Notice is hereby given that an Ordinary Meeting of Southland District Council will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Wednesday, 19 June 2019

9am

Council Chamber
15 Forth Street
Invercargill

 

Council Agenda

OPEN

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Mayor

Mayor Gary Tong

 

Deputy Mayor

Paul Duffy

 

Councillors

Stuart Baird

 

 

Brian Dillon

 

 

John Douglas

 

 

Bruce Ford

 

 

Darren Frazer

 

 

George Harpur

 

 

Julie Keast

 

 

Ebel Kremer

 

 

Gavin Macpherson

 

 

Neil Paterson

 

 

Nick Perham

 

 

IN ATTENDANCE

 

Chief Executive

Steve Ruru

Committee Advisor

Fiona Dunlop

 

 

Contact Telephone: 0800 732 732

Postal Address: PO Box 903, Invercargill 9840

Email: emailsdc@southlanddc.govt.nz

Website: www.southlanddc.govt.nz

 

Full agendas are available on Council’s Website

www.southlanddc.govt.nz

 

 

 


 


Council

19 June 2019

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

ITEM                                                                                                                                                                                  PAGE

Procedural

1             Apologies                                                                                                                                                                7

2             Leave of absence                                                                                                                                                7

3             Conflict of Interest                                                                                                                                             7

4             Public Forum                                                                                                                                                         7

5             Extraordinary/Urgent Items                                                                                                                        7

6             Confirmation of Council Minutes                                                                                                             7

Reports - Policy and Strategy

7.1         Adoption of the Annual Plan 2019/2020                                                                                               9

7.2         Rates Resolution - Setting of Rates for the Financial Year 1 July 2019 to 30 June 2020                                                                                                                                                                                  161

7.3         Establish the draft strategic framework and council activities for the Long Term Plan 2031                                                                                                                                                                       173

Reports - Operational Matters

8.1         Confirmation of Road Stopping at 1830 Manapouri Te Anau Highway (Twidle)     183

8.2         Disposal of Hokonui Hall                                                                                                                           189

8.3         Bridge Weight Restriction Postings 2018/2019                                                                          195

8.4         Southland Regional Development Agency Transition                                                           211

8.5         Management Report                                                                                                                                   217

Reports - Governance

9.1         Unbudgeted expenditure approval for grant to Edendale Scouts                                 231

9.2         Unbudgeted expenditure-Visitor Levy Fund applications                                                  265

9.3         Update on Proposed Governance Arrangements                                                                     277

9.4         Minutes of the Community and Policy Committee Meeting dated 8 May 2019      283

9.5         Minutes of the Finance and Audit Committee Meeting dated 14 December 2018 285

9.6         Minutes of the Services and Assets Committee Meeting dated 13 February 2019 287

9.7         Minutes of the Edendale-Wyndham Community Board Meeting dated 26 February 2019                                                                                                                                                                                  289

9.8         Minutes of the Tuatapere Community Board Meeting dated 2 April 2019                291

9.9         Minutes of the Wallacetown Community Board Meeting dated 13 March 2019     293

9.10       Minutes of the Stewart Island/Rakiura Visitor Levy Subcommittee Meeting dated 28 May 2019                                                                                                                                                            295

9.11       Minutes of the Browns Community Development Area Subcommittee Meeting dated 14 March 2019                                                                                                                                                 297

9.12       Minutes of the Garston Community Development Area Subcommittee Meeting dated 26 November 2018                                                                                                                                        299

9.13       Minutes of the Gorge Road and Districts Community Development Area Subcommittee Meeting dated 29 October 2018                                                                                                           301

9.14       Minutes of the Limehills/Centre Bush Community Development Area Subcommittee Meeting dated 14 March 2019                                                                                                               303

9.15       Minutes of the Tokanui Community Development Area Subcommittee Meeting dated 29 October 2018                                                                                                                                             305

9.16       Minutes of the Waikaia Community Development Area Subcommittee Meeting dated 21 November 2018                                                                                                                                        307

9.17       Minutes of the Woodlands Community Development Area Subcommittee Meeting dated 5 November 2018                                                                                                                            309

9.18       Minutes of the Northern Southland Development Fund Subcommittee Meeting dated 17 May 2018                                                                                                                                                      311   

Public Excluded

Procedural motion to exclude the public                                                                                                       313

C10.1    Milford Opportunities Project - funding application                                                              315

C10.2    Stewart Island/Rakiura Wind Project - funding application                                                315

C10.3    Pyramid Bridge Tender Evaluation Outcome                                                                              315

C10.4    WasteNet Council Agreement                                                                                                               315

C10.5    Public Excluded Minutes of the Finance and Audit Committee Meeting dated 14 December 2018                                                                                                                                               315  

 


Council

19 June 2019

 

1             Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

2             Leave of absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

3             Conflict of Interest

 

Councillors are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision-making when a conflict arises between their role as a councillor and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4             Public Forum

 

Notification to speak is required by 5pm at least two days before the meeting. Further information is available on www.southlanddc.govt.nz or phoning 0800 732 732.

 

5             Extraordinary/Urgent Items

To consider, and if thought fit, to pass a resolution to permit the Council to consider any further items which do not appear on the Agenda of this meeting and/or the meeting to be held with the public excluded.

Such resolution is required to be made pursuant to Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987, and the Chairperson must advise:

(i)        The reason why the item was not on the Agenda, and

(ii)       The reason why the discussion of this item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

(a)       that item may be discussed at that meeting if-

(i)         that item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

(ii)       the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

(b)       no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

6             Confirmation of Council Minutes

6.1             Meeting minutes of Council, 05 June 2019


Council

19 June 2019

 

Adoption of the Annual Plan 2019/2020

Record No:             R/19/6/10843

Author:                      Chantelle Subritzky, Corporate Performance Lead

Approved by:         Rex Capil, Group Manager Community and Futures

 

  Decision                                        Recommendation                                  Information

 

 

 

Purpose

1        This report recommends that Council adopt the Annual Plan 2019/2020.

Executive Summary

2        Every three years, councils adopt ten year plans which are referred to as the ‘Long Term Plan (LTP)’. In the intervening years, an Annual Plan is developed to address any variances from the LTP, confirm service levels and budgets for the year and set rates. This is also a requirement under the Local Government Act 2002 (LGA). Year two of the Council’s LTP 2018-2028 serves as the base for the Annual Plan 2019/2020. 

3        The Annual Plan 2019/2020 is broadly consistent with what was projected for the 2019/2020 year in the LTP 2018-2028. The majority of changes relate to capital works projects for roading, sewerage and water renewals. These projects were already included in the LTP 2018-2028 and budget included within the work programme.

4        As there were no significant variances between the LTP 2018-2028 and the Annual Plan 2019/2020, Council did not go out for formal consultation with the community. Council used other forms of engagement though, such as First Edition newsletter to update the community on the Annual Plan process.

5        A copy of the draft Annual Plan 2019/2020 is attached as attachment A.

 

Recommendation

That the Council:

a)        Receives the report titled “Adoption of the Annual Plan 2019/2020” dated 13 June 2019.

 

b)        Determines that this matter or decision be recognised as significant in terms of Section 76 of the Local Government Act 2002.

 

c)         Determines that it has complied with the decision-making provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 to the extent necessary in relation to this decision; and in accordance with Section 79 of the Act determines that it does not require further information, further assessment of options or further analysis of costs and benefits or advantages and disadvantages prior to making a decision on this matter.

 

d)        Confirms in accordance with Section 100 of the Local Government Act 2002 that the Annual Plan 2019/2020 has been prepared based on reasonable judgement and assumptions and that it considers the projected financial results, including the projected operating deficit for 2019/2020, to be financially prudent given its financial position.

 

e)        Adopts the Annual Plan, including the Funding Impact Statement for the 2019/2020 financial year (attached).

 

f)         Delegates authority to the Chief Executive to approve any final edits required to the Annual Plan in order to finalise the document for distribution.

 

Background

6        Once every three years, Southland District Council is required to adopt a Long Term Plan (LTP), and in the intervening years an Annual Plan. These plans set out the service levels and budgets for the coming year as well as being used to set rates.

7        Year two of the Council’s LTP 2018-2028 serves as the base for the Annual Plan 2019/2020. The Annual Plan 2019/2020 is broadly consistent with what was projected for the 2019/2020 year in the LTP 2018-2028.

8        All councils are required by legislation to prepare and adopt an Annual Plan for each financial year before the start of the new financial year. The Annual Plan is not audited.

9        The purpose of an Annual Plan is to:

·    Detail the proposed annual budgets and Funding Impact Statement;

·    Identify any variation from the financial statements and Funding Impact Statement included in the Long Term Plan (LTP) in respect of the year;

·    Provide integrated decision-making and co-ordination of the resources of the local authority;

·    Contribute to the accountability of the local authority to the community.

10      As part of developing the Annual Plan, Community Boards, Community Development Area Subcommittees and Water Supply Subcommittees were provided with the opportunity at their direction-setting meetings to highlight any planned changes for the 2019/2020 financial year from what was budgeted for year two of the Long Term Plan 2019/2020. Hall committees and Council staff were also asked to advise of any changes to fees and charges for the 2019/2020 year.

11      On 18 December 2018, Council meet informally in a workshop to discuss a number of key matters associated with the 2019/2020 Annual Plan. At this workshop staff and Council discussed the following:

1. Proposed fees and charges

2. Grants and donations

3. Rating revaluation

4. Roading rate model

5. Key financial matters, including loans, reserves, forestry dividend, SRDA funding and employee costs

6. Impact on the overall and specific rates for 2019/2020

 

12      Subsequently on 21 May 2019, staff presented to the Finance and Audit Committee workshop the draft Annual Plan. This document incorporated the outcomes of a comprehensive review of the capital work programme for 2019/2020 undertaken by activity managers and ELT, as well as the internal financial structure changes as a result of the Services and Assets restructure.

13      The Finance and Audit Committee provided guidance to staff to proceed with the finalisation of the draft Annual Plan for recommendation to Council at the Committee’s meeting on 18 June 2019.

14      There was no community consultation for the Annual Plan 2019/2020 as there were no significant variances to the LTP 2018-2028. This was in accordance with the Significance and Engagement Policy that was adopted in June 2018 through the LTP process.

Changes from Year Two of the LTP 2018-2028

15      The majority of the changes between what was forecasted in the 2019/2020 year in the LTP 2018-2028 from what has been included in the draft Annual Plan 2019/2020 relates to capital works projects. Key changes include:

·    the addition of Council’s contribution to the Pyramid Bridge ($1.5 million),

·    costs associated with the change in disposal method for Te Anau sewerage project ($3.3 million)

·    the addition of Otautau watermain renewal project ($0.5 million)

·    the addition of Te Anau watermain renewal project ($0.5 million)

·    the addition of Tokanui wastewater consent and treatment options project ($0.2 million)

·    removal of anticipated external debt ($7.9 million) and associated repayments ($0.2 million)

·    review of the capital work programme for 2019/2020 incorporating work deferred from 2018/2019

 

Issues

16      The Annual Plan is based on a number of assumptions. In addition, there are a number of issues described below that will require separate reports to be brought back to Council. These reports will explore the issues more fully and potentially include additional unbudgeted expenditure for 2019/2020 or beyond, if approved.

17      The Annual Plan 2019/2020 only includes a budget of $200,000 for costs associated with the consent and treatment options for Tokanui Wastewater. Staff believe that the outcome of the current resource consent process may require work above the $200,000 proposed.

18      The Annual Plan 2019/2020 includes a budget of $493,000 for the rebuild of the Ulva Island jetty and Golden Bay wharf. Staff are currently undertaking further investigations to ascertain the extent of the work required in relation to the jetties on the island. It is anticipated that there will be additional costs in future years over and above what is proposed in the Annual Plan 2019/2020.

19      The Annual Plan 2019/2020 includes a budget of $150,000 for refurbishment of the Winton Office/Library on the basis that there has been no work done for over 15 years. Given the current closure of this building and the associated issues it is unknown if this work will proceed.

Factors to Consider

Legal and Statutory Requirements

20      The Annual Plan is a statutory requirement under the Local Government Act 2002 (section 95).

21      All councils are required by legislation to prepare and adopt an Annual Plan before the commencement of the financial year to which it relates (1 July 2019 in this instance).

Community Views

22      The Community Boards and Community Development Area Subcommittees were involved in the direction setting for the Annual Plan 2019/2020 and provided input into any new projects that were urgently required for their areas and the fees and charges for the local assets. This feedback has been presented to the Council for consideration and included in the Annual Plan 2019/2020 where necessary.

Costs and Funding

23      There are various costs incurred in compiling the Annual Plan including staff costs and budgets. These are included in Council’s annual budgets and funded accordingly.

24      The specific financial implications of the changes made to the final Annual Plan are outlined in the financial considerations section below.

Policy Implications

25      The changes set out in the Annual Plan are consistent with Council’s current Financial Strategy, Infrastructure Strategy and policies, including the Revenue and Financing Policy.

26      No policies have been amended as part of the Annual Plan development process.

 

Financial considerations

27      The financial implications of the proposed Annual Plan 2019/2020 are noted below:  

28      Rating Impact /Rates Increase

·    The rate increase for 2019/2020 will be 3.49%, compared to 3.34% proposed in the LTP 2018-2028.

·    The Rates Funding Impact Statement has been updated to show the current District and Local Area Rates.  Rates will be set as either a rate in the dollar on land value or capital value or a Uniform Targeted Rate (UTR).

·    The rating information database has been updated to include the property valuations for all properties in the district as advised by Quotable Value in December 2018.  Consequently the rates calculations provided in the Annual Plan are based on the revalued amounts. The revaluation resulted in a number of significant increases in residential property values across the district.

29      30% Maximum Uniform Targeted Rate (UTR)

·    Uniform Targeted Rate - The maximum amount Council can collect under the UTR is 30% of total rates.  The UTR for the 2019/2020 financial year will be 27.09%, compared to 27.37% for 2018/2019.

30      Impact on Financial Reports

·    The consolidated impacts of the changes are shown in the forecast financial statements on pages 39 to 61 of the draft Annual Plan 2019/2020 attached.

·    In comparing the draft Annual Plan 2019/2020 forecast deficit to year two of the LTP 2018-2028, the deficit has decreased $911,000, from $4,264,000 to $3,353,000.  This is predominantly due to an increase in government grant funding for Te Anau wastewater project ($3.0 million) offset by an increase in contribution to joint Council projects (Pyramid Bridge $1.5 million) and employee associated costs ($700,000).

·    The prospective statement of financial position in the draft Annual Plan incorporates 30 June 2018 actual balances (as opening balances) as well as changes resulting from revised forecasts for 2018/2019.

31      Compliance with Financial Strategy

·    The draft Annual Plan is in compliance with the key financial indicators outlined in the financial strategy, being specifically:

·    Rates increases to be no more than LGCI + 2.0%. For 2019/2020 in the 2018-2028 Long Term Plan, the LGCI is budgeted at 2.2%, resulting in a limit of 4.2%. The actual increase in 3.49%.

·    Total debt not to exceed 100% of total revenue. Council anticipates it will require no long term external debt in the 2019/2020 year, however notes that it is forecast to be in overdraft at 30 June 2020 of $3.2 million.

·    Additional information on benchmarks are outlined on pages 30 to 33 of the draft Annual Plan.

Analysis

Options Considered

Analysis of Options

32      Option 1 – Recommend the draft Annual Plan 2019/2020 to Council for adoption, with amendments as agreed at this meeting.

Advantages

Disadvantages

·        Comply with statutory requirements and timeframes

·        Is consistent with the overall direction set through the LTP 2018-2028

·        Will enable rates to be set for the 2019/2020 financial year.

·        There are no disadvantages

 

33      Option 2 – Do not recommend the Annual Plan to Council.

Advantages

Disadvantages

·        There are no advantages to this option

·        Not comply with statutory requirements

·        Rates will not be able to set for the 2019/2020 financial year until an Annual Plan is adopted.

 

Assessment of Significance

34      The draft Annual Plan 2019/2020 does not contain significant variance from year two of the LTP 2018-2028. Therefore it did not meet the significant threshold in the Significance and Engagement Policy and the formal consultation with the public was not undertaken.

35      A reprioritisation of the LTP work programme was undertaken to ensure realistic project delivery for the financial year. This has resulted in some projects being deferred until the 2020/2021 work programme.

36      In order to keep the public updated, staff sent out information regarding the Annual Plan 2019/2020 in Council’s First Edition newsletter.

Recommended Option

37      Option 1 – Recommend the draft Annual Plan 2019/2020 to Council for adoption, with amendments as agreed at this meeting.


 

Next Steps

38      Following Council adoption, the Annual Plan 2019/2020 will be made available on the Council’s website www.southlanddc.govt.nz. Hard copies will be available upon request.

 

Attachments

a             Draft Annual Plan 2019/2020    

 


Council

19 June 2019

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Council

19 June 2019

 

Rates Resolution - Setting of Rates for the Financial Year 1 July 2019 to 30 June 2020

Record No:             R/18/11/27372

Author:                      Shelley Dela Llana, Accountant

Approved by:         Anne Robson, Chief Financial Officer

 

  Decision                                        Recommendation                                  Information

 

 

 

Purpose

1        The Local Government (Rating) Act 2002 (the Act) requires Council to adopt, by Council resolution, the rates it intends to set for the financial year. The rates for 2019/2020 can only be set once Council has adopted its Annual Plan 2019/2020, including the Funding Impact Statement (Rates Section) for 2019/2020.

2        The resolution must also include (instalment) due dates for payment. The Act permits Council to apply penalties of up to 10% for payments not received by the due dates and for any arrears of previous year’s rates. The penalty amount and dates must also be set by Council resolution.

Executive Summary

3        This report lists the various rates that have been calculated for the financial year 1 July 2019 to
30 June 2020. These rates are included in the Council’s Annual Plan 2019/2020 in the Funding Impact Statement (Rates Section).

 

Recommendation

That the Council:

a)            Receives the report titled “Rates Resolution - Setting of Rates for the Financial Year 1 July 2019 to 30 June 2020” dated 19 June 2019.

b)           Determines that this matter or decision be recognised as significant in terms of Section 76 of the Local Government Act 2002.

c)            Determines that it has complied with the decision-making provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 to the extent necessary in relation to this decision; and in accordance with Section 79 of the Act determines that it does not require further information, further assessment of options or further analysis of costs and benefits or advantages and disadvantages prior to making a decision on this matter.

d)           Sets the rates detailed below for the financial year commencing 1 July 2019 and ending on 30 June 2020. All rates and amounts are GST inclusive.

                Uniform Annual General Charge

                Pursuant to Section 15(1)(a) of the Act, a uniform annual general charge of $534.46 per rating unit on every rateable rating unit within the Southland District.

                General Rate

Pursuant to Section 13(2)(a) of the Act, a general rate of $0.00054196 in the dollar on the capital value of all rateable rating units within the Southland District.

                Targeted Rates

                Community Facilities Rates

Pursuant to Sections 16(3)(b) and 16(4)(a) of the Act, the following uniform targeted rates set per separately used or inhabited part of a rateable rating unit situated in the following Community Facility Areas:

Community Facility Areas

Charge

Community Facility Areas

Charge

Aparima Hall

$46.39

Mossburn Hall

$66.65

Athol Memorial Hall

$58.11

Myross Bush Hall

$30.28

Balfour Hall

$38.60

Nightcaps Hall

$77.43

Blackmount Hall

$50.29

Ohai Hall

$58.72

Browns Hall

$21.94

Orawia Hall

$58.77

Brydone Hall

$50.93

Orepuki Hall

$66.77

Clifden Hall

$50.20

Oreti Plains Hall

$72.00

Colac Bay Hall

$58.97

Otahuti Hall

$30.94

Dacre Hall

$43.00

Otapiri-Lora Gorge Hall

$155.25

Dipton Hall

$50.37

Riversdale Hall

$55.01

Eastern Bush Hall

$78.89

Ryal Bush Hall

$40.91

Edendale-Wyndham Hall

$19.98

Seaward Downs Hall

$43.30

Fiordland Community Event Centre

$37.62

Stewart Island Hall

$68.64

Five Rivers Hall

$56.68

Thornbury Hall

$62.90

Fortrose Domain

$28.75

Tokanui-Quarry Hills Hall

$55.08

Glenham Hall

$48.38

Tuatapere Hall

$40.08

Gorge Road Hall

$49.14

Tussock Creek Hall

$55.20

Heddon Bush Hall

$69.00

Tuturau Hall

$47.37

Hedgehope-Glencoe Hall

$69.71

Waianiwa Hall

$69.00

Limehills Hall

$61.95

Waikaia Recreation Hall

$53.91

Lochiel Hall

$36.07

Waikawa Community Centre

$29.93

Lumsden Hall

$36.00

Waimahaka Hall

$69.00

Mabel Bush Hall

$50.14

Waimatuku Hall

$36.58

Manapouri Hall

$35.49

Wairio Community Centre

$40.13

Mandeville Hall

$45.00

Wallacetown Hall

$50.00

Mataura Island Hall

$27.26

Winton Hall

$17.22

Menzies Ferry Hall

$40.25

Wreys Bush Hall

$81.35

Mimihau Hall

$55.00

Wrights Bush Hall

$31.71

Mokoreta-Redan Hall

$53.73

 

 

Roading Targeted Rate

Pursuant to Sections 16(3)(a) and 16(4)(a) of the Act, a uniform targeted rate of $92.00 per rateable rating unit within the Southland District; and

Pursuant to Sections 16(3)(a) and 16(4)(b) of the Act, a differential rate in the dollar of capital value for all rateable rating units:

Roading Differentials

Charge

Commercial

$0.00130851

Dairy

$0.00093661

Farming non-dairy

$0.00053930

Forestry

$0.00647417

Industrial

$0.00129183

Lifestyle

$0.00046738

Mining

$0.01656955

Other

$0.00014021

Residential

$0.00046738

Regional Heritage Targeted Rate

Pursuant to Sections 16(3)(a) and 16(4)(a) of the Act, a uniform targeted rate of $42.11 set per separately used or inhabited part of a rateable rating unit within the Southland District.

 

Waste Management Targeted Rates

Pursuant to Sections 16(3)(b) and 16(4)(a) of the Act, a uniform targeted rate of $90.03 per rating unit on every rating unit within the Southland District excluding Stewart Island; and

Pursuant to Sections 16(3)(b) and 16(4)(a) of the Act, a rate of $0.00003662 in the dollar of capital value across all rating units within the Southland District excluding Stewart Island.

Local Targeted Rates (Ward, Community Board, Community Development Area, Town)

Pursuant to Sections 16(3)(b), 16(4)(a) or 16(4)(b) of the Act, the following rates per rateable rating unit/rate in the dollar on the land value of all rateable rating units within the below areas:

Local Targeted Rates

Targeted Rate per rating unit

Rate in the dollar on land value

Mararoa Waimea Ward 

 

$0.00002380

Waiau Aparima Ward 

 

$0.00005462

Waihopai Toetoes Ward 

 

$0.00004413

Winton Wallacetown Ward 

 

$0.00001543

Edendale-Wyndham Community Board 

$184.31

 

Otautau Community Board

$305.35

 

Riverton/Aparima Community Board

$343.80

 

Stewart Island/Rakiura Community Board

$188.66

 

Te Anau Community Board Residential 

$291.52

 

Te Anau Community Board Commercial 

$583.04

 

Te Anau Community Board Rural 

$72.88

 

Tuatapere Community Board Residential/Commercial

$236.27

 

Tuatapere Community Board Rural 

$47.25

 

Wallacetown Community Board 

$158.50

 

Winton Community Board 

$249.03

 

Athol Community Development Area

$59.20

 

Balfour Community Development Area

$249.74

 

Browns Community Development Area

$233.63

 

Colac Bay Community Development Area

$104.34

 

Dipton Community Development Area

$100.21

 

Garston Community Development Area

$39.43

 

Gorge Road Community Development Area

$30.86

 

Limehills Community Development Area

$90.76

 

Lumsden Community Development Area

$316.69

 

Manapouri Community Development Area

$337.99

 

Mossburn Community Development Area

$358.93

 

Nightcaps Community Development Area

$217.44

 

Ohai Community Development Area

$286.79

 

Orepuki Community Development Area

$114.67

 

Riversdale Community Development Area

$187.93

 

Thornbury Community Development Area

$112.94

 

Tokanui Community Development Area

$227.45

 

Waikaia Community Development Area

$168.01

 

Woodlands Community Development Area

$208.42

 

Drummond Village Local 

$55.77

 

Swimming Pool Targeted Rates

Pursuant to Sections 16(3)(b) and 16(4)(a) of the Act, the following uniform targeted rates set per separately used or inhabited part of a rateable rating unit situated in the following Swimming Pool Areas:

Swimming Pool Area

Charge

Swimming Pool Area

Charge

Fiordland

$15.96

Takitimu

$23.15

Otautau

$23.00

Tuatapere Ward

$7.55

Riverton/Aparima

$22.16

Winton

$13.42

Te Anau Airport Manapouri Targeted Rate

Pursuant to Sections 16(3)(b) and 16(4)(a) of the Act, a uniform targeted rate of $128.00 per rateable rating unit within the Te Anau Manapouri Airport Area.

Stewart Island Waste Management Targeted Rate

Pursuant to Sections 16(3)(b) and 16(4)(a) of the Act, a uniform targeted rate of $353.29 per unit of service situated in the Stewart Island Waste Management Area.

Rubbish Bin Collection Targeted Rate

Pursuant to Sections 16(3)(b) and 16(4)(a) of the Act, a uniform targeted rate of $161.17 per unit of service where the collection service is actually provided.

Recycling Bin Collection Targeted Rate

Pursuant to Sections 16(3)(b) and 16(4)(a) of the Act, a uniform targeted rate of $161.17 per unit of service where the collection service is actually provided.

 

Te Anau Rural Water Scheme Targeted Rates

Pursuant to Sections 16(3)(b) and 16(4)(a) and (b) of the Act, the rates as outlined below:

An annual charge by way of a uniform targeted rate of $541.45 per restricted connection.

In regards to the supply of water, the following rates or combination of below will apply to each rating unit pursuant to Section 19(2)(b):

•        A rate of $360.97 for each unit supplied to the rating unit.

•        For rating units with an allocation of multiples of 7.7 units, a rate of $2,779.46 for every 7.7 units allocated.

•        For rating units allocated half a unit, a rate of 50% of a unit being $180.48.  For this to apply, the rating unit must already receive at least 1 unit.

Matuku Rural Water Scheme Targeted Rate

Pursuant to Sections 16(3)(b) and 16(4)(a) of the Act, a uniform targeted rate of $288.11 for each unit made available to the rating unit. 

Metered Property Water Supply Targeted Rate

Pursuant to Section 19 of the Act, a rate for actual water consumption of $1.10 per cubic metre.

Pursuant to Sections 16(3)(b) and 16(4)(a) of the Act, a fixed charge of $196.00 per meter.

District Water Targeted Rate

Pursuant to Sections 16(3)(b) and 16(4)(b) of the Act, the rates are assessed on a differential basis (These exclude rural water schemes):

•        For all rating units without meters that are connected to a water supply scheme or are within the scheme rating boundary but are not connected, a uniform targeted rate of $444.31 for each separately used or inhabited part of the rating unit.

•        For rating units with water troughs with direct feed from Council’s water mains, a uniform targeted rate of $88.86 per trough.

•        For vacant rating units within the scheme rating boundary(which are not connected but able to be connected), a uniform targeted rate of $222.15 being half of one unit rate for the provision of the service due to the ability to connect to the scheme. 

District Wastewater Targeted Rates

Pursuant to Sections 16(3)(b) and 16(4)(b) of the Act, the following rates:

•        For all residential rating units either connected or are within the scheme rating boundary and able to be connected, a uniform targeted rate of $457.21 for each separately used or inhabited part of the rating unit.

•        For vacant rating units within the scheme rating boundary, a uniform targeted rate of $228.60 being half of one unit rate for the provision of the service due to the ability to connect to the scheme. 

•        All other properties either connected or able to be connected, a uniform targeted rate of $457.21 for each pan/urinal.

Woodlands Septic Tank Cleaning Targeted Rate

Pursuant to Sections 16(3)(b) and 16(4)(a) of the Act, a uniform targeted rate of $51.16 in respect of each separately used or inhabited part of a rating unit within the Woodlands Septic Tank Cleaning Area.

 

Water Supply Loan Targeted Rates

Pursuant to Sections 16(3)(b) and 16(4)(b) of the Act, a uniform targeted rate per rating unit on the option that the ratepayer has previously chosen to pay either a one-off capital contribution for a new scheme or pay it over a selected period as below:

Water Supply Loan Rates

Charge

Edendale Water Loan Charge - 15 years

$225.98

Edendale Water Loan Charge - 25 years

$149.24

Wyndham Water Loan Charge - 10 years

$268.68

Wyndham Water Loan Charge - 15 years

$198.00

Wyndham Water Loan Charge - 25 years

$143.33

Sewerage Supply Loan Targeted Rates

Pursuant to Sections 16(3)(b) and 16(4)(a) and (b) of the Act, a uniform targeted rate per rating unit on the option that the ratepayer has previously chosen to pay either a one-off capital contribution for a new scheme or pay it over a selected period as below:

Sewerage Supply Loan Rates

Charge

Edendale Sewerage Loan - 15 years (incl connection cost)

$871.32

Edendale Sewerage Loan - 25 years (incl connection cost)

$628.99

Edendale Sewerage Loan - 25 years (excl connection cost)

$520.56

Gorge Road Sewerage Loan - 15 years

$471.23

Oban Sewerage  Loan Charge Extension - 15 years

$718.63

Tuatapere Sewerage Loan Charge - 15 years

$399.23

Tuatapere Sewerage Loan Charge - 25 years

$360.90

Wallacetown Sewerage Loan Charge - 15 years

$461.12

Wallacetown Sewerage Loan Charge - 25 years

$331.16

Wyndham Sewerage Loan - 10 years (incl connection cost)

$1,074.74

Wyndham Sewerage Loan - 15 years (incl connection cost)

$791.89

Wyndham Sewerage Loan - 25 years (incl connection cost)

$573.23

Wyndham Sewerage Loan - 10 years (excl connection cost)

$873.22

Wyndham Sewerage Loan - 15 years (excl connection cost)

$643.45

Wyndham Sewerage Loan - 25 years (excl connection cost)

$465.78

Sandy Brown Road Utility Loan Targeted Rate

Pursuant to Sections 16(3)(b) and 16(4)(a) of the Act, a uniform targeted rate of $43.94 per rating unit.

e)            Resolves under Section 24 of the Act that all rates (excluding metered water targeted rates) will be payable in four equal instalments with the due dates for payment being:

•        Instalment One - 30 August 2019.

•        Instalment Two   - 29 November 2019.

•        Instalment Three - 28 February 2020.

•        Instalment Four – 29 May 2020.

 

The due date for payment of metered water targeted rates will be

•        Instalment One - 22 July 2019.

•        Instalment Two- 21 October 2019.

•        Instalment Three - 20 January 2020.

•        Instalment Four – 20 April 2020.

f)             Resolves under Sections 57 and 58 of the Act to apply penalties to unpaid rates as follows:

•        A penalty of 10% will be added to the amount of any instalment of rates excluding metered water rates remaining unpaid after the relevant due date in recommendation (e) above, as shown in the table below:

Instalment

Date Penalty Added

1

2 September 2019

2

2 December 2019

3

2 March 2020

4

1 June 2020

 

•        A further penalty of 10% will be added to any amount of rates that are unpaid from previous years and remains unpaid at 1 July 2019. The penalty will be added on 2 July 2019.

·      A penalty of 10% for metered property water supply targeted rate will be added to the amount of any instalment remaining unpaid after the relevant due date in recommendation (e) above, as shown in the table below:

Instalment

Date Penalty Added

1

23 July 2019

2

22 October  2019

3

21 January 2020

4

21 April 2020

g)           Resolves that under Section 88 of the Act to set a postponement fee at $200 GST inclusive for the administration costs of registering a Statutory Land Charge plus an annual interest charge calculate at Council’s internal borrowing interest rate as prescribed in the Long Term Plan 2018-2028.

h)           Resolves that under Section 54 of the Act, where rates charged on a rating unit are less than or equal to $10 (GST incl), Council will not collect these as it believes it to be uneconomic.

i)             Agrees that valuation roll and rate records for the District of Southland are open for inspection by ratepayers at all District offices (as listed below), during normal office hours:

 

 

-        Invercargill Office

          15 Forth Street,
Invercargill 9810

-         Oban Office

          10 Ayr Street, Oban,
Stewart Island 9846

-        Lumsden Office

          18 Diana Street,
Lumsden 9730

-         Te Anau Office

       116 Town Centre,
Te Anau 9600

24 Milford Crescent,
Te Anau 9600

-        Otautau Office

          176 Main Street,
Otautau 9610

-         Winton Office

1 Wemyss Street,
Winton 9720

-        Riverton Office

          117 Palmerston Street,
Riverton 9822

-         Wyndham Library

41 Balaclava Street,
Wyndham 9831

j)             Agrees the following options be available for payment of rates:

•        Direct Debit.

•        Credit card (Visa or Mastercard).

•        Internet banking.

•        By cash, cheque or Eftpos.

 

 

Background

4       Council has adopted the Annual Plan 2019/2020.  This paper provides for Council to set rates for the year commencing on 1 July 2019 and ending on 30 June 2020.

5       Rates for the 2019/20 year are set on a GST inclusive basis. This is the actual amount that the Council will receive from the ratepayer, rather than the amount to which GST will be added.

6       Where a targeted rate applies to a particular area, reference is made within the Funding Impact Statement (Rates Section) of Council’s Annual Plan 2019/2020 to the land map detailing this.  These maps can be viewed at www.southlanddc.govt.nz/my-southland/maps

7       Definitions of rating terminology and applicability are explained at the beginning of the Funding Impact Statement (Rates Section) of Council’s Annual Plan 2019/2020.

8        Under Section 54 of the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002 (the Act), Council has the option to not collect small amounts. It is recommended that Council continue to not collect rates where the individual assessment totals less than $10 (GST inclusive), as has been done for the last two years as it is uneconomical to do so. 

9        We note that as part of our annual process, Council engage a legal advisor to undertake a review of this rates resolution report and the associated Funding Impact Statement (Rates Section).  The recommendations raised through this process have been actioned and incorporated into this report and Funding Impact Statement (Rates Section).

Changes this year

10     Staff this year have included penalty dates for metered water in the resolution. Council indicated during discussion around the debt policy that penalties should be charged on water rates as they are on rates. This debt policy was adopted on the 7 February. By resolution is the only way penalties can be applied.

Factors to Consider

Legal and Statutory Requirements

11     Under Section 23(1) and (2) of the Act the Council is required to set its rates by resolution.

12     Section 24 of the Act requires that the Council state the financial year for which the rates relate and the due date for payment of the rates in its resolution setting rates.

13     Section 57 of the Act states that a local authority may, by resolution, authorise penalties to be added to rates that are not paid by the due date.  The resolution must state how the penalty is calculated and the date the penalty is to be added to the amount of unpaid rates. Additionally the penalty must not exceed 10% of the amount of the unpaid rates on the date when the penalty is added.

14     Section 58 of the Act sets out the penalties that may be imposed.

Imposition of penalty

A local authority may impose the following types of penalty:

(a) a penalty on rates assessed in the financial year for which the resolution is made and that are unpaid after the due date for payment (or after a later date if so specified):

(b) a further penalty on rates assessed in any financial year and that are unpaid on whichever day is the later of—

(i)   the first day of the financial year for which the resolution is made; or

(ii) 5 working days after the date on which the resolution is made:

(c)   a further penalty on rates to which a penalty has been added under paragraph (b), if the rates

15     Pursuant to Section 23(5) of the Act, a copy of this rates resolution will be sent to the Secretary of Local Government within 20 working days from this resolution being approved.

Community Views

16     Members of the community have been provided with the opportunity to express their views in relation to Council’s proposed rates for the 2019/2020 financial year via Community Boards and Community Development Area Subcommittees.

Costs and Funding

17     The rates proposed to be set through the recommendations in this report are consistent with the financial forecasts included in the Annual Plan 2019/2020, that were considered for adoption by Council prior to its consideration of this report.

Policy Implications

18     The rates resolution is to set the rates as detailed in the Funding Impact Statement (Rates Section) from Council’s Annual Plan 2019/2020.

Analysis

Options Considered

19      This report considers only one option that is to set the rates penalties.


 

Analysis of Options

Option 1 - Set the rates, penalties and due dates as recommended

Advantages

Disadvantages

·        Adhering to the Act and LGA requirements.

·        The rates have been consulted on as part of the Annual Plan 2019/2020.

·        The rates are consistent with the financial forecasts included in the Annual Plan 2019/2020.

·        None.

Option 2 - Set the rates as indicated but amend the penalties and due dates as discussed at this meeting.

Advantages

Disadvantages

·        If the Council wishes to amend its penalty charges or due dates it can do so.

·        May affect the total penalties amount collected. A budgeted amount expected to be collected is included in the Annual Plan. In saying this the Annual Plan is based on the 2018-28 Long Term Plan, which was extensively consulted on. Additionally the local rate components of the Annual Plan have been discussed within the open meetings of community boards and community development authorities.

Assessment of Significance

20      In accordance with Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy, the resolution to set the rates is considered significant as it has a major effect on the community.

21      The rates are formulated on the basis of the Funding Impact Statement (Rates Section).

Recommended Option

22      The recommended option is option 1 – Set the rates, penalties and due dates as recommended.

Next Steps

23      Rates will be assessed in July in accordance with the recommendations of this report. The Act also requires Council to send a copy of the adopted resolution within 20 working days to the Secretary of Local Government.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.  

 


Council

19 June 2019

 

Establish the draft strategic framework and council activities for the Long Term Plan 2031

Record No:             R/19/5/9060

Author:                      Chantelle Subritzky, Corporate Performance Lead

Approved by:         Rex Capil, Group Manager Community and Futures

 

  Decision                                        Recommendation                                  Information

 

 

 

Purpose

1        To establish the proposed strategic framework, council activities and groups of activities to be used for the Long Term Plan 2031. 

Executive Summary

2        There have been two workshops with councillors in March and May 2019 to consider and assist in setting the direction for the Long Term Plan 2031. These workshops were focused on developing the draft strategic framework and the proposed council activities.

3        This report is to formally recognise and note the strategic framework that staff require guidance on to develop the Long Term Plan and the key strategies and policies as the next stages in the process.

 

Recommendation

That the Council:

a)            Receives the report titled “Establish the draft strategic framework and council activities for the Long Term Plan 2031” dated 11 June 2019.

 

b)           Determines that this matter or decision be recognised as not significant in terms of Section 76 of the Local Government Act 2002.

 

c)            Determines that it has complied with the decision-making provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 to the extent necessary in relation to this decision; and in accordance with Section 79 of the Act determines that it does not require further information, further assessment of options or further analysis of costs and benefits or advantages and disadvantages prior to making a decision on this matter.

 

d)           Notes the draft strategic framework for the Long Term Plan 2031.

 

e)            Notes the proposed council activities for the Long Term Plan 2031.

 


 

Background

4        The Long Term Plan process is an opportunity for Council to plan for the long term delivery of activities and consider their impact on the communities throughout the district.

5        Every three years the Southland District Council reviews the Long Term Plan to ensure that the work council undertakes is fit for purpose for the next ten years.

6        The purpose of the Southland District Council Long Term Plan 2031 is to:

·     provide a long term focus for Council decisions and activities

·     provide an opportunity for community participation in planning for the future

·     define the community outcomes desired for the District

·     describe the activities undertaken by Council

·     provide integrated decision-making between council and the community

·     provide a basis for performance measurement of the Council.

7        There have been two Council workshops with councillors in March and May 2019 which provided guidance on the draft strategic framework and proposed council activities.

Strategic Framework

8        Strategic direction setting encompasses Council’s high-level goals, particularly the vision for the District, what the outcomes for the community may be, and what the strategic priorities will be for delivering work to the community.

9        When considering the development of a strategic framework, councils are advised to consider the below:

10      The councillors were provided with a strategic context paper prior to the workshop in March 2019 which identified key issues for the district, both currently and emerging within the next ten years.

 

11      The Southland District Youth Council were also invited to attend the workshop in March 2019. Their input was received and appreciated when councillors considered the current strategic framework and provided guidance for the new proposed strategic framework.

12      The councillors met again at a workshop in May 2019 to further discuss the strategic framework and the potential wording. The feedback was acknowledged and used to create the draft strategic framework below:

STRATEGIC FRAMEWORK COMPONENT

LONG TERM PLAN 2018 - 2028

GUIDANCE FROM 21 MAY 2019 WORKSHOP

Mission

Working together for a better Southland

 

The mission statement is still appropriate for the district.

Vision

 “Southland – one community offering endless opportunities”

 

The vision statement is still appropriate for the district.

Community Outcomes

·   Proud, connected communities that have an attractive and affordable lifestyles

·   Resilient communities that leave a legacy for tomorrow

·    Environment - Kaitiakitanga for future generations

·    Culture - Inclusive, connected communities

·    Economic - A diverse economy creating healthy and affordable lifestyles

·    Social - Empowered communities with the right tools to deliver the best outcomes

Strategic Priorities

·    Improve how we work

·    Provide appropriate infrastructure and services

·    Make informed decisions

·    More people

·   Improve how we work to build resilience

·   Better preparing our communities and council for future changes

·   Provision of appropriate infrastructure and services

·   Support healthy environments and sustainable communities

 

 

Proposed council activities

13      Council activities and their grouping is important as it defines the work that Council undertakes and creates transparency in the planning and financial delivery of the services to the community.

14      There are currently nine groups of activities and 26 separate activities for Southland District Council (see below). In comparison to other councils, Southland District Council has one of the largest number of activities in the long term plan.

15      The grouping of activities is a fundamental building block for the LTP as it has implications for:

•     the level of detail that is disclosed in the LTP

•     the financial and planning information system

•     the transparency and ease of understanding of the LTP, such as, the grouping of activities can either obscure key issues or give them a pre-eminence that may be disproportionate

•     the degree of sensitivity that the plan has to change.

16      In schedule 10 of the Local Government Act 2002, each of the activities below must be a ‘group’ of activities in its own right:

•     water supply

•     sewerage and the treatment and disposal of sewage

•     stormwater drainage

•     flood protection and control works

•     the provision of roads and footpaths.

17      This means that funding impact statements and performance measure and targets must be separately disclosed for each of these grouping of activities.

18      There were a series of internal workshops with key staff and the executive leadership team to ensure that the proposed activities were fit-for-purpose and able to meet the requirements of Council and the community.

19      The proposed grouping in below meets Council requirements and has been recommended in the May Council workshop:

Group of Activities

Activity

Environmental Services (combines Environmental Health, Animal Services, Resource Management (including district planning) and Building Solutions)

Environmental Services

Emergency Management

Community Leadership

Community Leadership (including Representation and Advocacy, Community and Futures, and Community Assistance)

Transport

Provision of Roading and Footpaths (including cycle trails, airport, water facilities and bridges

Roading,  footpaths, airport and cycle trails

Water facilities

Sewerage

Sewerage

Stormwater Drainage

Stormwater

Water Supply

Water Supply

Community Resources

Community Facilities (including toilets, halls and libraries)

Community Services (including cemeteries, community housing, library services, and heritage and culture)

Open Spaces (including parks, reserves and streetscapes)

Waste Services

Stewart Island Electrical Supply Authority

 

Issues

20      Staff resource is required to change the system to reflect the new strategic framework and proposed Council activities within the financial and reporting systems. Staff are aware of these risks and are seeking to mitigate this risk as soon as possible by commencing work on the new structure.

21      The project plan for the development of the Long Term Plan 2031 requires that the draft strategic framework and Council activities are established by June 2019 so that work can begin on the key strategies and policies. 

Factors to Consider

Legal and Statutory Requirements

22      In schedule 10 of the Local Government Act 2002, each of the activities below must be a ‘group’ of activities in its own right:

•     water supply

•     sewerage and the treatment and disposal of sewage

•     stormwater drainage

•     flood protection and control works

•     the provision of roads and footpaths.

Community Views

23      During the workshop, councillors were also presented with survey results from recent surveys conducted at the Southland A&P show and Young Farmers meetings. This was not a statistically representative survey, but it gave the councillors an indication of what the community was feeling regarding the questions below:

What are the things that you love about your community?

The top five ‘things’ that were selected in the survey by descending order were:

·    Swimming Pools

·    Parks

·    School

·    Playground

·    Pub

What are you worried about in the future?

The top five ‘things’ that were selected in the survey by descending order were:

·    Climate change

·    New Zealand government legislation change

·    Lifestyle affordability

·    Meat-free meat

·    Ageing population

What future opportunities would you like to see within the district?

The top five ‘things’ that were selected in the survey by descending order were:

·    Employment opportunities

·    Tourism

·    Better rural lifestyle

·    Better support for young families

·    Increased internet connectivity

 

Costs and Funding

24      The costs associated with changing the strategic framework are expected to be funded from current operational budgets.

25      Internal staff resource is required to ensure all systems and documents reflect the updated strategic framework, activities and groups of activities.

Policy Implications

26      Policies will need to reflect in an appropriate manner to the proposed strategic framework, activities and groups of activities where appropriate.

Analysis

Options Considered

27      There are three options to be considered in this report:

Option 1: Establish the recommendations for the draft strategic framework and the proposed council activities

Option 2: Amend the recommendation of the draft strategic framework and proposed council activities

Option 3: Reject the draft strategic framework and proposed council activities.

Analysis of Options

Option 1 – Confirm

Advantages

Disadvantages

·        Establish the recommendations for the draft strategic framework and the proposed council activities

·        No disadvantages identified

 

Option 2 – Amend

Advantages

Disadvantages

·        Amend the recommendation of the draft strategic framework and proposed council activities

·        This may result in unclear guidance or guidance that is not compliant with legislation and delay the implementation of the draft strategic framework and council activities. This could negatively impact the delivery of the Long Term Plan 2031.

 

Option 3 – Maintain Status Quo

Advantages

Disadvantages

·        Reject the draft strategic framework and proposed council activities.

·        This will delay the implementation of the draft strategic framework and council activities. This could negatively impact the delivery of the Long Term Plan 2031.

 

Assessment of Significance

28      While the Long Term Plan is an important process for Council, the establishment of the draft strategic framework and the draft Council activities has a low significance as it is still in draft form. 

Recommended Option

29      Confirm the draft strategic framework and proposed Council activities so that staff are continue with the development of the Long Term Plan 2031.


 

Next Steps

30      Once the draft strategic framework and the proposed Council activities have been established, then staff will continue developing the key strategic, policies and Activity Management Plans.

31      The draft strategic framework and proposed Council activities will be reconfirmed with the new Council following the 2019 election.

This will be included in the Long Term Plan documents for consultation and adoption.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report. 

  


Council

19 June 2019

 

Confirmation of Road Stopping at 1830 Manapouri Te Anau Highway (Twidle)

Record No:             R/19/5/8065

Author:                      Theresa Cavanagh, Property Advisor

Approved by:         Matt Russell, Group Manager Services and Assets

 

  Decision                                        Recommendation                                  Information

 

 

 

Purpose

1        To make the final resolution that a portion of road at 1830 Manapouri Te Anau Highway is stopped in order for it to be disposed of to the adjoining landowner as per a previous Council resolution.

Executive Summary

2        Council at its meeting on 18 December 2018 agreed to commence the road stopping procedure for an unformed portion of road adjoining 1830 Manapouri Te Anau Highway.

3        Subsequently, the relevant procedures have been followed (survey definition and public notification) and the next step is for Council to publish a notice that the land is no longer road.

 

Recommendation

That the Council:

a)            Receives the report titled “Confirmation of Road Stopping at 1830 Manapouri Te Anau Highway (Twidle)” dated 11 June 2019.

 

b)           Determines that this matter or decision be recognised as not significant in terms of Section 76 of the Local Government Act 2002.

 

c)            Determines that it has complied with the decision-making provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 to the extent necessary in relation to this decision; and in accordance with Section 79 of the Act determines that it does not require further information, further assessment of options or further analysis of costs and benefits or advantages and disadvantages prior to making a decision on this matter.

 

d)           Resolves pursuant to Section 4 of the Tenth Schedule to the Local Government Act 1974 to publish a notice that Section 1 SO Plan 533063 is stopped and shall thereafter cease to be road.  

 

e)            Resolves that Section 1 SO Plan 533063 be sold to the adjoining owners J W & K P Twidle and be amalgamated with CFR 660460.

 

 

Background

4        Council at its meeting on 18 December 2018, agreed to commence the road stopping procedure for an unformed portion of road adjoining 1830 Manapouri Te Anau Highway.

5        Subsequently, the process required by Schedule 10 of the Local Government Act 1974 has been undertaken, which includes survey definition and seeking objections via public notification.  No objections were received.

6        The next step is for Council to publish a notice that the land is no longer road.

Issues

7        No issues have been identified in undertaking the process.

Factors to Consider

Legal and Statutory Requirements

8        All actions have been undertaken following the steps as set out in the Local Government Act 1974.

Community Views

9        The process required public notification of the proposal and no objections were received.

Costs and Funding

10      The applicant has paid the survey costs and agreed to pay the sale price of $6,500 including GST as per the valuation from registered valuer, Chadderton Valuation.

Policy Implications

11      None identified

Analysis

Options Considered

12      Proceed to publish or not.

Analysis of Options

Option 1 – Publish notice

Advantages

Disadvantages

·        Allows process to be completed.

·        None identified

 


 

Option 2 – Do not publish notice

Advantages

Disadvantages

·        None identified.

·        Council agreed to undertake the road stopping process with the Twidles, with the outcome dependent upon public notification.  Given there have been no objections, Council would be failing to honour the undertaking. 

·        Both Council and the Twidles have incurred costs to get the process to this point.  Council has paid for the valuation and the Twidles have paid for the survey. 

 

 

Assessment of Significance

13      Not considered significant.

Recommended Option

14      Option 1 – Publish the notice to stop the road.

Next Steps

15      Publish notice stopping road and complete sale process.

 

Attachments

a             Title Plan for Twidle Road Stopping SO 533063    

 


Council

19 June 2019

 


 


Council

19 June 2019

 

Disposal of Hokonui Hall

Record No:             R/19/5/8941

Author:                      Theresa Cavanagh, Property Advisor

Approved by:         Matt Russell, Group Manager Services and Assets

 

  Decision                                        Recommendation                                  Information

 

 

 

Purpose

1        To declare the Hokonui Hall property surplus to requirements to facilitate its disposal.

Executive Summary

2        In November 2016, the Hokonui Hall recommended to Council that the Hall be closed as it has no regular users and required significant maintenance.

3        A resolution was passed at a public meeting on 10 April 2017 for the hall to be closed and for Council to undertake the necessary steps to comply with this resolution.

4        This report is for Council to declare the property surplus to requirements to facilitate its disposal.

 

Recommendation

That the Council:

a)            Receives the report titled “Disposal of Hokonui Hall” dated 11 June 2019.

 

b)           Determines that this matter or decision be recognised as not significant in terms of Section 76 of the Local Government Act 2002.

 

c)            Determines that it has complied with the decision-making provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 to the extent necessary in relation to this decision; and in accordance with Section 79 of the Act determines that it does not require further information, further assessment of options or further analysis of costs and benefits or advantages and disadvantages prior to making a decision on this matter.

 

d)           Declares the Hokonui Hall property being Lots 1 DP 5784 held in RT SL240/21 and Lot 3 DP 5784 held in RT SL5A/457 surplus to requirements and to be disposed of.

 

e)            Acknowledges that pursuant to the Public Works Act 1981 that Lot 1 be offered to the ‘Successor in Title’ from which the land was originally acquired for a public work, being Wilson Farm Dairy Hokonui Limited.

 

f)             Resolves that Lot 3 is preferentially offered to Wilson Farm Dairy Hokonui Limited at the same time as Lot 1.

 

g)           Delegates to the Chief Executive the authority to enter into an Agreement for Sale and Purchase with Wilson Farm Dairy Hokonui Limited for Lot 3, upon conditions suitable to the Chief Executive.

 

h)           Agrees that In the event that the offer back and sale for both Lots 1 & 3 to Wilson Farm Dairy Hokonui Limited are not successfully completed, delegate to the Chief Executive the authority to determine the disposal method and conditions for both Lots 1 & 3, and accept any reasonable offer.

 

Background

5        This site was acquired by the ‘Education Board of the District of Southland’ for Education Purposes in 1888.    

6        Lot 1 (hall) - the Southland Education Board permitted the Hall Committee to use the area to build a hall in 1957.  A subdivision was undertaken to allow the hall to be within a standalone lot and the property was acquired by the Southland County Council in 1961.

7        Lot 3 (carpark) – was created via the above subdivision and sold by the Crown to Max William Campbell, who subsequently sold it to Council in 1981 for hall carparking.

8        In 2003, the Hall Society discussed the closing of the hall due to low usage and rising costs of electricity and insurance.  However, at a meeting on 29 May 2003, the Hall Society resolved to retain the hall as ‘there are 21 children in the district under the age of 3 and we should retain the hall for them.’ The hall levy was increased and changes made to insurance and electricity to ensure the hall could continue to be used.

9        In November 2016, the Hokonui Hall Committee recommended to Council that the Hall be closed as it ‘has no regular users and there is only very infrequent casual use.  We are faced with spending an estimated $40,000 on maintenance.  This would entail raising a loan and setting a rate of $240 per household to service the loan.’

10      The Hokonui Hall Committee called a public meeting on 10 April 2017 to consider the closing and disposal of the hall.  A resolution was subsequently received for the hall to be closed and for Council to take the necessary steps to comply with this resolution.

Issues

11      There are no issues identified at this point given the strong community support for closing and disposing of the hall.

Factors to Consider

Legal and Statutory Requirements

12      Sections 40 & 42 of the Public Works Act 1981 (PWA) govern the disposal of land no longer required for public work.  This determines whether the properties are to be offered back to former owners of the land.

13      Lot 1
Council’s Chief Executive under his statutory authority of the PWA has determined that the land is not exempt from offer back under s40.  Therefore Council ‘shall offer to sell the land by private contract to the person from whom it was acquired or to the successor of that person.’ 

14      The former owner of Lot 1 and their successors have passed away.  However, the successor includes ‘successor in title’, who is the current owner of land that remains after part of its original title has been acquired for public works and subsequently declared surplus.  The ‘successor in title’ in this instance is the adjoining landowner, Wilson Farm Dairy Hokonui Limited.  

15      Lot 3
Council’s Chief Executive under his statutory authority of the PWA has determined that the land is exempt from offer back under s40(2)(a), on the grounds that it is unreasonable considering the low value of this small unimproved parcel of land relative to the cost of completing this protracted process.

16      It is considered that this lot be preferentially offered to the adjoining neighbours along with Lot 1 for ease of disposal and the efficiencies of selling both lots at the same time to the same purchaser.  In addition, the location of the land would make it impossible to achieve an appropriate safe access direct onto Hokonui School Road as a separate property.

Community Views

17      The meeting held by the Hokonui Hall Committee on 10 April 2017 was open to the public and a resolution was made to close and dispose of the hall.

Costs and Funding

18      There will be standard legal and valuation costs associated with the disposal.

Policy Implications

19      None identified at this stage.

Analysis

Options Considered

20      To declare the property surplus to requirements or not.

Analysis of Options

Option 1 – Declare Surplus

Advantages

Disadvantages

·        Allows the property to be disposed of and eliminates future costs and liabilities relating to the building.

·        None identified.

 

Option 2 – Do not Declare Surplus

Advantages

Disadvantages

·        None identified as there is no demand from the community for the hall and it will fall into further disrepair.

·        The Council and the Hall Committee will continue to manage an unused building which will generate further costs and liabilities.

 

 

Assessment of Significance

21      Not considered significant.

Recommended Option

22      Option 1 – Declare Surplus

Next Steps

23      Engage a valuer to undertake a valuation of the property.

24      Offer both Lots 1 & 3 to the adjoining neighbours, Wilson Farm Dairy Hokonui Limited.

25      If the sale to Wilson Farm Dairy Hokonui Limited is unsuccessful, the property will be sold publicly. 

 

Attachments

a             Hokonui Hall Map    

 


Council

19 June 2019

 

PDF Creator


Council

19 June 2019

 

Bridge Weight Restriction Postings 2018/2019

Record No:             R/19/6/10084

Author:                      Hartley Hare, Strategic Manager Transport

Approved by:         Matt Russell, Group Manager Services and Assets

 

  Decision                                        Recommendation                                  Information

 

 

 

Purpose

1.      To comply with the Transport Act 1962 and Heavy Motor Vehicle Regulations 1974, the road controlling authority for any territorial area is required to confirm, at a minimum annually, any weight limit postings necessary for bridges on the roading network and to revoke any restrictions which no longer apply.  This report provides the information to be able to fulfil this requirement. Council last confirmed its bridge postings on 20 June 2018.

Executive Summary

2.      This report updates the list of posted bridges within the Southland District.  The posting weight limits are based on recent detailed inspections and follow up analysis. The 2019 inspection and analysis has resulted in a number of additional bridges needing to be restricted and a number of currently posted bridges having their posting further restricted as the bridges continue to deteriorate.

3.      The attached schedule (Attachment A) highlights changes to bridge postings as a result of the recent inspections and analysis as well as bridge upgrade and replacement work carried out in the 2018/2019 financial year, along with specific one off issues that have occurred.

4.      In summary:

·    Recently, Stantec inspected or attempted to inspect all of Southland District Council’s posted bridges, the bulk of which are timber. They also inspected a number of other bridges which may also be getting to the stage that they may need to be restricted.

·    Of the total number of bridges (1088) there are now 90 posted compared to 93 bridges that had posting restrictions advertised in 2018.

·    Of the 90 posted bridges 71 are posted at less than 100% Class I compared to the 66 of 93 posted bridges that were advertised in 2018.

·    Of the bridges identified for posting in 2018, there are 27 that require a revision of the previous posted restriction.

·    Of the total number of timber bridges there are a significant number that have indications of internal defects (i.e. rot/decay) requiring further investigation by either drill coring or non-destructive methods.

·    The lack of objective internal verification such as drilling of the timber components, as a supplement to hammer sounding, exposes Council to significant risk.  While some drilling has occurred on a selection of bridges, it is recommend that this internal verification methods continue to be undertaken going forward.

·    The adoption of central loading when setting posting, without consideration of eccentric loading, departs from best practice and exposes Council to additional risk. As discussed and agreed through the 2017 Report on this issue, this approach was considered acceptable on the basis that the posted bridges are single lane and vehicles tend to stay reasonably central as observed by the wheel tracks, as such it is considered that the central on bridge approach has merit.

 

Recommendation

That the Council:

a)        Receives the report titled “Bridge Weight Restriction Postings 2018/2019” dated 11 June 2019.

 

b)        Determines that this matter or decision be recognised as not significant in terms of Section 76 of the Local Government Act 2002.

 

c)         Determines that it has complied with the decision-making provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 to the extent necessary in relation to this decision; and in accordance with Section 79 of the Act determines that it does not require further information, further assessment of options or further analysis of costs and benefits or advantages and disadvantages prior to making a decision on this matter.

 

d)        Agrees to confirm that in accordance with the Transport Act 1962 and Heavy Motor Vehicle Regulations 1974, the maximum weight and speed limits for heavy motor vehicles on bridges as listed on the attached schedule (Attachment A) be imposed.

 

e)        Agrees to continue to rely on the Central on Bridge restriction to limit posting restrictions and continues to mitigate this risk through ongoing promotion of posting compliance, particularly in the following areas:

·        For those restrictions which have curved approaches; and

·        Where the posting restriction difference between the central on bridge and eccentrically loaded calculation exceeds 20% and the bridge carries more than two heavy vehicles a day.

 

f)         Agrees to confirm there is a commitment to further mitigate the risk associated with the inspection process by incorporating invasive annual testing across all posted bridges which have areas of concern.

 

g)        Agrees to notify the weight limits to the New Zealand Police, New Zealand Transport Agency, Road Transport Forum New Zealand (Inc) and by public notice in daily newspapers.

 

h)        Agrees to confirm the current closure of the following bridge:

·        2895.001 Benmore Road

 

Content

Inspection Process

5.      In the 2016 round of inspections, Stantec initiated a multi-level assessment in order to provide improved understanding and to better address the variable level of risk associated with each type of defect.  For each beam inspected there are three types of defects that are picked up, specifically:

·    External Condition Assessment – determining the condition of the member based on its external visual appearance (i.e. cracking, crack depth, surface tolerance, etc.).  This is typically a value between 100% and 80%.

·    External Defect Assessment – determining any further reduction in capacity resulting from an external visible defect in the beam cross section that can be measured (i.e. external decay, rebates, significant cracking, moisture content, etc.).  This factor is typically applied either as a negative percentage reduction to the external condition assessment, or physical reduction to the member size used in the calculations.

·    Internal Sounding Assessment – determining an “indicative” condition of the member based on sounding (hitting with a hammer).  As this method is highly subjective it requires further verification by drill coring or an alternative objective non-destructive method.  This factor is typically applied as a negative percentage reduction to the external condition assessment and also raises a “red flag”, indicating a higher priority for further internal verification.

6.      It should be noted that this more detailed format of assessment was only partially applied to the 2016 round of inspections in order to retain and identify beams indicated by previous inspectors as having some form of internal defect, while minimising undue and significant changes to the current postings.  The above process has been more intensively applied for the 2018 and 2019 inspections and postings have been adjusted accordingly.  In addition to the above inspection process, all posted bridge inspections moving forward will also include drilling in areas of potential concern.

7.      It is further recommended that all timber structures whether posted or not, should have some measure of objective internal condition assessment carried out (drilling or non-destructive testing (NDT)) on a periodic basis (i.e. 10 years).  For any bridges that have an internal defect noted via sounding, these structures should be prioritised for further assessment to verify the presence of decayed timber within the member. A programme of drilling beams has been developed to follow up the inspections. Part of this has been carried out by Stantec with assistance from the Alliance Maintenance Contractors. As a result of the internal condition assessment a number of restrictions have been confirmed.  Future assessments may show that bridge postings may need to be either increased or relaxed at a later date.


 

Posting Assessment Process

8.      The posting assessment process used generally aligns with Section 7 of the NZ Transport Agency Bridge Manual – Evaluation of Bridges and Culverts.  Bridge member capacities are typically calculated based on ultimate limit state loading and adopting the following assumptions:

·    Assume all timber is Mixed Australian Hardwood (MAH).

·    Assume strength classification of F17, based on table 2.1 of AS1720.1 (1988), adopting MAH, Structural No. 2, seasoned.

·    Characteristic strengths are given in table 2.4 of AS1720.1 (2010).

9.      It should be noted that the current posting process does depart from full compliance with the NZ Transport Agency Bridge Manual, in that an allowance has been made for posting to be based on a centrally placed vehicle and not an eccentrically placed vehicle (i.e. against the kerb).  The resultant/effect of this is that many of our bridges have as little as 50% of the posted capacity for eccentrically placed vehicles.

10.    As all the posted bridges are single lane bridges and accepting that most vehicles tend to stay reasonably central on bridge as observed by the wheel tracks, the proposed approach has merit.  However, it is a clear departure from best practice and does expose SDC to a higher level of risk and potential litigation in the event of a structural failure occurring as a result of a vehicle straying from its central on bridge position.

11.    It is recommended that Council continue to take further measures to address eccentric loading on bridges and review of their posted capacities to help manage this risk, specifically:

·    Prioritise actions for bridges with the greatest difference between central and eccentric loading.

·    Determine social/economic effects of reduced posting on typical traffic using the route.

·    Consider options for reduced posting, kerb to kerb narrowing, and strengthening of the outer beams.

·    Integrates a more invasive (drilling) investigation regime for all posted bridges.

Background

12.    The 2019 inspection and analysis has resulted in a number of additional bridges needing to be restricted and currently posted bridges having their posting reduce as the bridges continue to deteriorate. The number has been offset by a number of bridges which no longer require posting restrictions for a range of reasons. The net result is that 90 bridges need to have posting restrictions. This is 3 bridges less than the 93 bridges that had posting restrictions in 2018.

13.    Since the 2018 postings were imposed the following bridge has been replaced meaning it no longer needs to be restricted.

·    1057.001 George Road was replaced with a concrete box culvert.

14.    During the year the following bridges have been closed and therefore can come off the posting list.

·    2895.001 Benmore Road. This bridge is in very poor condition and requires substantial work just to make it safe for light vehicles.

·    2560.001 Off Tussock Creek Grove Bush. Agreement has been reached with the landowner for this bridge to be closed and removed.

·    2827.001 Wadworth Road. Council have redecked this bridge in preparation for divesting the bridge and removing it from the Council owned network.

·    1321 Wyndham River Road. This bridge has been divested to the landowner.

15.    The attached schedule (Attachment A) includes 90 bridges for which weight and/or speed restrictions, in terms of the Heavy Motor Vehicle Regulation 1974, are still necessary.  The schedule has three less weight limit postings than the previous 2018 Bridge Posting Council report. The changes in bridge postings from the 2018 report are shown in the schedule in bold italics including new postings.

16.    It is proposed that the Council accepts the attached schedule of bridge restrictions (Attachment A) and authorises the advertising and notification of the list in accordance with meeting the requirements of the Transport Act 1962 and the Heavy Motor Vehicle Regulations 1974.

17.    This requires that notification of the restricted weight limit posting or speed limits are advertised at least once annually to remain legally enforceable. This requirement is now due as the last public notification was carried out on 30 June 2018.

18.    The objective of the decision is to maintain a suitable level of safety for road users and to limit any further structural damage resulting from unsustainable overloading.

Issues

19.    The restricted bridges can cause a range of difficulties for those people who need them to transport heavy freight. The posted bridge listing continues to be used as a deficiency register to prioritise the bridge upgrading and renewal programmes in the coming years.

20.    Limited by the available funding for this work, only those bridges with restrictions that cause the greatest commercial hardship or present the highest safety risk will be prioritised to be upgraded or replaced initially.  Bridges that have no alternative access and nearing end of remaining useful life will take highest priority for renewals.

21.    Several bridges on the posting list are still being reviewed in terms of their status in relation to the extent of the roading network they provide access to and service. A few of these are not a part of council’s maintained network and council roading is scheduling those to be removed where and when possible. As these are progressed they will be brought to Council with a recommendation to close or dispose of.


 

22.    Each bridge on the posting list is subject to ongoing consideration of the alternatives which include:

·    Potential upgrading or replacement where this is justified in terms of the level of service that SDC can afford to provide.

·    How to effectively better manage ‘Long Term’ postings where the bridge is low use and the restriction is causing limited problems.

·    Potential removal or divestment of the bridge from the network register with consideration under Council’s Extent of Network Policy and utilisation of bridge matrix for rationalisation.

23.    The current use of the central on bridge restriction is not a standard restriction covered by the regulations. It is a pragmatic approach that has been used by SDC for a number of years to avoid excessive restrictions and manage the bridge asset to maximise its value and life.

24.    Discussions with the NZ Transport Agency indicate that very few, if any, other RCAs use this central on bridge restriction. This does not mean it is wrong, it is just not a standard practice covered by the regulations. This means that the restriction is not legally enforceable and acts more as an advisory sign.

25.    The Transport Agency will not tell SDC what to do regarding the use of the central on bridge restriction as it sees that it is up to SDC how it manages its network within the various legal requirements governing all RCAs, including the risks on the network. They do support appropriate measures that provide better access for trucks across the network. It needs to be noted that there is a risk that if people fail to comply with the central on bridge condition and this leads to a failure and truck crash, Council could potentially have some liability issues to defend.

26.    The risks are greatest where there is a substantial difference between the bridge weight restriction with and without the central on bridge restriction, the bridge approach is curved and there are greater heavy traffic volumes.

27.    In terms of dealing with the risks, Council has the full range of options between fully accepting the risk of continuing with the central on bridge restriction in all cases, in the knowledge that this has worked satisfactorily in the past, and down grading all posting restrictions to those that would apply under full eccentric loading.

28.    The most conservative option would lead to major inconvenience for a significant number of road users and accelerated pressure on the bridge replacement and upgrade budgets.

29.    In between the two extremes, there are a number of options Council could choose to implement, depending on where the balance is struck between risks and associated mitigations. For example, Council could choose to place a limit or cap (i.e. 25%) on the difference between posting restrictions for eccentrically placed loading calculations and central on bridge loading calculations. In the past Council have taken an uncapped central on bridge approach on the basis that the posted bridges are single laned, vehicles tend to stay reasonably central (as evidenced by wheel tracks). At this stage, it is recommended to retain this approach.

30.    There are approximately 58 bridges which gain benefit of more than 10% from a posting upgrade through the use of central on bridge. 38 of these benefit by greater than 20%, 23 by more than 30% and 7 by more than 40%.

31.    At its meeting on 20 June 2018 Council resolved to continue to rely on central on bridge restrictions to limit posting restrictions but to mitigate some of the risk by continuing to take action to promote compliance, particularly for the highest risk cases. The reduction in risk will be further bolstered by the recommendation and intention to undertake further invasive annual inspections of all posted bridges which have areas of concern.

32.    In terms of attempting to promote compliance the best example of this was Benmore Road Bridge 2895.001 where the approaches narrowed down to try to keep heavy traffic off the bridge and light traffic down the centre. This was particularly critical on this bridge as the deck planks cantilever significantly past the outside beams with a number of them broken.

33.    With other higher risk bridges the following actions have been taken.

·    3736.001 Hume Road.  The speed was dropped from 30 km/hr to 10 km/hr to improve central on bridge compliance and reduce the stress on the beams in the event of non-compliance.

·    3144.001 Tomogalak Road. The one outside beam most likely to carry a non-compliant COB load was strengthened along with the internal beams.

34.    Others have been accepted with the central on bridge restriction based on indications of vehicle tracking across the bridges.

35.    The risks relating to non-compliance with the central on bridge restrictions are also considered as part of the overall programming priorities for upgrades and replacements.

36.    To keep the allowable capacity of the bridges as high as possible, most of the postings are based on a speed restriction of 10 km/hr which carries the risk that people do not comply with the restriction and overload the bridge. Increasing the allowable speed reduces the allowable load on the bridge so a balance needs to be struck. The additional table in the table of recommended postings shows the effect on postings if the speeds are allowed to increase to 30 km/hr. This is provided for discussion at the meeting.

Factors to Consider

Legal and Statutory Requirements

37.   The annual setting and advertising of weight restrictions is a requirement of the Transport Act 1962 and the Heavy Motor Vehicle Regulations 1974.

Limitation of Liability and Disclaimer

38.   It should be noted that the engineering decisions on the posting requirements for each bridge carried out by Stantec are based on weighing up the available data, unknowns and risks and applying engineering judgement to come up with recommendations. The available information includes what can be seen visually, felt and heard (from hitting beams with a hammer) to try to best estimate their overall condition. In some cases there has also been limited load testing of individual beams to try to help calibrate the engineering judgement and selected drilling of some timber members on some bridges.

39.   The unknowns include many critical items, including:

·    The species and strength grade of timber used to build the bridges.

·    As-built plans of the original bridge.

·    Items that cannot be seen because they are either buried or internal to the structural members.

40.   This assessment has included determining the degree of decay within timber members via sounding (hitting with a hammer). As timber is a highly variable material that can have well-hidden and critical defects, it is recommended that further testing be undertaken including a programme of internal verification of the soundness of timber members. This will mitigate some of the risks associated with the above unknowns and align the inspection process with industry practice. It should be noted that programming of this work is underway.

41.   This will involve drilling small holes in the beams to try to identify areas of rot. Testing of the timber beams to determine the species of timber should also be carried out to maximise the available strength from specific species. Council’s Roading Team have decided not to carry out a more extensive programme of non-destructive testing such as ultrasound due to cost and potential reliability concerns.

42.   Where the weight restriction on a bridge impacts heavily on a community or particular road user, the weight restriction can be discussed and economic options considered for strengthening or replacing existing bridges, or options for improving alternative routes can be investigated.

Costs and Funding

43.   The ‘cost of advertising’ in providing notification of council’s bridge postings are minor compared to the asset gains and protection realised.  This is funded by the Roading Network and Asset Management budget.

Policy Implications

44.   The posted bridges generally meet the Land Transport Activity Management Plan requirements, the NZ Transport Agency funding requirement and policies, the Council’s Extent of Network Policy and the Heavy Motor Vehicle Regulations of 1974.

45.   It should be noted that NZ Transport Agency standards expect that posted bridges will be inspected annually to allow the restrictions to be updated and confirmed. This is now carried out annually under the Structural Services Contract.

Analysis

Options Considered

46.   The option of taking no action is not suitable in this case as it would result in ‘unsafe’ structures being used by road users with potentially serious or fatal consequences.

47.   In all cases the suggested weight restrictions have been set to provide a balance between safety and limiting damage to the structures, as well as setting reasonable limits for the type of vehicles using the bridges.

Analysis of Options

Option 1 - Impose Conservative Lower Posting Limits

Advantages

Disadvantages

·        Provides increased protection to bridges, slowing down the rate of degradation of the bridge.

·        Reduces risk of failure if an issue not fully identified during an inspection means the carrying capacity of the bridge is less than estimated.

·        Imposes greater cost on landowners and heavy transport industry when required to either take detours or run more truck movements with lighter loads.

Option 2 - Avoid Reliance on Central on Bridge Restriction

Advantages

Disadvantages

·        Complies more strictly with NZ Transport Agency procedures.

·        Reduces risk of people ignoring or failing to comply with restrictions, leading to failure of mainly outside beams.

·        Generally more conservative so also has same advantages as Option 1

·        Imposes greater cost on landowners and heavy transport industry when required to either take detours or run more truck movements with lighter loads.

·        Likely to increase pressure to replace and upgrade bridges sooner due to increased restrictions.

·        Fails to maximise the useful life of the asset.

Option 3 - Impose Higher Posting Limits

Advantages

Disadvantages

·      Higher postings mean fewer restrictions such that a lower cost is imposed on the heavy transport industry

·      There is a higher risk of failure as during inspections not all areas of internal rot in timber members can be identified.

·      Higher loads will lead to more rapid deterioration of the marginal bridge structures.  This will lead to the need to replace the structure sooner

 


 

Option 4 - Impose Higher Speed Limits

Advantages

Disadvantages

·      Reduces risk of people ignoring or failing to comply with restrictions.

·      Decrease bridge limits which imposes greater cost on landowners and heavy transport industry when required to either take detours or run more truck movements with lighter loads

·      Likely to increase pressure to replace and upgrade bridges sooner due to increased restrictions.

48.   This report is based on trying to achieve a reasonable balance of the above options.

Assessment of Significance

49.   It is determined that this matter is not significant in terms of Section 76 of the Local Government Act 2002.

Recommended Option

50.   It is proposed that Council accepts the attached list and authorises the advertising of the list in accordance with the requirements of the Transport Act 1962 and the Heavy Motor Vehicle Regulations 1974.

51.   It is requested that Council confirm that it wishes to continue to rely on the Central on Bridge restriction to limit the posting restrictions. 

52.   The objective of the decision is to maintain a suitable level of safety for road users and to also limit damage to the Council’s bridge asset from unsuitable loads crossing bridges.

Next Steps

53.   Following the Council meeting, the bridge restrictions will be advertised and notified to the
New Zealand Police, the New Zealand Transport Agency and the Heavy Transport Industry.

54.   Work will continue on priority bridge upgrades and replacements as part of an overall bridge strategy.

55.   Internal verification of timber members using objective testing procedures such as drill coring will continue.  This further assessment will begin with high risk structures, with an indication of some internal defect (from sounding), but will eventually be carried out on all timber beam bridges.


 

56.   The next round of posting inspections is scheduled to be carried out in 2020 and will continue annually. Stantec will also continue with the major detailed structural inspections of all of SDC’s bridges. This has been programmed to be split over three years with the second third due for completion by 30 September 2019. As a result of these inspections further bridges may be identified which also require postings.

 

Attachments

a             2019 SDC Bridge Postings Schedule (Attachment A)

b             2019 SDC Bridge Postings Speed Options (Attachment B)    

 



Council

19 June 2019

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Council

19 June 2019

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Council

19 June 2019

 

Southland Regional Development Agency Transition

Record No:             R/19/6/10610

Author:                      Steve Ruru, Chief Executive

Approved by:         Steve Ruru, Chief Executive

 

  Decision                                        Recommendation                                  Information

 

 

 

Purpose

1        To seek Council approval for proposed transition arrangements to allow establishment of the Southland Regional Development Agency (SRDA), including the transfer of existing Venture Southland assets and liabilities, to be completed in an orderly manner.

Executive Summary

2        Council has previously approved the creation of the new Southland Regional Development Agency (SRDA) based on the premise that the assets and liabilities of Venture Southland, which is established as a joint committee of the Invercargill City Council, Southland District Council and Gore District Council, would be transferred into the new entity.

3        While this work is progressing it is taking longer than originally envisaged given previous delays in the formation process including, for example, appointment of the board and the overall quantum of work that needs to be completed. As a result we are not currently in a position to complete the transfer of all of the Venture Southland assets and liabilities and the SRDA board are still to finalise their 2019/20 budget and statement of intent. Hence, the core and service agreements are still to be finalised.

4        Given the need to ensure that we can continue with a smooth transition it is proposed that Council agree to make an advance payment of the core and service agreement funding for the 2019/20 financial year and agree to extend the operation of the Venture Southland joint committee for a further six months.

 

Recommendation

That the Council:

a)            Receives the report titled “Southland Regional Development Agency Transition” dated 11 June 2019.

 

b)           Determines that this matter or decision be recognised as not significant in terms of Section 76 of the Local Government Act 2002.

 

c)            Determines that it has complied with the decision-making provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 to the extent necessary in relation to this decision; and in accordance with Section 79 of the Act determines that it does not require further information, further assessment of options or further analysis of costs and benefits or advantages and disadvantages prior to making a decision on this matter.

 

d)           Notes the progress being made with formation of the new Southland Regional Development Agency and agrees to extend the operation of the Venture Southland joint committee through to 31 December 2019 to enable the transition process to be completed in an orderly manner.

 

e)            Approves the payment of the first quarter of 2019/20 core and service agreement funding to the Southland Regional Development Agency.

 

Background

5        Council has previously approved the creation of the new Southland Regional Development Agency (SRDA) based on the premise that the staff, assets and liabilities of Venture Southland, which is established as a joint committee of the Invercargill City Council, Southland District Council and Gore District Council, would be transferred into the new entity. This approach was reflected in the propositions that were endorsed by Council when it made the decision to proceed with forming the SRDA as a council controlled organisation under the Companies Act 1993 at its 20 April 2018 meeting.

6        Subsequently, Council has also provided direction on the level of core and service agreement funding to be provided and the range of activities to which this funding is to be allocated in the 2019/20 financial year. These priorities were reflected in the letter of expectation sent to the board shortly after their appointment in March 2019 and are the subject of ongoing discussion between staff and the SRDA representatives.

7        While the work associated with the establishment of the agency is progressing it is taking time to work through all of the issues involved. Work on the transition of the existing Venture Southland staff is well advanced and is expected to be largely complete in the near future. The board have also appointed an interim chief executive while they work through the process of making a permanent appointment.

8        To enable the transfer of the existing assets and liabilities of the SRDA to be transferred a sale and purchase agreement is being developed so that the SRDA board have a clear understanding of the assets and liabilities that are being transferred.

9        Work is also being progressed to look at how the net assets that are to be transferred might best be recognised from an accounting and shareholding perspective in the SRDA accounts. At this stage consideration is being given to the creation of preference shares so that the initial equity injected can be recognised in an appropriate manner. This approach would, however, require an amendment to be made to the SRDA constitution and shareholders agreement.

Issues

10      Given the issues that remain to be resolved it is clear that the formal transition process will not be completed by 30 June 2019. As a result there is a need to formally extend the existence of Venture Southland as a joint committee, to enable the transfer of its assets and liabilities to be managed in an orderly manner, and to provide a cash injection so that the SRDA can meet its initial establishment costs and commence operations.

Factors to Consider

Legal and Statutory Requirements

11      Under the Companies Act 1993 the directors are required to ensure that the SRDA can meet a number of solvency tests. Without a cash injection to meet costs incurred to date and a level of surety around the provision of operational revenue the company will not be able to meet its existing commitments.

12      Schedule 9 of the Local Government Act 2002 outlines requirements relating to the transfer of local authority assets and liabilities into a council controlled organisations (CCO). These include a requirement for the CCO to formally accept the transfer of any liabilities.

Community Views

13      There was significant community and stakeholder input to the development of the Southland Regional Development Strategy and the decision to proceed with the formation of the new Southland Regional Development Agency (SRDA).

14      The decisions which Council is being asked to make through this paper represent a continuation of that process.

Costs and Funding

15      Council makes provision for regional development activity funding continuing as part of its LTP/Annual Plan processes. It is proposed that funding for the first quarter of 2019/20, as provided for the in 2019/20 Annual Plan, be advanced at this stage to provide a level of initial working capital.

16      The assets and liabilities, including the unallocated cash reserves, currently held by Venture Southland are reflected in their financial statements. A separate report on the assets and reserves proposed to be transferred will be provided once work currently underway to confirm what is to be transferred, and agreement is reached with the SRDA board, is complete.

Policy Implications

17      Council has formally resolved to support the formation of the new SRDA. It is appropriate that it provide support for this transition process by providing a level of funding for both.

Analysis

Options Considered

18      The options considered are for Council to approve the proposed transition arrangements (option 1) or do nothing (option 2).

19      Under the first option, Council would agree to extend the Venture Southland for a further six months so that the transfer of the remaining assets and liabilities, including contractual agreements, can be completed in an orderly manner. Council would also approve payment of the allocated core and service agreement funding for the first quarter of 2019/20.

 

Analysis of Options

Option 1 – Approve transition support

Advantages

Disadvantages

·        Allows for the establishment of the SRDA to be completed in an orderly manner that will meet the relevant statutory requirements.

·        Ensures that the SRDA can commence operational activity and meet its financial commitments.

·        Is consistent with the 2019/20 Annual Plan.

·        Payment would be made ahead of core and service agreements being finalised. 

 

Option 2 – Do nothing

Advantages

Disadvantages

·        Payment of funding would be delayed until the core and service agreements are finalised.

·        Existing Venture Southland commitments and liabilities would need to be allocated to individual councils.

·        SRDA would not be able to begin operational activity.

·        SRDA will have contractual commitments that it cannot meet.

 

Assessment of Significance

20      A decision in accordance with the recommendation is not considered to be significant. It will allow for a more orderly establishment process and transfer of the existing Venture Southland assets and liabilities.

Recommended Option

21      It is recommended that Council approve option 1 and agree to advance the core and service agreement funding to the SRDA.

Next Steps

22      Staff will arrange for the invoicing and payment of funds to be made.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report. 

 


Council

19 June 2019

 

Management Report

Record No:             R/19/6/10149

Author:                      Steve Ruru, Chief Executive

Approved by:         Steve Ruru, Chief Executive

 

  Decision                                        Recommendation                                  Information

 

 

 

Chief Executive

Office of the Controller and Auditor-General (OAG)

1.       The Office of the Auditor-General has recently published a report which provides a summary of their work in the local government sector during 2018, including a summary of the sector’s performance in the production of the 2018 LTPs and annual reports. A copy of the report is available on their website www.oag.govt.nz/2019/local-govt/docs/local-govt.pdf.

2.       Key themes/issues to emerge from the work include:

·       the need for the sector to continue to improve the quality of the information it has available about the condition and performance of their critical assets and how these might be affected by natural hazard events and/or climate change

·       the significant gap between the level of local government capital expenditure and depreciation levels for fixed assets. This gap has existed for a number of years and highlights the potential for there to be a growing ‘infrastructure deficit’ across the local government sector

·       the challenges that local authorities are facing delivering on the capital works programmes included in their LTPs. While there has been an increase in sector performance there continues to be a gap between planned performance and actual performance.

·       the need for strong consultation as part of the LTP processes about the way in which local authorities are looking to manage the level of renewals

·       the importance of local authorities having an effective audit and risk committee with an independent chair to support council decision-making processes.

·       the significance of the two major reviews occurring across the sector in relation to the delivery of 3 waters and funding/financing, with the latter being led by the Productivity Commission.

3.       The OAG have also recently published their draft annual plan www.oag.govt.nz/2019/draft-annual-plan for 2019/20 year, which outlines their proposed areas of focus for the next three years. Areas of work signalled that are of particular relevance to local government include:

·       completion of their water management work, which has been area of review over the last two years

·       continuation of their procurement practices work programme. Contract design and management are subsets of this area that is of particular relevance to the local government sector

·       ethics and integrity and giving consideration to how standards can be raised across the public sector. The management of conflicts of interest and the Local Authorities (Members Interests) Act 1068, which is in need of review, is a subset in this area

·       a review of risk management practices across the local government sector.

4.       At a broader public sector level the OAG are also proposing to start a programme of work in the broader public/community outcomes area. With the recent release by central government of the “Well-Being Budget”, there is a high level of interest in relation to the extent to which the Living Standards Framework being used by government might link ‘upwards’ with the Sustainable Development Goals, issued by the United Nations, and ‘downwards’ to the four well-beings which have recently been put back into the Local Government Act 2002.

5.       The OAG will also be doing a series of reviews looking at particular areas of public sector service delivery. This will start with a review in the family violence area but is expected to move into other areas over time. As part of this work they will be looking at the extent to which collaboration across agencies is contributing to the achievement of improved community outcomes.

Southland Heritage

6.       A joint Invercargill City; Gore District and Southland District councils meeting was held in May to discuss the various options for improving governance structures relating to the delivery of heritage services across the region including in relation to the Southland Museum and Art Gallery.

7.       As a result of this briefing process staff are looking to establish a working group to look at the next steps in relation to both addressing the issues relating to the Southland Museum and Art Gallery and a regional heritage strategy.

Walking Access

8.       In accordance with provisions within the Walking Access Act which require that a review be initiated ten years after its passage the Ministry for Primary Industries have initiated a formal review process.

9.       The Act is about increasing free access to tracks, trails and other areas for all sorts of recreation associated with walking - biking, horse riding, four wheel driving etc. Through the review consideration will be given to the effectiveness of the legislation to date and whether any changes might be needed. A copy of the consultation document is available on the Ministry for Primary Industries website www.mpi.govt.nz/law-and-policy/legislation/walkingaccessreview/

Climate Change

10.     The new Zero Carbon Bill legislation, which is to be progressed via an amendment to the existing Climate Change Response Act 2002 so that all of the key climate-related legislation is covered under one Act, has been introduced to Parliament and referred to select committee.

11.     The overall aim is to establish a framework which New Zealand can use to develop clear climate change policies which are in accordance with the Paris Agreement. This agreement is a global effort to combat the effects of climate change by limiting the global average temperature increase to 1.5 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels.

12.     The bill does four key things:

i.   sets a new greenhouse gas emissions reduction target to reduce all greenhouse gases (except biogenic methane) to net zero by 2050, and reduce emissions of biogenic methane within the range of 24-47 per cent below 2017 levels by 2050, including to 10 per cent below 2017 levels by 2030;

ii.  sets a series of emissions budgets to act as stepping stones towards the long-term target;

iii. requires the Government to develop and implement policies for climate change adaptation and mitigation; and

iv. establishes a new, independent Climate Change Commission to provide expert advice and monitoring to help keep successive governments on track to meeting long-term goals.

13.     The bill, as currently drafted, gives the Minister of Climate Change the power to request that councils and council-controlled organisations provide certain information on climate change adaptation.  This includes an assessment of the current and future effects of climate change in relation to the organisations functions; a statement of the organisations proposals and policies for addressing the effects of climate change; and an assessment of the progress made by the organisation towards implementing its proposals and policies.  This requirement will obviously increase compliance costs for local authorities.

3 Waters

14.     Cabinet is scheduled to make decisions on the initial stages of the 3 waters review this month. These initial decisions are expected to be focussed on the implementation of a new approach to the regulation of 3 waters activities. It is expected that much of the initial focus will be on improved drinking water standards and how these are to be enforced.

15.     It is expected that a decision will be made to form a new agency to assume responsibility for drinking water regulation that has previously been the responsibility of the Ministry of Health. The Havelock North inquiry identified a number of issues with the way in which the Ministry had been managing this function in the past.

16.     As part of the drinking water area there has been considerable discussion about any new standards also being applied to ‘private’ water schemes (ie those which are not administered by local government). There are a large number of private water supplies operating across New Zealand and at present they are not subject to a regulatory regime.

17.     There is also the potential for new regulatory standards to be introduced for wastewater. While the responsibility for environmental regulation currently rests with regional councils it is possible that some of the responsibilities in this area could also be transferred into any new agency that might be formed to regulate the drinking water area.

18.     At this stage any decisions on addressing the financial and funding implications of new standards is yet to be addressed. Decisions are not expected to be made in this area, nor the question of potential ‘forced’ amalgamation of suppliers until early 2020. This will enable the Productivity Commission to complete its current funding review work.

Stewart Island Service Sustainability Study

19.     Work is being progressed with the Stewart Island Service Sustainability Study. This work is being led by Morrison Low who were in Invercargill, and also visited Stewart Island, during the last month to seek input from the relevant activity managers, the Stewart Island/Rakiura Community Board and other stakeholders with an interest in the outcome from this work.

20.     An initial report is expected to be produced in the next month.

Customer Delivery

21.     May 2019 was impacted by the sudden closure of the Winton Library.  It was heartening to see the community and staff work together to offer a temporary solution so we remained open for our residents.  At the time of writing this report, we are still awaiting further test results of the Winton site before we make any further decisions.

Customer Support

22.     Rates payments were the strong focus for the month and with some heavy rain we saw an increased number of calls relating to flooding events across the District.  As we near the annual dog registration period, there has been a number of customers taking advantage of being able to change their details online. 

23.     Our call volumes have increased in April by over 1400 calls which shows the impact of a large rain event with our RFS increasing as well.  Visitor numbers are down due to the impact of the Winton branch closure.

 

MAY2019

Total number of calls to 0800 732 732

4999

Abandonment rate

0.12%

Request for Service received

1009

Top three requests types

Change of address, building inspection request, roading issues

Payments processed by Council

18164

Cash

Cheques

Direct Credit

Direct Debit

Eftpos

1.6%

9.1%

54.4%

27%

7.8%

Number of visitors to our libraries and Council service centres

*Excludes Invercargill, Stewart Island, Wyndham and Book Bus

7905


 

Libraries

24.     This month has mainly been highlighted by the sudden closure of the Winton Library on the 14th of May. The Winton team quickly sprang into action and with the help of the project delivery team, a pop-up library was up and running within the supper room of the Winton Memorial Hall within three working days.

25.     The library staff are all very appreciative of the effort that all departments within Council have made into making this transition a success. This experience has also provided a large part of the community who had never been inside the Memorial Hall a chance to have a look at the resource that the hall provides.

26.     Circulation of our collections and the receiving and processing of new books has managed to remain business as usual throughout. We have also continued to offer the range of programs for library patrons. 

27.     The table below shows the number of individuals checking out items from a branch library each month:

Library Name

MAY 2019

Book Bus

410

Lumsden

95

Otautau

110

Riverton

186

Stewart Island

53

Te Anau

391

Winton

503

Wyndham

74

28.     We currently have 5223 active library users across the District.

29.     Our library service has new books each month, these can be viewed online through our catalogue on https://www.southlanddc.govt.nz/my-southland/libraries/

Knowledge Management

30.     In May there were 47 LIMS issued and 167 property files were provided to customers which demonstrates there is still activity in the property market in the District. 

31.     In June we begin to deliver a program of work that integrates two of our key systems in Council.  While customers will not notice a change in procedure at first, as we progress, we should see reduced processing times for some applications as automation improves the process for staff.

Business Solutions

32.     Over the month of May the team were actively involved in supporting the Winton team to get back up and running in an efficient manner.  Work also continued on our phone system upgrade is set to be delivered in August.

33.     Community and Futures

Governance and Democracy

Local Authority Elections

34.     Planning is underway for the local authority elections to be held in October 2019.  Elections will be held for the position of mayor, 12 councillors and 56 community board members elected from nine boards.  For two of the community boards there will be elections held in subdivisions.  This is where members for a community board are elected from a particular part of the board’s area (subdivisions).  For more details of the boundaries and maps go to our website www.southlanddc.govt.nz 

35.     Nominations open on Friday 19 July and the forms will be available at our offices and on the website. Details on when nominations close are also on the website as well as other useful information. The candidate information booklet will be available in July.

36.     It is important that all people who are over the age of 18 who are a citizen or a permanent resident are on the electoral roll.  Anyone who has moved within the last couple of years should check that their enrolment details are up to date.  This can be done by ringing 0800 367 656.  

Governance Arrangements for Community Boards

37.     Planning is underway for confirming arrangements for the new community boards operating structure following the election.  There will be a new agenda structure to ensure that the boards are receiving appropriate information.  There will be a community board planning process undertaken to align with and feed into the long term plan.  There will also be opportunities to build relationships between community organisations and the community board in the new board areas.  There will be a series of workshops, four a year that will focus on service delivery matters.  All board members will be invited to attend these with senior managers.

Transitional Issues

38.     At a recent briefing for community board and CDA chairs, information was provided about several transitional issues including:

·    reserves will remain allocated to the areas they have been collected from and will be used for the purpose they were collected for in that area – any change to this approach will require consultation 

·    rating area units – the 2020-2021 Annual Plan will result in rates being collected on the current existing rating boundaries.  Any potential new rating boundaries will be discussed as part of the consideration of the 2021-2031 long term plan 

·    as is a requirement of the Local Government Act the new incoming Council will consider its committee and subcommittee structure 

·    it will also consider any changes to delegations and terms of reference for community boards and committees.


 

Community Partnership Liaison

Stewart Island/Rakiura Visitor Levy Subcommittee

39.     The Stewart Island/Rakiura Visitor Levy Subcommittee met on Tuesday 28 May 2019 to consider recommendations from the Technical Advisory Group (TAG) on applications to the Stewart Island/Rakiura Visitor Levy fund. The nine applications received totalled $215,478 and the amount available for distribution was $184,595.

40.     Eight applications, totalling $183,141 were successful.

41.     It was noted by the committee, that a new Stewart Island/Rakiura Visitor Levy policy would be introduced from 1 July 2019.

Community Board Plans

42.     Meetings with current Community Board and CDA Subcommittee members are planned over the coming weeks in order to provide an update on the process around the development and implementation of the new community board plans.  The meetings will be held in clusters around the District commencing with the eastern area on 18 June, central on 26 June, northern on 1 July and western on 4 July.  All meetings are planned to start at 6.30pm. 

43.     Further information about the process will be provided prior to the meetings which will include a fact sheet on what a community board plan is and examples of other plans from around New Zealand.  The fact sheet will also be available as part of the election packs for prospective new candidates. 

44.     Following the cluster meetings, the Community Leadership team will undertake engagement with service groups and other volunteer organisations around the District and in the latter part of this year eight community workshops will be held around the District in the new community board areas in order to allow our communities the opportunity to come together and discuss the future they want for their area.

45.     It’s important to note that a key focus of the plans will be the establishment of outcomes for each of our new community boards.  These outcomes will be used to inform the planning process going forward for the development of Council’s asset management plans and the Long Term Plan.

Provincial Growth Fund Applications

46.     Work has been progressing on applications for Stewart Island/Rakiura Wind Project and Milford Opportunities Project. Council will be asked to decide on whether or not those applications should be submitted at the meeting on the 19th June.

Environmental Services

Group Managers Update

47.     A key focus of the last three months in the building solutions area has been implementing the clearance plan to address the non-compliances identified in the recent IANZ audit. The various systems and process changes required have been made, and now the focus is demonstrating that consent processing times are compliant to IANZ satisfaction by the end of July 2019.

48.     Also in the building solutions area, recruitment is underway for new leadership, with Michael Marron having resigned and finishing at the end of June. This recruitment process is progressing at the time of writing.

49.     Building and resource consent activity has been relatively strong over the late autumn - early winter period. There has been some use of external consultant resources to seek to maintain processing times for customers and manage workloads for internal staff

50.     An important focus for 2019/2020 is the transition to E-delivery of services, with building solutions being the key initial focus area for this, noting the number of consents lodged and the criticality of timeliness of service. Staff are in the initial stages of evaluating various options and recent visits to the Solutions Team in Christchurch, which runs multiple systems side by side, and to Waitaki District Council which recently made this transition have been extremely valuable. A project team will be established to progress this project.

51.     At its May meeting Council agreed to be a signatory to the Predator Free Rakiura multi-agency Memorandum of Understanding. A formal signing of this is scheduled for Rakiura on Saturday 13th July, with the Director General of Conservation scheduled to attend. An application has also been lodged with the Provincial Growth Fund seeking a further 3 years of funding for the Project Manager role.

52.     Southland District Council hosted the quarterly Te Ropu Taiao in early June. At this meeting Dean Whaanga, Kaupapa Taiao Manager for Te Ao Marama highlighted the significant number of work streams that his team are involved with, and that this is proving challenging resourcing –wise.

53.     The group manager attended a workshop at Te Rau Aroha Marae in Bluff in early June organised by OMV and hosted by Te Runanga o Awarua to workshop OMV’s intentions in the Great South Basin. This was a useful session and provided for a good exchange of information and views.

Dark Skies Plan Change for Rakiura

54.     The Resource Management team undertook preliminary consultation on the proposed Dark Skies plan change.

55.     The change to the District Plan has been sought to create rules around future artificial lighting on the Island in order to maintain the existing quality of the dark skies. The key stakeholders and general public attended workshops in Oban on 13 and 14 May 2019 with all feedback being positive. It is intended to publicly notify the proposed plan change in the last quarter of 2019.

Climate Change

56.     Council has teamed up with Environment Southland, Gore District and Invercargill City councils to undertake high level region wide assessments on Climate Change, Biodiversity, Landscapes and Natural Character. These reports have been progressing well.

57.     The Climate Change report was presented to Council on 22 May 2019 and wider communication of climate change was endorsed. The other reports are still being completed and are unlikely to be released in 2019.

Ministry of the Environment – National Policy Statement

58.     Council is part of the TA reference group providing feedback to the Ministry of the Environment on the proposed National Policy Statement on Indigenous Biodiversity and the proposed New Zealand Biodiversity Strategy which are both proposed to be finalised in early 2020. Consultation on both of these work streams is anticipated to occur between July and September 2019.

Environmental Health

59.     Due to an unexpected extended leave of a staff member, food verifications have been largely contracted out for several months.  The team has also been going through a transition in the training of the new Technical Support Partner team, created to provide administration support. 

60.     While the team has had to focus on ensuring transitional arrangements go smoothly, the team has a target of clearing the backlog of alcohol renewal applications, over the next several months.

61.     A decision was made to postpone accreditation as a food verification agency, for reasons including:

•   accreditation is not legally required, Council already has exclusivity to verify template food control plans

•   MPI’s latest advice is to expect exclusivity for at least two more years

•   cost/benefit considerations

•   accreditation would add significant workload and complexity at a critical transitional time.

Animal Control

62.     There has been a focus over the last several months to promote more dog owners to register online.  For the first time, all dog owners were successfully sent a bulk email; the content being to encourage dog owners to advise Council of any changes to their dog ownership, so that we can ensure their details are correct when their letters are sent.

63.     Staff have been working hard to set up the online service for registering new dogs online, at the time of writing it is uncertain whether this will be available by the time dog owners receive their letters in mid-June.

Services and Assets

Community Facilities

64.     Both of the vacant community facility contract manager positions have been filled and the portfolios and contracts have been assigned across the team. The team will now work together to bed in their new responsibilities and start to engage with the contractors, elected members and the communities.

65.     Next year’s projects have been entered into CAMMS and the project managers assigned. The project managers are now working through the business case phase so that projects can be started as soon as possible in the new financial year. In some cases the project managers will need to consult with the elected members to determine the final scope of some of the projects and in some cases whether or not the project is still required.

66.     The work on developing the Master Data and Meta Data standards and also minimum levels of service for the community facilities portfolios is progressing. We are looking to engage with Waugh consultants to have a workshop around the Master Data and Meta Data standards and have a second workshop with Xyst to finalise the levels of service. This work will support the Activity Management Plan, Team Business Plan and works programme that will be undertaken later in the year.

67.     Further design work, community consultation and sustainable funding options have to be confirmed before a report seeking approval from Council to submit an application to MBIE for funding from the Tourism Infrastructure Fund is tabled. The upgrading of the Stewart Island jetties is a major project and will represent a substantial commitment for the Stewart Island community and Council.

68.     We are still waiting on the second biological assessment report on the Winton office/library from K2 Environmental. Council has received the biological assessment peer review report from Biodec and this will be used in association with the K2 report to determine what remedial work we will need to do to return the building to a useable state.

Property Services

69.     Work is almost complete in the review of the Council Fixed Asset Register as the basis of Council’s Property Register. Asset managers are currently finalising the first cut of whether the properties are strategic or not.

70.     After this stage has been completed, the proposal is to present the register to the Finance and Audit Committee as a step towards identifying a Council list of surplus properties.

71.     Current property agreements that have been finalised of interest are Ringaringa Road deviation, easement agreement with Landcorp for access to and the pipeline on their land for the Kepler disposal field, land acquisition for the Clifden bridge Tourism Infrastructure Fund development, landowner agreement related to the Orawia water take site, as well as a memorandum with the owners on the north side of the Mararoa bridge around ownership divestment.

72.     Each of these projects are at differing stages of completion. Actions have commenced to dispose of the Hokonui, and Menzies Ferry halls as well as transferring the Blackmount and Waianawa community centres to local societies.


 

Work Schemes

73.     Main projects completed by Work Scheme over the last month have been:

•   various tasks at Winton temporary library and Brandan Street

•   erection of Gorge Road sign

•   mowing throughout District

•   noxious control at Andersons Park for Invercargill City Council

Strategic Water and Waste

Te Anau Wastewater Discharge Project

74.     Following Council resolutions from the 23 October 2018 meeting, when it was resolved to proceed with a sub-surface drip irrigation as disposal route, staff have been progressing work on a number of fronts including development of resource consents for the sub-surface drip irrigation field, as well as advancing towards a detailed design.

75.     The tender for the pipeline element of the contract has now closed and following evaluation a preferred contractor has been identified with a recommendation to award the contract approved by the Services and Assets Committee on 5th June.

76.     Further work is ongoing on a number of fronts related to the overall project including lodging of the SDI consent application on 5th June and development of a procurement plan to deliver other work packages associated with the upgrade.

Land and Water Plan Implementation

77.     Environment Southland released their proposed Land and Water Plan last year.

78.     In total 25 appeals were received by Environment Southland of which Council has identified 10, which it will join as a Section 274 party. Council has also lodged an appeal to the decision. The basis of Council’s appeal, is largely around the ‘non-complying’ activity status on wastewater discharges to water. The latest direction issued from the Environment Court outlines a proposed path, where appeals to objectives will be heard ahead of mediation, by grouped topic on policies and rules. Evidence in support of the appeals have been filed with the Environment Court.

79.     The first stage of the hearing commenced on 4th June with Council staff and experts due to present evidence in support of Councils position some time week commencing 10 June 2019.

Review of Solid Waste Contract Arrangements

80.     The WasteNet Southland Waste Management Group has rolled over the Bond Contract for waste collection on the same rates and terms and conditions. Further, WasteNet resolved to put out a tender for the provision of the recycling acceptance contract.

81.     The Request for Proposal was issued in December, with a number of tenders having been evaluated and requests for clarifications issued. As of 7th May a preferred tender has been identified.

82.     At this stage a report recommending the awarding of the contract was presented to the Waste Advisory Group by 30th May and to individual councils on 4th and 5th June. Further negotiations and meetings are required following a split decision by the three Councils at these meetings. 

Tokanui Wastewater Discharge Consent Application

83.     In 2018, staff prepared a consent application for the renewal of the Tokanui wastewater discharge proposing a minor upgrade, on the basis that monitoring showed no significant impact on the receiving water, based on comparison of upstream and downstream monitoring.

84.     The application is the first one to be assessed under the new proposed Southland Water and Land Plan which indicates that discharges to water will be considered as a non-complying activity.

85.     Environment Southland have produced their report recommending that the application is declined on the basis that the impact of any leakage through the base of the ponds is not sufficiently managed.

86.     Evidence in support of the application has been prepared and lodged with Environment Southland with a hearing held on the 16th May. Following the presentation of evidence Environment Southland amended their recommendation to the Commissioners to support the application as requested.

Strategic Transport

Speed Limit Review

87.     Discussions with community boards and community area subcommittees which are potentially affected by the proposed changes in speed limits have now been completed. Feedback to date has been supportive and where appropriate suggested changes have been incorporated into the proposed bylaw.

88.     Staff are now engaging with other stakeholders such as NZ Transport agency before finalising a report to Services and Assets for the August meeting and then Council later in the month, with the objective of starting the formal public consultation process.

District Wide Renewals Programme

89.     The road design for the District wide pavement rehabilitation programme for 2019/20 season is currently being completed with the goal of tendering in July.

Bridges

90.     The annual restricted bridge inspections by Council’s structural engineering consultants, Stantec are completed. The outcome of these inspections along with updated bridge restriction list will be presented to Council at the 19 June meeting.

91.     Council approved expenditure to accelerate the bridge renewal programme at its meeting on 23 May 2019. The total value of this programme is $3 million made up of $1.47million from Council and a $1.53 million contribution from NZ Transport Agency. The focus of this expenditure is on bridges which pose the greatest risk to Council and provide the only access to residents.

Footpath Renewal

92.     This contract was awarded to SouthRoads for District wide renewal works of footpaths based on 2018 condition rating and available funding. Programme of works is currently on track.

93.     The 2019 footpath condition rating has been carried out by WSP Opus with results currently being collated.

Commercial Infrastructure

Stewart Island Electrical Supply Authority (SIESA) (PowerNet)

94.     The two red tagged poles at Peterson Hill/Elgin Terrace were replaced on 8 April. Two more red tag poles need to be replaced although planning work has not yet been started on these, one is at Jensen’s Bay where there is no vehicle access; a cable installation may be appropriate at this site. The other is at the north end of Horseshoe Bay and again there is no access for a crane truck; a helicopter lift might be an option at this site.

95.     The 30kVA transformer installation in Main Road was completed on the 9 April and the new connection for Curtin at 83 Main Road is complete but not livened, we are awaiting a Record of Inspection (ROI) for the builders temporary supply box.

96.     The low voltage network cable for the Heritage Centre has been installed and connections made in preparation for connecting the consumer once the onsite electrical work has been completed.

Forestry (IFS)

97.     Forestry activity for this period has been quiet with June expected to signal the planting of trees in Waikaia (137,000) and Ohai (23,000) this work is expected to be completed by the 30th June.

Around the Mountains Cycle Trail

98.     The directional signs have been installed from Walter Peak to Centre Hill, with toilets and shelters installed as at the end of May.  An application has been made to the Maintaining Great Ride fund for $100,000, this includes funds for water tanks along the trail as well as tables, benches and interpretation panels for stage one.

99.     The Maintaining Great Rides (MGR) fund has approved $77,822 of the $100,000, the remainder relates to a sign that signals the end of the trail which was deemed too similar to another cycle trails sign.  Work on an appropriate sign is continuing with MGR fund still keen to progress the sign although this will be through another round of funding. 

Te Anau Manapouri Airport

100.   The crack sealing was completed in May along with the remarking of the runway.  Currently the estimated costs of completing the Part 139 Certification are being collected with a report due to be presented to the Te Anau community board in July.

 

 

Recommendation

That the Council:

a)            Receives the report titled “Management Report” dated 11 June 2019.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.  

  


Council

19 June 2019

 

Unbudgeted expenditure approval for grant to Edendale Scouts

Record No:             R/19/5/8862

Author:                      Tina Harvey, Community Development Planner

Approved by:         Rex Capil, Group Manager Community and Futures

 

  Decision                                        Recommendation                                  Information

 

 

 

Purpose

1        The purpose of this report is to present information regarding a request for funding of upgrades to the Edendale Scout Hall submitted by the Edendale Scout Group.  The letter of request is included in attachment A.

2        Funding is being requested from the Financial and Reserves Contribution fund.  This fund is being reviewed as part of a wider review of community assistance and grant funding.

Executive Summary

3        The Edendale Scout Group wish to make application to the Financial and Reserves Contribution Fund for $20,000 to go towards upgrades to their Scout Hall. The Group had also applied to the SDC Community Initiatives Fund for $5,000 for the same project also.

4        The Community and Policy Committee met to consider applications on 8 May 2019.  It was agreed by the Committee to seek approval from Council for the unbudgeted expenditure.

 

 

 

Recommendation

That the Council:

a)            Receives the report titled “Unbudgeted expenditure approval for grant to Edendale Scouts” dated 10 June 2019.

 

b)           Determines that this matter or decision be recognised as not significant in terms of Section 76 of the Local Government Act 2002.

 

c)            Determines that it has complied with the decision-making provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 to the extent necessary in relation to this decision; and in accordance with Section 79 of the Act determines that it does not require further information, further assessment of options or further analysis of costs and benefits or advantages and disadvantages prior to making a decision on this matter.

 

d)           Considers the request from the Edendale Scout Group and the approval from Community and Policy for funding from the Financial and Reserve Contribution Fund.

 

e)            Approves unbudgeted expenditure of $25,000 from the Financial and Reserve Contribution Fund to the Edendale Scout Group.

 

Background

5        The Scout Hall, located at 43 Seaward Downs Road Edendale, was purchased by the Edendale Scout Group in 1972.  The Edendale Scout Group operates under the umbrella of the Scout Association of New Zealand with the title of the hall being held by this association.

6        Since 2017 the Edendale Scout Group has undertaken a variety of upgrades to their facility.  These upgrades have included the installation of two new heat pumps, replacement of the roof, painting the outside of the facility, upgrade of the storage area, purchase of a new oven, painting of the concrete floor in the kitchen and toilet area and hedge removal, to name a few. 

7        A large number of volunteer hours have gone into the renovations and upgrades to date.  Please refer to attached information for details of the Maintenance and Development Plan.

8        The Edendale Scout Group currently has 30 members.  The Hall is used at least three times a week for Scout related activities and is also used for monthly meetings.  It is available for public hire and in the past it has been utilised for birthday parties and gym classes.  The planned upgrades will ensure that this facility is more user friendly and better meets the needs of the community.

9        The Edendale Scout Group request funding for the following:

-     Upgrade to a gas hot water system

-     Installation of a dishwasher

-     Hot water connection to toilets

-     Replacement of windows

-     Upgrade electrical wiring as well as outside lighting

-     Installation of new kitchen cupboards

-     Drainage and downpipes

-     Alterations to building for provision for disabled access.

The total project cost is $41,177, of which they are seeking $20,000 from the Financial and Reserve Contribution Fund.

Issues

10      The Financial and Reserves Contribution Fund is part of the Southland District Council review of community assistance and grant funding review.

11      In regards to the consideration of how the money is able to be spent, the committee needs to take guidance from both the resource consent, any additional correspondence with the contributor and the Southland District Plan 2001 under which it was collected.

Factors to Consider

Legal and Statutory Requirements

12      The Financial and Reserve Contribution Fund is made up of development levies invoiced as a result of any development over $500,000. These were collected as financial contributions under the Resource Management Act.

Community Views

13      No community views have been sought on this particular application. As it is contributions received under the act the application needs to fulfil the conditions noted within the district plan and consent.

Costs and Funding

14      The funding request is to the Financial and Reserves Contribution Fund for $20,000. As at 31 March 2019 there was $625,213 available for distribution. The Group had also applied to the SDC Community Initiatives Fund for $5,000 for the same project also.

15      The majority of the fund is made up of contributions from Fonterra or its name sakes.

16      As part of the grant funding review being undertaken, Council’s financial team are undertaking a detailed review of the monies received and granted to date.  As part of this process, Council staff will be looking to identify any correspondence undertaken with contributors that further identified the ways in which council would be looking to distribute the monies.

17      At this stage, Council staff have identified that a number of the resource consents issued with Fonterra and its namesakes notes or made comment about how each would be spent.

18      When the Edendale-Wyndham Community Board cancelled the development of a new community centre at Edendale three contributions totalling $305,000 were transferred back into the Financial and Reserve Contribution Fund.  These are now available for re-distribution.

19      The first was for $35,000 from a 1997 Southland Dairy Co-op contribution which notes in the decision letter that the “Council will utilise this financial contribution in order to provide for additional community facilities and services which are necessitated by the rapid expansion of the dairying sector in Southland”.

20      The second was for $70,000 from a 2001 contribution for Drier 2 to NZMP, this in a report to the Edendale Community Board noted that “after negotiation with company representatives, the Resource Planning Committee ‘tagged’ the funds” this included $70,000 towards the upgrade/new development of Edendale Hall.

21      The third was for $200,000 from a 2003 contribution for Drier 3 to NZMP.  In correspondence to the company in December 2002, it was notes that Council’s Resource Planning Committee “declines to resolve at this stage as to how this money will be allocated, but signals that it considers that the following projects are projects worthy of consideration when allocation of this contribution is being considered by the Council’s Allocations Committee:

-     Possible future Edendale water and/or sewerage schemes

-     Seaward Road and Ferry Road, Edendale, stormwater and kerb and channel upgrading

-     Upgrading of chlorination in existing limited Edendale water scheme

-     Wyndham sewerage scheme

-     Edendale co-response vehicle replacement.

-     Edendale Primary School playground upgrade,

-     District wide funding for ecological habitat protection.

-     District wide funding for reserve maintenance and upgrading.

The Committee further considers that prior to any allocation of such funding, consultation by Council staff with the Edendale and Wyndham Community Boards should occur.

Policy Implications

22      Under Councils delegations policy, Council is required to approve any unbudgeted expenditure over $10,000. As such any approval by the Committee of the grant will require Councils approval for the unbudgeted expenditure.

23      Section 6.2.2 of the Southland District Plan 2001, outlines the specifics around development of the Edendale Dairy Plant development.  Section 6.2.6 Financial Contributions of this states:

(a)  The Council may impose a financial contribution for developments in the Edendale Dairy Plan Development Plan Area the value of which exceed $500,000.

(b)  The financial contribution shall not exceed 0.5% of the value of which exceed $500,000.

(c)   The purpose of the imposition of the financial contribution shall be to remedy, mitigate or offset adverse effects arising from, in consequence of, or in association with, any development.

(d)  The use of the financial contributions shall be for one or more of the following in the Edendale Township, its environs or the District generally;

-     Offsetting additional demands on infrastructure and utility services by Council.

-     Offsetting additional demands on community and recreational facilities.

-     Restoring or enhancing amenity values.

-     Restoring or enhancing open space and landscaping

(e)   The Council will assess the need for, and quantum of, a financial contribution on a case by case basis as development occurs having regard to:

-     The significance of the adverse effect.

-     The extent to which the adverse effect can be dealt with successfully by other means.

-     Any proposals to mitigate or remedy the adverse effects.

-     Any direct positive community benefits arising from the development.

(f)   If applying the provisions of this clause Council shall regard to the fact that in the circumstances money is the preferred form of contribution.

24      Further to this, as noted above in the “Costs and Funding” section, each consent indicated generally how the money would be spent.  It is advised that the committee in making a decision acknowledges from which consent any funding would be granted and notes what additional steps it deems appropriate to empower the above comments.  Additionally it is recommended that where necessary appropriate resolutions are added to this report.

Analysis

Options Considered

25      The options for consideration is to either support or decline the funding request in full or in part.

Analysis of Options

Option 1 – In full or in part approve the grant to the Edendale Scout Group to be funded from the Fonterra Financial Contributions

Advantages

Disadvantages

·        Upgrades to the Scout Hall can be completed which will improve the safety and functionality of the Hall.

·        The upgrades will provide a more user friendly facility for the community to utilise.

·        This application has not been considered as part of a wider project seeking funding.

·        Southland District Council are in the process of reviewing all community assistance and grant funding including the Financial and Reserves Contribution Fund.

·        The committee may not agree that it has met the spirit of the previous correspondence with the contributors or received enough detail on this to make a decision.

 

Option 2 – Decline the grant funding request

Advantages

Disadvantages

·        Funds from the Financial and Reserve Contribution Fund are not allocated until the grant funding review is completed.

·        Allows additional research or discussions to occur.

·        There is potential that the upgrades will be delayed while further funding options are investigated.

·        Recently funding was allocated to Edendale School – which was allocated before the completion of the funding review.

 

Assessment of Significance

26      In terms of Council’s significance policy, this issue is not considered significant.

Recommended Option

27      Option 1 – In full or in part approve the grant to the Edendale Scout Group to be funded from the Fonterra Financial Contributions.

Next Steps

28      Advise applicant on outcome of funding request.

 

Attachments

a             Edendale Reserve Fund Application - Edendale Scout Group    

 


Council

19 June 2019

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Council

19 June 2019

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Council

19 June 2019

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Council

19 June 2019

 

Unbudgeted expenditure-Visitor Levy Fund applications

Record No:             R/19/6/10106

Author:                      Karen Purdue, Community Partnership Leader

Approved by:         Rex Capil, Group Manager Community and Futures

 

  Decision                                        Recommendation                                  Information

 

 

 

Purpose

1        The purpose of this report is to seek approval from Council to allow unbudgeted expenditure by the Stewart Island/Rakiura Levy Subcommittee of $46,426 from the Visitor Levy Fund allocations to be funded from the revenue collected from the visitor levy to date.

Executive Summary

2        The current budget provides for the allocation of $136,715 in grants from the Stewart Island/Rakiura Levy Fund as compared with the proposed allocation of $183,141.

3        Nine applications for grants, totalling $213,141 were received for consideration and the Stewart Island/Rakiura Visitor Levy Subcommittee has recommended that approval be given for eight grants, totalling $183,141.

 

Recommendation

That Council:

a)            Receives the report titled “Unbudgeted expenditure-Visitor Levy Fund applications” dated 11 June 2019.

 

b)           Determines that this matter or decision be recognised as not significant in terms of Section 76 of the Local Government Act 2002.

 

c)            Determines that it has complied with the decision-making provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 to the extent necessary in relation to this decision; and in accordance with Section 79 of the Act determines that it does not require further information, further assessment of options or further analysis of costs and benefits or advantages and disadvantages prior to making a decision on this matter.

 

d)           Approves the recommendation of the Stewart Island/Rakiura Visitor Levy Subcommittee for unbudgeted expenditure for the amount of $46,426 in Visitor Levy Fund allocations to be funded from the revenue collected from the visitor levy to date.

 

Background

4        Nine applications for grants were received to the Stewart Island/Rakiura Visitor Levy by the closing date of 31 March 2019.

5        The Stewart Island/Rakiura Visitor Levy Fund is available to groups and organisations to assist with projects, activities and/or services used by visitors; for the benefit of visitors; or to mitigate the adverse effects of visitors on the environment of the Island.

6        The Technical Advisory Group (TAG) was appointed by the Southland District Council to provide strategic insight and technical expertise regarding funding applications. The TAG provide recommendations to the subcommittee for review and approval, based on an assessment of the demand for projects, their viability, likely impact and alignment with strategic outcomes.

7        The TAG group met on Monday, 20 May 2019 and made recommendations to the subcommittee to approve eight applications, totalling $183,141.

8        The Stewart Island/Rakiura Visitor Levy Subcommittee subsequently met on Tuesday, 28 May and approved the eight applications for grants as recommended by the Technical Advisory Group.

Issues

9        An annual budget of $136,715 has been set for allocations and as the total grants approved by the Stewart Island/Rakiura Visitor Levy Subcommittee total $183,141, approval for unbudgeted expenditure of $ 46,426 is sought.

Factors to Consider

Legal and Statutory Requirements

10      None identified.

Community Views

11      The Stewart Island/Rakiura Visitor Levy Subcommittee represents the views of the community.

Costs and Funding

12      The Stewart Island/Rakiura Visitor Levy fund has $184,595 available for distribution.

Policy Implications

13      Council approval for the unbudgeted expenditure is required.

Analysis

Options Considered

14      Council must decide if it wishes to approve the unbudgeted expenditure or not.


 

Analysis of Options

Option 1 – Approve unbudgeted expenditure of $ 46,426 in Visitor Levy fund allocations to be funded from the revenue collected from the Visitor Levy to date.

Advantages

Disadvantages

·        The projects identified in the eight applications approved by the Stewart Island/Rakiura Visitor Levy Subcommittee will be able to proceed.

·        None identified.

 

Option 2 – Decline the unbudgeted expenditure request.

Advantages

Disadvantages

·        More funds are available for future funding rounds.

·        It may be perceived that the purpose of the visitor levy fund has not been fulfilled.

·        The eight applications approved for projects by the Stewart Island/Rakiura Visitor Levy Subcommittee may not be able to proceed.

 

Assessment of Significance

15      Not considered significant.

Recommended Option

16      Option 1 is the recommended option.

Next Steps

17      The Stewart Island/Rakiura Visitor Levy Subcommittee will be advised of the outcome and the eight applicants will be advised of their requirements for uplifting the funds.

 

Attachments

a             Report to Stewart Island/Rakiura Visitor Levy Subcommittee - 28 May 2019 - Southland District Council Stewart Island/Rakiura Visitor Levy Fund Financial Report to 31 March 2019 and Application Summary    

 


Council

19 June 2019

 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


Council

19 June 2019

 

Update on Proposed Governance Arrangements

Record No:             R/19/6/10247

Author:                      Clare Sullivan, Governance and Democracy Manager

Approved by:         Rex Capil, Group Manager Community and Futures

 

  Decision                                        Recommendation                                  Information

 

 

 

Purpose

1        The purpose of the report is to provide information about the proposed arrangements for the new governance structure for the 2019 – 2022 term as a result of the representation review.

Executive Summary

2        Since the release of the Local Government Commission’s determination in March discussions have taken place about ways to support the new governance structure both at a council level and community boards.

3        This includes the delegations to community boards that the incoming council will make to enable the community boards to make decisions on behalf their communities, the committee and subcommittee structure to enable council to be informed of local views and enable input, at the same time as enhance the ease of doing business and lowering the amount of bureaucracy. 

 

Recommendation

That the Council:

a)            Receives the report titled “Update on Proposed Governance Arrangements ” dated 11 June 2019.

 

b)           Determines that this matter or decision be recognised as not significant in terms of Section 76 of the Local Government Act 2002.

 

c)            Determines that it has complied with the decision-making provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 to the extent necessary in relation to this decision; and in accordance with Section 79 of the Act determines that it does not require further information, further assessment of options or further analysis of costs and benefits or advantages and disadvantages prior to making a decision on this matter.

 

d)           Notes the suggested approach and suggests to the incoming council to recognise it  and take the information contained in this report into account when it makes its decisions on the council’s governance structure.

 


 

Background

4        Every three years as the Council term ends and a new one begins it provides an opportunity for Council to consider its governance structure for the new term and how it can best support council achieve its vision and mission.  This will assist us to achieve our strategic priorities by improving how we work and making informed decisions.

Issues

5        The current council has six committees, 30 subcommittees based on geographical areas and common interests and eight community boards.  In total, the membership of the current council, structure is 225 members and that is without half of the district having access (this term) to a community board. 

6        The determination of the Council’s representation arrangements that was released in March 2019 sets the basis on which elections will be held in October 2019 for the 2019-2022 term for the Mayor, 12 Councillors elected from 5 wards and nine community boards providing district-wide coverage of community boards.

7        This determination has then been the basis for discussions with current elected members about the nature of what the committee structure could be for the new term, including the relationship and roles of council, its committees and community boards; what delegated authority should be given to community boards and committees and the role that joint committees play.  

8        The relationship that community groups and groups with common interests have with each other, community boards, council and other stakeholders and how these groups can get on and achieve things for their community or get their point of view heard has been the subject of many discussions.  How are group operates or how successful a group is in achieving its outcomes does not need to depend upon its legal status, whether it is a subcommittee or and unincorporated or incorporated society.  A group can still have influence and get on and get things done outside of a formal council structure.

9        For example, a current subcommittee that is based on common issues in the current structure could be, in the 2019-2022 term be a user liaison group with current interests represented on it and it could still provide its thoughts and considerations on a matter to the relevant committee or Council, the local community board, or Council who would make the decision.

10      Now that there will be community boards operating across the whole of the district provides an opportunity to enable local decision-making in each community board area.  The suggested new reporting approach will enable better information to be given to community boards and the people in the board area about both local and district-funded projects in the area; commentary about any contracts operating in the board area and local finance reporting. 

11      There will also be a new community and leadership report that will provide any relevant updates on local community organisations, progress against the board’s plan and any policy and planning matters affecting the area.

12      It is intended that the delegations for community boards and committees will be reviewed to provide clarity and assist in the sense of purpose for Council’s decision-making entities and enable decisions to be made at the appropriate and relevant level. 

13      Attached to this report is a diagram that shows the current council committee, subcommittee structure and activities and where the new community boards post 2019 fit.  It also identifies a possible reporting structure to the community boards.

Factors to Consider

Legal and Statutory Requirements

14      Clause 30 of Schedule 7 provides for the Council to appoint committees, subcommittees, and any other subordinate decision-making bodies it considers appropriate.  In addition, together with another local authority it can also appoint joint committees.   

Community Views

15      The committee structure is a decision for the Council to make.  There have been a number of opportunities for elected members to hear from the community. 

Costs and Funding

16      There are no funding implications to this report.

Policy Implications

17      Staff will assist the incoming council by preparing for consideration following discussion with elected members draft terms of reference and delegations for community boards and a committee structure.

Analysis

Options Considered

18      There are two options.  Either to suggest to the incoming council that it takes into consideration the information contained in this report around the approach of the council’s governance structure or not to take it into consideration.

Analysis of Options

Option 1 – Take into consideration the work undertaken by the previous council

Advantages

Disadvantages

·        Assists the incoming council to understand the direction that the governance review has taken.

·        Allows the incoming council to make decisions sooner into the new term to allow its governance entities to ensure a smooth transition

·        Governance entities will need to wait until later in the new term before they get the direction from Council

·        Communities and interest groups will also need to wait longer to continue discussions on issues   

 


 

Option 2 – Not take note of the work previously undertaken

Advantages

Disadvantages

·        The incoming council can set its own pathway.

·        May involve rework for the Council rather than building upon the direction of the previous term.

 

Assessment of Significance

19      This is assessed as low significance

Recommended Option

20      Option one is the recommended option.

Next Steps

21      Over the next few months more discussion will occur on the possible structure and delegations to inform the incoming council.

 

Attachments

a             Governance Structure diagram    

 


Council

19 June 2019

 

 

GOVERNING BODY

Executive CommitteeCOUNCIL

COUNCIL     COMMITTEES   ++

Services and Assets

Finance and Audit

Regulatory and Consents

Community and Policy

ACTIVITIES AND FUNCTIONS

Local

Community Centres/Halls

Wharves and Jetties

Storm Water

Parks and Reserves

District

Transport

Wastewater

Solid Waste

Water Supply

Libraries

Cemeteries

Emergency Management

Finance

Health and Safety

Risk

Environmental Services

-      Building

-      Resource Management

-      Environmental Health

Community Leadership

Community Partnership

Strategy and Policy

Community Assistance

 

DISTRICT REPORTS

Council Report

COMMUNITY BOARDS

FIORDLAND

NORTHERN

ARDLUSSA

TUATAPERE

TE WAEWWAE

ORAKA APARIMA

WALLACE TAKATIMU

ORETI

WAIHOPAI TOETOE

STEWART ISLAND RAKIURA

 

Chairperson’s Report

GEOGRAPHIC   SPECIFIC

Operations Report

Community and Leadership Report

EXISTING STRUCTURES

JOINT COMMITTEES

Venture Southland Joint Committee

Venture Southland Advisory Subcommittee

Emergency Management Group

Southland Regional Heritage Joint Committee

Southland Regional Land Transport Committee

Wastenet (Waste Management Advisory Group)

Combined Local Approved Products Committee

Combined Local Alcohol Policy Committee

 

 

 

 

SUBCOMMITTEES

Te Anau Basin Water Supply+

Te Anau Airport

Five Rivers Water Supply+

Matuku Water

Supply+

Northern Southland Development Fund+

 

 

Riverton Harbour+

Ohai Railway Fund+

Ohai Nightcaps and Districts Doctors House Surgery Fund+

 

 

Stewart Island Visitor Levy+

Stewart Island Jetties+

SIESA

 

Mararoa Waimea Ward +

Waiau Aparima Ward +

Oreti Ward +

Waihopai Toetoe Ward +

 

++ assuming that 2016-2019 committee structure is the same for 2019-2022 triennium

+   2016-2019 subcommittees

 



Council

19 June 2019

 

Minutes of the Community and Policy Committee Meeting dated 8 May 2019

Record No:             R/19/6/10312

Author:                      Alyson Hamilton, Committee Advisor

Approved by:         Alyson Hamilton, Committee Advisor

 

  Decision                                        Recommendation                                  Information

 

 

 

Recommendation

That Council receives the minutes of the Community and Policy Committee meeting held 8 May 2019 as information.

 

 

Attachments

a             Minutes of Community and Policy Committee Meeting dated 8 May 2019 (separately enclosed)

 


Council

19 June 2019

 

Minutes of the Finance and Audit Committee Meeting dated 14 December 2018

Record No:             R/19/5/9514

Author:                      Fiona Dunlop, Committee Advisor

Approved by:         Fiona Dunlop, Committee Advisor

 

  Decision                                        Recommendation                                  Information

 

 

 

Recommendation

That Council receives the minutes of the Finance and Audit Committee meeting held 14 December 2018 as information.

 

 

Attachments

a             Minutes of Finance and Audit Committee Meeting dated 14 December 2018 (separately enclosed)

 


Council

19 June 2019

 

Minutes of the Services and Assets Committee Meeting dated 13 February 2019

Record No:             R/19/5/9515

Author:                      Fiona Dunlop, Committee Advisor

Approved by:         Fiona Dunlop, Committee Advisor

 

  Decision                                        Recommendation                                  Information

 

 

 

Recommendation

That Council receives the minutes of the Services and Assets Committee meeting held 13 February 2019 as information.

 

 

Attachments

a             Minutes of Services and Assets Committee Meeting dated 13 February 2019 (separately enclosed)

 


Council

19 June 2019

 

Minutes of the Edendale-Wyndham Community Board Meeting dated 26 February 2019

Record No:             R/19/5/9503

Author:                      Fiona Dunlop, Committee Advisor

Approved by:         Fiona Dunlop, Committee Advisor

 

  Decision                                        Recommendation                                  Information

 

 

 

Recommendation

That Council receives the minutes of the Edendale-Wyndham Community Board meeting held 26 February 2019 as information.

 

 

Attachments

a             Minutes of Edendale-Wyndham Community Board Meeting dated 26 February 2019 (separately enclosed)

 


Council

19 June 2019

 

Minutes of the Tuatapere Community Board Meeting dated 2 April 2019

Record No:             R/19/6/10153

Author:                      Alyson Hamilton, Committee Advisor

Approved by:         Alyson Hamilton, Committee Advisor

 

  Decision                                        Recommendation                                  Information

 

 

 

Recommendation

That Council receives the minutes of the Tuatapere Community Board meeting held 2 April 2019 as information.

 

 

Attachments

a             Minutes of Tuatapere Community Board Meeting dated 2 April 2019 (separately enclosed)

 


Council

19 June 2019

 

Minutes of the Wallacetown Community Board Meeting dated 13 March 2019

Record No:             R/19/5/9505

Author:                      Fiona Dunlop, Committee Advisor

Approved by:         Fiona Dunlop, Committee Advisor

 

  Decision                                        Recommendation                                  Information

 

 

 

Recommendation

That Council receives the minutes of the Wallacetown Community Board meeting held 13 March 2019 as information.

 

 

Attachments

a             Minutes of Wallacetown Community Board Meeting dated 13 March 2019 (separately enclosed)

 


Council

19 June 2019

 

Minutes of the Stewart Island/Rakiura Visitor Levy Subcommittee Meeting dated 28 May 2019

Record No:             R/19/5/9822

Author:                      Kirsten Hicks, Committee Advisor/Customer Support Partner

Approved by:         Kirsten Hicks, Committee Advisor/Customer Support Partner

 

  Decision                                        Recommendation                                  Information

 

 

 

Recommendation

That Council receives the minutes of the Stewart Island/Rakiura Visitor Levy Subcommittee meeting held 28 May 2019 as information.

 

 

Attachments

a             Minutes of Stewart Island/Rakiura Visitor Levy Subcommittee Meeting dated 28 May 2019 (separately enclosed)

 


Council

19 June 2019

 

Minutes of the Browns Community Development Area Subcommittee Meeting dated 14 March 2019

Record No:             R/19/5/8861

Author:                      Alyson Hamilton, Committee Advisor

Approved by:         Alyson Hamilton, Committee Advisor

 

  Decision                                        Recommendation                                  Information

 

 

 

Recommendation

That Council receives the minutes of the Browns Community Development Area Subcommittee meeting held 14 March 2019 as information.

 

 

Attachments

a             Minutes of Browns Community Development Area Subcommittee Meeting dated 14 March 2019 (separately enclosed)

 


Council

19 June 2019

 

Minutes of the Garston Community Development Area Subcommittee Meeting dated 26 November 2018

Record No:             R/19/5/9536

Author:                      Rose Knowles, Committee Advisor/Customer Support Partner

Approved by:         Rose Knowles, Committee Advisor/Customer Support Partner

 

  Decision                                        Recommendation                                  Information

 

 

 

Recommendation

That Council receives the minutes of the Garston Community Development Area Subcommittee meeting held 26 November 2018 as information.

 

 

Attachments

a             Minutes of Garston Community Development Area Subcommittee Meeting dated 26 November 2018 (separately enclosed)

 


Council

19 June 2019

 

Minutes of the Gorge Road and Districts Community Development Area Subcommittee Meeting dated 29 October 2018

Record No:             R/19/5/9510

Author:                      Fiona Dunlop, Committee Advisor

Approved by:         Fiona Dunlop, Committee Advisor

 

  Decision                                        Recommendation                                  Information

 

 

 

Recommendation

That Council receives the minutes of the Gorge Road and Districts Community Development Area Subcommittee meeting held 29 October 2018 as information.

 

 

Attachments

a             Minutes of Gorge Road and Districts Community Development Area Subcommittee Meeting dated 29 October 2018 (separately enclosed)

 


Council

19 June 2019

 

Minutes of the Limehills/Centre Bush Community Development Area Subcommittee Meeting dated 14 March 2019

Record No:             R/19/5/8863

Author:                      Alyson Hamilton, Committee Advisor

Approved by:         Alyson Hamilton, Committee Advisor

 

  Decision                                        Recommendation                                  Information

 

 

 

Recommendation

That Council receives the minutes of the Limehills/Centre Bush Community Development Area Subcommittee meeting held 14 March 2019 as information.

 

 

Attachments

a             Minutes of Limehills/Centre Bush Community Development Area Subcommittee Meeting dated 14 March 2019 (separately enclosed)

 


Council

19 June 2019

 

Minutes of the Tokanui Community Development Area Subcommittee Meeting dated 29 October 2018

Record No:             R/19/5/9507

Author:                      Fiona Dunlop, Committee Advisor

Approved by:         Fiona Dunlop, Committee Advisor

 

  Decision                                        Recommendation                                  Information

 

 

 

Recommendation

That Council receives the minutes of the Tokanui Community Development Area Subcommittee meeting held 29 October 2018 as information.

 

 

Attachments

a             Minutes of Tokanui Community Development Area Subcommittee Meeting dated 29 October 2018 (separately enclosed)

 


Council

19 June 2019

 

Minutes of the Waikaia Community Development Area Subcommittee Meeting dated 21 November 2018

Record No:             R/19/5/8734

Author:                      Rose Knowles, Committee Advisor/Customer Support Partner

Approved by:         Rose Knowles, Committee Advisor/Customer Support Partner

 

  Decision                                        Recommendation                                  Information

 

 

 

Recommendation

That Council receives the minutes of the Waikaia Community Development Area Subcommittee meeting held 21 November 2018 as information.

 

 

Attachments

a             Minutes of Waikaia Community Development Area Subcommittee Meeting dated 21 November 2018 (separately enclosed)

 


Council

19 June 2019

 

Minutes of the Woodlands Community Development Area Subcommittee Meeting dated 5 November 2018

Record No:             R/19/5/9508

Author:                      Fiona Dunlop, Committee Advisor

Approved by:         Fiona Dunlop, Committee Advisor

 

  Decision                                        Recommendation                                  Information

 

 

 

Recommendation

That Council receives the minutes of the Woodlands Community Development Area Subcommittee meeting held 5 November 2018 as information.

 

 

Attachments

a             Minutes of Woodlands Community Development Area Subcommittee Meeting dated 5 November 2018 (separately enclosed)

 


Council

19 June 2019

 

Minutes of the Northern Southland Development Fund Subcommittee Meeting dated 17 May 2018

Record No:             R/19/5/8735

Author:                      Rose Knowles, Committee Advisor/Customer Support Partner

Approved by:         Rose Knowles, Committee Advisor/Customer Support Partner

 

  Decision                                        Recommendation                                  Information

 

 

 

Recommendation

That Council receives the minutes of the Northern Southland Development Fund Subcommittee meeting held 17 May 2018 as information.

 

 

Attachments

a             Minutes of Northern Southland Development Fund Subcommittee Meeting dated 17 May 2018 (separately enclosed)

   

 


Council

19 June 2019

 

Exclusion of the Public: Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987

 

Recommendation

 

That the public be excluded from the following part(s) of the proceedings of this meeting.

C10.1 Milford Opportunities Project - funding application

C10.2 Stewart Island/Rakiura Wind Project - funding application

C10.3 Pyramid Bridge Tender Evaluation Outcome

C10.4 WasteNet Council Agreement

C10.5 Public Excluded Minutes of the Finance and Audit Committee Meeting dated 14 December 2018

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution are as follows:

General subject of each matter to be considered

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

Milford Opportunities Project - funding application

s7(2)(i) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry on, without prejudice or disadvantage, negotiations (including commercial and industrial negotiations).

That the public conduct of the whole or the relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists.

Stewart Island/Rakiura Wind Project - funding application

s7(2)(a) - The withholding of the information is necessary to protect the privacy of natural persons, including that of a deceased person.

s7(2)(c)(i) - The withholding of the information is necessary to protect information which is subject to an obligation of confidence or which any person has been or could be compelled to provide under the authority of any enactment, where the making available of the information would be likely to prejudice the supply of similar information or information from the same source and it is in the public interest that such information should continue to be supplied.

s7(2)(i) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry on, without prejudice or disadvantage, negotiations (including commercial and industrial negotiations).

That the public conduct of the whole or the relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists.

Pyramid Bridge Tender Evaluation Outcome

s7(2)(h) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry out, without prejudice or disadvantage, commercial activities.

s7(2)(i) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry on, without prejudice or disadvantage, negotiations (including commercial and industrial negotiations).

That the public conduct of the whole or the relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists.

WasteNet Council Agreement

s7(2)(g) - The withholding of the information is necessary to maintain legal professional privilege.

s7(2)(h) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry out, without prejudice or disadvantage, commercial activities.

s7(2)(i) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry on, without prejudice or disadvantage, negotiations (including commercial and industrial negotiations).

That the public conduct of the whole or the relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists.

Public Excluded Minutes of the Finance and Audit Committee Meeting dated 14 December 2018

s7(2)(e) - The withholding of the information is necessary to avoid prejudice to measures that prevent or mitigate material loss to members of the public.

s7(2)(h) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry out, without prejudice or disadvantage, commercial activities.

s7(2)(i) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry on, without prejudice or disadvantage, negotiations (including commercial and industrial negotiations).

That the public conduct of the whole or the relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists.