of sectors including education, health, social services, culture, social groups, sporting and recreation, faith based, and emergency.

5        There were three key objectives to be achieved from this research, linked to both evaluating the current situation and assessing future options and strategies. 

-     Objective one was the development of a database to determine Community Organisation service delivery to rural Southland;

-     Objective two was a service map of the District to determine what this level of service delivery is; and

-     Objective three was to provide a summary of findings and key observations and recommendations as we look to the future of Community Organisation service delivery in Southland. 

The Southland Community Organisation Database has not been included as an attachment as it contains personal details relating to community organisation and volunteer members.

6        The not-for-profit sector plays a significant role in the Southland district, and the need to identify opportunities for ensuring this continues into the future may be critical to the success of the District as a whole.

7        The effectiveness of the not-for-profit sector relies heavily on the demand for services and groups, and on the ability of rural communities to service that demand.  Considerations for succession planning of an aging volunteer sector base, and reliance on annual contracts and grant funding may leave much of the sector in a vulnerable position and require the sector to adapt to changing demographics and situations that impact their ability to deliver services.  Therefore, a strong focus on the future opportunities for not-for-profit service delivery in the District is a crucial component of this brief.

8        There are a number of recommendations that have been put forward in this research, and Council staff will investigate the merit of any or all of the recommendations that may influence future work of Council throughout the District. 

9        The cost of this research was allocated according to the Letter of Expectation between Southland District Council and Venture Southland 2016/17. 

 

Recommendation

That the Community and Policy Committee:

 

a)         Receives the report titled “Community Organisation and Volunteer Futures Sector Research” dated 3 May 2017.

b)         Determines that this matter or decision be recognised as not significant in terms of Section 76 of the Local Government Act 2002.

c)         Determines that it has complied with the decision-making provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 to the extent necessary in relation to this decision; and in accordance with Section 79 of the Act determines that it does not require further information, further assessment of options or further analysis of costs and benefits or advantages and disadvantages prior to making a decision on this matter.

d)         Endorses Council staff to assess the recommendations and findings identified from the research and determine any future opportunities in relation to

-      Council activities and work streams

-      Multi agency partnership opportunities

e)         Acknowledges and supports that additional work identified (where appropriate) to be undertaken on behalf of Southland District Council by Venture Southland as part of the Letter of Expectation 2017/18 priority community development projects.

 

 


 

Content

Background

10      As part of the Community Development Letter of Expectation 2016/2017, Southland District Council commissioned Venture Southland to undertake the Southland Community Organisation and Volunteer Futures Sector Research.

11      The research brief identified the scope of the Community and Volunteer sector to include all not-for-profit community organisation service delivery in the Southland District Council boundary, irrespective of where that service is physically located or of their legal status.  The research brief specifically excluded from scope all not-for-profit community organisations based in surrounding Local Authority boundaries, which did not have the mandate for service delivery in the Southland District, and all not-for-profit community organisations that ceased to operate in the Southland District prior to August 2016.

12      The not-for-profit sector is a significant service delivery arm in the Southland District.  Services range from Community Organisations delivering Central Government contracts to groups run entirely by volunteers, and cover a wide range of sectors including education, health, social services, culture, social groups, sporting and recreation, faith based, and emergency.

Issues

13      Southland District has a vast geographical area, and is serviced by many diverse not-for-profit organisations.  While the research has identified that geographic isolation can be both a strength and a barrier, population and demographic shifts throughout the Southland District may have a significant impact on the number and types of services needed and delivered within Southland into the future.

14      A key goal of this research was to help identify future community partnership opportunities, and to look at how the levels of service required by our communities can be maintained, sustained and remain or grow to be fit for purpose.

15      The effectiveness of the not-for-profit sector relies heavily on the demand for types of services and groups, and on the ability of rural communities to service that demand.  The level of service from not-for-profit groups physically based within Southland District shows challenges in maintaining a strong and diverse volunteer base, attracting funding (often competing on a regional and national stage), and where there are gaps in the level of service it is important that Council understands the future implications of this to its communities.  The purpose of this research was to identify any such gaps and identify what impact, and what opportunities this might have on future levels of service to the District.

16      For the future of not-for-profit levels of service in Southland District it is important to reflect on the sustainability of our community organisations and volunteer sector.  Considerations for succession planning of an aging volunteer sector base, and reliance on annual contracts and grant funding may leave much of the sector in a vulnerable position as the demographics of the Southland District continue to change.

17      The expectation of the brief was for the research to clearly determine where an organisation or group were geographically funded to deliver a service, and where they physically delivered that service. The purpose behind this was to determine the expected level of service based on funding contracts and the actual level of service based on a physical or delivery of service presence.  The identification of this allows for further discussion around the level of service being delivered to our communities, and identification of any gaps or opportunities for future service provision.

18      To help determine the level of community organisation and volunteer sector service to our communities, a key aspect of this research was to consider what opportunities for the future were seen by both the sector themselves, and by the analysis of the findings in the research.  The purpose of this was to determine what support or challenges face this sector in both the immediate term and in the years ahead.

Factors to Consider

Community Views

19      A cross section of not-for-profit community organisations and Volunteer Sector members were interviewed as part of this research.  Over 90 face to face interviews were conducted over a period of 6 months from services located within the Southland District.  The views of organisations and volunteers who deliver a level of service to the Southland District, irrespective of being physically based within the District were not captured in the research, and this will provide some limitations to determining the level of service to the Southland District.

Costs and Funding

20      The cost of this research was allocated according to the Letter of Expectation between Southland District Council and Venture Southland 2016/17.  There are no additional costs to Southland District Council for the completion of this report.

Next Steps

21      Council staff will assess the recommendations and findings put forward in the research, based on the interviews conducted, and determine any future opportunities in relation to Council work streams.

22      Preliminary assessment of the recommendations identify that the majority of recommendations provide baseline information and therefore may have limited benefit.  There are some recommendations made that provide a future focus approach in the not-for-profit level of service across the District and will be assessed further by staff.

23      Any additional work may be undertaken as part of the Letter of Expectation between Southland District Council and Venture Southland 2017/18.

 

Attachments

a         Final report Southland Community Organisation and Volunteer Futures Sector Research 15 March 2017

b         FINAL Community Organisation & Volunteer Sector Research Project Brief    

 


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Community and Policy Committee

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Community and Policy Committee

17 May 2017

 

 

 

SOUTHLAND COMMUNITY ORGANISATION AND VOLUNTEER FUTURES SECTOR RESEARCH

 

Project Brief August 2016

 

Southland District Council has commissioned Venture Southland to undertake this project as part of the Community Development Letter of Expectation 2016/2017. 

 

The information below details the research that is desired, and the reporting requirements.

___________________________________________________________________

 

1.         Project Aim

1.1  Definition of the Community and Voluntary Sector

2.       Project Objectives

2.1       Database of the Southland Not-for-Profit Community Organisations Sector

2.2       Service Map of Community Organisations to determine the level of service

2.3       Summary of findings, key observations and recommendations

 

3.       Scope

          3.1     Inclusions in the Community Organisation and Volunteer Database

          3.2     Exclusions in the Community Organisation and Volunteer Database

          3.3     Inclusions in the Community Organisation and Volunteer Service Mapping

          3.4     Exclusions in the Community Organisation and Volunteer Service Mapping

 

4.       Methodology

4.1  Timeframe

4.2  Costs

4.3  Project Management

4.4  Project Milestone

4.5  Enquires

 

          Appendix A

          Appendix B

          Appendix C

          Appendix D

         

1.
Project Aim

To investigate the Not-for-Profit Community Organisation and Volunteer sector in the Southland District in order to gain an understanding of the current situation and future opportunities; what, why, how and who services are delivered for/in the community.

1.1       Definition of the Community and Voluntary Sector

For the purpose of clarity, the Community and Voluntary Sector organisations will be referred to as not-for-profit.  This will include all groups and organisations that deliver a service to communities in the Southland District, irrespective of their legal status.  The Department of Internal Affairs[2], as based on the United Nations definition determine the not-for-profit sector to have the following characteristics:

·    “organisations with some degree of internal organisational structure, meaningful boundaries, or legal charter of information

·    non-profit, that is, not returning profits to their owners or directors and not primarily guided by commercial goals

·    institutionally separate from government, so that while government funds may be received, the organisation does not exercise governmental authority

·    self-governing, which means the organisations control their management and operations to a major extent

·    not compulsory, which means that membership and contributions of time and money are not required by law or otherwise made a condition of citizenship”

 

2. Project Objectives

The primary objective of this research is to look at the level of service delivery for Community (not-for-profit) services in Southland rural communities.  From this, three key objectives are to be achieved from this research, linked to both evaluating the current situation and assessing future options and strategies.  Objective one is the development of a database which will provide a snapshot of Community Organisation service delivery to rural Southland; objective two is a service map of the District to determine what this level of service delivery is; and the last objective is to provide a summary of findings and key observations and recommendations as we look to the future of Community Organisation service delivery in Southland. 

2.1. Database of the Southland Community Organisation and Volunteer Sector

Develop a database of the Southland Community Organisation and Volunteer sector.  This will provide a snapshot in time of services being delivered in Southland rural communities, and create the backbone to a database of Community Organisations in the not-for-profit sector for future information. 

2.2. Service map of Community Organisations and Volunteer Sector in Southland District

Create a service map that may be an extension of the database, or a separate document.  The service mapping of not-for-profit community organisations and volunteer sector will ideally be strengths based and will include:

·    Purpose and function of the organisation (what do they do, what function do they have in the wider community? This may be split by sectors to be more meaningful – for example health, recreation, culture, faith-based, social service, education)

·    Location (where are they situated considering Council boundaries and communities of interest; where do they physically deliver their service; are there issues associated with groups who are located in different areas such as rural/urban/national, what local facilities do they use)

·    Description and type (e.g. charity vs legal entity; local Trust etc) – how does Southland sit compared to nationally (more informal groups or charities than others)

·    Funding (what sector and geographical area are they funded to service; the type of funding they have – contract/grant/gift/fundraising; length of time funding will cover)

·    How many employ staff (how many FTE equivalents, and their breakdown; for example 2 FTE’s made up of 6 people working part-time); key contact information

·    How many utilise volunteers (including but not limited to, a description of how many people are volunteering, their distance travelled to engage in volunteering, age and gender breakdown, increase or decrease in volunteering numbers/organisations, motivations for volunteering, barriers, and an understanding of how people volunteer – has this changed over time, do people volunteer for more than one group)

 

Please note that it is important that the definition of the ‘volunteer sector’ and the term ‘non-profit organisations’ is clear because of the breadth of the term.  Consideration to be given to the categories that Statistics New Zealand use to allow comparison of data.

2.3. Summary of findings, key observations and recommendations

As we look to the future of Community Organisation (not-for-profit) service delivery in and from communities in Southland, what observations, analysis and recommendations can be put forward.  This should include, but not be limited to all of the following:

·    Are there duplications of services

·    Are there gaps in levels of service and/or service delivery

·    Identify cross-agency or group partnership opportunities

·    Alternative delivery mode opportunities

·    Impact of levels of service on declining and aging population

·    Impact of isolation and distance to travel for the future of Community organisation levels of service across Southland

·    How could future levels of service be maintained or increased (sustainability models)

·    Are there areas that are at risk – for example, sectors or communities that rely on the volunteer sector or individual people heavily that need to be aware of changes in volunteers? What opportunities could this present?

·    Increasing numbers of migrants to the areas – key opportunities or considerations?

·    Managing and supporting community organisations and volunteers – ideas to implement in Southland? Opportunities associated with ‘collective impact’ which looks at developing structures to combine governance while maintaining operational arms being activity specific.

 

3. Scope

The scope of this research is to give insights, data analysis, and assessments to inform and provide a way forward for community organisation and volunteer sector service delivery across the Southland District.  The scope of this research will include, but not be limited to the following sector and geographical inclusions and exclusions:

3.1.  Inclusions in the Community Organisation and Volunteer Database

·    Health sector

·    Cultural groups

·    Social Service sector

·    Educational sector

·    Faith-based groups

·    Sports and Recreation sector

·    All not-for-profit community organisation service delivery in the Southland District Council boundary

 

3.2.  Exclusions in the Community Organisation and Volunteer Database

·    All not-for-profit community organisations based in surrounding Local Authority boundaries, that do not have the mandate for service delivery in the Southland District

·    All not-for-profit community organisations that have ceased to operate in the Southland District prior to August 2016

 

3.3. Inclusions in the Community Organisation and Volunteer Service Mapping

·    Health sector

·    Cultural groups

·    Social Service sector

·    Educational sector

·    Faith-based groups

·    Sports and Recreation sector

·    All not-for-profit community organisation service delivery in the Southland District Council boundary

 

3.4. Exclusions in the Community Organisation and Volunteer Service Mapping

•    All not-for-profit community organisations based in surrounding Local Authority boundaries, that do not have the mandate for service delivery in the Southland District

•    All not-for-profit community organisations that have ceased to operate in the Southland District prior to August 2016

 

4. Methodology

The Approach

The research will include, but not be limited to the following methodologies:

·    Face-to-face consultation with a minimum of 90[3] community organisations and volunteer groups across the Southland District.  This should be representative across sector and geographical areas of interest and include no less than:

o 15 community organisations from within each Southland District Council Ward (Mararoa/Waimea, Waiau/Aparima, Winton/Wallacetown, Waihopai/Toetoes, Stewart Island/Rakiura)

o Within each Ward a minimum of 3 community organisations across 6 Sectors of importance (key sectors identified in 3.1; additional sectors of importance may be determined by Venture Southland staff)

·    Observational study; exclusive of longitudinal study given the short timeframe for this project

·    Desktop Evaluations

·    Consideration of previous work undertaken to allow for comparisons

 

The Report

A written report will be provided to Southland District Council upon the completion of the project and will include, but not be limited to:

·    Database of Community Organisations who deliver community services, including geographic communities of interest (to be defined), and Sector or Activity groups (to be defined)

·    Service map that includes but may not be limited to, assessment of the purpose, result, achievement, effectiveness of not-for-profit community organisations; and analysis of the level of service delivery including duplication, gaps, significance and relevance to the Southland District, sustainability and thoughts around future modes of delivery; including collective impact

·    Summary of findings

·    Recommendations to support community organisation service delivery in Southland and to align with the Southland District Council’s Service Delivery work being undertaken.  Recommendations will consider community organisations future levels of service to/for the District, and provide direction and priority areas to help inform future projects.

 

4.1. Timeframe

The Community Organisation and Volunteer Futures Sector Research will be undertaken by Venture Southland Community Development staff.  The completion date for this research is 28 February 2017, with an interim progress update to be submitted to the Southland District Council Community Partnership Leader by 7 November 2016.

4.2. Costs

All costs for this project have been allocated according to the Letter of Expectation between Southland District Council and Venture Southland 2016/17. 

 

4.3. Project Management

Southland District Council has requested Venture Southland undertake this work on its behalf.  Venture Southland staff will undertake this project, and be responsible for ensuring the agreed objectives and deliverables are achieved.  Venture Southland are expected to carry out all necessary research to ensure the completion of the Community Organisation and Volunteers Futures Sector Research and the successful provision of project objectives within the timeframe as identified in this project brief. The project will be overseen by the Southland District Council Community Partnership Leader.

 

4.4. Project Milestones

 

Key milestones for this project are:

Action

Timeframe

Person responsible

Date Completed

Finalisation of Project Brief

Friday 12 August 2016

Michelle Stevenson

Friday 12 August 2016

Checkpoint – review database with Community Partnership Leader to allow refinement of organisation consultations       

Monday 19 September 2016

Nic Wills

Thursday 29 September 2016

90 Community Organisation interviews undertaken

Friday 14 October 2016

Nic Wills

February 2017

Project Brief update completed

Monday 7 November 2016

Nic Wills

Received Monday 7 September 2016.  Revised to Monday 21 November 2016

Database of community organisations completed                    

Tuesday 28 February 2017

Amy Bird

15 March 2017

Final report completed

Tuesday 28 February 2017

Amy Bird

15 March 2017

Analysis and assessment report to SDC ELT project team

Friday 31 March 2017

Michelle Stevenson

 

Issues and options report to ELT project team

Tuesday 30 May 2017

Michelle Stevenson

 

 

4.5. Enquiries

All communications relating to this project brief or requests for clarification or further information to be directed in the first instance to:

Venture Southland

Nicola Wills | Community Development Team Leader

T +64 3 211 1803        M +64 21 064 5467       | E: nicola@venturesouthland.co.nz

 

In the event that further clarification or information is required that cannot be met by Venture Southland staff, communication should be directed to:

Southland District Council

Michelle Stevenson | Community Partnership Leader

T 0800 732 732       M +64 27 201 9802          | E: michelle.stevenson@southlanddc.govt.nz

                                                                                                                                             

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Appendix A

Non Profit Institutions Satellite Account: 2013 (Statistics New Zealand)


Non-profit institutions satellite account: 2013 measures and analyses the contribution of non-profit institutions to New Zealand’s economy and includes an estimate of the contribution volunteers make to their activities. This release includes information about financial and non-financial information for the year ending March 2013. The statistics in this release update the 2004 account we published in 2007.

 

Non-profit institutions include: cultural societies, sports clubs, social service institutions, private schools and hospitals, churches, environmental groups, trade unions, political parties and charitable trusts. Overall, the methodology and classifications used for the 2013 statistics are the same as we used for 2004. However, we’ve implemented improvements to source data between 2004 and 2013 when compiling the latest statistics.

 

The NPISA supplements the existing New Zealand System of National Accounts (NZSNA). Satellite accounts are recognised internationally as a way of rearranging existing information in a country’s SNA, so an area of particular economic or social importance (eg non-profit institutions) can be analysed more closely.

 

Links are maintained between the satellite account and the central national accounting framework. This is important as it enables us to present new information alongside standard economic measures such as gross domestic product.

 

http://www.stats.govt.nz/browse_for_stats/economic_indicators/NationalAccounts/non-profit-institutions-2013.aspx

 

NZSCNPO has 12 major activity groups:

·    culture and recreation

·    education and research

·    health

·    social services

·    environment

·    development and housing

·    law, advocacy, and politics

·    grant making, fundraising, and voluntarism promotion

·    international

·    religion

·    business and professional associations, unions

·    not elsewhere classified (a residual category).

·    Composition of largest NPI activity groups The largest groups, and the institutions that make them up are:

Culture and recreation – the largest group, this includes institutions such as film societies, community theatres, toy libraries, historical associations, garden societies, operatic societies, pipe bands, Māori performing arts groups, sports clubs, regional sports trusts, racing clubs, tramping clubs, and vintage car clubs.

Culture and recreation subgroups

The culture and recreation activity group has four distinct subgroups.

The culture and arts subgroup consists of NPIs involved in: visual and performing arts; architecture, media, and communications societies; historical, literary, heritage, and humanistic societies; museums, libraries; and zoos and aquariums.

The sports subgroup has the full range of sports clubs, physical fitness, sports competition services, and events.

The third subgroup is ‘other recreation and social clubs’, and includes NPIs providing services to members, using recreational and community facilities. Examples are local country clubs, men’s and women’s clubs, Lions and Rotary clubs, and returned and services associations.

The fourth subgroup includes NPIs providing supporting services for culture and recreation, where actual participation in culture and recreation are not the primary activities.

Social services – includes social service providers, emergency and relief services, and institutions providing income support and maintenance. Examples are: early intervention services, services for the disabled and elderly, food banks, self-help and other personal social services.

Development and housing – includes NPIs working towards improving the quality of life within communities or the economy to improve public well-being. Examples include community centres, community development trusts, neighbourhood support groups, employment services, and tangata whenua governance institutions that manage the affairs of iwi, hapū, and marae.

Religion – includes churches and associations promoting religion or administering religious services. Examples are: bible chapels, churches, and temples. Service agencies with religious affiliations, in fields such as health, education, and social services, are grouped with related service providers rather than being included here.

Business and professional associations, unions – brings together three distinct types of membership institutions. This group includes institutions that promote, regulate, and safeguard the interests of businesses, professionals, and workers. Examples are: trade unions, professional associations, chambers of commerce, and industry associations.

Education and research – includes kindergartens, playcentres, kōhanga reo, private primary and secondary schools, private tertiary providers, other education providers (eg English for speakers of other languages), and research institutions. However, public education institutions such as universities, polytechnics, and state and integrated schools are not included.

Appendix B


 

http://www.stuff.co.nz/southland-times/news/features/79211592/riverton-rsa-who-will-step-up

 

Appendix C


http://www.scoop.co.nz/stories/CU1606/S00155/volunteering-statistics-point-to-effective-managers.htm

 

Appendix D


http://www.stats.govt.nz/browse_for_stats/economic_indicators/NationalAccounts/non-profit-2013-mr.aspx

http://www.stats.govt.nz/browse_for_stats/economic_indicators/NationalAccounts/non-profit-satellite-infographic.aspx

 


Community and Policy Committee

17 May 2017

sdclogo

 

Venture Southland Quarterly Report March 2017

Record No:        R/17/4/8723

Author:                 Hunter Andrews, Communications Manager Venture Southland

Approved by:       Rex Capil, Group Manager Community and Futures

 

  Decision                              Recommendation                         Information

 

  

 

Venture Southland Quarterly Report – Third Quarter

1        Report on progress of all activities undertaken by the organisation.

 

Recommendation

That the Community and Policy Committee:

a)         Receives the report titled “Venture Southland Quarterly Report March 2017” dated 26 April 2017.

 

Attachments

a         Venture Southland Quarterly Report March 2017    

 


Community and Policy Committee

17 May 2017

 

 

QUARTERLY REPORT

Third Quarter 2016/17

This report contains a complete breakdown of Venture Southland’s Business Plan Key Objectives/Performance Measures for 2016/17. Each measure has a commentary and a status provided; green for completed, orange for ongoing and red indicating work is yet to start.

 

Additional information may be provided at the end of each section or as an appendix.   

 

Some highlights contained within this report

 

Tourism continues to perform strongly, particularly the international visitor market and recent figures back up anecdotal industry feedback.  For the year ended January 2017, MBIE report that revenue collected from tourism in Southland has increased to $605 million, up 6% on the previous year and up 14% since 2015.  This is impressive considering SoRDS have a goal of increasing revenue from $530 million in 2015 to $1billion so it shows we are well and truly progressing in a positive direction.

Another success this quarter has been the World Shearing and Woolhandling Championships.  VS proud to be supporting the hard working organising committee in a number of ways.

Tourism Growth Partnership funding successes - Business case development complete for 2 Tourism Growth Fund applications to a total funding value of $1,050,000

 

A funding agreement has been entered into between Education New Zealand and Venture Southland until June 2019 for the delivery of the Regional Business Programme. The International Education Coordinator has been appointed and will be attending the Australian New Zealand Agent workshop in Cairns between the 5-7 April 2017 with Education New Zealand and most other regions from around New Zealand involved in International Education.  The ANZA Workshop is the most efficient and cost effective way to personally meet a large number of high quality agents committed to sending students and youth travellers to Australia and New Zealand. In 2016 the ANZA Workshop hosted 419 participants from 290 organisations in 47 countries and it is expected a similar number will also attend in 2017.

 

Joice Dondalski has been appointed to the position of International Education Coordinator. Joice is originally from Brazil and has a Bachelor in Tourism, and also a DipGrad in Applied Management and International Marketing. Portuguese is Joice’s native language and she is very fluent in Spanish and English.  Joice for the past 4 years has been working within the International Education sector in Auckland developing marketing campaigns for the Latin American Market.

 

 

 

Regional Statistics

Priority Area: Increase in Population – SOURCE: 2013 CENSUS

Population

97,339

+3961                                                                

Up on 2006 Census

 

 

 

                                                                                       NZ

Population Over 65

16.1%

+0.4%

 

14.6%      

 

Priority Area: Increase in Regional GDP

 

 

 

 

 

 NZ

GDP Per Capita

$52,497

Year to Mar 2016

-1.8%

 Year to Mar 2016

 

 $54,178

 

 

 

 

 

 

Regional GDP

$5.1 billion

-$52 million

On year end March 2015

 

 

 

Priority Area: Increase in Number of New Businesses – FOR 2016 - SOURCE: MBIE

 

Business Units

14,022

 

 

 

 

 

 

New Businesses

39

Down on 2015

 

Priority Area: Increase in Job Opportunities – SOURCE: MBIE DEC 2016

 

 

 

 

 

NZ

 

Participation Rate

75.6%

+1.1%

 

 69.8%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Unemployment Rate

5%

+0.5%

 

 5.2%

 

 

 

 

 

 

NEET Rate (15 to 24 year olds not in employment, education and training)

13.8%

-0.3%

 

 12%

 

Job Seeker Benefit Recipients by TLA – December Quarter 2016- SOURCE: MSD

 

 

Total

 

Sept Quarter Total

 

18-24 age

 

Sept Quarter

18-24 age

Gore District

332

330

 

88

84

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Invercargill City

1,835

2239

 

402

535

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Southland District

430

446

 

83

70

 

 

Priority Area: Increase in Household Income - SOURCE: MBIE

 

 

 

 

 

       NZ Mean Income

Mean Household Income

$84,889

For 2016

+4.9%

Up on 2015

 

$94,587

For 2015

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NZ Mean Rent

 

Mean Weekly Rent

$235

year to Feb 2017

 

 

$415

Year to Feb 2017

 

 

 

 

 

 

NZ Mean House Value

 

Mean House Value

$224,627

year to Sept 2016

+5.8%

 

$588,374

Year to Sept 2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Deprivation Index*

5.0

 2013 Census

-

 

 

NZ: 5.4

2013 Census

 

 

 

 

 

 

NZ Internet Access

 

Household Internet Access

71.6%

   2013 Census

-

 

 

76.8%

 2013 Census

 

 

*The New Zealand deprivation is an index of socioeconomic deprivation based on census information. Meshblocks (the smallest geographic area defined by statistics New Zealand) are assigned to deciles, with 1 representing least deprived areas, and 10 representing most deprived areas.

 

Priority Area: Increase in Number Visitor Nights and Occupancy Rate

SOURCE: STATISTICS NZ COMMERCIAL ACCOMODATION MONITOR YEAR END JANAURY 2017

 

 

 

 

Guest Night

Southland Guest Nights RTO

5.1%

 439,644

 

 

 

 

International Guest Nights

24%

150,968

 

 

 

 

Domestic Guest Nights

-2.6%

 288,618

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fiordland Guest Nights RTO

16.5%

 638,990

 

 

 

 

International Guest Nights

25.9%

 474,081

 

 

 

 

Domestic Guest Nights

-4.0%

 164,911

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Southland Total Spend

3.9%

$379,000,000

 

 

 

 

Fiordland Total Spend

14.9%

$226,000,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Overall Southland Occupancy Rate

35.44%

Increased from 34.73%

 

 

 

 

Overall Invercargill Occupancy Rate

38.64%

Decreased from 41.38%

 

 

 

 

Overall Fiordland Occupancy Rate

43.03%

Increased from 37.06%

 

 

 

 

Excluding all holiday parks

Southland RTO excluding Fiordland RTO

43.6%

-1.1%

on year ended 2016

 

 

 


 

KEY INITIATIVES

 

Section 1:    Regional Strategies, Assessments and Advocacy

 

As a regional organisation Venture Southland is able to act in the best interests of the region as a whole, rather than being confined by traditional council boundaries. This is evident when preparing and facilitating strategies, assessments and advocating on the region’s behalf.

 

Key Objectives/Performance Measures

Successfully facilitate the completion of:

 

 

 

Status

Notes

1.1

Southland Cycling Strategy

ONGOING

Draft document complete - undergoing stakeholder consultation.  Key projects already being implemented e.g. Cycle Fiordland initiative.

1.2

Southland Visitor Strategy

YET TO

START

Awaiting recommendations from Councils. RFP prepared.

1.3

Community Organisation and Volunteers Futures Project

ONGOING

The project brief has been finalised by SDC and the project is on schedule. Currently in the community consultation phase. See 10.1

1.4

Swimming Pool Heating Assessments

COMPLETE

Pool heating assessments have been completed for eight identified pools. A generic report providing a summary of the findings for use by any pool committee, is currently being finalised. Work overlaps to Section 4, Energy Efficiency & Section 10 Community Development.

1.5

Regional Export Value Research

ONGOING

Working with Statistics NZ to develop tools that will allow this to occur.

1.6

Provision of support and advice towards the development of cycle ways in Gore

COMPLETE

A range of support provide to Gore District Council and the local community.  Funding of $20,000 approved from Impetus Fund and uplifted.

1.7

Facilitate a stakeholder’s meeting to progress the Southland Museum and Art Gallery redevelopment

ONGOING

Working alongside SMAG, ICC and Southland Regional Heritage Committee to investigate and progress the project.

 

1.8

Support Sport Southland in the creation of a Southland Sport and Recreation Strategy

ONGOING

Initial discussions held with Sport Southland. 

1.9

Southland Perception Study

ONGOING

The Perception Study is complete, the full results have been publicised and an infographic summary is being prepared for release in April 2017.

 


 

Support the implementation of the following:

 

 

 

Status

Notes

1.10

Southland Regional Development Strategy

ONGOING

Venture Southland prepared extensive information that was included in the preparation of the strategy.

 

Venture Southland participated and serviced the following strategy action teams: Vibrant Urban Centres, Destination Attraction and Tourism, Inclusive communities, New Industries, Broadband and Education.

1.11

Southland Regional Labour Market Strategy 2014-2031

ONGOING

MOU signed with MBIE outlining collaborative approach forward between MBIE and Venture Southland.

 

The MOU is consistent with the Southland Labour Market Strategy, Youth Futures Initiative and enables the implementation of The Regional Labour Market and Settlement activities. 

 

Specific areas of action are currently being undertaken including work with MBIE on attraction initiatives, retention of skilled migrants and their spouses and employer education. Further action plans will be developed focusing on local workforce skill development, attraction and retention to the region by the Regional Labour Market Coordinator.

1.12

Southland Digital Strategy

ONGOING

Digital Survey complete – 214 responses received.  Internet speed test complete and submission made to Rural Broadband Initiative/ Ultra-Fast Broadband/ Mobile Black Spot Fund Crown Fibre process.

Mobile coverage on State Highways and other key routes complete and available online.

Independent expert review of long term options for telecommunications in Southland commenced to be delivered next quarter.

Support being provided for Telecommunications providers submissions to Crown Fibre Holdings.

Digital Strategy action plan review commenced.

1.13

Southland Regional Heritage Research 2016

COMPLETE

Research has been completed and Venture Southland are currently working alongside the Southland Regional Heritage Committee to finalise the document and assess implementation options.

1.14

Southern NZ Cruise Destination Strategy 2016

COMPLETE

Strategy complete and implementation options currently being assessed considering wider sector happenings- cruise network, key actions and resources.

1.15

Catlins Tourism Strategy Review 2016

COMPLETE

Strategy complete and implementation underway alongside Catlins Coast Inc. Opportunities to partner with Lotteries also being investigated.

1.16

Around the Mountains Cycle Trail Business and Marketing Plan

ONGOING

Continued activity of promotions in coordination with the NZCT (New Zealand Cycle Trail), ATMCT (Around the Mountains Cycle Trail), trail operators and Southland District Council.

1.17

Creative New Zealand’s Regional Arts Pilot 2016-17

ONGOING

Creative NZ project commenced with governance group, planned activities and resources attributed. 23/3 Governance board now in place. Staff appointments pending.

1.18

Electricity Authority submitted to on cheaper public network pricing

COMPLETE

Paper submitted to Electricity Authority aimed at promoting equitable transmission pricing and the associated benefits for Southland. The document included coordinated submissions from Southland stakeholders.

1.19

Participate in the Milford Opportunities Project

ONGOING

Awaiting direction from SDC.

Ongoing visitor and visitor flow monitoring has been undertaken and reported. Visitor satisfaction social media monitoring has been undertaken.

 

 

 


 

Section 2:   Diversification of Southland’s Economy

 

Venture Southland works to identify opportunities for investment which are complementary with the regional economy and ensure they are promoted to relevant domestic and international markets. Opportunities include silica, oat based health and wellness foods, aquaculture, oil, gas and lignite exploration, tourism and satellite tracking.

 

Venture Southland’s role is to investigate the potential of these opportunities. Some of the projects are ongoing. It is important to have relevant and up to date information available so that when the time is right, an investor will take up the opportunity.

 

Key Objectives/Performance Measures

Successfully facilitate the completion of:

 

 

 

Status

Notes

2.1

Facilitate six investment opportunities

ONGOING COMPLETE

 

Investment profiles completed for Oats opportunity and Curio Bay Heritage Centre. Proposal for Singapore Airforce Training Base compete. Promotion continues of Awarua and Lochiel Ground Stations and Earth AdVantage concept. Silica opportunity report and profile completed – no further action until silica pricing strengthens.  Earth Advantage investment proposal has also been developed

2.2

Aerial Magnetic & Radio Surveys completed and data available

to Stakeholders

 ONGOING

First portion of survey work completed. Second component is in progress.  The southern Southland area commissioned by ICC, SDC, GDC and ES has been completed ahead of schedule, during the 2015 – 2016 summer period.  An RFP is currently being prepared to undertake interpretation of this data.

2.3

Deliver services to 5 international satellite and space

organisations

ONGOING

Ongoing assistance to Planet, European Space Operations Centre, Spire Global and Spaceflight, with new contract signed with Kongsberg Satellite for a new ground station. ESA Arrangement renewed. CNES services agreement being renegotiated.

2.4

Aquaculture - target water space identified and environmental investigations

commenced

ONGOING

Spaces have been identified – awaiting feedback and direction from stakeholders for any further actions.

2.5

Identify film opportunities for the region

ONGOING

Working with Film Otago Southland to promote film opportunities for the region.

 

Southland secured the Ultimate Waterman event (1 – 9 April 2017) which will be filmed as a 3 part documentary by Red Bull Media House and available online free to a worldwide audience. Location scouting and promotional support are being provided. 

 


 

Section 3:   Business Service Efficiency and Competitiveness

 

Venture Southland offers business services to Southland businesses, such as business advice referral services, funding support, and facilitating mentoring services. This is to ensure Southland businesses are operating as efficiently as possible and to encourage research and development and innovation.

 

In addition, Venture Southland runs specific business efficiency services such as Lean Manufacturing and Dairy Lean “Farm Tune” and facilitates business innovation programmes such as new product development workshops and digital enablement training.

 

Programmes delivered through business services enables extension of existing businesses and industry.

 

Key Objectives/Performance Measures

Facilitate the Regional Business Partner Programme

 

 

 

Status

Notes

3.1

$200,000 in funding allocated to Southland businesses

ONGOING COMPLETE

 

$180,000 allocated for first three quarters of the contract. Discussions are underway with NZTE to access additional support funding – on target.

 

50 Mentor Client Matches

ONGOING

32 matches made Year-to-Date – Increase in requests anticipated following interactions with early stage businesses. Increased focus on agri-focused mentor matches.

 

Southland has maintained its rating as an ‘A’ mentor agency

 

Complete 140 Client Assessments

ONGOING

141 NZTE registered assessments and actions plans undertaken – on target. Over 300 assessments and start-up advise provided to-date

 

Train 50 mentors

ONGOING

Training scheduled for July 2017. 10 mentors currently registered to participate in this programme. These new mentors will add to the current total of 54.

 

 

Coordinate and promote business efficiency through Lean Management and Lean Dairy in Southland

 

 

Status

Notes

3.2

Deliver Lean Management training to seven businesses

ONGOING

The 2016 Lean Management Cluster Programme concluded in October, with ongoing health checks and site visits underway. This programme saw 6 businesses participated in and complete the six month programme.

 

While interest in the 2017 programme has been higher than previous years, many businesses have indicated that they are currently not in a position to commit to the time requirements of the programme due to existing workloads. Most have indicated a desire to participate in the 2018 programme. As a result, a smaller number of companies, anticipated to be 3, will participate in the programme.

 

Additional programmes have been developed to meet the growing demand of smaller businesses. These programmes include a stand-alone Process Improvement Programme and Workplace Management course. These courses continue to be highly subscribed.

 

Deliver Dairy Lean to 12 farms

ONGOING

The Dairy Lean (“Farm Tune”) programme is currently being delivered by DairyNZ, with the support of Venture Southland to 10 farms across 2 training sites in Southland. Venture Southland is providing contracted services to DairyNZ for review of material and delivery of the programme. Feedback to-date has been positive.

 

30 Businesses attend other lean support initiatives including

site-visits, networking and the Southland Lean Forum

ONGOING

Health checks completed in February, with previous course participants.

 

Planning is currently underway to the next series of site-visits, following the success of the NZAS visit in November.

 

A Lean Forum is also planned for mid-year.

 

 

Development of a report identifying gaps within Invercargill business/industry and tourism and what is needed to fill those gaps

 

 

 

Status

Notes

3.3

Deliver four Research and Development and innovation

events/programmes

COMPLETE

Four workshops delivered on Design Thinking – with over 40 business attending. Many participants have gone on to undertake one-to-one training and assistance in implementation of Design Thinking, which Venture Southland has supported through the NZTE Capability Voucher Programme.

 

Workshops Delivered:

·        New product development

·        Design thinking

·        Practical application of design thinking tools

·        Integrating product development into day to day business

 

Planning for the next Innovation series is currently underway.

 

 


 

Section 4:   Energy Efficiency

 

Venture Southland has a number of projects that aim to promote energy efficiency and alternative fuel sources in Southland. This is one of the ways Venture is promoting business efficiency and competitive advantages.

 

Key Objectives/Performance Measures

 

 

 

Status

Notes

4.1

Switch 0.15 PJ of boiler capacity to waste wood fuel

ONGOING COMPLETE

 

Project is progressing well with three months remaining.  There are 5 high priority engagements ongoing. 

 

The Grants Programme closed to feasibility studies in December, with one trial completed in the last quarter. 31 March is the deadline for capital grants – 5 applications are expected.

 

The final conference of the programme is planned for 7 June 2017.

4.2

Facilitate a professional development programme in

partnership with EECA and The Bio Energy Association of New

Zealand

ONGOING

First programme delivered in Wellington. South Island workshop planned for April.

4.3

Complete trial of methane recovery on dairy farms

COMPLETE

New Zealand’s first dairy pond methane recovery and generation system has been commissioned and early issues are being worked through. Third party monitoring is ongoing and planning for advocacy and promotion is underway.

 

 


 

Section 5:   Attracting and Retaining Skilled Workforce

 

Southland, like other regions, is facing a workforce shortage due to an aging population.  For business to grow, skilled staff are required.  Venture Southland is active in attracting migrants to the region, and also ensuring the skilled workers remain in the region.  Without people, new businesses and new industries can-not develop, and existing industries cannot be extended.

In 2014 Venture Southland commissioned the Southland Region-al Labour Market Assessment from the University of Waikato, to provide insight into the expected labour market conditions in Southland for 2014 to 2031.  The assessment used historical population data to project future labour supply and demand.

 

Overall the report highlighted the need for the Southland region to develop plans to increase its labour supply to meet the projected demand.  Southland is not alone with this challenge, which highlights the importance of implementing a strategy now to minimise the impact in an increasingly competitive market.

 

The Southland Regional Development Strategy has also set a population target of 110,000, an increase of 13,000 from the current population.

 

Venture Southland host MBIE support personal on a monthly basis and also hosts the immigration stakeholder meetings in conjunction with MBIE.

 

Key Objectives/Performance Measures

Successfully facilitate the completion of:

 

 

 

Status

Notes

5.1

Identify with employers, industry groups and Immigration New Zealand (MBIE) initiatives to support migrant attraction and retention

ONGOING COMPLETE

 

Venture Southland and MBIE are working with a range of employers to assist with migrant retention and attraction.

 

Specific work is currently being undertaken with the dairy sector around pathways to residency. A Survey of dairy farm owners was completed by DairyNZ at the end of 2016 asking about potential impacts of immigration changes on migrant work forces. Venture Southland is coordinating a survey of migrants on the same topic to enable a full understanding of potential social and economic impacts of changes to immigration policy. This survey closes on the 30th March, after which analysis will be undertaken in partnership with DairyNZ and Federated Farmers to assess the social and economic impacts of the changes.

5.2

Work with Education New Zealand for pathways to employment

ONGOING

Pathways to employment is one of the six strategy goals and work is ongoing through Southern Education Alliance.

5.3

Work with the Relationship Manager at (MBIE) to assist with joint initiatives for migrant retention

ONGOING

MOU signed with MBIE to establish joint development of programmes that support migrant retention.

 

Work currently underway to develop a regional development agreement. Action plan currently being developed as the basis of a regional partnership agreement.

5.4

Deliver 2 management skills workshops, based on regional workforce need where there is a gap in the market

COMPLETE

Delivered digital enablement workshop 2015 and retail workshop 2016.

5.5

Complete and circulate welcome to Southland packages to new employers and other sectors

COMPLETE

Complete and available online.

 

Further update of materials and additional information being undertaken in partnership with MBIE.

5.6

To have 11 youth employment programmes operating in Southland

ONGOING

Southland Youth Futures continues to work with employers to develop pathways for youth employment, this includes supporting existing programmes and develop new programmes as required.

 

Dates for employer talks to schools is now completed. Planning underway for site visits and Year 12/employer ‘speed dating’ programme.

 

The delivery of the in-schools employment opportunities programme is currently underway.

5.7

To have trained 30 'youth friendly' employers in the region

ONGOING

9 foundation youth friendly employers established, a further 25 identified or partially through training. Reach of this programme is currently being expanded to meet increased demand on services.

5.8

To have all secondary schools in Southland actively participating in the Southland Youth Futures

COMPLETE

All Southland secondary schools engaged.

 

Delivery is currently underway for 2017 programme.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Section 6:   International Education

 

Key Objectives/Performance Measures

Successfully facilitate the completion of:

 

 

 

Status

Notes

6.1

Review and update the Regional International Education Strategy with Education New Zealand

COMPLETE

The Southern Regional International Education Strategy has been completed. The document was been sent to Education New Zealand for feedback and was presented to the Southern Education Alliance Governance Group for feedback and approval on the 21 November 2016 prior to the Southern Regional Development Strategy launch on the 30 November 2016.

6.2

Implementation of the Regional International Education Partnership Programme

COMPLETE

 

A funding agreement has been entered into between Education New Zealand and Venture Southland until June 2019 for the delivery of the Regional Business Programme. The International Education Coordinator has been appointed and will be attending the Australian New Zealand Agent workshop in Cairns between the 5-7 April 2017 with Education New Zealand and most other regions from around New Zealand involved in International Education.  The ANZA Workshop is the most efficient and cost effective way to personally meet a large number of high quality agents committed to sending students and youth travellers to Australia and New Zealand. In 2016 the ANZA Workshop hosted 419 participants from 290 organisations in 47 countries and it is expected a similar number will also attend in 2017.

 

6.3

Establish an International Education Governance Group for Southland

COMPLETE

An inaugural Education Governance Group has been established – through an invitation sent by the Chair of SoRDS.

6.4

The appointment of a Southland Education Alliance (SEA) coordinator

COMPLETE

Joice Dondalski has been appointed to the position of International Education Coordinator. Joice is originally from Brazil and has a Bachelor in Tourism, and also a DipGrad in Applied Management and International Marketing. Portuguese is Joice’s native language and she is very fluent in Spanish and English.  Joice for the past 4 years has been working within the International Education sector in Auckland developing marketing campaigns for the Latin American Market.

 

6.5

Align regional education opportunities to Education New Zealand’s vision for continued growth of international education

COMPLETE

During this quarter Venture Southland has been involved in hosting both a Chinese inbound agent in collaboration with James Hargest High School, Southland Girls High School, Southland Boys High School and Waihopai Primary School and a Media group from the Philippines.  Representatives included Robert Abano from the Philippine Daily Enquirer, Krizette Chu from the Manila Bulletin, and Sara Siguion from the Lifestyle Asia, hosted by Janet Bache from Education New Zealand. Again a significant opportunity to expand the education sector into the Philippines through the media and hosting this group in the city.

 

 

 

 


 

Section 7:   Destination Promotion

 

While Venture Southland and Destination Fiordland’s approach aligns with being Regional Tourism Organisations (RTOs) and is promotion, marketing and industry focussed, it is becoming more and more evident that there is a need for an integrated approach across the community development, business, tourism and events teams.  There is also a need to ensure appropriate infrastructure development which aligns with the tourist experience proposition and this requires collaboration with Councils and other providers.

 

The Venture Southland work programme approach consists of seven key work programmes as listed below and these are delivered by the two RTOs (Venture Southland and Destination Fiordland) as well as the Invercargill i-SITE.

 

Key Objectives/Performance Measures

Media Engagement

 

 

 

Status

Notes

7.1

Generate 52 media pieces with 18 media famils

ONGOING COMPLETE

 

109 media pieces year to date (+50 this quarter)

13 media famils year to date (+6 this quarter)

 

Please see Appendix A for a detailed list. Individual articles can be provided on request.

 

 

Develop Trade Channels

 

 

 

Status

Notes

7.2

Engage with 105 IBO/wholesale/trade agents through a minimum of four Trade Shows presenting regional profile and product offerings of 60 Southland operators

ONGOING COMPLETE

 

25+ engagements (RTOW) (annual total 286)

 

Attended 1 trade show (3 to date)

 

Further Information regarding Trade Channels provided in Appendix B.

 

7.3

Participate in eight International Marketing Alliance activities and develop three trade itineraries/campaigns

ONGOING

2 International Marketing Alliances (IMA) activities undertaken.

 

6 trade itineraries prepared (including Cruise NZ, and Tourism NZ and TIA post TRENZ).

 

 

Marketing and Promotional Campaigns

 

 

 

Status

Notes

7.4

18 campaigns facilitated as part of annual programme

ONGOING COMPLETE

 

4 campaigns executed (19 to date)

 

Further Information regarding Campaigns provided in appendix C.

7.5

Create tourism marketing packages with a specific focus on the Chinese Market

ONGOING

Coordinating with SOUTH and Eastern stream of TRENZ 2017

 

 

Digital Marketing

 

 

 

Status

Notes

7.6

Growth of consumer/trade digital databases (+5%), social media community (+12%) and website traffic (+8%)

ONGOING COMPLETE

 

Digital database + 1,041 (+11%).

Social media community + 2,312 (+5%).

Website Traffic (44% of target).

 

Further Information regarding Digital provided in Appendix D.

7.7

120 operators, 24 destination events, and 24 events articles listed online through Southlandnz.com and Newzealand.com

ONGOING

Operators (368) – 14 new this quarter

 

 

Engagement with Industry

 

 

 

Status

Notes

7.8

Facilitate three regional tourism workshops and engage with 100 tourism operators within the Southland region

COMPLETE

 

7.9

Participate in nine national tourism activities (including Tourism New Zealand, RTONZ; TIANZ; SOUTH, i-SITE and TEC)

ONGOING

9 national tourism meetings (18 in total to date)

 

Further Information regarding Digital provided in appendix E.

 


 

Product Development

 

 

 

Status

Notes

7.10

Undertake research to identify gaps for tourism product in Invercargill and Western Southland and research into current Southland visitor characteristics and behaviour

ONGOING COMPLETE

 

Integrative framework draft prepared to undertake research and development into current Southland visitor characteristics and behaviour with implementation underway.  Understanding market insights from 7.12 important part of this objective.

7.11

Assist with the development of four new trade ready tourism sector products

ONGOING

·        3 trade products assisted in quarter

·        7 additional businesses assisted with feasibility and concept development

·        Business case development complete for 2 Tourism Growth Fund applications to a total funding value of $1,050,000

 

7.12

Statistics, Market Insights and Analysis

ONGOING

·        Three generic monthly reports completed, uploaded on VS website and distributed via tourism and business newsletters

·        six individual reports prepared as requested (inc. Milford Sound Monitoring Report, Curio Bay analysis, Tuatarium/ Kakapo analysis, Lumsden and Invercargill FIT analysis, Stadium Southland report)

 

Visitor Information

 

 

 

Status

Notes

7.13

Undertake review of operations with growth of total sales income by 14% per annum

ONGOING

 

Jul – Dec 2015

Jul – Dec 2016

% Change

Retail Sales

$14,199

$14,782

4.1%

 

Commissions

 

$37,339

$39,130

4.8%

Advertising Revenue

$24,366

$29,584

21.40%

Ticket Sales  Commissions

$2,639

$3,588

36.0%

Updated figures will be available next quarter.

7.14

Development of the Invercargill i-SITE review findings for the consideration of the associated visitor information network needs across the region

COMPLETE

Review complete and initial changes implemented. New structure including the business development function commenced.


 

Successfully facilitate the completion of:

 

 

 

Status

Notes

7.15

Investigate the strategic and operational issues and opportunities for the region associated with combining the Destination Fiordland and Venture Southland Regional Tourism Organisation functions

YET TO

START COMPLETE

 

SDC has suggested the investigation be delayed at this stage.

 

Additional Notes:

 

Destination Fiordland Key Activities:

·        This was a busy period for media famils in Fiordland.  We hosted the Mail on Sunday (DF), Indian Freelance journalist (TNZ),  German magazine Material Girl (TNZ), Japanese TV Show – Zekkei (TNZ).  In addition we hosted 2 key agents from the UK on a trade famil (DF) – these were agents who couldn’t attend the TRENZ famils last year and we facilitated their experience in Fiordland.  

·        Activity around TRENZ – corresponding with operators who are attending, attending Southern Lakes meeting, coordinating presence at TRENZ, confirming floor plan and undergoing the appointment process.  Seven operators attending from Fiordland – Fiordland Outdoors Co, Fiordland Trips & Tramps, Fiordland Lodge, Distinction Te Anau Hotel & Villas, Wings and Water, Fiordland Helicopters & Cinema Suites, Destination Fiordland.

·        Preparations for the 40th Fiordland Annual Tourism Awards dinner

·        Fiordland Highlights video completed and released on Facebook and Vimeo – so far reached 36,451 people on Facebook and had 13k views.

·        Google Analytics for www.fiordland.org.nz – for 1 Aug 16 to 31 Jan 17 – users up 14% sessions up 16%. Figures are a comparison with the same period in the previous year.  48% increase in mobile traffic to the website

·        Attended RTO Workshop in Sydney – 15 minute meetings over 2 days with key Australian Inbound Operators

·        Hosting networking function for members with Qualmark presentation.  Southland contacts invited also.

 


 

Section 8:   Conference Attraction

 

Venture Southland collaborates with local event organisers to promote the Southland region and its facilities as conference destination. To promote the region Venture Southland positions Invercargill specifically as a value based destination, with world class facilities and differentiated propositions (including food, heritage, entertainment and recreation. The wider Southland region is positioned as an accessible incentive destination to complement the facilities found in the major centres of Invercargill, Gore and Te Anau.

 

For more detail see Appendix G.

 

Key Objectives/Performance Measures

Successfully facilitate the completion of:

 

 

 

Status

Notes

8.1

Prospect 50 conference opportunities, undertaking 12 bids to attract 6 additional conferences

ONGOING COMPLETE

 

43 conferences prospected to date, working alongside local conference operators.

 

Conference bid template in development with industry partners

 

Further Information regarding Conference provided in Appendix G.

8.2

Represent the region through 4 events/activities and industry channels

ONGOING

 

8.3

Undertake an investigation of Southland destinations (Te Anau and Gore) as potential conference destinations

ONGOING

Site inspections of conference venues in Te Anau and Gore.

 


 

Section 9:   Events

 

Southland is known for high quality events which add diversity, vibrancy and a sense of well-being to the region’s residents and ratepayers. Venture Southland believes that events are an important aspect of our approach to develop and promote Southland as an attractive place to live, study, work and visit. We run a number of events but support an even larger number of events with a variety of support, resources and expertise.

 

Key Objectives/Performance Measures

Successfully facilitate the completion of:

 

 

 

Status

Notes

9.1

Facilitate events that generate spectatorship of 40,000 per annum and support other regional events with spectatorship of 40,000 per annum

ONGOING COMPLETE

 

6,500 facilitated (26,500  to date)

14,000 supported (28,000 to date)

 

Further Information regarding Events provided in Appendix H.

9.2

Three event impact assessments undertaken to investigate the social and economic benefits

ONGOING

3 completed with reports currently being produced

9.3

52 promotional activities undertaken across various media, trade, campaign and digital programmes

ONGOING

Progressing with social media, website, Tourism New Zealand and Air NZ.

 

24 events per month being supported.

9.4

Facilitate two workshops to investigate opportunities to cluster with event organisers and provide event planning advice to other community events

YET TO

START

Investigating an events forum alongside Sport Southland

Working with Sport Southland who is the key agency on Healthy Families forum (Events and Alcohol)

 

9.5

Provide marketing support to 32 events per through marketing initiatives such as website, social media, competitions, design, publishing and sponsorship advice

ONGOING

Ongoing support being provided.

9.6

Investigate the feasibility of two new regional events

ONGOING

Working on proposals for Air NZ with ILT, Chamber of Commerce and Invercargill Airport

Two projects in progress.

9.7

Development of a platform for reviewing and planning coordination of events across the region

COMPLETE

Internal build of events website complete. Monthly update of industry event calendar.

9.8

Created a Tourism / Events calendar combining all Invercargill facilities

COMPLETE

Calendar live on www.southlandnz.com

9.9

Establishment and/or further development of two events in the Southland region

COMPLETE

World Shearing and Woolhandling World Championships;  Heritage Month, Down River Dash

 

 


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