Notice is hereby given that an Ordinary Meeting of Southland District Council will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Wednesday, 16 May 2018

9am

Council Chambers
15 Forth Street
Invercargill

 

Council Agenda

OPEN

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Mayor

Mayor Gary Tong

 

Deputy Mayor

Paul Duffy

 

Councillors

Stuart Baird

 

 

Brian Dillon

 

 

John Douglas

 

 

Bruce Ford

 

 

Darren Frazer

 

 

George Harpur

 

 

Julie Keast

 

 

Ebel Kremer

 

 

Gavin Macpherson

 

 

Neil Paterson

 

 

Nick Perham

 

 

IN ATTENDANCE

 

Chief Executive

Steve Ruru

Committee Advisor

Fiona Dunlop

 

 

Contact Telephone: 0800 732 732

Postal Address: PO Box 903, Invercargill 9840

Email: emailsdc@southlanddc.govt.nz

Website: www.southlanddc.govt.nz

 

Full agendas are available on Council’s Website

www.southlanddc.govt.nz

 

 

 


 


Council

16 May 2018

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

ITEM                                                                                                                                                                                  PAGE

Procedural

1             Apologies                                                                                                                                                                5

2             Leave of absence                                                                                                                                                5

3             Conflict of Interest                                                                                                                                             5

4             Public Forum                                                                                                                                                         5

5             Extraordinary/Urgent Items                                                                                                                        5

6             Confirmation of Council Minutes                                                                                                             5

Reports - Policy and Strategy

7.1         Draft Trade Waste Bylaw 2018- Feedback and Deliberations                                                   7

7.2         Southland Cycling Strategy                                                                                                                      53

Reports - Operational Matters

8.1         Wyndham Camping Ground Electrical Compliance                                                                  141

8.2         Financial Report for the month ended 31 March 2018                                                           145

8.3         Management Report                                                                                                                                   193

Reports - Governance

9.1         Minutes of the Regulatory and Consents Committee Meeting dated 7 March 2018 221

9.2         Minutes of the Stewart Island/Rakiura Community Board Meeting dated 11 December 2017                                                                                                                                                                       223

9.3         Minutes of the Stewart Island/Rakiura Community Board Meeting dated 12 February 2018                                                                                                                                                                       225

9.4         Minutes of the Winton Community Board Meeting dated 19 February 2018           227   

 

 

 

Public Excluded

Procedural motion to exclude the public                                                                                                       228

C10.1    Southland Water and Land Plan

 


Council

16 May 2018

 

1             Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

2             Leave of absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

3             Conflict of Interest

 

Councillors are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision-making when a conflict arises between their role as a councillor and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4             Public Forum

 

Notification to speak is required by 5pm at least two days before the meeting. Further information is available on www.southlanddc.govt.nz or phoning 0800 732 732.

 

5             Extraordinary/Urgent Items

To consider, and if thought fit, to pass a resolution to permit the Council to consider any further items which do not appear on the Agenda of this meeting and/or the meeting to be held with the public excluded.

Such resolution is required to be made pursuant to Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987, and the Chairperson must advise:

(i)        The reason why the item was not on the Agenda, and

(ii)       The reason why the discussion of this item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

(a)       that item may be discussed at that meeting if-

(i)         that item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

(ii)       the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

(b)       no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

6             Confirmation of Council Minutes

There are no minutes to confirm.

 


Council

16 May 2018

 

Draft Trade Waste Bylaw 2018- Feedback and Deliberations

Record No:             R/18/4/10149

Author:                      Rebecca McElrea, Policy and Planning Consultant

Approved by:         Matt Russell, Group Manager Services and Assets

 

  Decision                                        Recommendation                                  Information

 

 

 

Purpose

1        This report is for Council to consider and deliberate on submissions and comments received on the draft Trade Waste Bylaw 2018 (the draft bylaw).

Executive Summary

2        From 1 March 2018 to 2 May 2018, Council consulted on the draft bylaw in accordance with the Special Consultative Procedure and other requirements outlined in the Local Government Act 2002 (the LGA).  One formal submission was received, as well as informal comments from Public Health South and the Minister of Health. The submission and comments are attached to this report as Attachments A to C.

3        Staff are recommending Council consider and deliberate on all the feedback received. It is also recommended that Council endorse the draft bylaw with the minor amendments proposed by staff, which are in response to the feedback received. The draft bylaw is included with this report as Attachment D.

4        If Council endorses a draft bylaw at this meeting, the next steps are for staff to present the final Trade Waste Bylaw 2018 to Council at its meeting on 20 June 2018, for adoption.

 

Recommendation

That the Council:

a)        Receives the report titled “Draft Trade Waste Bylaw 2018- Feedback and Deliberations” dated 10 May 2018.

 

b)        Determines that this matter or decision be recognised as not significant in terms of Section 76 of the Local Government Act 2002.

 

c)         Determines that it has complied with the decision-making provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 to the extent necessary in relation to this decision; and in accordance with Section 79 of the Act determines that it does not require further information, further assessment of options or further analysis of costs and benefits or advantages and disadvantages prior to making a decision on this matter.

 

d)        Consider the submission and informal comments received on the draft Trade Waste Bylaw 2018.

 

e)        Deliberate on the submission and informal comments received on the draft Trade Waste Bylaw 2018.

 

f)         Endorse the draft Trade Waste Bylaw 2018, including the following minor amendments:

 

·        Altering the formatting of paragraph 3.2.1

·        Adding to paragraph 3.2.1.4 “Standard fees for permitted discharges are set out in Council’s Schedule of Fees and Charges, published annually”

·        Removing the numbering from paragraph 3.3.1

·        Rearranging the order of paragraphs 3.4 and 3.5

·        Adding to paragraph 6.4.1 “and consent does not include any transfer of rights”

·        Adding to Appendix A -

2.7      Radioactivity

Radioactivity levels shall not exceed the Office of Radiation Safety Code of Practice CSP1 for the Use of Unsealed Radioactive Material.

The Ministry of Health’s Office of Radiation Safety administers the Radiation Safety Act 2016 and the Radiation Safety Regulations 2016 on behalf of the New Zealand Government. This legislation controls all dealings with ionising radiation.

·        Also adding to Appendix A -

“3.4   Pharmaceutical Waste

3.4.1  Pharmacies must not discharge more liquid pharmaceutical waste per month than the volumes listed below. The volume limit is based on the concentration of active ingredients in the product.

 

 

Table 4 – Liquid Waste from Pharmacies

Volume Limit

Active Concentration

10 Litres

125mg/5ml

5 Litres

250mg/5ml

3 Litres

Above 250mg/5ml

 

Any discharge above these limits should be a controlled discharge and require a trade waste agreement.

No waste may contain cytotoxic waste or liquid antibiotics, which are prohibited.”

·    Adding to Appendix B, “h) Cytotoxic waste or liquid antibiotics”.

 

 

Background

5        Southland District Council owns and operates a number of wastewater reticulation systems within the Southland District. These systems collect, treat and dispose of sewage and trade wastes from industry, businesses and other trade activities.

6        Section 146(a)(iii) of the LGA provides that a territorial authority may make a bylaw for its district for the purposes of regulating trade wastes.

7        Trade waste discharges and related activities are currently managed and regulated under the Trade Waste Bylaw 2008. Although the Trade Waste Bylaw 2008 has been effective at controlling trade waste discharges, under section 159 of the LGA, the Trade Waste Bylaw 2008 is due to be reviewed in 2018.

8        The draft bylaw was presented to Council at its meeting on 22 February 2018. At that meeting, Council endorsed and released the draft bylaw and a Statement of Proposal for public consultation.

9        Staff have undertaken a consultation process on the draft bylaw in accordance with the Special Consultative Procedure and s148 of the LGA. This has included giving people in the District the required notice of Council’s intention to make the bylaw, and staff have undertaken a 2-month consultation process. As is required, staff also sent a copy of the draft bylaw to the Minister of Health for his comments.

Issues

10      One formal submission was received on the draft bylaw, as well as informal comments from Public Health South and the Minister of Health. The submission and comments are attached to this report (see Attachments A to C). The submitter did not wish to speak to his submission.


 

11      The submitter suggested minor formatting adjustments to the draft bylaw (these are listed in the below table). Staff have provided comment.

Clause Number

Submission

Requested Change

Staff comment

3.2.1

Clause is not clear because text in subsection d) includes a portion pertaining to all subsections.

Shift text commencing with the words “shall if required by the Council…..” on to a new line to clarify interpretation of the
clause.

Text shifted within Clause 3.2.1 to provide clarification

3.2.1

The text makes reference to the prescribed form for applications but there is no information about the prescribed form in the bylaw or on the council website.

Assist public understanding & council administration of the bylaw by either including a copy of the application form as an appendix to the bylaw or by making it readily available to users on the council
website.

Advise that Council make application form available on website

3.2.1.1

The text refers to a “Description of Trade Waste and Premises” form but there is no copy of this form available.
I note that the Invercargill City Council attaches quite a few forms to their bylaw.

Assist public understanding & council administration of the bylaw by either including a copy of the form as an appendix to the bylaw and/or by making it readily available to users on the council
website.

Advise that Council make application form available on website

3.3

The inclusion of a sub-clause number 3.3.1 is inconsistent with the document layout.

Remove the superfluous sub-clause
number 3.3.1. Amend the heading 3.3 if desirable.

Adjusted numbering

3.4 & 3.5

Interpretation of the bylaw requires readers to refer first to 3.5, then 3.4, then 3.6: an
unnecessary distraction. Keep it simple!

Improve the document flow by renumbering clause 3.5 to 3.4 & 3.4 to 3.5.

Adjusted numbering

6.2.1

Clause 3.2.1.4 refers to Council’s Schedule of Fees and Charges for the trade waste application fee but there is no information regarding the schedule of charges for actual
discharge of trade waste.

 

Reference to the Local Government Act confirms Council’s
ability to impose charges but is too general to assist with setting the amount of charges and invoicing as set out in clause 6.2.2.

Add the following:
Standard fees for permitted  discharges are set out in Council’s Schedule of Fees and Charges, published annually.

Added text to clause

6.4.1

Despite the clause heading, the text does not give any information on the limits to transfer of rights.

Add the following to the end of the current text:…and consent does not include any transfer of rights.

Added text to clause

 

Public Health South - Comments

Clause Number

Comment

Requested Change

Staff comment

Appendix A

2.7

The National Radiation Laboratory no longer exists. It is now the Office of Radiation under the Ministry of Health. NRL.C1 is still current but not for much longer and new codes will be out at a later date. 

Provide reference to the Radiation Safety Act.

Updated reference in regards to radioactivity to reflect Public Health South’s suggested amendment.

 

Minister of Health – Comments

Clause Number

Comment

Requested Change

Staff comment

Appendix B

2.1.3

NZS 4304:2002 Management of Healthcare Waste currently states that cytotoxic waste can be discharged to a sewer with the local authorities’ permission.  However this is no longer appropriate and when this standard is up for review, the Ministry will seek to have this advice amended.

Recommend that cytotoxic wastes be prohibited and controls are places on the disposal of liquid antibiotics.

Added ‘cytotoxic ingredients and liquid antibiotics’ to discharges with prohibited characteristics.

Appendix A

3.4

The Trade Waste Bylaw does not specifically address the discharge of liquid pharmaceutical waste.

Addition of volume limits and concentrations of liquid pharmaceutical waste not to be exceeded based on the advice of the Pharmacy Guild of New Zealand.

Table advising volume limits and concentration levels of liquid pharmaceutical waste not to be exceeded has been added to the Trade Waste Bylaw.

Appendix A

2.7

Radiation regulatory body has changed from the National Radiation Laboratory to the Office of Radiation Safety.

The text and schedules of the Bylaw should refer to the Office of Radiation Safety Code of Practice CSP1 for the use of unsealed radioactive material.

This has already been amended as per Public Health South’s comments above.

 

Factors to Consider

Legal and Statutory Requirements

12      The decision-making provisions in sections 77-82 of the LGA are relevant to all decisions of local authorities. Under section 77, a local authority is required to identify all of the reasonably practicable options and assess those options by considering the criteria in section 77.

13      Council has the ability under sections 145 and 146 to make bylaws for its district, specifically for the purposes of regulating trade wastes.

14      Council has to comply with the Special Consultative Procedure in accordance with sections 83 and 86 of the LGA before it can make a trade waste bylaw.

15      Section 148 of the LGA outlines some special requirements relating to the making of a trade waste bylaw. Council was required to have a two month consultation period, to give specific notice of its intention to make a trade waste bylaw, and to consult with the Minister of Health.

Community Views

16      Undertaking a consultation process in accordance with the Special Consultative Procedure and the requirements outlined in section 148 of the LGA, has given people in the District an opportunity to give their views on the draft bylaw.

17      Council must, in the course of its decision making process, give consideration to the community views received on this matter.

18      The Minister of Health has stated that there are no representatives of the owners or occupiers of trade waste premises that he requires Council to undertake additional consultation with.

Costs and Funding

19      Advertising costs have been met through current budgets.

Policy Implications

20      No policy or plan implications have been identified.

Analysis

Options Considered

21      Staff have considered two reasonably practicable options on how Council could proceed.

·    Endorse the draft bylaw with the minor amendments proposed by staff (and any other desired amendments).

·    Endorse the version of the draft bylaw that went out for consultation.


 

Analysis of Options

Option 1 – Endorse the draft bylaw with the minor amendments proposed by staff (and any other desired amendments).

Advantages

Disadvantages

·        This option takes into account the feedback received on the draft bylaw.

·        The draft bylaw is an amended version of the current bylaw, which has been operating effectively.

·        It is an effective method for Council to achieve compliance with its own discharge consent and to preserve the wastewater infrastructure.

·        This option is in line with current legislative requirements.

·        This option should ensure conservation and protection of Council’s wastewater assets and the environment by having formal controls in place with which to control trade waste discharges.

·        This option would minimise the cost to the community of treating trade waste sourced wastewater by ensuring operational and maintenance costs are equitably spread.

·        If Council would like to make a substantial change to the draft bylaw, further consultation would be required.

 

Option 2 – Endorse the version of the draft bylaw that went out for consultation.

Advantages

Disadvantages

·        This version of the draft bylaw is an amended version of the current bylaw, which has been operating effectively.

·        This version of the draft bylaw effective method for Council to achieve compliance with its own discharge consent and to preserve the wastewater infrastructure.

·        This option is in line with current legislative requirements.

·        This option should ensure conservation and protection of Council’s wastewater assets and the environment by having formal controls in place with which to control trade waste discharges.

·        This option would minimise the cost to the community of treating trade waste sourced wastewater by ensuring operational and maintenance costs are equitably spread.

·        This option would not take into account the feedback received. Council is required to consider community views.

 

Assessment of Significance

22      A significant decision is one that has a high degree of significance in terms of its impact on:

·    the current and future social, economic, environmental or cultural wellbeing of the district or region;

·    people who are likely to be particularly affected by or interested in, the issue, proposal decision or matter;

·    the capacity of Council to performs its role, and the financial and other costs of doing so;

·    the ownership or function of a strategic asset.

23      In this report the Council is being asked to consider and deliberate on feedback on the draft bylaw, and to endorse a draft bylaw. Based on the criteria above, staff have assessed this decision as of lower significance.

Recommended Option

24      The recommended option is that Council endorses the draft bylaw with the minor amendments proposed by staff (and any other desired amendments).

Next Steps

25      If Council endorses a draft bylaw at this meeting, the next steps are for staff to present the final Trade Waste Bylaw 2018 to Council at its meeting on 20 June 2018, for adoption.

 

Attachments

a             Submission on draft Trade Waste Bylaw 2018

b             E-mail from Southern District Health Board - Renee Brown

c             Letter from Hon Dr David Clark

d            Draft Trade Waste Bylaw 2018    

 


Council

16 May 2018

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Council

16 May 2018

 

PDF Creator


Council

16 May 2018

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Council

16 May 2018

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Council

16 May 2018

 

Southland Cycling Strategy

Record No:             R/18/4/9942

Author:                      Dylan Rabbidge, Commercial Lead Roading

Approved by:         Matt Russell, Group Manager Services and Assets

 

  Decision                                        Recommendation                                  Information

 

 

 

Purpose

1        The draft Southland Cycling Strategy presented to Council on 14 December 2016 has been finalised and is presented for adoption.

Executive Summary

2        This report provides an overview of the Southland Cycling Strategy from when first presented in draft form to its final form.  The purpose of the document is provide guidance around cycling in the greater Southland district.  Invercargill City Council and Gore District have both adopted the Southland Cycling Strategy.

 

Recommendation

That the Council:

a)            Receives the report titled “Southland Cycling Strategy” dated 10 May 2018.

 

b)           Determines that this matter or decision be recognised as not significant in terms of Section 76 of the Local Government Act 2002.

 

c)            Determines that it has complied with the decision-making provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 to the extent necessary in relation to this decision; and in accordance with Section 79 of the Act determines that it does not require further information, further assessment of options or further analysis of costs and benefits or advantages and disadvantages prior to making a decision on this matter.

 

d)           Adopts the Southland Cycling Strategy.

 

Background

3        The Southland Cycling Strategy was developed in consultation with the region’s councils, government agencies, cycling organisations and the community.

4        Venture Southland managed a process whereby an experienced consultant was procured via a competitive tender process.  The successful consultant was TRC Tourism.  The TRC team has been working in the fields of tourism, recreation, conservation and culture for over 25 years.

5        The process TRC used involved analysis of Southland’s population, social, economic and tourism situation.  Previous plans and studies on cycling in the region were reviewed. An audit was conducted of the existing cycling infrastructure, services, experiences and organisation in Southland and competitor cycling destinations. Local and visitor cycling markets and their cycling needs and references were also analysed to identify the market segments and types of cycling with most potential for the region.

6        Community views and input on directions for cycling were provided through interviews with major stakeholders and community open house sessions.  Stakeholders were also invited to comment on a paper setting out a proposed strategic approach to cycling development.

7        The views of Southland’s cyclists were sought through an online survey that received 339 responses.

8        This process lead to the compilation of the draft strategy.

9        This is a collaboration between the four local authorities along with key stakeholders and interest groups

10      Subsequent to this the strategy has evolved with additional inputs from NZTA to ensure it will meet the strategic requirements that form part of the Business Case approach required for funding from NZTA. The Cycling Southland Strategy is attached.

Purpose

11      “The Southland Cycling Strategy is a fundamental document for government, the community, cycling organisations, the tourism industry and business at the local, district and regional levels to develop and invest in cycling opportunities in a consistent, collaborative and sustainable way for Southland. It is geared to the specific needs, situations and practicalities in Southland while guiding local stakeholders on developing effective initiatives in their local areas.”

12      This will be a useful document for the Southland District Council to use as the base planning document for cycling initiatives of all types.  Whether it be on-road or off-road cycling.  Whether it be NZTA funded, local funded, private funded or District funded.

Vision Statement

13      The vision statement in the strategy is quoted below;

“Our aim is to improve cycling safety and participation in Southland”

Process

14      The proposal from here is for each of the Southland region’s authorities to adopt the strategy, currently Invercargill City Council and Gore District Council have adopted with only Southland District to complete adoption with Environment Southland to endorse the strategy.

 

Issues

15      No relevant issues identified.

Factors to Consider

Legal and Statutory Requirements

16      There is no out of the ordinary legal requirements. 

Community Views

17      The Strategy has been developed with input from stakeholders such as Cycling Southland, Cycling New Zealand, Te Anau Cycling Inc to name a few.

Costs and Funding

18      Other than staff time, there has been no direct financial costs.  One of the key outcomes of this document is to meet NZTA’s funding requirements, this document forms part of the Strategic Case required to enable funding applications.

Policy Implications

19      At present the Southland District Council does not have a Strategic document around cycling across the region.  This document aims to provide guidance for future safe cycling networks.

Analysis

Options Considered

20      Either adopt the Southland Cycling Strategy or develop a standalone strategy.

Analysis of Options

Option 1 - Adopt the Southland Cycling Strategy 

Advantages

Disadvantages

·        A Southland wide strategy – unified approach.

·        Buy in from all stakeholders.

·        Sets the platform for funding applications - NZTA strategic case has been developed to meet funding requirements.

·        Provides Southland District with a strategy.

·        None identified.

Option 2 - Develop a standalone strategy

Advantages

Disadvantages

·        Retain control / great level of ownership.

·        Financial implications – re consult.

·        Will not be in keeping with the wider Southland strategy.

·        Potential issues with stakeholders.

·        May not meet NZTA requirements.

Option 3 – Have no strategy

Advantages

Disadvantages

·        None identified.

·        Lack of direction and leadership.

·        Reduced ability to access funding.

 

Assessment of Significance

21      This is not deemed significant.

Recommended Option

22      It is recommended that the Southland Cycling Strategy be adopted.

Next Steps

23      Southland District Council continue with the Southland Cycling governance group, currently Councillor Frazer and staff member.

 

Attachments

a             Cycling Southland Strategy    

 


Council

16 May 2018

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 

 


Council

16 May 2018

 

Wyndham Camping Ground Electrical Compliance

Record No:             R/18/5/10257

Author:                      Shaun Holland, Community Engineer

Approved by:         Matt Russell, Group Manager Services and Assets

 

  Decision                                        Recommendation                                  Information

 

 

 

Purpose

1        The purpose of this report is to update Council on the compliance issues at the Wyndham Camping Ground.

Executive Summary

2          The Wyndham Camping Ground has a current agreement between the Southland District Council (the lessor) and James Garthwaite (the lessee), for the lease of the Wyndham Camping Ground located at 135 Cardigan Road, Wyndham. The lease was signed in 2016 with a renewal every three years. At this present point of time the camping ground is compliant to the standard at the time of installation. However, it has been reported by the two electrical contractors recently engaged to undertake works, that fittings at the camping ground are unsafe and require replacement.  This would mean the camping ground would have to comply with the current standards of compliance (A/NZ Electrical Standards 3001). As the owner of the camping ground and in accordance with the lease agreement, the Council is responsible for significant capital works at the site. There is also a Health and Safety consideration for the Council in terms of discharging responsibilities.

3          On the advice of two electricians there needs to be extensive work completed in relation to cable location plans, switchboard work, and renewal of power outlets, plugs, RCDs and switches. Two quotes have been received; from AMTEC Electrical which came in at $17,250.34 and Nind Electrical which came in at $12,000 (this is not a true indication as they did not include some major components of the work as requested - the local electrical agent failed to respond to any contact). AMTEC’s quote was the highest but appeared to be the most comprehensive. Their grasp of the relevant regulations was also very apparent.

4          The quote from AMTEC totals $17,250.34.  It is considered that this work is a high priority, as such it is requested that funds be made available to rectify this issue and discharge Council’s responsibility associated with both the Health & Safety legislation and the A/NZ Electrical Standards.  There will be some disruption to the normal operations of the camping ground and as such the lessee will need to be given advance notice.

5          If the camp closed, the Board would be subjected to an approximate deficit of $5,000 associated with mowing, building insurance, rates, and building maintenance.

 

Recommendation

That the Council:

a)        Receives the report titled “Wyndham Camping Ground Electrical Compliance” dated 10 May 2018.

b)        Determines that this matter or decision be recognised as not significant in terms of Section 76 of the Local Government Act 2002.

c)         Determines that it has complied with the decision-making provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 to the extent necessary in relation to this decision; and in accordance with Section 79 of the Act determines that it does not require further information, further assessment of options or further analysis of costs and benefits or advantages and disadvantages prior to making a decision on this matter.

d)        Approves the electrical compliance work submitted by AMTEC Electrical for the price of $17,250.34.

 

Background

6          The Wyndham Camping Ground has a current agreement between the Southland District Council (the lessor) and James Garthwaite (the lessee), for the lease of the Wyndham Camping Ground located at 135 Cardigan Road, Wyndham. The lease was signed in 2016 with a renewal every three years. At this present point of time the camping ground is compliant to the standard at the time of installation. However, it has been reported by the two electrical contractors recently engaged to undertake works, that fittings at the camping ground are unsafe and require replacement.  This would mean the camping ground would have to comply with the current standards of compliance (A/NZ Electrical Standards 3001). As the owner of the camping ground and in accordance with the lease agreement, the Council is responsible for significant capital works at the site. There is also a Health & Safety consideration for the Council in terms of discharging responsibilities. The cost of the proposed electrical upgrades totals $17,250.34.

Issues

7        The status quo cannot continue. Council must discharge its responsibilities under the lease and in line with the health and safety and A/NZ Electrical Standards (updated in 2012).

8          If the camp closed, the Board would be subjected to an approximate deficit of $5,000 associated with mowing, building insurance, rates, and building maintenance.

Factors to Consider

Legal and Statutory Requirements

9        Legal advice obtained by Council’s Property Manager, Kevin McNaught, indicates that Council is obligated to fulfil its contractual obligations. The agreement for lease clearly outlines major works such as refurbishments, renewal of structures significant failures etc shall be the responsibility of the Lessor.

Community Views

10      It is considered that there would be a social cost in closing the camping ground as it has a high use rate of freedom campers’. Campers also frequent local businesses and contribute to the local community.

Costs and Funding

11      With the sale funds from the Baltic Street land (yet to be formally signed off) and the Edendale Hall, the Board is able to cover the cost of this undertaking. The Board may consider recovering these costs back from the camping ground reserve over time.

Policy Implications

12      Non-compliance with contractual obligations.

Analysis

Options Considered

Analysis of Options

Option 1 – Carry out compliance work

Advantages

Disadvantages

·        Carry out compliance work.

·        Initial cost to the Board.

 

Option 2 – Status Quo

Advantages

Disadvantages

·        Nil Cost.

·        Risk of serious incident/accident.

·        Council is at risk of being sued for not meeting contractual obligations.

·        In event of incident/accident, Council exposed to reprimand under Health and Safety legislation.

 


 

Option 3 - Closure of the camp

Advantages

Disadvantages

·        Closure of the camp.

·        The Board would be in deficit approximately $5,000 dollars per annum.

·        Council is at risk of being sued for not meeting contractual obligations.

·        Social cost to the community.

 

Assessment of Significance

13      The Edendale-Wyndham Community Board and Community Engineer posed the following questions to Mr James Garthwaite (lessee).

14      Mr Garthwaite’s comments are as follows:

·    Usage of dump station - not high usage but it is used by both people camping and people passing through.

·    Cabin usage - has been getting some of interest and usage, however we have had issues with 3 lots of people staying longer term (payments, issues with other campers, hard to get them to leave etc).  Currently cabins are empty with the some casual use.

·    Numbers - has there been an increase? - yes there has been an increase comparing with the numbers I received from the council, approx. 10% based on last comparisons.

·    Shower/washing facilities, do you think there is a lot of external use? - yes there is wider use than just campers, have easily seen this as camper numbers have decreased yet laundry and shower usage is higher than expected.

·    General comments - had catch up at Council offices on Friday, discussed rubbish, power and also the ongoing issues we have been having with water pipes splitting.  Overall going pretty good, currently working on website and some further marketing around promotion and things to do around the area.

·    Health and Safety incidents etc. - no reported incidences.

Recommended Option

15      Recommend Option 1 as this would allow the camp to remain open and for Council to meet its obligations under the Health and Safety Act and AS/NZS Electrical Standards 3001.

Next Steps

16      Give the preferred contractor instruction to start works.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report. 

 


Council

16 May 2018

 

 

Financial Report for the month ended 31 March 2018

Record No:             R/18/4/10025

Author:                      Dipal Patel, Project Accountant

Approved by:         Anne Robson, Chief Financial Officer

 

  Decision                                        Recommendation                                  Information

 

  

 

Background

1.         This report outlines the financial results for the nine months to 31 March 2018 or 75% of the financial year.

2.         The Monthly and YTD Actual results are compared to the Full Year Budget (Projection) in the attached Summary Monthly Financial Report. 

3.         The projection values include any 2016/2017 carried forward items approved by Council in September 2017 and February forecast changes approved by Council in March 2018.

4.         The 2017/2018 Annual Plan budget is shown in the Reports as the Full Year Budget (Budget).

Overview

5.         The Summary Monthly Financial Report consolidates the business units within each of the key areas of the Executive Leadership Team (ELT) responsibility.  The following commentary focuses on the year to date (YTD) results excluding GST.

6.         The Detailed Monthly Financial Report includes more detailed explanations and commentary on variances by the Executive Leadership Team.  Commentary generally focuses on the year to date (YTD) results and, where specified, monthly results. 

7.         In the Council Summary and Detailed Reports, the values in the columns for:

·              The Monthly Budget, is phased where appropriate and is based on the full year projection and includes carry forwards and forecasting.

·              The YTD Budget is based on the full year projection and is a combination of the Annual Plan, carry forwards and forecasting. 

·              The Full Year Budget is the Annual Plan budget for the year.

·              The Full Year Projection is the forecasted year end result.

8.         Phasing of budgets occurs in the first 2 months of the financial year, at forecasting and when one-off costs have actually occurred. This should reduce the number of variance explanations due to timing.

9.         Where phasing of budgets has not occurred, one twelfth of annual budgeted cost is used to calculate the monthly budget.

10.       Council staff will continue to refine the format of this report to enhance the financial information reported.  We welcome any feedback or suggestions on further improvements that could be made to this report.

11.       The Council Summary Report (actuals vs phased and forecast budget) year to date are as follows:

Income

12.       Operating Income is $4 million (7%) under budget year to date ($56.4 million actual vs $60.4 million budget).

13.       Transport (Roading) income is 8% under projection, a variance of $2.1 million compared to the YTD budget of $31.4 million. This relates to the timing of various works and those being weather dependent including special purpose roads (lower Hollyford) which have required minimal work this financial year.

14.       Services and Assets is under budget by $1.6 million (10%). This relates predominantly to harvesting activities within the forestry business unit. It is forecast that this shortfall against budgeted income will have corrected by year end due to significant harvesting activities currently underway with healthy associated yields.

Operating Expenditure

15.       Operating Expenditure is $2.3 million (4%) under budget for the year to date ($51.8 million actual vs $54.1 million budget).

 

16.       Transport (Roading) costs are 3% under budget, a variance of $695 thousand. This relates to the timing of various works and those being weather dependent including special purpose roads (lower Hollyford) which have required minimal work this financial year.

17.       Services and Assets are $786 thousand (5%) under projection. The most significant variation is associated with Forestry ($904 thousand) which is due to the delayed harvesting. It is still expected we will be on projection at year end. Road safety is considerably over budget ($225 thousand over budget). However, a limited budget was included in the Annual Plan as the costs are recovered from all councils involved in this shared service.

Capital Expenditure

18.       Capital Expenditure is $3.8 million (16%) under budget year to date ($20.1 million actual v $23.9 million budget).

 

 

19.       Customer Support, Services & Assets, Environmental & Financial Services have vehicle replacements in their budgets, some of which have not been spent to date. 20 vehicles are due for replacement by 30 June 2018.  15 replacement vehicles have been delivered during January-April, 2 others have been ordered in February and are scheduled to arrive in June. Orders for the remaining vehicles are anticipated to be placed by the end of May.

 

 

 

 

 

20.       Capital expenditure for Services and Assets is 28% ($1.1 million) under budget for the year to date. It is anticipated that by year end this deficit will be approximately 36%. This is predominantly due to District Water activities and District Sewerage activities.

 

Wastewater ($447 thousand):

·   $105 thousand relates to the funds allowed for ongoing work relating to Te Anau Work is ongoing in order to undertake the updated business case work comparing CPI and SDI disposal methods.

·   Desludging is currently $113 thousand under budget with the contractor having established during February.

·   Otautau ($205 thousand) – the Otautau upgrade of plant, equipment and SCADA is currently under budget by $205 thousand, but is expected to be completed by the end of the year.

 

Water ($626 thousand):

·    Water loss analysis across the district is currently ongoing through a number of projects. These are collectively $146 thousand under budget with the work planned expected to be completed by 30 June.

·    Eastern Bush water supply upgrade ($74 thousand) – Stantec is currently working on required consenting documentation that should be completed by 30 June.

·    Winton Water Supply ($329 thousand) – The project is in progress to replace the water main. It is expected to be on budget at year end.

 

21.         Overall roading capital expenditure is $2.8 million less than projected for the year to date due to the timing of programmed works including delays as a result of inclement weather.

·   Two bridge replacements were awarded in February. An issue with fish passage has again put the projects in jeopardy of being completed by 30th June. As a condition of being an ‘Affected Party’, DOC and Iwi will only allow works to be undertaken between December and March. The Waianiwa Oporo bridge replacement’s completion sign off has been delayed due to the contractor installing the box culvert approx. 500mm higher than designed.  Currently the contractor is attempting to get a variation to the resource consent, if this is not approved by Environment Southland the box culvert will need to be removed in which case a new box culvert will be required.  SDC are currently holding payment for this work.   Wyndham Valley structural component replacement (replacing of beams and deck) was awarded to Southroads in February, construction is due to begin in early April.  Two replacement bridges will have tender documents drawn up in April to be tendered prior to July, these will be design builds.  This is based off discussions with Bridge It NZ (prefabricated bridging company).

·   The Alternative Coastal Route: Slope Point Road is complete, with curve advisory signage being completed in February, only the car park remains to be completed which will be undertaken prior to 30th June 2018. Approximately 59% of the project is now sealed with a further 17% likely to happen by the end of April subject to weather. The project is expected to be completed by year end.

·   A slip occurred at the Curio Bay end in March, the Roading team have engaged Opus for Geotech advice and design.  McNeill’s were engaged to drill six core samples, this occurred on the 27th of March, this information will be used in the design.  The costs to date are $40K, as more information becomes available Roading will update Council.

·   Special Purpose Roads are currently under budget. This Business Unit is 100% funded from NZTA this has no overall impact on SDC.  The Lower Hollyford Road has required no emergency works this year however the section down to Marion Falls has been sealed by NZTA, an item was identified in the forecast as the sealing is expected to cost in excess of $275K. 

·   The Chaslands Slip project was put to tender however the tender price was significantly higher than estimate.  This is awaiting approval from NZTA which is expected by the 18th April.  Based off the programme supplied it is expected that the completion date will be late January 2019.

 

22.         Council’s financial position as at 31 March 2018 is detailed below and is for the activities of Council only.  The balance sheet as at 30 June 2017 represents the audited balance sheet for activities of Council only.

23.       At 31 March 2018, Council had $15 million invested in six term deposits ranging from three to six month maturities as follows:

 

24.       Funds on call are : 

 

25.       The movement in Property, Plant and Equipment is due to capital additions during the year less budgeted depreciation.

26.       The increase in Non-Current Assets (Intangible Assets) is the continued acquisition costs of Council’s digitisation software.

 

 

Recommendation

That the Council:

a)         Receives the report titled “Financial Report for the month ended 31 March 2018” dated 10 May 2018.

 

Attachments

a             Council s District Activities - Summary Monthly Financial Report for March 2018

b             Council s District Activities - Detailed Monthly Financial Report - 31 March 2018    

 


Council

16 May 2018

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Council

16 May 2018

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Council

16 May 2018

 

PDF Creator


Council

16 May 2018

 

PDF Creator


Council

16 May 2018

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Council

16 May 2018

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Council

16 May 2018

 

PDF Creator


Council

16 May 2018

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Council

16 May 2018

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Council

16 May 2018

 

PDF Creator


Council

16 May 2018

 

PDF Creator


Council

16 May 2018

 

PDF Creator


Council

16 May 2018

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Council

16 May 2018

 

PDF Creator


Council

16 May 2018

 

PDF Creator


Council

16 May 2018

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Council

16 May 2018

 

PDF Creator


Council

16 May 2018

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Council

16 May 2018

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Council

16 May 2018

 

Management Report

Record No:             R/18/4/10027

Author:                      Steve Ruru, Chief Executive

Approved by:         Steve Ruru, Chief Executive

 

  Decision                                        Recommendation                                  Information

 

 

 

Chief Executive

Water Issues

1.       During the month the Minister of Local Government announced the establishment of a 3 waters review, which follows on from the work that they have completed to date in considering the recommendations from the Havelock North Drinking Water Inquiry that was released in late 2017. A copy of the cabinet paper and other reports relating to the review are available on the DIA website www.dia.govt.nz/three-waters-review 

2.       The work completed by the Government to date has concluded:

·        That the operating environment is becoming more complex because of rising standards and expectations, risk and resilience issues, and the funding pressures to renew and extend infrastructure;

·        There are risks to human health and the environment in some parts of New Zealand;

·        There is evidence of affordability, capacity, and capability concerns in some areas of New Zealand;

·        There is inadequate system oversight and connection between different parts of the overall system;

·        There are variable asset management practices throughout the country which have efficiency and effectiveness consequences;

·        Existing reporting obligations do not provide consumers and other stakeholders with accurate, meaningful, and easily assimilated information. This position fails to incentivise performance improvement.

3.       The perceived consequences of these concerns are:

·        A risk of further Havelock North type of events;

·        Housing infrastructure supply being unable to meet demand in high-growth areas;

·        A failure to meet national and local environmental outcomes for freshwater and the marine environments;

·        A constrained ability to plan and fund robust systems to meet the hazard landscape;

·        Limitations on developing regions particularly where business establishment or expansion is dependent on the existence of reliable water infrastructure.

4.       The review is to be completed and decisions made by Cabinet in October 2018 so that any financial implications of the decisions made can be included in the 2019 Budget. Hence, the work is to be progressed within a very tight timeframe particularly given the wide scope and complexity of the work to be completed before then.

5.       As part of the review the Department of Internal Affairs will be establishing the following four work streams:

i.    Effective oversight, regulatory settings, and institutional arrangements relating to three waters;

ii.   Funding and financing mechanisms, including analysis of a range of options for funding the three waters infrastructure system;

iii.  Capacity and capability of decision makers and suppliers (including consideration of the Government Havelock North Drinking Water Inquiry’s recommendations for the aggregation and licensing of drinking water suppliers);

iv.  Information for transparency, accountability and decision making.

6.       Each of the four work streams will identify the range of options available to address the issues which have been identified to date. It is expected that this will include a move to establish an independent regulatory agency. The implications, including potential cost impacts, for local authorities will be depend on:

·        The design and breadth of role of any independent water infrastructure regulator;

·        The incentive or mandatory regime that might drive supplier aggregation;

·        The cost and timeframe to meet increased regulatory standards;

·        The degree of rigour of any possible licensing regime;

·        The nature of any changes to the existing planning regime to heighten the enforcement regime;

·        The nature of the relationship between existing regulatory institutions and any new regulatory body; and

·        The impacts of any changes to central government accountabilities for water infrastructure policy.

7.       Given the tight timeframes within which the Government’s review is to be progressed Local Government NZ (LGNZ) will be looking to accelerate the work that they have been completing in this space, primarily through their Water 2050 project. As part of this work they recently released a Stage 1 report expressing their views on a potential model for the establishment of a water regulator. A copy of the report is available at www.lgnz.co.nz/assets/Uploads/45959-LGNZ-Water-2050-Governance-FINAL.pdf

8.       The report proposes:

·        A co-governance model that would bring together the information held by central government policy makers with the knowledge of local issues held by local government and the technical insights of suppliers and assessors;

·        The co-governance entity would be responsible for continuously evaluating and recommending to the Minister refinements to drinking water standards and mandatory processes;

·        The enforcement of the standards by a regulator which should be independent from any policy-making department;

·        Replacing the current ‘principles-based’ approach to the regulation of drinking water with an outcome or performance-based form of regulation.

9.       A Stage 2 report, which will look at the detailed design for a co-regulatory model for drinking water is currently under development and is expected to be released in coming months.

Climate Change

10.     The Deep South Science Challenge has recently released a discussion document which sets out current understanding of the vulnerability of communities to rising seas and more frequent flooding. 

11.     The report confirms that many communities and Iwi in coastal and flood-prone locations face an uncertain future because of climate change.  It identifies that Councils will need to be proactive in working with exposed communities, anticipate the support that may be required, and offer equitable solutions.  However, the report has identified that we do not yet have a good understanding of a number of issues, including:

·        Identifying who might be disproportionately affected by climate change;

·        How institutions for addressing climate change impacts and adaptation could focus on protecting vulnerable people and communities;

·        Understanding how local government’s planning for climate change adaptation can focus on reducing impacts on vulnerable people and communities;

·        How information about climate change impacts and adaptation can be most effectively communicated to facilitate positive attitudes and constructive.

12.     The Government has also recently established an Interim Climate Change Committee to advise on how agriculture can be included in the current Emissions Trading Scheme and also how New Zealand can move to having 100 percent of its electricity generated by renewable energy.

13.     This work is important as the Government works towards the formation of a new Climate Change Commission and introduction of a Zero Carbon Act next year. Keith Turner, who chairs the Milford Opportunities Project has been appointed to this Committee.

14.     The work that is occurring in the emissions reduction area is very important to our Southland communities given that agriculture currently accounts for close to half of New Zealand’s total emissions. As a result achieving real reductions in the agriculture area is fundamental to New Zealand being able to achieve its targets under the Paris Accord.

Low Emissions Economy

15.     The Productivity Commission has now released its draft report www.productivity.govt.nz on how New Zealand can transition to a low-emissions economy. The report is in response to a request from Government for the Commission to identify options for how New Zealand can reduce its domestic greenhouse gas emissions through a transition to a low-emissions economy, while at the same time continuing to grow income and wellbeing.

16.     The draft report provides insights into how and where emission reductions can be achieved, the emissions-pricing and other regulatory policies that will be required to bring about the transition, and the challenges, opportunities, benefits and costs of alternative transition pathways.  It also notes that current land use will change significantly across NZ as part of the transition.

17.     The recommendations in the draft report include:

·        a strong signal from the Government, and preferably from across the Parliament, about its long-term commitment to transitioning to a low-emissions economy;

·        establishing an institutional framework that supports policies for transition;

·        a broad-based and effective emissions pricing scheme that includes phasing in agriculture;

·        supporting regulation and policies, such as a “feebate” scheme for imported vehicles;

·        more resources focused on low-emissions research and development, especially for agriculture; and

·        mandatory financial disclosures about climate risk.

18.     The report is open for submissions until 8 June following which the Commission will finalise its report by August.

Roading GPS

19.     The Government released the draft Land Transport Government Policy Statement for consultation at the beginning of April.

20.     The GPS helps guide investment in transport by providing a longer-term strategic view of what is prioritised and why. The new strategic priorities outlined in the document reflect the Government’s commitment to:

·        Safety;

·        Mode neutrality;

·        Liveable cities;

·        Regional economic development;

·        Protecting the environment; and

·        Delivering the best possible value for money.

21.     The GPS represents a shift in government priorities from the previous GPS. In particular there is now a much stronger emphasis being placed on road safety and a more to supporting broader regional development. The focus that was previous placed on a number of ‘roads of national significance’ projects is now significantly reduced. Other themes in the draft GPS 2018 include:

·        a mode-neutral approach to transport planning and investment decisions;

·        incorporating technology and innovation into the design and delivery of land transport investment; and

·        integrating land use and transport planning and delivery.

22.     Submissions on the draft GPS were open until 2 May. It is expected that the final GPS will be released in mid-May so that the Land Transport programmes for 2018/19 can be finalised before 30 June.

23.     Initial indications are that the new draft GPS is not expected to have a significant effect on Southland District Council’s transport plan for the next three years. This has been further supported by recent correspondence from NZ Transport Agency which has provided Council with an update on its funding application for the 2018-21 National Land Transport Programme – indicative investment levels for continuous programmes.

24.     At its meeting on 20 April the NZ Transport Agency Board made its decision on indicative investment levels for continuous programmes. Continuous programmes relate to local road maintenance, state highway maintenance, public transport services and road safety promotion programmes.  Council requested $70,228,000 over the three years and indicative funding approval has been received for this quantum.

25.     The Board made its decision ahead of the adoption of the NLTP on 31 August to assist Councils with budgeting, long-term plan development, and Regional Transport Committees to finalise their Regional Land Transport Plan (RLTP). The NZTA Board will confirm the funding allocations for these programmes when it adopts the NLTP.

26.     The local road maintenance programme has traditionally included renewals, maintenance and operations of local roads. The draft GPS has signalled footpath maintenance as now being eligible for NLTF funding which may create opportunities to access funding. In anticipation of its inclusion in the final GPS, an indicative funding allocation for footpath maintenance has been made nationally. What this actually means for Council still needs to be worked through with the NZ Transport Agency as there is little detail available at present. Staff will continue to work with NZTA on how this funding can be accessed.

Local Government (Community Wellbeing) Amendment Bill and Local Electoral Matters Bill

27.     A Local Government (Community Wellbeing) Amendment Bill and the Local Electoral Matters Bill have been introduced to Parliament and referred to select committee.

28.     The Local Government (Community Well-being) Amendment Bill seeks to reinstate the four well-beings back into the Local Government Act and acknowledges the role local leadership has to promote the social, economic, environmental and cultural well-being of citizens and communities. Explicit statutory recognition of the four well beings is recognition that local authorities, by their nature, have a broad responsibility to make their jurisdictions, whether towns, cities or regions, better places in which to live.

29.     The Bill also seeks to give Councils back the ability to collect development contributions in order to fund increased demand for community facilities, such as libraries, sports grounds and swimming pools resulting from developments. The ability to fund these activities through development contributions was removed from the Local Government Act by the previous government.

30.     The Bill also seeks to modify the development contributions power so that it is clear that advances of financial assistance from the NZTA that are recoverable do not affect the power of territorial authorities to collect development contributions for projects financed using this mechanism. This provides clarity in an area that has been contentious for some time.

31.     The Local Electoral Matters Bill addresses the design, trial and analysis of new voting methods for local elections, and will make it easier to trial electronic voting, including online voting.

Auditor General Local Government Report

32.     The Office of the Auditor General (OAG) has recently released its report on local authority financial performance for the 2016/17 financial year.

33.     In the report the OAG notes that they continue to be concerned that a number of local authorities might not be investing enough to ensure the maintenance of infrastructure capacity, which is critical to be able to ensure the ongoing delivery of services in the long term.

34.     While the appropriateness of comparing asset renewals with the level of depreciation can be questioned it is important to recognise that a prolonged period of under investment can create an infrastructure deficit risk including an increased risk of asset failure and/or the transfer of costs to future generations.

35.     The cost transfer issue is a ‘known’ issue for the sector given that the funding of depreciation did not become a requirement until relatively recently. 

36.     The report also highlights the need for ongoing investment in the development of good quality and reliable asset management data noting that “without good information about assets, elected members cannot make good decisions about whether they are spending the right amount at the right time on the assets they govern".

Freedom Camping

37.     Freedom camping has been a topical issue with significant discussion occurring around different parts of New Zealand. Mayor Tong was one of 30 Mayors who met with Tourism Minister Kelvin Davis and senior officials to discuss freedom camping issues on 8 March. The discussions were wide ranging and highlighted the diversity of views that exist in relation to freedom camping and how it is best managed. The challenges facing different local authorities vary around the country.

38.     There was also a national freedom camping symposium held in Nelson on 19 April, in conjunction with the Zone 5 and 6 meeting. The symposium was very well attended with a range of representatives from local government, the tourism industry, NZ Motor Caravan Association and central government in attendance.

39.     The level of commitment that central Government has to addressing the issues was demonstrated by the attendance of Hon Nanaia Mahuta, as the Minister of Local Government, and Hon Eugenie Sage, as the Minister of Conservation. This can be seen as a clear indication that Government are wanting to develop a better understanding of the issues and opportunities that might exist to address the issues which are currently being experienced.

40.     As can be expected there were a wide range of views presented at the meeting with some areas clearly seeing freedom camping as providing an opportunity to grow the tourism industry and the economic contribution that it makes to local communities, while others see it as a significant issue that requires a significantly tighter level of control introduced.

41.     There remains a level of concern, particularly at the national level, that if action is not taken to address the impacts that freedom camping is having in communities currently experiencing problems that it may begin to have an impact on the level of community support for the tourism industry. Given that tourism is now New Zealand’s biggest export earner it is clearly important that the industry be allowed to grow in a way that manages its adverse impacts, including its impact on local communities.

42.     At a local level staff are continuing to monitor the situation and have work planned to look at developing a district wide management strategy once the direction of any national policy review work becomes clearer.

Road Safety Summit

43.     A local government road safety summit was held in Wellington on 9 April 2018. Key themes emerging from the discussions at the Summit included:

·        The need for strong and ongoing leadership on road safety from central government, including consideration of the Vision Zero approach to road safety;

·        There should be clear government road safety targets and consideration should be given as to whether local government should be tied to any interim targets;

·        Support for increased funding for road safety projects including changing Funding Assistance Rates;

·        The processes for accessing funding for road safety improvements should not be unduly onerous and disproportionate to the scale of the project;

·        The process for changing local speed limits, including looking at how default speed limits are set, should be simplified and streamlined;

·        Road safety should be a whole of government approach and should bring together a wide range of government agencies, all of which should share a consistent view;

·        Improving the safety of children and other vulnerable users walking and cycling to school, including an increased use of eBikes, should be a priority;

·        There should be increased use of road safety education campaigns, as well as an increased level of on-road enforcement by New Zealand Police;

·        There should be improved access to national data especially for smaller Councils which may lack specialist data analysis skills;

·        Ensuring consistent national standards for road markings, signage, and road designs.

44.     The Associate Minister of Transport, who also attended the summit, has asked officials to start investigating how these and the other ideas that were recorded can be developed further. Further information related to the summit is available on the Ministry of Transport website www.transport.govt.nz

Southland Regional Development

45.     All four Southland Councils have now endorsed the recommendation of the Joint Committee to proceed with the establishment of a new Southland Regional Development Agency as a CCO. Following the confirmation of these decisions work will now proceed with the next phase of work needed to establish the new Agency.

46.     The work to be progressed in the next phase will include the drafting of constitutional documents, identifying a process for the appointment of the Board and commencing an internal Southland District Council process to identify the range of services that it might want to purchase from the new Agency.

Finance

47.     Council staff are currently compiling the required information in preparation for the annual insurance renewal which is due to expire on 30 June 2018.  This information will be provided to insurers so they can provide policy details and quotes to Council before the expiry date for confirmation and placement.

48.     Audit NZ visited in mid-April to undertake their interim audit procedures in preparation for the audit of the annual report for the year ended 30 June 2018. 

49.     Staff are awaiting the management report from Audit NZ in relation to recommended areas for improvement.  This report will be provided to the Finance and Audit committee at its June meeting.

50.     Council have engaged Deloitte to undertake a fraud risk assessment exercise. Deloitte were onsite for 2 days at the end of April to undertake a number of workshops with key staff.  These workshops and the results of an online survey of Council staff, will inform a fraud risk assessment report which will be included in the June Finance and Audit committee agenda.

Libraries

51.     By the time this report is read, our partnership with Kōtui as the Library Management System will be in place.  We will also have launched a new Library webpage, with great support from the Communications team, as part of the project.  Users will need to update their library cards if they have not already done so. 


 

Customer Support

52.     Below is a table showing the work completed within the Customer Support Group for March and April 2018.

 

March 2018

April 2018

Total number of calls to 0800 732 732

4487

3936

Abandonment rate

0.16%

0.28%

Request for Service received

541

591

Top three requests types

1.  Change of address

2.  Building inspection requests

3.  Roading matters

1.  Building Inspection Requests

2.  Change of address

3.  Roading matters

Processed payments to Council

·      Cash

·      Cheque

·      Direct Credit

·      Direct Debit

·      Eftpos

7002

2%

8%

60%

26%

5%

7140

2%

6%

59%

27%

4%

Number of visitors to our Libraries and Council Service Centres

*Excludes Invercargill, Stewart Island, Wyndham and Book Bus

11652

10851

 

Services and Assets

Group Manager’s Update

53.     It has been a busy time for the team, with a number of important work streams currently underway. A priority for staff has been summarising, considering and responding to the Long Term Plan submission feedback.

54.     Earlier in the month Environment Southland finalised their Land and Water Plan.  This document has some significant implications for our long-term asset management strategies in relation to our three-waters assets.  As such, a working group has been established including other local Territorial Local Authorities in a bid to undertake a detailed review of the plan and determine next steps.

55.     As we draw to a close on the latest New Zealand Transport Agency three year funding cycle our transport team is working very hard to maximise the value able to be elicited from the funding whilst also seeking to ensure that our delivery resource has a steady stream of work to deliver in the new financial year as we embark on the next three year cycle.

56.     In addition to the day to day activity and asset management functions undertaken by the group there are a number of other key strategic activities requiring some focus. Some of these include:

·        the establishment of a consolidated Project Management Framework;

·        a review of reporting functions across the group;

·        an upcoming Stewart Island Electrical Supply Authority Contractor Procurement exercise;

·        the Community Facilities 17A Review Implementation Plan;

·        the Open Space Implementation Strategy;

·        the management structure and resource associated with Stewart Island Electrical Supply Authority, Te Anau Airport and Southland District Council Forestry Activities.

Stewart Island Electrical Supply Authority (SIESA) (PowerNet)

57.     A review and update of the SIESA Asset Management Plan is a priority for the coming months. Concurrently, further assessment of the management contract needs to be undertaken as the existing contract draws to a close mid-year.

58.     It is anticipated that a further extension of this contract will be necessary in order to enable an adequate assessment and procurement process to be undertaken.

59.     Unit 4 engine replacement is now programmed for the third week in May. 

60.     Damage was reported to a pillar box at Petersons Hill, this was probably caused by vehicle impact, the pillar was immediately made safe and repaired shortly afterwards. There have been concerns expressed that some pillar boxes on the more recent sub-divisions are unprotected and prone to vehicle damage.

61.     In February, certification checks were made on the day tank and fuel line installation which had been undertaken by PowerNet staff on the Island.  The only issues for certification were the main tank condition and the bund. The main tanks have been surveyed and the report sent to SIESA although the general opinion seems to be that refurbishment of the existing tanks is probably not an economic reality.

62.     The next step is for SIESA to make a decision regarding long term certification of the fuel system.

Forestry (IFS)

63.     Harvesting is now completed at Ohai, with the crew now re-established and operating in the Waikaia forest.  All production, safety and financial targets are anticipated to meet and exceed expectations.

64.     With a full year reforecast program of 48,000 tonnes, there remains 28,000 tonnes to be harvested by the end of the year.  Log prices are slightly back for export in April, but overall still well up on budget.  There has been no change in domestic sawmill prices.

65.     The pruning and thinning program is close to completion which included the Gowan and Ohai Forests.  Preparation for planting at Ohai for this winter is awaiting an aerial pre-plant spray, to be completed in April.

66.     The mandatory emissions return for the Post89 ETS (2013-18 period) has been submitted and approved by the Ministry for Primary Industries.  With the influence of harvesting there is a net unit loss resulting of 15,000 units to cover harvest liabilities.  These units will be surrendered from the Council to the Crown soon.

Te Anau Wastewater Discharge Project

67.     Following the decisions made at the 13 December 2017 Council meeting to approve the business case for the Kepler option, albeit subject to a final decision being made as to the preferred discharge method staff have been progressing the work needed to give effect to the decisions made. This includes:

·    Establishment of the project team and associated processes needed to enable the project to proceed to the next phase. The recruitment process for a Project Manager is currently underway.

·    Progressing the development of the detailed design for the reticulation system needed to transport the treated wastewater from Te Anau to the Kepler block. This has included surveying of the proposed route for the disposal pipeline. 

·    Development of a ‘basis of design’ report conceptual design for a sub-surface drip irrigation disposal system at the Kepler block

·    The appointment of a peer reviewer, Ben Stratford, and the engagement of Peter Riddell to provide comments on the design and costings for the proposed sub-surface drip irrigation system.

·    Completion of a bird strike risk assessment report for the Te Anau Manapouri airport

·    Commissioning of legal advice on the resource management issues that will need to be considered in advancing a new disposal method

·    Development of further financial models to support future decision-making as to a preferred disposal method once the costs and risks associated with Option 3 have been developed further

·    Development of advice (including the drafting of a brief for legal advice) on the Local Government Act 2002 decision-making requirements if the Council were to make a decision to adopt an alternative disposal method

·    Preliminary consideration of the procurement methods that might be used and the process that might be used to assess each of these.

68.     Changes to the terms of reference for the Te Anau Wastewater Discharge Project Committee have also now been approved by Council. These changes reflect the current status of the project and Council’s desire for the Project Committee, along with the Finance and Audit Committee and Services and Assets Committee to provide commentary on the revised business case before it is presented back to Council.

Land and Water Plan Implementation

69.     Under the National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management (NPS-FM) water quality and quantity are to be maintained and improved, with any over allocation to be phased out over time.  Environment Southland is required to set environmental limits by 2025, with all ‘communities’ required to meet those limits in due course.  They are progressing this work via their proposed Water and Land Plan.

70.     To assist with addressing the impacts of these changes on local authority infrastructure, Environment Southland have formed a Three Waters Officer Working Group.  The objectives of the group are to work through the implications of the new freshwater standards, develop an agreed approach to the re-consenting of local authority infrastructure and ensure that the organisational objectives are aligned.

71.     Council staff and elected members from the three Southland Territorial Local Authorities, presented evidence to the hearing panel in September.  Decisions have now been released with the appeal period closing on 17 May.  Council staff are currently considering options and will report to Council on a decision recommending appeal or otherwise.

Review of Solid Waste Contract Arrangements

72.     The WasteNet Southland Waste Management Group recently notified contractors Bond Contracts and Southland Disability Enterprises Limited of its intention to begin negotiations, around rolling both contracts over.  Both contracts are currently in year six of an initial eight year duration, with ability to roll over for a further eight years.  Negotiations are due to begin in April 2018 and will be led by an independent facilitator.

Operations and Community Services

73.     The new TIF application projects are tracking well. The cost estimates for each of the locations are nearing completion.

74.     The Lumsden Project has started with South Roads completing preparation work for the sealing and at this stage, subject to weather the project is on track.

75.     All Community Engineers areas are tracking well with Request for Services. There is a workshop coming up with Customer Support Partners and the Community Engineers to review and assist with the information they get from the customer at lodgement of the RFS.

Work Schemes

76.     The main projects completed over the last month have been memorial monument preservation, building of a Pole Shed at Church Street, Riverton, mowing throughout district, track maintenance and noxious weed control in reserves. 

Alternative Coastal Route Seal Extension Project

77.     This project is tracking behind schedule and recent weather events have slowed progress. The Roading Company have completed all the earthworks and drainage works on the Otara Haldane Road section. Construction on this section is nearing completion with 60% of the route sealed.

78.     The earthworks and drainage are have started along the Waipapa section and are approximately 50% completed.

District-Wide Resurfacing Contract

79.     Downer have completed all the chip sealing for the 2017/2018 season.

 

LED Streetlight Replacement Programme

80.     Network Electrical Services have established a third crew on the project and still believe they will be able to complete at least 65% of the network by 30 June 2018. It is noted that NZTA have now extended the 85% funding for the programme until 2021.

81.     They are currently working in the Te Anau area as accommodation availability allows and when not, they are working in the Otautau area.

Riverton Water Structures

82.     Progress is continuing to be made on the Riverton Wharves.  Licencing and overview of the repair works of the jetties has occupied staff time.  Most licence holders are progressing with essential repairs.  However some are not and the time will come soon when decisions need to be taken about action for those not carrying out repairs.

Golden Bay Wharf

83.     Negotiations have been continuing with South Port and Rakiura Adventures over the potential transfer of ownership and redevelopment of the Golden Bay Wharf.

84.     Through this process the legal position re the public right to pass over and use any coastal structure, including the Golden Bay Wharf and pontoon, has been confirmed. Any restrictions, including the right to charge, for such passage need to be reflected in the relevant coastal permit.

85.     Conceptual designs for replacement of the Golden Bay Wharf have also been developed and forwarded to the Stewart Island Community Board and Jetties Subcommittee for their feedback.

86.     A further report outlining a proposed pathway forward in relation to the ownership and replacement of the wharf structure will be taken to the Community Board, Jetties Subcommittee and Council in the near future. 

Information Management

Core Systems Review

87.     The proposed first phase of projects to be progressed as part of the Core Systems Review project have been identified and will be put to the June Finance and Audit meeting for approval.

88.     These projects include:

·      CSR – Application Integration – This project is needed to integrate Pathway – Records Manager – IPS. 

·      CSR – Trapeze (Electronic Processing) – This allows for the electronic processing of documents including building consents.

·      CSR – HRIS/H&S – The implementation of a new Health and Safety will be a key first delivery for this to continue on the great work with the eLearning and removing risk with paper based systems and better contractor support.

·      CSR – Financial Information Management Systems – Deloitte are currently working through providing assistance to reassess the options we have available.  The main part will be the options around JDE and how best to re-implement this and expand the use to provide greater functional and support to the overall business – again similar to the HRIS, this will need to be potentially phased over time. 

·      Project Management Framework – this includes the development of a module to support the implementation of a new project management framework.

·      Corporate Performance Framework – this is looking at development of a tool/solution that will be used to capture, process, report and present this information to the various areas of Council. This work has linkages to Project Management and the Data Governance work currently underway.

89.     The work being progressed in this area is resource intensive and is competing for the limited resources we have across the organisation. As a result it will be important to establish clear priorities and phase the work to reflect the availability of staff in the relevant areas. Consideration will also be given to backfilling positions where possible.

Digitisation

90.     Work has continued with the final PDF files now being imported into the Council Document and Records Management system.  Part of the work that is ongoing is around how Council processes will need to change in order to accommodate and support the ‘Digital First’ philosophy that will be critical to maximise the investment in the Property File digitisation project.

People and Capability

91.     Health and Safety continues to be a focus with work progressing well on the 2017/18 plan.  Our goal is for our people to be bold and to actively think about their own and others safety and wellbeing so that we deliver safe and effective services to our community and that everyone gets home safe and well.

92.     As part of the implementation of the plan a health and safety framework including procedures was approved and implemented.  The health and safety framework contains procedures that enables a risk based approach to managing health and safety.  Critical Risk Control Plans have been drafted.  The plan also requires staff to be trained in the procedures.  A series of e-learning modules have been developed to do this.  Each module covers the requirements of a procedure with the intent of guiding staff through the process of understanding their responsibilities and to support Council from moving to a more proactive health and safety culture.  All our staff are required to complete the training.

93.     Matt Keil was awarded the Emerging Leader of the year at a recent annual Society of Local Government Management (SOLGM) award dinner.  Matt has worked at Council for the past four years in our Water and Waste Team in that time he has worked hard to complete engineering and management studies while managing a number of high profile projects.

Community and Futures Group

Corporate Performance Framework

94.     The Corporate Performance Framework (CPF) aligns Council’s intended high level direction (expressed through its Vision, Community Outcomes and Strategic Objectives) to its activities and outcomes delivered by teams and individuals.

95.     Development of the CPF is now complete and work is underway in the implementation phase with staff involved in preparation for the 2018-2019 financial year and associated work programme.

96.     The CPF project has been developed on the ‘less is more’ and is an attempt to streamline planning and reporting functions while at the same time not compromising Council’s legislative and audit responsibilities. It has also been developed with the idea of being ‘user friendly’ for staff, minimising duplication of effort and attempting to develop a ‘one source of truth’ approach and a process whereby one input can be derived for use with multiple audiences and processes.

97.     It is intended that the CPF will be implemented from 1 July 2018. As part of the CPF, Council will deliver on its legislative requirements – including the LTP, Annual Plan, Annual Report and Activity Management Plans.

98.     Council will not be producing a Corporate Performance Report or the Corporate Performance Variance Report. These will be replaced by the Interim Performance Report (IPR) which will be produced three times a year – for the four month periods of July-October, November-February and March-June. The IPR should also align with the re-forecasting process currently implemented for these same time periods.

99.     A change in the process will require the activity manager to report by exception and provide meaningful explanation of the level of performance as compared with that planned.

Risk Management Framework

100.   Council has identified the need to invest in and further develop its risk management processes and approach. It is acknowledged that an organisation wide approach to risk management is important.

101.   In developing the Risk Management Framework (RMF) the objective is to create a framework to effectively understand, plan for and mitigate risk across all levels and activities within SDC. Understanding and mitigating risks is central to safeguarding Southland District’s critical community assets and services and other activities it is responsible for.

102.   Risk management is a core enabling function that adds value to the activities of Council and supports the achievement of the strategic framework and Council’s objectives and vision.

103.   A comprehensive RMF will inform Council’s Risk Management Policy and will:

·      Provide a consistent, structured approach to identifying and managing risk

·      Support the achievement of Council’s strategic and operational objectives by managing risks that would otherwise impede success

·      Encourage an open and transparent organisational culture where risk discussion and awareness are supported

·      Facilitate better decision making practices that support risk informed choices, prioritise actions and distinguish between potential options

·      Provide assurance to Council, the Southland district community and stakeholders that critical risks are identified and are being managed effectively.

104.   Council approved the engagement of Structured Conversations Ltd to undertake the design and development of the RMF.

Community Futures Research and Analysis Work Programme

105.   Council is committed to undertake various research and analysis work to support its decision making and transitioning from 2018 to 2021 in preparation for the Long Term Plan 2021-2031.

106.   The work to be undertaken over the period of 2018-2021 will assist in leading the development of Council’s overall approach to the management of change and preparation for what the future might hold for the district and its communities.

107.   The Research and analysis work and initial topics for consideration include

·      Socio demographic projects – how BERL can help to shape community futures

·      Climate change and implications for Southland District

·      Service delivery framework – district vs. local service provision and levels of service

·      Rating affordability modelling and scenario planning and implications for Southland District

·      Asset renewal strategy

·      Environmental – Land and Water Plan implications for Southland District Council

·      Community facility functional hierarchy provision framework

·      Community partnership, community assistance and funding alignment approach

·      Technological change impact on communities and implications for Council

108.   This is a significant programme of work identified to be advanced and developed across the organisation. This is important to assist council in delivering on the Long Term Plan 2018-2028 and the identified priority of investing in our community future planning.

Representation Review

109.   On 20 April the Council adopted its Initial Proposal on the Representation review to go out for consultation. 

110.   Consultation opened on Monday 30 April and will close at 5pm on Wednesday 6 June.  Council’s proposal includes 12 councillors elected from five wards with boundary changes for the four of the wards to ensure that each ward (apart from Stewart Island Rakiura) meeting the requirements for fair representation as noted in the Local Electoral Act 2001 (the plus or minus 10% rule).  Council is also proposing that Stewart Island Rakiura remain as an island community of interest.  Council is also proposing (in line with the guiding principles it adopted) that there will be eight community boards across the district providing district wide coverage of community boards.

111.   Public notice was given in the Southland Times and the Advocate.  A copy of the consultation booklet was provided with the Advocate for distribution across the district and available from SDC offices.  A copy of the booklet and a copy of the Community Governance Reference Document (which was produced to give a context, background, and a draft indicative set of terms of reference for the proposed community boards) was sent to all 175 elected members.

112.   A hearings panel comprising Council and members of the Elected Representative Working Group will meet on 18 and 19 June to hear any submitters who wish to be heard and considered, and make recommendations on the proposal.  Council will then on 11 July decide whether to make any changes to the proposal and adopt its final proposal.  Public notice of the final proposal will then be given and there will be an opportunity for objections and/or appeals.  These will be sent to the Local Government Commission who will make the final determination. 

Milford Opportunities

113.   The governance group met on the 19th April where they received an update on Phase 1 from the project managers. The work is progressing well with the information gathering phase nearly complete and the analysis well underway. The analysis will identify the further work that is needed to be done and the project managers will then prepare business cases for those pieces of work.

114.   The team provided a survey link to give the public a chance to provide any information they are aware of as well as having an open meeting session in Te Anau and approaching stakeholders directly.

115.   Also on the 3rd of May the Chair of the governance group, Dr Keith Turner, took the opportunity to meet with the Ministers of Conservation and Tourism to discuss the Milford Opportunities project

Leadership Cluster Meetings

116.   Staff have re-instigated the Northern Southland Leadership Cluster meetings with the first of the meetings for 2018 being held in March in Lumsden.  The meeting was very well attended by members of all the CDAs in Northern Southland and the Mararoa Waimea Ward Councillors. 

117.   Those in attendance discussed issues common to their area such as tourism and the impact on local facilities and speed issues on state highways.   The next meeting will take place in July.

118.   Staff are also working to set up a Leadership Cluster for Western Southland with the majority of Board and CDA Chairs indicating they would also like to become part of this group.  The first meeting will take place over the next month. 

Catchment Groups

119.   With the release of the Draft Land and Water Plan many local farming communities have banded together to form local catchment groups based on land users of Southlands waterways.  Initially these groups were set up to provide feedback on the Land and Water Plan to Environment Southland but have continued to grow and evolve their focus into broader projects.  As an example, staff recently attended a Waimatuku Catchment Group Field Day at the Otautau Blueberry Farm where landowners, Department of Conservation, Environment Southland and Southland District Council staff were in attendance.

120.   Continuing with this, an initial meeting was held in March by several parties to explore the possibility of working together collectively in the Aparima, and subsequently a much broader invitation has gone out to invite interested parties to a follow-up session to discuss the draft concept brief and project plan that have been put together by a small working group based on the discussion at that initial meeting and subsequent conversations. 

121.   The working description for the brief states that the Aparima project is a land manager led initiative to build and support the resilience of the Aparima catchments.  It is aiming to accelerate the uptake of farm environmental management plans and good management practices (and capture and monitor the work that is being done), and to go beyond this to support the catchments and people in those catchments to transition into the future.  It is proposed that this project will be implemented across the Aparima Freshwater Management Unit, of which the Aparima, Pourakino and Waimatuku Catchments are the largest catchments with each of these catchments having active catchment groups.

Stewart Island Community Plan

122.   In August 2017, the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment (MBIE) approached Council, to lead a programme of development and consultation around opportunities and planning for the future of Stewart Island.  The catalyst behind this was the Bonamia Ostreae parasite that has devastated oyster production on Stewart Island.  The purpose of the project is to determine the short, medium and long term community vision for the future sustainability and growth of Stewart Island Rakiura. 

123.   The final report was submitted to Council 27 March, at which time Council accepted the recommendations made and endorsed the preparation of two investment proposals around Strategic leadership and wharves on the island.  Following the completion of any investment proposals, a further report will be submitted to Council in June for approval to submit to MBIE.

Community Organisation and Volunteer Sector Shared Services Pilots

124.   The purpose of this project is to develop and run two pilot projects around the concept of shared services and shared service delivery within two communities in the Southland district. The two communities running this pilot are Winton township and Edendale-Wyndham and surrounds.  Shared services is a concept utilised throughout many groups around the country and beyond, and where there is significant benefit to the efficiency and effectiveness of community organisations and volunteer groups, can work extremely well.

125.   From the Community Organisation and Volunteer Sector Research undertaken in 2017, and anecdotal information here in Southland and across other areas in New Zealand, we know that many community organisations and groups have identified barriers in their administration, and attracting and retaining people in skilled governance roles, such as Chairs, Secretaries and Treasurers.  These pilots will investigate the opportunities available for shared services and what is needed to achieve this by organisations and, if appropriate, funding agencies.

126.   One of the most critical aspects of shared services will be to look at how we communicate with community and volunteer groups around retaining their autonomy while also being supported by peers in a shared service environment.  This will be an important part of any discussions, and will play a pivotal role in determining the success of any shared services.

Venture Southland community development staff have begun discussing this with a number of groups within the pilot areas, and will progress this over the next few months.  The pilot will run for the course of the calendar year.


 

Community Leadership Plans

127.   Council’s Community Partnership Leaders have been working together to develop phase three of the community leadership plan process.  Phase one consisted of workshops with elected members to seek feedback on a range of questions relating to the future of the district.  Phase two involved similar workshops but this time with key stakeholders in the community.  Staff are now working to develop a brief for phase three which will bring together the important findings of the first two phases into draft plans focusing on key issues impacting our people across the district.  Phase three will also involve broad discussions with the wider community. 

Environmental Services Group

Group Managers Update

128.   Incoming resource consent and building consent applications have remained quite steady this month, with little sign of any significant winter slow down as yet. Staff are continuing to meet statutory processing times, although this has required some additional after hours work from the Building Solutions team with incoming building consent volumes continuing to be strong and in the order of 30-40 applications per week.

129.   The Group Manager Environmental Services attended the National Freedom Camping Symposium in Nelson on 19th April. This was well attended and a very worthwhile seminar with very useful information exchange in relation to issues that areas were experiencing. The vast majority of these related to non-self-contained camping. There was also useful discussion on possible solutions to some issues, and a very informative and impressive presentation from the creator of the Campermate smart phone app about how technology can assist in the management of freedom camping issues and assisting to inform the best location for tourist related infrastructure.

130.   The Whakamana te Waituna Trust held its first meeting in April. Councillors Keast and Duffy are the Council’s appointed representatives on this Trust. This was a very positive first meeting, co-chaired by Cr Lloyd McCallum of Environment Southland and Mr Dean Whaanga, Kaupapa Taiao Manager, of Te Ao Marama.

131.   The Ministry for Business Innovation and Employment is providing a grant towards a one year fixed term Project Manager - Community position for the Predator Free Rakiura Leadership group. Council has agreed to be the administrator of this funding and to management the recruitment process. This position is being advertised at present, closing late May.

132.   Senior council elected representatives and staff along with Emergency Management Southland staff met with Sarah Stuart-Black the Director of the Ministry of Civil Defence and Emergency Management at Environment Southland recently to discuss the civil defence review and items of mutual interest in the emergency management arena. This was a very useful session and it was appreciated that the Director travelled to Southland to deliver this.

133.   Work is continuing within the IANZ audit project team to position the council for the March 2019 2-yearly reaccreditation audit of the Council’s Building Control functions


 

Building Solutions Team

134.   The value of consented work for April 2018 is above that of April 2017. The number of consents issued for April 2018 is also up on the same period as last year.

135.   The 71 consents were issued in an average of 10 working days this is down from 16 working days for the same period last year. There is an increase in the value of work associated with dwelling alterations and heating units. There is also a noted decrease in the value of work associated with farm buildings, whilst there were the same number of consents issued there was a noted reduction in the total value.

136.   The workflows remain high having received 108 building consent applications for the month, this is one higher than the average for the previous three years and up from 90 for April 2017.

137.   There are currently 51 building consent applications on hold and 77 consents progressing through the system. The department issued 36 CCCs and carried out 221 inspections.

Environmental Health

138.   The new Food Act has enabled any authorised persons to audit a category of food approvals called ‘national programmes’, as opposed to template food control plans that only the local Council can audit. National programme approved businesses include garages that sell pies, or some grocery stores. To enable Councils to offer these services they offered a ‘fast track’ approval process. 

139.   Staff were surprised to learn that only four Councils in the South Island received fast track approval, being Southland District, Invercargill City, Central Otago District, and Queenstown Lakes District Councils. Dunedin is the only Council in New Zealand that has a full audit approval, without having to go through fast track.

140.   Currently, the Environmental Health team has put these (discretionary) services on hold in order to focus on other priorities, but hopes to offer these services soon.

Dog Control

141.   Extensive work has been carried out to reduce administration workload for dog registration. A number of initiatives have been implemented (or in the process of) to achieve this, such as new systems to enable new dogs to be registered online, a re-designed form, a prize draw to encourage online registration, and new promotional banners in our area offices.

Resource Management Team

142.   The entire Resource Management team went for a visit to Te Ao Marama Incorporated. The purpose of the visit was to have an informal meeting, maintaining/strengthening relationships and give an overview of some of the projects that the resource management team are progressing. Dean Whaanga Te Ao Marama Kaupapa Taiao Manager, did a presentation on Te Ao Marama which provided a good insight into Maori culture and their spiritual background.

143.   A commissioner hearing has been set for 25 May to determine a resource consent application for an RD Petroleum facility in Lumsden. The site is at 120 Flora Road on the former Sawmill site.

144.   Council has teamed up with Environment Southland, Gore District Council and the Invercargill City Council to undertake high level region wide assessments on Climate Change, Biodiversity and Landscapes. These reports are due to be completed in the second half of the year.

145.   The Resource Management team have been working on some internal process improvements which look towards gaining efficiency and better reporting on resource consents that are processed. The improvements are looking to be implemented by the start of the new financial year.

 

Recommendation

That Council:

a)            Receives the report titled “Management Report” dated 30 April 2018.

 

 

Attachments

a             Building Solutions - April 2018 Tables and Graphs    

 


Council

16 May 2018

 

PDF CreatorPDF Creator


 

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator

 


Council

16 May 2018

 

Minutes of the Regulatory and Consents Committee Meeting dated 7 March 2018

Record No:             R/18/4/9834

Author:                      Alyson Hamilton, Committee Advisor

Approved by:         Alyson Hamilton, Committee Advisor

 

  Decision                                        Recommendation                                  Information

 

 

 

Recommendation

That Council receives the minutes of the Regulatory and Consents Committee meeting held 7 March 2018 as information.

 

 

Attachments

a             Minutes of Regulatory and Consents Committee Meeting dated 7 March 2018 (separately enclosed)

 


Council

16 May 2018

 

Minutes of the Stewart Island/Rakiura Community Board Meeting dated 11 December 2017

Record No:             R/18/4/9145

Author:                      Kirsten Hicks, Committee Advisor/Customer Support Partner

Approved by:         Kirsten Hicks, Committee Advisor/Customer Support Partner

 

  Decision                                        Recommendation                                  Information

 

 

 

Recommendation

That Council receives the minutes of the Stewart Island/Rakiura Community Board meeting held 11 December 2017 as information.

 

 

Attachments

a             Minutes of Stewart Island/Rakiura Community Board Meeting dated 11 December 2017 (separately enclosed)

 


Council

16 May 2018

 

Minutes of the Stewart Island/Rakiura Community Board Meeting dated 12 February 2018

Record No:             R/18/4/9146

Author:                      Kirsten Hicks, Committee Advisor/Customer Support Partner

Approved by:         Kirsten Hicks, Committee Advisor/Customer Support Partner

 

  Decision                                        Recommendation                                  Information

 

 

 

Recommendation

That Council receives the minutes of the Stewart Island/Rakiura Community Board meeting held 12 February 2018 as information.

 

 

Attachments

a             Minutes of Stewart Island/Rakiura Community Board Meeting dated 12 February 2018 (separately enclosed)

 


Council

16 May 2018

 

Minutes of the Winton Community Board Meeting dated 19 February 2018

Record No:             R/18/4/8749

Author:                      Alyson Hamilton, Committee Advisor

Approved by:         Alyson Hamilton, Committee Advisor

 

  Decision                                        Recommendation                                  Information

 

 

 

Recommendation

That Council receives the minutes of the Winton Community Board meeting held 19 February 2018 as information.

 

Attachments

a             Minutes of Winton Community Board Meeting dated 19 February 2018 (separately enclosed)

   

 


Council

16 May 2018

 

Exclusion of the Public: Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987

 

Recommendation

 

That the public be excluded from the following part(s) of the proceedings of this meeting.

C10.1 Southland Water and Land Plan

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution are as follows:

General subject of each matter to be considered

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

Southland Water and Land Plan

s7(2)(g) - The withholding of the information is necessary to maintain legal professional privilege.

That the public conduct of the whole or the relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists.