Notice is hereby given that a Meeting of the Community and Strategy Committee will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 11 February 2020

1pm

Council Chamber
15 Forth Street, Invercargill

 

Community and Strategy Committee Agenda

OPEN

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Julie Keast

 

 

Mayor Gary Tong

 

Councillors

Don Byars

 

 

John Douglas

 

 

Paul Duffy

 

 

Bruce Ford

 

 

Darren Frazer

 

 

George Harpur

 

 

Ebel Kremer

 

 

Christine Menzies

 

 

Karyn Owen

 

 

Margie Ruddenklau

 

 

Rob Scott

 

 

IN ATTENDANCE

 

Group Manager - Community and Futures

Rex Capil

Committee Advisor

Alyson Hamilton

 

 

Contact Telephone: 0800 732 732

Postal Address: PO Box 903, Invercargill 9840

Email: emailsdc@southlanddc.govt.nz

Website: www.southlanddc.govt.nz

 

Full agendas are available on Council’s Website

www.southlanddc.govt.nz

 

 

 


Terms of Reference – Community and Strategy Committee

 

TYPE OF COMMITTEE

Council committee

RESPONSIBLE TO

Council

SUBCOMMITTEES

None

LEGISLATIVE BASIS

Committee constituted by Council as per schedule 7, clause 30 (1)(a), LGA 2002.

Committee delegated powers by Council as per schedule 7, clause 32, LGA 2002.

MEMBERSHIP

The Community and Strategy Committee is a committee of the whole Council.  The mayor and all councillors will be members of the Community and Strategy Committee. 

FREQUENCY OF MEETINGS

Six weekly or as required

QUORUM

Seven

SCOPE OF ACTIVITIES

The Community and Strategy Committee is responsible for:

       providing advice to Council on the approaches that it should take to promote the social, economic, environmental and cultural well-being of the District and its communities and in so-doing contribute to the realisation of Council’s vision of one District offering endless opportunities

       to provide leadership to District communities on the strategic issues and opportunities that they face

       to develop relationships and communicate with stakeholders including community organisations, special interest groups and businesses that are of importance to the District as a whole.

•      assessing and providing advice to Council on:

-    key strategic issues affecting the District and Council

-    community development issues affecting the District and Council

-    the service needs of the District’s communities and how these needs might best be met

-    resource allocation and prioritisation processes and decisions. 

•      developing and recommending strategies, plans and policies to the Council that advance Council’s vision and goals, and comply with the purpose of local government as specified in the Local Government Act 2002

•      monitoring the implementation and effectiveness of strategies, plans and policies

•      developing and approving submissions to government, local authorities and other organisations

•      advocating Council’s position on particular policy issues to other organisations, as appropriate

•      considering recommendations from community boards and Council committees and make decisions where it has authority from Council to do so, or recommendations to Council where a Council decision is required.

It is also responsible for community partnerships and engagement.  This includes:

•      monitoring the progress, implementation and effectiveness of the work undertaken by Great South in line with the Joint Shareholders Agreement and Constitution.

•      allocations of grants, loans, scholarships and bursaries in accordance with Council policy

•      international relations 

•      developing and overseeing the implementation of Council’s community engagement and consultation policies and processes. 

The Community and Strategy Committee is responsible for overseeing the following Council activities:

•      community services

•      district leadership.

DELEGATIONS

Power to Act

The Community and Strategy Committee shall have the following delegated powers and be accountable to Council for the exercising of these powers:

a)        approve submissions made by Council to other councils, central government and other bodies

b)        approve scholarships, bursaries, grants and loans within Council policy and annual budgets

c)        approve and/or assign all contracts for work, services or supplies where those contracts relate to work within approved estimates.  

d)        monitor the performance of Great South.. 

Power to Recommend

The Community and Strategy Committee«name of entity» has authority to consider and make recommendations to Council regarding strategies, policies and plans.

FINANCIAL DELEGATIONS

Council authorises the following delegated authority of financial powers to Council committees in regard to matters within each committee’s jurisdiction.

Contract Acceptance:

            accept or decline any contract for the purchase of goods, services, capital works or other assets where the total value of the lump sum contract does not exceed the sum allocated in the Long Term Plan/Annual Plan and the contract relates to an activity that is within the scope of activities relating to the work of the Community and Strategy committee

            accept or decline any contract for the disposal of goods, plant or other assets other than property or land subject to the disposal being provided for in the Long Term Plan

Budget Reallocation

The committee is authorised to reallocate funds from one existing budget item to another. Reallocation of this kind must not impact on current or future levels of service and must be:

            funded by way of savings on existing budget items

            within the jurisdiction of the committee

            consistent with the Revenue and Financing Policy

LIMITS TO DELEGATIONS

Matters that must be processed by way of recommendation to Council include:

•      amendment to fees and charges relating to all activities

•      powers that cannot be delegated to committees as per the Local Government Act 2002 and sections 2.4 and 2.5 of this manual.

Delegated authority is within the financial limits in section 9 of this manual.

STAKEHOLDER RELATIONSHIPS

This committee will maintain and develop relationships with:

            Community Boards

            Great South

•      Milford Community Trust

•      Destination Fiordland.

The committee will also hear and receive updates to Council from these organisations as required.

CONTACT WITH MEDIA

The committee chairperson is the authorised spokesperson for the committee in all matters where the committee has authority or a particular interest.

Committee members do not have delegated authority to speak to the media and/or outside agencies on behalf of Council on matters outside of the board’s delegations.

The group manager, community and futures will manage the formal communications between the committee and the people of the Southland District and for the committee in the exercise of its business.   Correspondence with central government, other local government agencies or official agencies will only take place through Council staff and will be undertaken under the name of Southland District Council.

 


Community and Strategy Committee

11 February 2020

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

ITEM                                                                                                                                                                                  PAGE

Procedural

1             Apologies                                                                                                                                                                7

2             Leave of absence                                                                                                                                                7

3             Conflict of Interest                                                                                                                                             7

4             Public Forum                                                                                                                                                         7

5             Extraordinary/Urgent Items                                                                                                                        7

6             Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                                                               7

Reports for Resolution

7.1         Welcoming Communities Programme Transition from Great South to Southland District Council                                                                                                                                                                   23

7.2         Community Partnership Fund - Guiding Principles                                                                    73

7.3         Approval of scholarship recipients                                                                                                       83

Reports for Recommendation

8.1         Use of Fonterra contribution fund interest                                                                                     89

8.2         Details on the Financial and Reserve Contribution Fund                                                        95

Reports

9.1         Update on Community Boards Representative Leadership Structure                         105

9.2         Murihiku Regional Arts Strategy 2020-2030                                                                                 111

9.3         Central Government Agency and National Stakeholder Relationship Management 115

9.4         Chairperson's Report                                                                                                                                  123

9.5         Southland Settlement Hierarchy Report 2019                                                                            125

9.6         Community Well-beings and Strategic Issues Overview - January 2020                     153

   


1             Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

2             Leave of absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

3             Conflict of Interest

 

Committee Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision-making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4             Public Forum

Notification to speak is required by 5pm at least two days before the meeting. Further information is available on www.southlanddc.govt.nz or phoning 0800 732 732.

 

5             Extraordinary/Urgent Items

To consider, and if thought fit, to pass a resolution to permit the committee to consider any further items which do not appear on the Agenda of this meeting and/or the meeting to be held with the public excluded.

Such resolution is required to be made pursuant to Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987, and the Chairperson must advise:

(i)            the reason why the item was not on the Agenda, and

(ii)          the reason why the discussion of this item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

(a)           that item may be discussed at that meeting if-

(i)        that item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

(ii)       the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

(b)          no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

6             Confirmation of Minutes

6.1             Meeting minutes of Community and Strategy Committee, 03 December 2019


 

Community and Strategy Committee

 

OPEN MINUTES

 

 

 

Minutes of a meeting of Community and Strategy Committee held in the Council Chamber, 15 Forth Street, Invercargill on Tuesday, 3 December 2019 at 1.01pm.

 

present

 

Chairperson

Julie Keast

 

 

Mayor Gary Tong

 

Councillors

Don Byars

 

 

John Douglas

 

 

Paul Duffy

 

 

Bruce Ford

 

 

Darren Frazer

 

 

George Harpur

 

 

Ebel Kremer

 

 

Christine Menzies

 

 

Karyn Owen

 

 

Margie Ruddenklau

 

 

Rob Scott

 

 

IN ATTENDANCE

 

Chief Executive

Steve Ruru

Group Manager - Community and Futures

Rex Capil

People and Capability Manager

Janet Ellis

Group Manager - Customer and Support

Trudie Hurst

Group Manger Services and Assets

Matt Russell

Group Manager - Environmental Services

Fran Mikulicic

Governance and Democracy Manager

Clare Sullivan

Communications Manager

Louise Pagan

Committee Advisor

Alyson Hamilton

 


1             Apologies

 

There were no apologies.

 

 

2             Leave of absence

 

Chairperson Keast requested a leave of absence from 26 December 2019 to 17 January 2020.

 

Cr Ruddenklau requested a leave of absence from 9 December 2019 to 13 December 2019.

 

Resolution

Moved Mayor Tong, seconded Cr Frazer and resolved:

That the Community and Strategy Committee approve the request for leave of absence from Chairperson Keast from 26 December 2019 to 17 January 2020 and Cr Ruddenklau from 9 December 2019 to 13 December 2019.

 

 

3             Conflict of Interest

 

Chairperson Keast declared a conflict of interest in relation to item 7.1 - South Catlins Promotions Incorporated funding application to the Community Initiatives Fund and advised she would take no part in discussion or voting on this matter.

 

Councillor Owen declared a conflict of interest on the following funding applications and advised that she would not take part in debate or voting on these items:

Ø  item 7.1 - Riverton Heritage and Tourist Centre Trust funding application to the Community Initiatives Fund

Ø  item 7.2 - Riverton Heritage and Tourist Centre Trust funding application to the District Heritage Fund

 

Councillor Ford declared a conflict of interest in relation to item 7.1 - Rakiura Heritage Trust and advised that he would not take part in debate or voting on this matter.

 

Councillor Duffy declared a conflict of interest on the following funding applications and advised that he would not take part in debate or voting on these items:

Ø  item 7.1 - South Catlins Promotions Incorporated funding application to the Community Initiatives Fund

Ø  item 7.2 - Waikawa District Museum Incorporated funding application to the District Heritage Fund and advised that he would not take part in debate or voting on these matters.

 

 

4             Public Forum

 

There was no public forum.

 

 

 

5             Extraordinary/Urgent Items

 

There were no Extraordinary/Urgent items.

 

 

6             Confirmation of Minutes

 

                There are no minutes for confirmation.

 

Reports for Resolution

 

 

7.1

Community Initiatives Fund application summary and financial report

Record No: R/19/11/26071

 

Communications Manager Louise Pagan, Community Liaison Officer Kathryn Cowie and Community Liaison Officer Megan Seator were in attendance for this item.

1          Mrs Pagan advised the purpose of the report is for the committee to consider a summary of applications received for the Community Initiatives Fund, with recommendations for amounts to be given based on the criteria and amount available to be granted.

Moved Cr Frazer, seconded Cr Harpur recommendations a to c, which were put and declared CARRIED.

 

Moved Cr Frazer, seconded Cr Harpur recommendations d 1-6 which were put and declared CARRIED.

 

d)        Agrees to fund the following applications:

 

1.      Stewart Island Community Centre         $2,000

2.      Roslyn Bush Playcentre                                $4,000

3.      Winton Central Bowling Club                    $2,000

4.      Wyndham Athletic Club                                $1,000

5.      Heritage South                                                   $800

6.      Northern Southland Community

Resource Centre Charitable Trust                       $1,000

 

Moved Cr Frazer, seconded Cr Harpur recommendation d 7 which was put and declared CARRIED.

 

Cr Ford declared a conflict of interest on the application -  Rakiura Heritage Trust and took no part in discussions or voting on this item.

 

d)        Agrees to fund the following application:

 

7.        Rakiura Heritage Trust                                 $1,500

 

Moved Cr Frazer, seconded Cr Harpur recommendation d 8 which was put and declared CARRIED.

 

Cr Owen declared a conflict of interest on the application - Riverton Heritage and Tourist Centre Trust and took no part in discussions or voting on this item.

 

d)        Agrees to fund the following application:

 

8.        Riverton Heritage and Tourist

Centre Trust                                                        $2,000

 

Moved Cr Frazer, seconded Cr Harpur recommendation d 9-15 which were put and declared CARRIED.

 

d)        Agrees to fund the following applications:

 

9.             Winton Men’s Friendship Club             $1,700

10.         Otahuti Tennis Club                                    $456.93

11.         Fiordland Community Events Centre           $2,000

12.         Edendale Rugby Club                                 $2,000

13.         Tuatapere Valley Scouts                          $500

14.         Balfour Home and School

            Rock the Ridge Fundraiser                      $1,000

15.         Takitimu Swimming Club                                      $1,516

 

Moved Cr Frazer, seconded Cr Harpur recommendation d 16 which were put and declared CARRIED.

 

d)        Declines the following application:

 

16.         Youth Development

Southland Region Trust                           Nil

 

Moved Cr Frazer, seconded Cr Harpur recommendation d 17-30 which were put and declared CARRIED.

 

d)        Agrees to fund the following applications:

 

17.         Gorge Road and Districts

            Heritage Society                                            $3,000

18.         Otautau Golf Club                                        $2,000

19.         Fiordland Community Pool                    $402.50

20.         Manapouri Community Pool                 $402.50

21.         Otautau Community Pool                       $201.25

22.         Waianawa School                                          $175.00

23.         Balfour Home and School                        $3,000

24.         Manapouri Community Pool                 $2,500

25.         Takitimu District Pool                                $201.25

26.         Te Anau Waitangi Day 2020                    $1,000

27.         Balfour Lions Club                                        Nil-retrospective

28.         Edendale Bowling Club                             $2,000

29.         Castlerock Mossburn Pony Club         $2,000

30.         Fiordland Trails Trust                                 $10,000

Moved Cr Frazer, seconded Cr Harpur recommendation d 31 which was put and declared CARRIED.

 

d)        Declines the following application:

 

31.         Fiordland Community Event Centre

Trust and Fiordland Endurance and

Adventure Racing Society                       Nil

 

Moved Cr Frazer, seconded Cr Kremer recommendation d 32 which was put and declared CARRIED.

 

Cr Duffy declared a conflict of interest on the application - South Catlins Promotions and took no part in discussions or voting on this item.

 

Chairperson Keast declared a conflict of interest on the application -  South Catlins Promotions and took no part in discussions or voting on this item.

 

Mayor Tong assumed the chair for this item.

 

d)        Agrees to fund the following application:

 

32.         South Catlins Promotions                       $2,000

 

Chairperson Keast returned to the chair.

 

Moved Cr Frazer, seconded Cr Harpur recommendation d 33 which was put and declared CARRIED.

 

d)        Agrees to fund the following application:

 

33.         Tuatapere Valley Scouts                          $500

 

 

 

 

Final Resolution

That the Community and Strategy Committee:

a)            Receives the report titled “Community Initiatives Fund application summary and financial report” dated 26 November 2019.

 

b)           Determines that this matter or decision be recognised as not significant in terms of Section 76 of the Local Government Act 2002.

 

c)            Determines that it has complied with the decision-making provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 to the extent necessary in relation to this decision; and in accordance with Section 79 of the act determines that it does not require further information, further assessment of options or further analysis of costs and benefits or advantages and disadvantages prior to making a decision on this matter.

 

d)           Approves the allocation of funds from the Community Initiatives Fund as follows:

 

1

Stewart Island Community Centre

$2,000

2

Roslyn Bush Playcentre

$4,000

3

Winton Central Bowling Club

$2,000

4

Wyndham Athletic Club

$1,000

5

Heritage South

$800

6

Northern Southland Community Resource Centre Charitable Trust

$1,000

7

Rakiura Heritage Trust

$1,500

8

Riverton Heritage and Tourist Centre Trust

$2,000

9

Winton Men’s Friendship Club

$1,700

10

Otahuti Tennis Club

$456.93

11

Fiordland Community Events Centre

$2,000

12

Edendale Rugby Club

$2,000

13

Tuatapere Valley Scouts

$500

14

Balfour Home and School – Rock the Ridge Fundraiser

$1,000

15

Takitimu Swimming Club

$1,516

16

Youth Development Southland Region Trust

Nil

17

Gorge Road and Districts Heritage Society

$3,000

18

Otautau Golf Club

$2,000

19

Fiordland Community Pool

$402.50

20

Manapouri Community Pool

$402.50

21

Otautau Community Pool

$201.25

22

Waianawa School

$175

23

Balfour Home and School

$3,000

24

Manapouri Community Pool

$2,500

25

Takitimu District Pool

$201.25

26

Te Anau Waitangi Day 2020

$1,000

27

Balfour Lions Club

Nil -retrospective

28

Edendale Bowling Club

$2,000

29

Castlerock Mossburn Pony Club

$2,000

30

Fiordland Trails Trust

$10,000

 

31

Fiordland Community Event Centre Trust and Fiordland Endurance and Adventure Racing Society

Nil

32

Southland Catlins Promotions

$2,000

33

Tuatapere Valley Scouts

$500

 

e)            Approves the financial report to 30 September 2019 for the Community Initiatives Fund.

 

 

7.2

District Heritage Fund application summary and financial report

Record No: R/19/11/26073

 

Communications Manager Louise Pagan, Community Liaison Officer Kathryn Cowie and Community Liaison Officer Megan Seator were in attendance for this item.

Mrs Pagan advised the purpose of this report is to give the committee a summary of the applications to the Southland District Council Heritage Fund from the September round.

 

The Committee noted the applications seek grants to assist with the day-to-day running of local museums, heritage centres or similar type organisations within the Southland District Council boundaries.

 

 

 

 

Resolution

Moved Mayor Tong, seconded Cr Scott  and resolved:

That the Community and Strategy Committee:

a)            Receives the report titled “District Heritage Fund application summary and financial report” dated 26 November 2019.

 

b)           Determines that this matter or decision be recognised as not significant in terms of Section 76 of the Local Government Act 2002.

 

c)            Determines that it has complied with the decision-making provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 to the extent necessary in relation to this decision; and in accordance with Section 79 of the act determines that it does not require further information, further assessment of options or further analysis of costs and benefits or advantages and disadvantages prior to making a decision on this matter.

 

d)           Approves the allocation of funds from the District Heritage Fund as follows:

 

Cr Owen declared a conflict of interest on item 1 relating to the Riverton Heritage and Tourist Centre Trust and took no part in discussions or voting on this item.

 

Cr Duffy declared a conflict of interest on item 5 relating to the Waikawa District Museum Incorporated and took no part in discussions or voting on this item.

 

1

Riverton Heritage and Tourist Centre Trust

$18,300

2

Thornbury Vintage Tractor Club

$3,000

3

Wyndham and Districts Historical Society

$2,000

4

Switzers Museum (Waikaia) Inc

$7,200

5

Waikawa District Museum Inc

$7,300

 

e)            Approves the financial summary for the District Heritage Fund to 30 September 2019.

 

 

7.3

Sport NZ Rural Travel Fund application summary and financial report

Record No: R/19/11/26451

 

Communications Manager, Louise Pagan, Community Liaison Officer, Kathryn Cowie and Community Liaison Officer, Megan Seator were in attendance for this item.

1          Mrs Pagan advised the purpose of this fund is to assist with transport expenses associated with participating in regular local competitions, sports clubs and school-based clubs with young people between five and 19 years are eligible to apply.

The Committee noted the Southland District Council administers funding on behalf of the Sport New Zealand Rural Travel Fund.

 

 

 

Resolution

Moved Cr Harpur, seconded Cr Kremer  and resolved:

That the Community and Strategy Committee:

a)            Receives the report titled “Sport NZ Rural Travel Fund application summary and financial report” dated 21 November 2019.

 

b)           Determines that this matter or decision be recognised as not significant in terms of Section 76 of the Local Government Act 2002.

 

c)            Determines that it has complied with the decision-making provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 to the extent necessary in relation to this decision; and in accordance with Section 79 of the act determines that it does not require further information, further assessment of options or further analysis of costs and benefits or advantages and disadvantages prior to making a decision on this matter.

 

d)           Approves the allocation of funds for the Sport NZ Rural Travel Fund as follows:

 

 

 

 

 

1

Fiordland College

$1,500

2

Netball Fiordland Club Inc

$1,500

 

e)            Approves the financial report up to 30 September 2019.

 

 

Reports

 

 

8.1

Creative New Zealand Communities Funding Scheme Summary of Grants Awarded

Record No: R/19/11/26072

 

Communications Manager, Louise Pagan, Community Liaison Officer, Kathryn Cowie and Community Liaison Officer, Megan Seator were in attendance for this item.

 

 

Resolution

Moved Cr Ruddenklau, seconded Cr Kremer  and resolved:

That the Community and Strategy Committee:

a)            Receives the report titled “Creative New Zealand Communities Funding Scheme Summary of Grants Awarded” dated 14 November 2019.

 

 

 

8.2

Southern Field-days at Waimumu

Record No: R/19/11/26070

 

Communications Manager, Louise Pagan was in attendance for this item.

Mrs Pagan advised the purpose of the report is tp provide an update on the upcoming Southern field-days at Waimumu, near Gore, is held every two years and is a key event for the rural community throughout Southland and Otago.

The Committee noted this year Southland District Council will be sharing its space with Environment Southland in a deliberate move to break down the confusion in the community around what each council does.  The two councils will use this chance to work together to educate and grow awareness.

 

 

Resolution

Moved Cr Ruddenklau, seconded Cr Douglas  and resolved:

That the Community and Strategy Committee:

a)            Receives the report titled “Southern Field-days at Waimumu” dated 14 November 2019.

 

 

 

8.3

Community and Futures Research and Analysis Programme - Transition to Strategy Deficit and Development

Record No: R/19/11/26091

 

Strategy and Policy Manager, Michelle Stevenson was in attendance for this item.

1          Ms Stevenson advised the purpose of the report is to provide the Community and Strategy Committee with an update on the Community and Futures Research and Analysis Work Programme.      

 

 

 

Resolution

Moved Cr Menzies, seconded Cr Frazer  and resolved:

That the Community and Strategy Committee:

a)            Receives the report titled “Community and Futures Research and Analysis Programme - Transition to Strategy Deficit and Development ” dated 20 November 2019.

 

b)           Determines that this matter or decision be recognised as not significant in terms of Section 76 of the Local Government Act 2002.

 

c)            Determines that it has complied with the decision-making provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 to the extent necessary in relation to this decision; and in accordance with Section 79 of the act determines that it does not require further information, further assessment of options or further analysis of costs and benefits or advantages and disadvantages prior to making a decision on this matter.

 

d)           Notes the Community and Futures Research and Analysis work programme is transitioning to investigate Council’s strategy deficit and will develop a programme of work to progress this over the next five years.

 

 

 

8.4

Stewart Island/Rakiura Future Opportunities Project Update

Record No: R/19/11/26146

 

Community Partnership Leader, Karen Purdue was in attendance for this item.

Mrs Purdue advised the purpose of the report is to provide an update on the Rakiura Future Opportunities Project.

The Committee noted the project focused on future strategic development and planning for Stewart Island/Rakiura so that the island in partnership with local, regional and central government, iwi and other strategic partners, can proactively plan its future.

 

 

 

Resolution

Moved Cr Ford, seconded Cr Ruddenklau  and resolved:

That the Community and Strategy Committee:

a)            Receives the report titled “Stewart Island/Rakiura Future Opportunities Project Update” dated 26 November 2019.

 

b)           Determines that this matter or decision be recognised as not significant in terms of Section 76 of the Local Government Act 2002.

 

c)            Determines that it has complied with the decision-making provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 to the extent necessary in relation to this decision; and in accordance with Section 79 of the act determines that it does not require further information, further assessment of options or further analysis of costs and benefits or advantages and disadvantages prior to making a decision on this matter.

 

 

 

8.5

Community Board Plan Project Update

Record No: R/19/11/26319

 

Community Partnership Leader, Kelly Tagg was in attendance for this item.

Mrs Tagg advised the purpose of the report is to provide an update to the committee on the continuing work being undertaken on the development and implementation of the community board plan project process.

 

 

 

Resolution

Moved Cr Ruddenklau, seconded Mayor Tong  and resolved:

That the Community and Strategy Committee:

a)            Receives the report titled “Community Board Plan Project Update” dated 19 November 2019.

 

 

 

8.6

Welcoming Communities

Record No: R/19/11/26377

 

Community Liaison Officer, Megan Seator was in attendance for this item.

 

Ms Seator advised the purpose of the report is update the Committee on the Welcoming Communities programme led by Immigration New Zealand working in partnership with the Office of Ethnic Communities and the New Zealand Human Rights Commission.

 

 

Resolution

Moved Cr Ruddenklau, seconded Cr Duffy  and resolved:

That the Community and Strategy Committee:

a)            Receives the report titled “Welcoming Communities” dated 26 November 2019.

 

 

8.7

Customer Satisfaction Survey Report August - October 2019

Record No: R/19/11/26844

 

Group Manager, Customer Support, Trudie Hurst was in attendance for this item.

 

Ms Hurst advised the purpose of the report is to provide the Community and Strategy Committee with the results of the Customer Satisfaction Survey and Net Promoter Score for August-October 2019.

 

 

 

Resolution

Moved Cr Frazer, seconded Cr Douglas  and resolved:

That the Community and Strategy Committee:

a)            Receives the report titled “Customer Satisfaction Survey Report August - October 2019” dated 26 November 2019.

 

The meeting adjourned for afternoon tea at 2.45pm and reconvened at 2.57pm.

 

Mayor Tong, Councillors Keast, Byars, Douglas, Duffy, Ford, Frazer, Harpur, Kremer, Menzies, Owen, Ruddenklau and Scott were present when the meeting reconvened.

 


8.8

Chairperson's Report

Record No: R/19/11/26921

 

Chairperson Keast presented the report.

 

 

Resolution

Moved Chairperson Keast, seconded Cr Douglas  and resolved:

That the Community and Strategy Committee:

a)            Receives the report titled “Chairperson's Report” dated 26 November 2019.

 

 

 

8.9

Community Well-beings and Strategic Issues Overview

Record No: R/19/11/25608

 

Group Manager, Community and Futures, Rex Capil was in attendance for this item.

 

 

Resolution

Moved Cr Ruddenklau, seconded Cr Kremer  and resolved:

That the Community and Strategy Committee:

a)            Receives the report titled “Community Well-beings and Strategic Issues Overview” dated 19 November 2019.

 

 

The meeting adjourned at 3.30pm and reconvened at 3.32pm.

 

Mayor Tong, Councillors Keast, Byars, Douglas, Duffy, Ford, Frazer, Harpur, Kremer, Menzies, Owen, Ruddenklau and Scott were present when the meeting reconvened.

 

 

Public Excluded

 

Exclusion of the Public: Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987

Resolution

Moved Cr Ford, seconded Cr Frazer  and resolved:

That the public be excluded from the following part(s) of the proceedings of this meeting.

C9.1   Great South - progress update and upcoming process

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution are as follows:

General subject of each matter to be considered

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

Great South - progress update and upcoming process

s7(2)(i) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry on, without prejudice or disadvantage, negotiations (including commercial and industrial negotiations).

 

That the public conduct of the whole or the relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists.

 

That the That the Chief Executive, Group Manager, Environmental Services, Group Manager, Community and Futures, People and Capability Manager, Group Manager, Customer Support, Publications Manager, Governance and Democracy Manager, Committee Advisor be permitted to remain at this meeting, after the public has been excluded, because of their knowledge of the items C9.1           Great South - progress update and upcoming process. This knowledge, which will be of assistance in relation to the matters to be discussed, is relevant to those matters because of their knowledge on the issues discussed and meeting procedure.

 

 

The public were excluded at 3.32pm.

 

Resolutions in relation to the confidential items are recorded in the confidential section of these minutes and are not publicly available unless released here.


 

 

 

The meeting concluded at 3.53pm                       CONFIRMED AS A TRUE AND CORRECT RECORD AT A MEETING OF THE Community and Strategy Committee HELD ON TUESDAY, 3 DECEMBER 2019.

 

 

 

DATE:............................................................................................

 

 

 

CHAIRPERSON:........................................................................

 


Community and Strategy Committee

11 February 2020

 

Welcoming Communities Programme Transition from Great South to Southland District Council

Record No:             R/20/1/1183

Author:                      Megan Seator, Community Liaison Officer

Approved by:         Rex Capil, Group Manager Community and Futures

 

  Decision                                        Recommendation                                  Information

 

 

 

Purpose

1        The purpose of this report is to update the Community and Strategy Committee of recent developments regarding the Welcoming Communities programme.

2        Great South has advised Southland District Council that they will be withdrawing from coordinating the Welcoming Communities programme in Southland having delivered the pilot and achieved “welcoming” accreditation on behalf of the Southland region. 

3        A decision is required from the Community and Strategy Committee as to whether Southland District Council continues an involvement with the Welcoming Communities programme and if so, to what extent.

Executive Summary

4        Southland District Council has been involved in Welcoming Communities programme coordinated by Venture Southland/Great South since 2017.

5        During this time a number of initiatives have been achieved including the development of the Southland Murihiku Welcoming Plan, the development of the welcome portal, and securing stage one accreditation for all Southland councils.

6        Following a change in strategic direction, Great South will no longer be coordinating the Welcoming Communities programme on behalf of Southland’s councils. This provides an opportunity for the Welcoming Communities programme to be “transitioned’ to each of the councils to deliver without Great South providing a coordination role.

 

Recommendation

That the Community and Strategy Committee:

a)            Receives the report titled “Welcoming Communities Programme Transition from Great South to Southland District Council” dated 4 February 2020.

 

b)           Determines that this matter or decision be recognised as not significant in terms of Section 76 of the Local Government Act 2002.

 

c)            Determines that it has complied with the decision-making provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 to the extent necessary in relation to this decision; and in accordance with Section 79 of the act determines that it does not require further information, further assessment of options or further analysis of costs and benefits or advantages and disadvantages prior to making a decision on this matter.

 

d)           Requests that Southland District Council representatives work with MBIE to consider the options available to transition the Welcoming Communities programme delivery by Council.

 

e)            Requests that Southland District Council staff provide a detailed options paper following undertaking the work with MBIE relating to transitioning the Welcoming Communities programme to Council. This options paper is to include an assessment of resource requirements – financial and human – and detail how these will be provided for on an ongoing basis prior to making a final decision on this matter.

 


 

Background

7        Welcoming Communities is a programme led by Immigration New Zealand working in partnership with the Office of Ethnic Communities and the New Zealand Human Rights Commission.

8        It was developed in recognition that communities are healthier, happier and more productive when newcomers are welcomed, and participate fully in society and the local economy. Councils are recognised as having a community leadership role in supporting their communities to advance inclusion and diversity.

9        The point of difference for this programme is that where previous settlement initiatives focused primarily on supporting newcomers, Welcoming Communities focuses on the receiving community to ensure they are well equipped and supported to welcome and interact with newcomers. 

10      During 2017 to 2019, ten councils across five regions were a part of a Welcoming Communities two-year pilot working with their communities to implement the Welcoming Communities programme. The Southland region was selected as one of these pilot areas. Please note that while the national pilot programme officially concluded at the end of 2019 calendar year, the Southland region still has funding allocated for the pilot until June 2020 due to delays in Southland joining the pilot.

11      Following the national success of the pilot programme, in October 2019 Immigration Minister Iain Lees-Galloway announced that the programme would become permanent.  Funding of $6.6 million has been allocated over the next four years to fund the expansion of Welcoming Communities throughout the country.

12      Great South (previously Venture Southland) has been coordinating the Welcoming Communities pilot within Southland under the guidance of the Southland Welcoming Communities Advisory Group. The Advisory Group consists of representatives from Invercargill City Council, Southland District Council, Gore District Council, Environment Southland, and iwi.

13      Internally at Southland District Council, momentum has been building around Welcoming Communities with a number of initiatives happening including the formation of a SDC Welcoming Communities Internal Working Group.

 

Issues

14      On 4 December 2019, Great South advised the Advisory Group that they would be withdrawing their coordination role for the Southland Murihiku Welcoming Communities programme having delivered the pilot and achieving accreditation for the Southland’s councils. This means Great South is seeking to transition over the programme to each of the councils by February 2020.

15      Council officers are seeking direction from the Community and Strategy Committee as to whether Welcoming Communities is a programme that Council wishes to continue to support in light of the completion of the pilot project.

16      In the interim, MBIE have provided Southland District Council with a “Draft Transition Plan” (attached) which provides insight about what Welcoming Communities programme at Southland District Council might look like. However this paper is silent on resource allocation available from MBIE to assist and support the transition.

 

Factors to Consider

Legal and Statutory Requirements

17      There are no legal or statutory requirements to consider at this stage – pending any possible agreement with MBIE.

Community Views

18      On 25 July 2019, a workshop was held (as a part of the community board planning process) with the Southland District Youth Council to discuss what they saw to be the biggest issues for youth the District. They identified diversity and inclusion as one of their top three priority issues.

19      The Youth Council recognised that community demographics and society as whole is changing. They believed that their generation are supportive and welcoming of this but they see other people in the community who are not and many of the Youth Council had witnessed examples of unwelcoming behaviour.

20      During the community board planning process, community workshops were held across the District and topics related to community inclusion and togetherness were raised.

21      The Fiordland community identified one of their key strengths as being “socially diverse and welcoming”. While the Oreti communities saw one of their challenges as increasing acceptance of cultures.

22      Additionally the Ardlussa, Northern, and Wallace-Takitimu communities all saw that having a connected, inclusive, and involved community as a key outcome they want for their future.

Costs and Funding

23      There has been some discussion with MBIE about funding and that there may be some funding available. However this is yet to be confirmed.

24      Delivering the Welcoming Communities programme at Southland District Council will require staff resource to do so. It is yet to be determined how many hours this will require and will depend on the size and scale of the programme to be delivered.

25      The Draft Transition Plan suggests the appointment of a dedicated Welcoming Communities Coordinator to deliver Welcoming Communities programme at Southland District Council. This is not planned for and no resource is allocated for such a role. On initial assessment it is not anticipated a designated role is required and if anything it is envisaged the outcomes would be resourced as part of the community leadership team deliverables, subject to consideration of other priorities and resource allocation demands.

Policy Implications

26      Consideration should be given to the “BERL Southland Community Futures – Stage 3 Final Report” (attached) in relation to population projections, labour market demands, and the need for faster population growth.

27      Additionally, consideration should be given to the Southland Regional Development Strategy which set that target of attracting 10,000 more people by 2025 in order to achieve social and economic viability and vibrancy in the Southland region.

28      It is also important to recognise and acknowledge Council’s community leadership function in supporting local community development and to enhance social, economic, environmental and cultural outcomes for communities – ‘the four well-beings.’

Analysis

Options Considered

29      There are two options for the Committee to consider:

1.   Southland District Council representatives work with MBIE to consider the options available to transition the Welcoming Communities programme to Council, and builds on the work that has previously been delivered by Venture Southland/Great South.

2.   Southland District Council discontinues its involvement in the Welcoming Communities programme.

Analysis of Options

Option 1 – Southland District Council representatives work with MBIE to consider the options available to transition the Welcoming Communities programme to Council

Advantages

Disadvantages

·        Opportunity to access external funding to support a community led development initiative for district communities

·        Building work on what has already done to date

·        Contributing to the outcomes identified by Youth Council and community boards

·        Part of national initiative and a network of other councils involved

·        Access to support from Immigration NZ and MBIE

·        Resourcing

·        The administrative requirements of the programme

 

Option 2 – Southland District Council discontinues its involvement with the Welcoming Communities programme

Advantages

Disadvantages

·        Enables Council the freedom to develop its own “welcoming” initiatives outside of the Welcoming Communities programme

·        Losing the work done to date by Councillors and staff who have been involved in the programme

 

Assessment of Significance

30      This is not considered significant in terms of Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

Recommended Option

31      In light of the work that has been made to date and Southland District Council’s previous involvement, it is recommended that Southland District Council representatives work with MBIE to consider the options available to transition the Welcoming Communities programme and continues an involvement with it.

Next Steps

32      If the Committee approves the recommendations, staff will liaise with MBIE to develop the transition approach and prepare an options paper for this committee’s consideration prior to formalising the transition of the Welcoming Communities programme to Southland District Council. 

33      If the Committee decides not to endorse the recommended option, staff will inform MBIE of this decision.

 

Attachments

a             Draft - Welcoming Communities - Transition Plan for Southland District Council

b             BERL Southland Community Futures Final Stage 3 report    

 


Community and Strategy Committee

11 February 2020

 

Insert logos

Draft Welcoming Communities Southland – Transition Plan for Southland District Council

Author: June Rout

Xx January 2020

Purpose

This document sets out the approach Great South will take to withdraw from the role of coordinating the Welcoming Communities programme in Southland and to handover to Southland District Council (SDC). In future SDC will operate as a member of the Welcoming Communities network in its own right on behalf of its community.

It covers:

1.    The context for this change

2.    The logistics of the handover

3.    Roles and responsibilities

1.   Context

Great South (formally Venture Southland) coordinated the Welcoming Communities pilot programme in Southland (July 2017 - June 2019) on behalf of four Southland councils – Invercargill City Council, Southland District Council (SDC), Gore District Council and Environment Southland. Significant milestones achieved by Great South during this period included:

·    consulting on, developing, publishing and launching the Southland Murihiku Welcoming Plan

·    implementing many welcoming activities including the regional welcome portal

·    securing accreditation for all Southland councils for Stage One – Committed Welcoming Communities

·    applying for accreditation for Stage Two – Established Welcoming Communities. This included sourcing, collating and referencing evidence for each of the 30 Welcoming Communities Standard sub-outcomes.

Its coordinating role included:

·    employing a dedicated Welcoming Communities coordinator to work across all the councils

·    introducing, socialising and promoting the programme and its objectives in the community

·    liaising with and reporting to INZ

·    convening the Southland Advisory Group and providing secretariat services

·    signing funding agreements with the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment for 2017/18 – 2018/19 and 2019/20

·    consulting with councils and providing input into developing the evaluation framework and the evaluation reports (interim and final)

·    facilitating the stocktake and collating the findings

·    drawing on the stocktake and community consultation findings to develop the Southland Murihiku Welcoming Plan

·    facilitating and supporting others to implement the Welcoming Plan activities

·    gathering evidence, completing and submitting the accreditation application for Established Welcoming Community status (stage 2). Note: SDC have already received accreditation as a Committed Welcoming Community (stage 1) on the basis of the work Great South, SDC and the other councils have already done.

2.   Logistics

Great South will officially withdraw from its coordinating role by 28 February 2020. Prior to this Great South will meet with Karen Purdue and Megan Seator from SDC. They will discuss the transition plan and elements of the programme that SDC will pick up. Great South will supply documents and collateral (either physical or electronic copies).

3.   Roles and responsibilities

Great South

Great South will work with all the councils to develop and implement an agreed approach to explaining the changes to Welcoming Communities Southland stakeholders and the public. Great South will provide the following to SDC.

Promotion

·    Images from its Welcoming Communities library that SDC can use under the Welcoming Communities umbrella

·    The latest Welcoming Communities brand guidelines

·    InDesign materials for the Welcoming Poster and leaflet plus printed copies

Stocktake

·    Survey questions used to as part of conducting the stocktake and benchmarking

·    A copy of the Welcoming Plan survey feedback The resulting stocktake spreadsheet

Accreditation

·    Physical copies of the published Welcoming Communities Applicant Accreditation Manual

·    Links to the Accreditation page on the Welcoming Communities pages on INZ’s websites

·    An evidence ring binder with all the evidence provided to INZ on behalf of all the councils for stage 2 accreditation.

Great South will take SDC through the Welcoming Plan and accreditation workbook to update SDC on the status of each Welcoming Plan activity (for example, not started, in progress, completed, ongoing). SDC will use this information to determine which activities it will incorporate into its own Welcoming Plan in the future. Great South will also point out which are the regional activities which Invercargill City Council, SDC and Gore District Council could continue to be a part of and progress individually or together

·    The features checklist for stage three – Advanced Welcoming Community

Resources

·    Key documents and resources (for example, the printed copies of the Welcoming Communities Standard,  the Welcome Mat and the six-monthly report for October to December 2019)

·    Materials prepared as part of delivering the programme – for example, the cue cards

·    Printed copies of the Welcoming Plan

·    A link to the Welcoming Communities data online data fact sheet tool.

INZ

INZ will work closely with SDC as it participates directly in the programme and works through transition arrangements.

INZ will provide:

·    support, guidance and advice from INZ, including site visits from INZ’s Wellington-based Welcoming Communities staff and the regionally-based Relationship Manager

·    access to accreditation and its associated benefits and recognition

·    opportunities to network with councils and communities already members of the New Zealand welcoming network, as well as those operating overseas

·    access to new and existing Welcoming Communities resources to assist the council with its on-the-ground delivery role

·    information on national and international settlement and community development best practice

·    participation in national Welcoming Communities workshops

·    support for the council as it develops its Welcoming Plan, including thinking ahead to how to monitor, track and measure outcomes

·    opportunities to feature on INZ’s website under Our stories and in INZ publications

·    regular update newsletters.

Southland District Council

SDC will:

·    work with Great South in the handover of the programme

·    engage with tangata whenua to partner in delivering and implementing Welcoming Communities. Tangata whenua will have a presence in the programme as determined by them.

·    appoint a dedicated Welcoming Communities coordinator

·    become familiar with the resources and materials associated with the programme

·    continue to keep in touch with Invercargill City Council and Gore District Council via the regular Welcoming Communities conference calls between the coordinators and informally at a local coordinator-to-coordinator level. In association with the other councils, it will also set up more formal opportunities to update each other to avoid duplication of activities and effort, share learnings etc

·    supported by INZ, draw on the lessons learned from the pilot programme as they implement their welcoming approach

·    work with INZ  to map out a course of action over the next six to nine months. Depending on what is already in place at present this may include:

§ setting up Welcoming Communities governance and an advisory group. Note: the INZ Relationship manager may be able to support SDC with this.

§ identifying Welcoming Communities champions and other teams within council to support the programme

§ identifying potential partners, including those in the business community, who can work with the council to deliver Welcoming Plan activities

§ exploring with Environment Southland if it could lead a relevant welcoming activity

§ letting residents (new and existing ) know that SDC is working directly with them to promote and foster a welcoming and inclusive community

§ considering what activities in the current regional welcoming plan to carry over into a bespoke SDC Welcoming Plan

§ continuing to implement those Welcoming Plan activities as appropriate and relevant to the community

§ conducting a stocktake of SDC’s policies, services, programmes and activities through an inclusion and diversity lens

§ working with the community to do a community stocktake of what’s working well and identify opportunities to help inform the content of SDC’s own Welcoming Plan

§ benchmarking against the Welcoming Communities Standard. (Note: these activities will all contribute to SDC drafting its own Welcoming Plan when the council and community are ready for that next step. This transition plan does not cover off on that aspect.)

 


Community and Strategy Committee

11 February 2020

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Community and Strategy Committee

11 February 2020

 


Community and Strategy Committee

11 February 2020

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Community and Strategy Committee

11 February 2020

 

Community Partnership Fund - Guiding Principles

Record No:             R/20/1/1457

Author:                      Kathryn Cowie, Community Liaison Officer

Approved by:         Rex Capil, Group Manager Community and Futures

 

  Decision                                        Recommendation                                  Information

 

 

 

Purpose

1        The purpose of this report is to present the Community and Strategy Committee with draft guiding principles for the Community Partnership Fund.

Executive Summary

2        In July 2019 Southland District Council resolved to establish the Community Partnership Fund. This decision sought to bring funding decisions to a grass-roots level and enable community leadership.

3        In order to implement the Community Partnership Fund, it was identified there is a need to develop a common approach to the distribution of funding across community boards to ensure a broad level of consistency for the outcomes that the fund aims to achieve and for administrative purposes.

4        The draft guiding principles (attached) outlines the purpose, key outcomes, guiding principles, and common approach to administration and accountability for the Community Partnership Fund.

 

Recommendation

That the Community and Strategy Committee:

a)            Receives the report titled “Community Partnership Fund - Guiding Principles” dated 4 February 2020.

 

b)           Determines that this matter or decision be recognised as not significant in terms of Section 76 of the Local Government Act 2002.

 

c)            Determines that it has complied with the decision-making provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 to the extent necessary in relation to this decision; and in accordance with Section 79 of the act determines that it does not require further information, further assessment of options or further analysis of costs and benefits or advantages and disadvantages prior to making a decision on this matter.

 

d)           Endorses the guiding principles for the Community Partnership Fund to allow staff to progress the next stage of the process and facilitate workshops with each of the community boards. 

 


 

Background

5        Southland District Council’s community assistance activity seeks to contribute to a District of ‘proud, connected communities that have an attractive and affordable lifestyle’ by enabling Southland’s communities to be desirable places to live, grow up, work, run a business, raise a family and enjoy a safe and satisfying life. Through providing financial assistance by way of grant funding, community groups and individuals are supported to undertake their desired activities.

6        A review of the community assistance activity was completed in early 2019.  The purpose of this review was to ensure that Council is providing assistance in a considered and prudent manner to ensure efficient and effective outcomes for the communities they support.  

7        It was recommended that there should be a significant change in the way that Council administers the Community Initiatives Fund.  In July 2019, Council resolved to disestablish the Community Initiatives Fund and to establish the Community Partnership Fund.  

8        The most significant change is that the Community Partnership fund will be distributed by community boards who have the authority to grant funds for local applications.

9        Attached to this report is a document containing draft guiding principles for the Community Partnership Fund. This seeks to provide guidance to community boards (and Council in relation to District applications) in the development of their criteria and subsequent allocations.

Issues

10      There are no issues related to Council to endorsing the draft guiding principles.

11      Issues could arise if the draft guiding principles are not endorsed and there is a lack of consistency across the District in their allocation.

Factors to Consider

Legal and Statutory Requirements

12      There are no legal or statutory requirements.

Community Views

13      There are no community views that have been sought related to this decision.

Costs and Funding

14      There are no costs or funding requirements involved with endorsing the draft guiding principles.

Policy Implications

15      There are no policy implications involved with endorsing the draft guiding principles.

Analysis

Options Considered

16      Option 1 – The Community and Strategy Committee endorses the draft guiding principles.

17      Option 2 – The Community and Strategy Committee does not endorse the draft guiding principles. 

Analysis of Options

Option 1 – The Community and Strategy Committee endorses the draft guiding principles.

Advantages

Disadvantages

·        staff can proceed to confirm workshop dates with community boards to develop their funding criteria

·        there are no disadvantages.

 

Option 2 – The Community and Strategy Committee does not endorse the draft guiding principles.

Advantages

Disadvantages

·        there are no advantages

·        inconsistent funding outcomes across the District due to absence of guiding principles

 

Assessment of Significance

18      This is not considered significant in terms of Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

Recommended Option

19      The recommended option is that the committee endorses the draft guiding principles for the Community Partnership Fund.

Next Steps

20      If the committee endorses the draft guiding principles, staff will arrange workshops to be held with the community boards and Council to develop their criteria for funding based on the guiding principles.

 

Attachments

a             Community Partnership Fund - guiding principles    

 


Community and Strategy Committee

11 February 2020

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Community and Strategy Committee

11 February 2020

 

Approval of scholarship recipients

Record No:             R/20/1/2310

Author:                      Louise Pagan, Communications Manager

Approved by:         Rex Capil, Group Manager Community and Futures

 

  Decision                                        Recommendation                                  Information

 

 

 

Purpose

1        This report is to seek the committee’s approval for the proposed recipients of the Southland District Council Centennial Bursary, the Valmai Robertson Arts Scholarship and the Outward Bound Scholarships.

Executive Summary

2        Southland District Council gives out two Centennial Bursaries a year and up to $2500 for the Valmai Robertson Arts Scholarship. It also offers scholarship for both 18 to 24 year olds and over 27 year olds to go to Outward Bound. We have had seven applicants for the bursary, five applicants for the arts scholarship and one for the under 24 scholarship for Outward Bound.

3        Council also offers the Eric Hawkes Memorial Employee Outward Bound Scholarship. We received seven applications and the interviews were held on 3 February. Because this was after the close of the agenda, the recommendation will be tabled at the committee.

4        A subcommittee led by Cr Julie Keast as chair of this committee, and including Crs Margie Ruddenklau and Rob Scott, interviewed the applicants on Monday 27 January and have made the following recommendations.

 

Recommendation

That the Community and Strategy Committee:

a)            Receives the report titled “Approval of scholarship recipients” dated 28 January 2020.

 

b)           Determines that this matter or decision be recognised as not significant in terms of Section 76 of the Local Government Act 2002.

 

c)            Determines that it has complied with the decision-making provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 to the extent necessary in relation to this decision; and in accordance with Section 79 of the act determines that it does not require further information, further assessment of options or further analysis of costs and benefits or advantages and disadvantages prior to making a decision on this matter.

 

d)           Approves the 2020 Southland District Council scholarship recipients as recommended:

 

·         Centennial Bursary:

Ø  Alys Webb, Gemma Marnane

·         Valmai Robertson Arts Scholarship:

Ø  Tess Kutsyk $250, Ella Kutsyk $250, Monica McConnell $250, Ellen Leslie $250, Jordi Cowan $250, Kirsty Pickett $708

·         Outward Bound Scholarship:

Ø  Thomas Lundman

·         Eric Hawkes Memorial Outward Bound Scholarship:

Ø  To be tabled on day

 


 

Background

5        Southland District Council offer a variety of scholarships annually. These include:

·    the Centennial Bursary introduced in 1976 to commemorate 100 years of local government in Southland. Applicants are restricted to those about to commence the first year of tertiary education.  Two bursaries are awarded annually with successful applicants receiving $2,000 each.

·    the Valmai Robertson Arts Scholarship, so named to acknowledge the contribution and commitment to the field of dance by Valmai Robertson, of Blackmount, for more than 50 years. This scholarship is to encourage and assist those wishing to increase their skills through the attendance of development courses, workshops, and/or study in the arts. This is a contestable fund of up to $2,500 annually.

·    two scholarships to Outward Bound – one for people aged between 17 and 24, and one for people aged over 27. Council pays for the full course and travel for the first scholarship and pays for the course only for the second scholarship

·    the Eric Hawkes Memorial Outward Bound scholarship, named in honour of the Southland District Council staff member who died in the Southern Air plane accident in 1998. One employee scholarship is offered each year.

 

6        Applications for all scholarships close before Christmas and all applicants are invited to attend an interview in late January.

Issues

7        This year the interviews for the external bursaries and scholarships were held on 27 January and the employee scholarship on 3 February.

8        Council received seven applicants for the Centennial Bursary, five for the Valmai Robertson Arts Scholarship, one for the external Outward Bound scholarship and seven for the employee scholarship.

9        The interview panel, made up of Cr Julie Keast as chair, and Crs Margie Ruddenklau and Rob Scott, have recommended the following:

·    Centennial Bursary: Alys Webb and Gemma Marnane

·    Valmai Robertson Arts Scholarship: Tess Kutsyk $250, Ella Kutsyk $250, Monica McConnell $250, Ellen Leslie $250, Jordi Cowan $250, Kirsty Pickett $708

·    Outward Bound: Thomas Lundman

·    Eric Hawkes Memorial: to be tabled on the day

Factors to Consider

Legal and Statutory Requirements

10      The bursaries and scholarships have set criteria which is explained in the application form. All legal and statutory requirements are met.

Community Views

11      Applications are invited from the public through advertising and word of mouth.

Costs and Funding

12      The bursaries and scholarships are funded through the grants and donations business unit from rates.

Policy Implications

13      The bursaries and scholarships are included in the Community Assistance policy and meet its requirements.

Analysis

Options Considered

14      The options are to either award the bursaries and scholarships or not to.

Analysis of Options

Option 1 – Award the bursaries and scholarships

Advantages

Disadvantages

·        Council is helping members of its community to undertake further learning and development.

·        The bursaries and scholarships are a cost to the ratepayers through rates.

 

Option 2 – Don’t award the bursaries and scholarships

Advantages

Disadvantages

·        Council will save the costs of these bursaries and scholarships and use the funding elsewhere.

·        Council will not supporting its community to undertake further learning and development.

 

Assessment of Significance

15      This is not considered significant under Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

Recommended Option

16      To award the bursaries and scholarships.

Next Steps

17      Council will let the successful and unsuccessful candidates know the results.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report. 

  


Community and Strategy Committee

11 February 2020

 

Use of Fonterra contribution fund interest

Record No:             R/20/1/2377

Author:                      Louise Pagan, Communications Manager

Approved by:         Rex Capil, Group Manager Community and Futures

 

  Decision                                        Recommendation                                  Information

 

 

 

Purpose

1        This report is to set out proposed criteria for the use of the interest received from Fonterra’s financial contributions which were received as a result of it carrying out the developments of the Edendale plant.

Executive Summary

2        Fonterra has paid several financial contributions to Council when carrying out development of the Edendale plan since 1997. Those funds have been used for different projects, but the last set of payments in 2002-03 have not been fully used.

3        In the report to this committee called Update on the Financial and Reserve Contribution Fund (includes Fonterra Contributions), the amounts have been set out and a recommendation made to use the remaining contribution funds. However, there is also an amount of interest that has been paid on the contribution reserve during the past 17 years, to a total of $217,531.

4        This report looks at how this interest component can be used and proposes a set of criteria to reflect the eligibility of use of the interest funds.

 

Recommendation

That the Community and Strategy Committee:

a)            Receives the report titled “Use of Fonterra contribution fund interest” dated 28 January 2020.

 

b)           Determines that this matter or decision be recognised as not significant in terms of Section 76 of the Local Government Act 2002.

 

c)            Determines that it has complied with the decision-making provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 to the extent necessary in relation to this decision; and in accordance with Section 79 of the act determines that it does not require further information, further assessment of options or further analysis of costs and benefits or advantages and disadvantages prior to making a decision on this matter.

 

d)           Approves the interest amount of $217,531 be used as a fund for the Waihopai Toetoe Community Board to apply to for projects in its community.

 

e)            Agrees to liaise with the Waihopai Toetoe Community Board and Fonterra on proposed criteria and the use of the funds.

 

 


 

Background

5        Fonterra has given multiple financial contributions during the development of the Fonterra plant. Some of the contributions since 1999 haven’t been spent and some of the planned expenditure has altered.

6        Since 1997 $894,018 GST exclusive has been received over six contributions and as of 27 January 2020, there is $402,173 left. Of that, $112,990 has been put aside for a layby project at the school, and $113,523 to go to Council for the community water scheme. Neither of these tagged amounts have been paid over, but as the first report states, the $113,523 will go to Council for the water scheme. The layby project may have been superseded by the state highway upgrade.

7        It has been recommended in an earlier report titled Update on the Financial and Reserve Contribution Fund (includes Fonterra Contributions) to this committee, that the funds left over from the Fonterra contributions could go to the Curio Bay reserve purchase made last year.

8        This report is specifically about the interest that remains, which as of 27 January 2020 is a total of $217,531.

Issues

9        Council in 2019 agreed to allocate funding from the Financial and Reserve Contribution Fund to three community groups in the Edendale-Wyndham area. After that funding was given out, the then Edendale-Wyndham Community Board provide a draft list of possible projects linked to seeking Financial and Reserve Contribution Funds to carry out work, including fencing around the Edendale Bowling Club, extra street lights and water fountains in various reserves.

10      That draft report by staff was put on hold so the review of the fund could be carried out.

11      Council’s financial team carried out a detailed review of the monies received from Fonterra and staff identified that a number of the consents issued made comment about how each would be spent.

12      Section 6.2.2 of the Southland District Plan 2001, outlines the specifics around development of the Edendale Dairy Plant development.  Section 6.2.6 Financial Contributions of this states:

(a)  The Council may impose a financial contribution for developments in the Edendale Dairy Plan Development Plan Area the value of which exceed $500,000.

(b)  The financial contribution shall not exceed 0.5% of the value of which exceed $500,000.

(c)   The purpose of the imposition of the financial contribution shall be to remedy, mitigate or offset adverse effects arising from, in consequence of, or in association with, any development.

(d)  The use of the financial contributions shall be for one or more of the following in the Edendale Township, its environs or the District generally;

-     Offsetting additional demands on infrastructure and utility services by Council.

-     Offsetting additional demands on community and recreational facilities.

-     Restoring or enhancing amenity values.

-     Restoring or enhancing open space and landscaping

(e)   The Council will assess the need for, and quantum of, a financial contribution on a case by case basis as development occurs having regard to:

-     The significance of the adverse effect.

-     The extent to which the adverse effect can be dealt with successfully by other means.

-     Any proposals to mitigate or remedy the adverse effects.

-     Any direct positive community benefits arising from the development.

(f)   If applying the provisions of this clause Council shall regard to the fact that in the circumstances money is the preferred form of contribution.

13      Its recommendation to use the remaining contribution funds for the Curio Bay reserve fitted under d in section 6.2.2.

14      However, the interest from these funds could be used for other projects as it is not bound by the District Plan requirements.

15      It is considered appropriate and consistent with the rationale developed for the community partnership fund concept, that the Waihopai Toetoe Community Board be provided the opportunity to utilise the interest funds for projects in its boundary area. The projects can be community board planned projects and/or community organisation led projects.

16      Suggested criteria for the use of the interest funds is:

·    The Waihopai Toetoe Community Board to recommend to Council the allocation of funds for planned community board projects to benefit the Waihopai Toetoe community

·    Community groups can apply to the fund and that decision will be made by the Waihopai Toetoe Community Board directly.

·    The fund is of a finite value and once it is fully allocated the fund will no longer exist.

·    The allocation of funds can be made on an as required basis by way of a recommendation from the board to Council.

·    Any project will be funded on a 50-50 principle – 50% from rates and 50% from the fund.

·    The fund can be used for replacement or renewals of existing assets, particularly if that is needed because of growth.

·    The board will liaise with Fonterra on all applications prior to making its recommendation to Council.

 

17      It is recommended that discussions are held with the community board and Fonterra on these criteria to reach an agreement.

Factors to Consider

Legal and Statutory Requirements

18      Council has considered all requirements around the contribution funding as per past agreements and statements in the District Plan.

Community Views

19      Liaison with the community board and Fonterra will be carried out before the criteria is formalised for the interest fund.

Costs and Funding

20      This fund will be established from the interest received from Fonterra financial contributions.

Policy Implications

21      This fund and the criteria will become part of the Community Assistance Policy in its next review this year.

Analysis

Options Considered

22      To approve the use of the interest from the contributions fund for a fund for the Waihopai Toetoe Community Board or to not approve the use of the interest in this way.

Analysis of Options

Option 1 – To approve the use of the interest

Advantages

Disadvantages

·        Funding is available for the community board and community organisations to assist in delivery of projects.

·        The funding benefits the community and can help with development pressures or improvements.

·        The principles are consistent with the community partnership fund approach and also support the community led development approach being supported by council.

·        There are none.

 

Option 2 – To not approve the use of the interest

Advantages

Disadvantages

·        The interest is not spent and will gain more interest on it.

·        The community does not benefit from this fund.

·        The community board does not have funding available for projects.

 

 

Assessment of Significance

23      This decision is not considered significant under Council’s significance and engagement policy.

Recommended Option

24      Option 1 – to approve the use of the interest from the contribution fund

Next Steps

25      Council will liaise with the community board and Fonterra over the next steps.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report. 

 


Community and Strategy Committee

11 February 2020

 

Details on the Financial and Reserve Contribution Fund

Record No:             R/19/11/26999

Author:                      Shelley Dela Llana, Accountant

Approved by:         Anne Robson, Chief Financial Officer

 

  Decision                                        Recommendation                                  Information

 

 

 

Purpose

1        The purpose of this report is to provide a breakdown of the financial and reserve contribution fund, outlining what the fund is made up of and any conditions or commentary around the funds remaining and what they can be used on.

2        It will also seek to get the committee’s support for the partial use of the fund towards the purchase of reserve land at Curio Bay.

Executive Summary

3        The financial and reserve contribution fund is made up of financial contributions collected under the Resource Management Act 1991 (RMA) and collected via the Southland District Plan (principally from Fonterra) with interest allocated to the reserve annually.

4        This report seeks to provide information around the fund for the committee and provide an update on the contributions from Fonterra as per an earlier request by the previous
Edendale-Wyndham Community Board.

5        Two key issues discussed in the report include:

-     what to do with funds previously allocated for the Edendale hall and school layby project that have been since cancelled

-     background to the request from Council to look at funding options for the purchase of reserve land at Curio Bay

6        A third issue, looking at changes to the process of allocation of monies remaining in this fund, will be discussed in a separate report in this meeting agenda.

7        At the 30 June 2019, the reserve had $619,704. $402,173 of this was remaining contributions from Fonterra of which $400,095 has been allocated. The balance of $217,531 is related to interest earned on the reserve over the years.

8        As part of issuing resource consents to Fonterra or its namesakes in the past, Council and Fonterra had a number of discussions and/or noted in the resource consent correspondence potential uses of the fund or guidance on the manner in which some would be allocated. This is noted further in the report.

 

 

 

Recommendation

That the Community and Strategy Committee:

a)            Receives the report titled “Details on the Financial and Reserve Contribution Fund ” dated 4 February 2020.

 

b)           Determines that this matter or decision be recognised as not significant in terms of Section 76 of the Local Government Act 2002.

 

c)            Determines that it has complied with the decision-making provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 to the extent necessary in relation to this decision; and in accordance with Section 79 of the Act determines that it does not require further information, further assessment of options or further analysis of costs and benefits or advantages and disadvantages prior to making a decision on this matter

 

d)           Notes the discussions and comments sent to or had with Fonterra as part of the resource consent approval process on the potential use of financial contributions paid by them or the process that Council would enter into around any allocation

 

e)            Supports the funding of the purchase of land for a reserve at Curio Bay from the financial and reserve contribution reserve up to $319,800, noting that other sources of funding are still being investigated

 

f)             Recommends to Council that it seeks feedback from Fonterra representatives and the Waihopai Toetoe Community Board as to their support of the use of Fonterra financial contributions to fund the land at Curio Bay for a public reserve before Council makes the final decision on how the Financial and Reserve contribution reserve is to be allocated.

 

 

 


 

Background

9        As part of the grant funding review being undertaken, Council’s financial team have undertaken a review of the monies received and granted to date. As part of this process, Council staff have identified any correspondence with contributors that further identified the use of the contributions received or the ways in which Council would be looking to distribute the monies.

10      Staff have subsequently identified that a number of the resource consents issued with Fonterra and its namesakes, noted or made comment about how each would be spent in the correspondence sent to them on issuing of the consent or, in one case, as a result of the appeal of the financial contribution charged.

11      As at 30 June 2019, the fund had a total reserve of $619,704. A breakdown of this reserve indicates the following:

Analysis of Financial & Reserve Contribution Reserve

$

Unallocated Fonterra contributions

$2,078

Fonterra funds allocated to the building of a new Edendale hall, since returned due to the decision not to proceed with the hall

$198,750

Fonterra funds allocated for the Edendale School layby project

$100,436

Fonterra funds allocated for the Edendale water supply scheme

$100,909

 

$402,173

Interest earned

$217,531

Total

$619,704

 

12      The table below provides further analyses and outlines the six financial contributions that have been received from Fonterra or its equivalent namesakes since 1997 totalling $894,018 (GST excl). The table details the amount spent to date, the funds remaining as well as any relevant correspondence identified regarding the use of the funds.

Year

Contribution excl GST

Amount Spent

Amount Remaining

Discussions/Consent letter comments relating to amounts remaining

1997

$2,933

$2,933

-

 

1998

$171,907

$171,907

-

 

1999

$15,333

$13,255

$2,078

Nothing identified.

2002

$225,000

$155,000

$70,000

Discussion that $90k for district wide activities and $135k for use in the Edendale/Wyndham area. The remaining $70k was for the Edendale hall upgrade that has been cancelled.

2003

$277,500

$148,750

$128,750

Letter where the committee declined to resolve how the money was to be allocated however noted that prior to any allocation consultation by Council staff would occur with the Edendale and Wyndham Community Boards.

2008

$201,345

-

$201,345

Letter identifying $112,990 to Edendale School for the school layby project and $113,523 for the purposes of a community water supply scheme.

 

$894,018

$491,845

$402,173

 

 

13      Council is legally bound by the conditions it imposed as part of the resource consent. The narrations above were not part of the conditions but were included in the correspondence with Fonterra either:

-     advising of the consent; or

-     the appeal to the consent by Fonterra; or

-     in correspondence by the Resource Consent Hearing committee at times about the potential use of funds

14      Staff recognise that although Council is not bound by these discussions, they recognise the value Council places on the relationship with Fonterra. Accordingly staff have included a recommendation in the report suggesting a general discussion be had with Fonterra advising of the potential use of funds and seeking feedback from them before Council makes a final decision.

15      The interest that has been earned on the reserve has no restrictions attached to it. However this does not stop the Council from establishing some criteria around its future use.

16      For background, Attachment One includes a schedule of the monies allocated to date.

17      In 2002 the manager of resource planning at the time presented a report to the Policy Committee. This report outlined the background to the $225,000 financial contribution charged and the reasons why the Resource Planning committee identified specific projects the money was to be used on as part of the consent correspondence. It drew the committee’s attention to Section C and D of the District Plan over the purpose and use of the funds, which is detailed in the legal and statutory section below. The report also noted the legal cases that were occurring at the time and the potential cost and delay in the decision making process should it have gone to the Environment Court. It then went on to outline the projects that had been agreed for the $225,000 and the company’s strong desire to see a substantial amount of its contribution targeted towards the Edendale and Wyndham areas.

Issues

18      There are potentially three discussion points/issues that the committee needs to consider and provide direction over:

-     discussion around the current committed funds for the Edendale School layby project of $100,436 and monies remaining from the Edendale hall project cancellation of $198,750

-     the potential application of funds towards the purchase of part lot 300 dp526128 at Curio Bay, further to a resolution of Council

-     the future use of the funds and any application criteria the committee may see as relevant for the granting of funds taking into account correspondence with Fonterra over how the monies would be spent or with whom consultation would occur. A separate report in this meeting agenda has been prepared to discuss this issue further.

19      Additionally monies tagged for the Edendale water supply scheme will be allocated to the appropriate Council reserve for spending on the scheme.

Edendale School layby project and Edendale hall

20      Discussions with Councillor Duffy indicate that this project was in response to safety concerns by the school given its location immediately beside state highway one.

21      Indications are that the layby planned was to enable the dropping off and picking up of school children safely. By all accounts this project was put on hold when NZTA announced the potential re-alignment of the state highway. This realignment has recently been completed.

22      Funds were also set aside for the Edendale hall. Following many years of investigation the decision was made at the Edendale- Wyndham Community Board meeting on the 22 March 2016 not to proceed with the development of the hall.

23      Given that both of these projects have been cancelled, the funds previously committed would now be available for other uses in line with the purpose of collection as noted in the District Plan.

Purchase of reserve land at Curio Bay

24      On the 14 November 2019, Council resolved to “purchase part lot 300 DP 526128 containing 4500 square metres more or less for $319,800 plus gst for a recreation reserve to be funded by way of a district wide loan against the curio bay district reserve”. Additionally it also “request staff to investigate additional funding sources to reduce the amount of the loan such as funding from the Reserve and Development Contributions and that where additional funding is obtained that this is used to reduce the loan”.

25      This property is in the Porpoise Bay/Curio Bay area and has seen significant growth in visitors, with over 100,000 per annum. Council owns or administers the adjacent land to the south and the Curio Bay Reserve including the adjacent camping ground. Regarding the purchase of lot 300, it was stated that it provides a better configuration for future land management overall, especially given the increasing pressure for physical space in this locality.

26      As noted in Schedule 6.22 of the District Plan 2001, subsection 2.6(d);

(a)  The use of the financial contribution shall be for one or more of the following in the Edendale Township, its environs or the District generally;

-     Offsetting additional demands on infrastructure and utility services by Council.

-     Offsetting additional demands on community and recreational facilities.

-     Restoring or enhancing amenity values.

-     Restoring or enhancing open space and landscaping

 

27      As such, the purchase of the land is in line with the use defined in the District Plan.

28      Given this and Council’s earlier resolution to purchase the land, staff are recommending that the Fonterra contributions be used to fund the balance of the property up to $319,800 after the application of any other funding sources currently being investigated.

29      If the committee supports the purchase of the land from this fund, it is proposed to use the balance of Fonterra contributions first, with the use of any interest accrued to make up the difference.

Factors to Consider

Legal and Statutory Requirements

30      Under section 108(2)(a) of the RMA, financial contribution conditions can be imposed subject to section 108(10)which states,

A consent authority must not include a condition in a resource consent requiring a financial contribution unless

(a)  The condition is imposed in accordance with the purposes specified in the plan… and

(b)  The level of the contribution is determined in the manner described in the plan…

31      The District Plan 2001, section 6, schedule 6.22 Edendale Dairy Plant Development Concept Plan, subsection 2.6 para a to d state;

(a)  The Council may impose a financial contribution for developments in the Edendale Dairy Plant Development Concept Plan Area the value of which exceed $500,000

(b)  The financial contribution shall not exceed 0.5% of the value of the development

(c)   The purpose of the imposition of the financial contribution shall be to remedy, mitigate or offset adverse effects arising from, in consequence of, or in association with, any development.

(d)  The use of the financial contribution shall be for one or more of the following in the Edendale Township its environs or the District generally

-     Offsetting additional demands on infrastructure and utility services provided by Council

-     Offsetting additional demands on community and recreational facilities.

-     Restoring or enhancing amenity values

-     Restoring or enhancing open space and landscaping

Community Views

32      The contributions collected are done so under the Resource Management Act. As noted under the legal and statutory requirements section above, the District Plan outlines the criteria under which monies are collected and the reasons for the collections of the monies.

33      Having said this and, keeping in mind the previous correspondence and discussions with Fonterra, it is recommended that Council does liaise with Fonterra and the Waihopai Toetoe Community Board to inform them of the proposed use of funds and seek their feedback before making a final decision on the use of the funds collected from Fonterra.

Costs and Funding

34      There are no costs associated with this report.

35      As noted previously, a separate report on the committee agenda discusses possible criteria around the potential use of any remaining funds.

Policy Implications

36      Discussion around the relevant sections of the District Plan are noted in the legal and statutory section above.

Analysis

Options Considered

37      The options are to either support or not support the funding of the purchase of land for a reserve at Curio Bay from the financial and reserve contribution reserve up to $319,800, noting that other sources of funding are still being investigated.

Analysis of Options

Option 1 – Support the funding of land to be purchased for a reserve at Curio Bay from the financial and reserve contribution reserve up to $319,800 noting that other sources of funding are still being investigated

Advantages

Disadvantages

·        The purchase is in line with the use of the funds identified in the District Plan.

 

·        The funds will not be available for any other purpose the committee may consider desirable.

 

Option 2 – Not support the funding of land to be purchased for a reserve at Curio Bay from the financial and reserve contribution reserve up to $319,800 noting that other sources of funding are still being investigated

Advantages

Disadvantages

·        The funds will be available for other projects identified by the committee which are in line with the District Plan uses.

·        Rates funding will be needed to fund the loan repayments for the purchase of the land which will still be purchased.

Assessment of Significance

38      In terms of Council’s significance policy, this issue is not considered significant. Notwithstanding this, Fonterra and the Waihopai Toetoe Community Board do have a specific interest in this matter and as such, it is recommended that Council liaises with them both, informing them of the proposed use of funds and seeking any feedback before making a final decision on the use of the funds collected from Fonterra.

Recommended Option

39      Option 1 – Support the funding of land to be purchased for a reserve at Curio Bay from the financial and reserve contribution reserve up to $319,800 noting that other sources of funding are still being investigated.

Next Steps

40      Report to Council the recommendations of the Committee.

41      Provide a copy of this report to the Waihopai Toetoe Community Board.

42      Continue to investigate the other funding sources available to fund the purchase of the land.

 

Attachments

a             Allocations paid to date from Financial & Reserve Contribution Fund    

 


Community and Strategy Committee

11 February 2020

 

 


Community and Strategy Committee

11 February 2020

 

Update on Community Boards Representative Leadership Structure

Record No:             R/20/1/2446

Author:                      Clare Sullivan, Governance and Democracy Manager

Approved by:         Rex Capil, Group Manager Community and Futures

 

  Decision                                        Recommendation                                  Information

 

 

 

Purpose

1        The purpose of the report is to provide an update to the Community and Strategy Committee on the implementation of the information to support the representative leadership model with a network of nine community boards in the District.

Executive Summary

2        To support the representative leadership pillar Council has developed a new induction, reporting and information regime.  This report provides the committee with an update on the implementation of this including the induction programme, agenda status and reporting, and the chair’s forum.  

 

Recommendation

That the Community and Strategy Committee:

a)            Receives the report titled “Update on Community Boards Representative Leadership Structure ” dated 3 February 2020.

 

b)           Determines that this matter or decision be recognised as not significant in terms of Section 76 of the Local Government Act 2002.

 

c)            Determines that it has complied with the decision-making provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 to the extent necessary in relation to this decision; and in accordance with Section 79 of the act determines that it does not require further information, further assessment of options or further analysis of costs and benefits or advantages and disadvantages prior to making a decision on this matter.

 

 


 

Background

3        One of the outcomes of the community governance review project Council undertook over four years was the Representation Review. This culminated in the Local Government Commission providing a determination on the community board structure for the 2019 – 2022 and 2022 – 2025 trienniums, unless Council decides to conduct its next Representation Review in six years rather than three years.

Issues

4        There are four matters this report provides an update on.

Community board induction and inaugural meeting feedback

5        Following the election an induction and inaugural meeting programme was implemented.  For community boards in particular this included an induction day for all community board members (councillors were also invited and attended) on Saturday 9 November 2019.

6        The induction workshop provided board members with a more detailed discussion of the role of Council, its priorities and provided an opportunity to brief new members on their legal responsibilities and other operational matters.

7        Prior to this, and in preparation for the inaugural meetings, workshops were held for each board which covered information of the board’s role and the role of Council, and considering the high level direction for the new board structure. 

8        The workshop also gave an introduction to the community board planning process to date and an update on progress.  It highlighted also the importance of community board plans and how they will help communities to achieve real change in their areas.

9        Finally, the workshop included a discussion on the work programme process and financial details for each board.

10      All community boards held their inaugural meetings in December and the Fiordland Community Board had an additional meeting in December to consider and decide on two local matters.

11      Chairs and deputy chairs were elected at each inaugural meeting.  Since then a number of boards have been planning forums in the months in between ordinary meetings to meet with staff and community groups in their areas to build relationships and discuss matters of mutual interest with groups in their community board area and vice versa. Several boards have also toured their board area to assist in informing them of issues.

12      Anecdotal feedback is that the induction process has been informative and useful to elected members.  

13      There are currently by-elections being held in four boards for eight members as there were insufficient nominations at the close of nominations for the elections held in October 2019.  Election day (when postal voting closes) is 12 noon on Tuesday 18 February.  It is anticipated that the new members will be able to be sworn in at the February meetings.

 

 Community board agenda status

14      For the 2019 – 2022 triennium, Council is providing to boards four reports that will be on each agenda of their scheduled six meetings a year.  If a board holds any additional meetings these four reports will not go to those meetings.  The four reports are a Community Leadership Report, an Operations report, a Council Report and a Chairperson’s Report.

15      The Community Leadership Report will include local information on the funding each board can allocate to groups in its board area.  This fund comes into effect on 1 July 2020.  Staff will assist the boards to determine guiding principles and funding criteria for each board. Each report will also include updates on the board’s community board plan and various local initiatives.  For example the Wallace Takitimu Community Leadership Report contains information about initiatives in Drummond, Nightcaps, Ohai and Otautau.

16      Information will also be provided on District, regional and national inititiatives that relate to matters from a community relationship/led development perspective.  Information will also regularly be included from a strategy and policy, communications and engagement and governance perspective so that the boards and the public can be more informed about current issues.

17      The community leadership team has also included information about their role and how they can support the board and local communities.   

18      The Operational Report includes information on projects in the board’s area including a comment and the status of the project.  It provides information on service contracts for the board’s area and requests for service within the board’s area and the District as a whole.

19      The operational report also includes a section on local finance reporting.  This will provide details of all the local rating districts and current income and expenditure and commentary within the board area.  For example the Wallace Takitimu board covers the Drummond Village, Wallace Takitimu, Nightcaps, Ohai and Otautau business units.  Information is also provided on the various reserve balances within the board area.  

20      The Council Report will continue to provide information about issues at a District wide level as well as regional and national issues that will affect Council including the community boards.

21      The Chairperson’s Report is another new report for the community boards.  It will provide the board and the public with information on activities the chairperson has been involved with over a regular period.

22      It is the intention that these four reports will assist in providing the community boards and the public with a more holistic view of activities and items of interest in their respective board areas.

Service delivery review workshop update

23      Confirmed details of the programme and timings of these workshops is currently being worked through and will be provided when they are finalised.  It is anticipated these will occur twice a year and will provide an opportunity for the community boards to discuss with activity managers issues and the context relating to their activities.

 

Chairs forum update

24      As part of the new way of working and a collaborative relationship approach Council has committed to host a minimum of two Chairs’ Forums annually – involving Council Executive Committee members and the chairs of the nine community boards.

25      It is intended that the forum will contribute to managing the support processes for community boards by Council, create a level of knowledge transfer and sharing between the different boards on matters of common interest, provide an opportunity for feedback and guidance to Council on matters of relevance that would benefit from local involvement among other things.

26      The inaugural Chair’s Forum is scheduled for Wednesday 18 March 2020. 

Factors to Consider

Legal and Statutory Requirements

27      There are no legal and statutory requirements relating to this report.

Community Views

28      There was no requirement to consider community views for this report.

Costs and Funding

29      There are no additional costs or funding associated with or required for this.

Policy Implications

30      There are no policy implications

Analysis

Options Considered

31      There are two options - receive the report or not receive it.

Analysis of Options

Option 1 – Receive the report

Advantages

Disadvantages

·        the committee is aware of the progress of the implementation of the community board leadership structure

·        there are no disadvantages

 

Option 2 – Not receive the report

Advantages

Disadvantages

·        there are no advantages to not receiving the report

·        the committee is not aware of progress with the implementation

Assessment of Significance

32      The report has been assessed as having low significance in accordance with Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

Recommended Option

33      Option 1 – receive the report.

Next Steps

34      Progress will continue to be monitored.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report. 

 


Community and Strategy Committee

11 February 2020

 

Murihiku Regional Arts Strategy 2020-2030

Record No:             R/20/1/183

Author:                      Karen Purdue, Community Partnership Leader

Approved by:         Rex Capil, Group Manager Community and Futures

 

  Decision                                        Recommendation                                  Information

 

 

 

Background

1        Arts Murihiku is a volunteer Trust formed to administer a two-year pilot programme, initiated and funded by Creative New Zealand. The programme is aimed at growing the capacity and capability of the Arts sector. Based in Invercargill the area covered by Arts Murihiku also includes rural Southland, Rakiura/Stewart Island, Gore, Queenstown, the Wakatipu Basin and West Otago, aligning with the same boundaries as Community Trust South.

2        Current Trustees are from Invercargill, Gore, Southland District, Rakiura/Stewart Island and Queenstown. The chair is Councillor Paul Duffy.

3        The brief from Creative New Zealand included the development of a Regional Arts Strategy as a guiding document to support the strengthening of the Arts in Southland communities into the future.

4        Arts Murihiku engaged Mary-Jane Rivers of Delta Networks to carry out this work supported by an advisory group of trustees and Arts Murihiku staff. Mary-Jane had considerable experience in strategic planning particularly related to communities, including other arts strategies.

5        In the development of the strategy, conversations were held with a wide range of people involved in the Arts including iwi, Councils, funding organisations, event organisers, arts performers and creators across all genres as well as interested members of the public.

Setting the context of the strategy

6        The strategy has been prepared at a time of mixed circumstances when those from the arts and cultural sector are keen to see greater action and unity, and to build on high quality local developments that are already happening through local leadership.

7        It is also a time of significant challenge for the arts and culture sector with uncertainty around earthquake prone buildings and resource constraints and amid some frustration about inaction on previous strategies.

Arts and Culture in Murihiku (Rural)

8        In several rural communities throughout Murihiku community arts groups provide locally-led and relevant opportunities for arts and culture events and learning – including opportunities for artists in residence, local theatre and music, competitions for visual artists and poetry afternoons in the local pub.

9        Often the events involve the whole family – starting with the children. Anecdotal comments suggest that involvement in arts and culture at a community level builds confidence and a pathway into trying other art forms outside the community. These groups reflect the strength of local relevance and energy, and have the potential for being a network of thriving arts and culture.

10      Mixed in with this dynamic and grounded arts and culture sector is ‘volunteer fatigue’, the changing nature of volunteering and uncertain or insufficient funding for many.

How Southlanders ‘see’ Art and Culture

11      The 2017 Creative New Zealand survey shows that a large majority of Southland residents (79%) are engaged with the arts and 81% think Southland is a great place to live.

12      Attendance is highest for performing arts (51%) and visual arts (43%) and lowest for literary arts (6%).

13      People participate most in craft and in art that creates objects (23%).

14      The majority of Southland residents recognise a range of benefits arising from the arts. More than half (51%) agree their community would be poorer without the arts and residents agree that the arts:

·    contribute positively toward the economy (59%)

·    give young people an opportunity to express themselves (58%)

·    define who we are as New Zealanders (54%)

·    help to improve New Zealand society (53%)

·    encourage people in the region to be innovative (47%)

·    give a voice to important issues in the community (39%)

15      Southlanders see that arts help build understanding of other cultures, allow creative expression, and are thought provoking.

16      Fifty-one percent of Southland residents support public funding of the arts and 44% agree that their local council should financially support the arts. Sixty three percent of Southland residents agree that it is important that the region has an organisation that supports, promotes and advocates for the arts. Over half (52%) agreed it is important to develop an arts strategy to increase the liveability and vibrancy of Southland.

17      Choice, price and social isolation emerged as key barriers for engagement in the arts - 41% indicated that having someone to go with would make a big difference. The key activities people would like to see more of are music concerts and street art, such as murals.

18      New Zealand’s Core Cities research identified the contribution of creative industries to the ‘buzz of a place, and (its) strengthened brand and identity.”

19      One third of Southland residents feel that arts and culture are important to the region’s identity and that the arts in the Murihiku area encourage overseas tourists to the region. The new Destination Strategy for Southland may well provide an opportunity for arts and culture economic contribution.

Principles that guide the strategy

20      Treaty of Waitangi – Te Tiriti o Waitangi

The principles of Te Tiriti are foundational to the Arts and Culture Strategy. This strategy specifically acknowledges the relationship with Iwi, Ngai Tahu as Manawhenua and especially the Runanga of Hokonui, Waihopai, Awarua and Oraka Aparima.

 

 

21      Collaboration and Partnership

Most effective and long lasting arts and culture development happens through working together while respecting the individual drive and skills of individual artists.

22      Sustainability

The strategy supports enhancing the sustainability of arts and culture in Murihiku.

23      Inclusion

Arts and culture are for all and this strategy supports growing people’s engagement in arts and culture: artist involvement, in communities, across sectors, through greater audience participation and visitor engagement.

Directions for progressing arts and culture in Murihiku

24      There were a number of consistent messages in the development of this strategy. Key messages involved growing  pride in our identity as a thriving arts and culture mecca that is envied and admired, and to do this:

·    it is vital to build on the strengths, assets and local points of brilliance. As one arts leader noted “There is extraordinarily good stuff happening and all good stuff starts with the heart”.

·    the whole region leading together is crucial. Working across sectors and localities – connecting with iwi, business, funders, education, and conservation – and with arts and culture ‘being in the psyche’ of the region based on the arts and culture sector being strategic and unified in positioning the sector

·    being artist-focused matters – creating an environment for artists to thrive in their art form

·    assessing and understanding the contribution of arts and culture to the economy and quality of life

·    art education is a key – starting in the schools

·    capacity building, succession planning, financial sustainability and increasing young people’s involvement is crucial for sustainable development, and

·    there must be action – not a strategy sitting on a shelf

25      Together these key messages led to the vision and four themes of the strategy.

 

Vision for Arts and Culture in Murihiku

26      Celebrating the distinctive raw beauty of Murihiku’s identity through arts and culture

Arts and creativity are:

·    visible (everywhere)

·    valued (know the benefits to health, well-being, community cohesion, economy)

·    vibrant (diversity embraced and celebrated)

 

27      The four themes establish the main areas of focus for the region.

·    Toi te whenua, Toi te mana: Celebrate our identity

·    Whakapapa: Strengthen creative connections

·    Taonga: Arts and culture values are supported... and at the centre

·    Whare Toi: Building today for a thriving creative future

 

Next steps

28      There are a number of actions identified in the strategy that create opportunities for Southland District therefore it’s important this strategy is shared internally within Council and with our Community Boards. It will be useful to discuss with our strategy and policy team whether an Arts strategy is on the agenda for Southland District.

29      Starting a conversation and asking the question, “As a Council can we be more mindful of the aesthetic value of public amenities?” We have started on this journey as is evidenced by our “wrapping” of new public toilets.

30      Investigating how our communities and Council can incorporate this type of thinking into what we do.

31      Building relationships and connecting with the Ministry of Culture and Heritage and Creative New Zealand.

32      Building relationships and connecting with other stakeholders such as Great South, Iwi, other Councils, business, funders and groups/individuals within the Arts community.

33      Supporting and nurturing leaders, groups and individuals already within the District to build on current local initiatives and encouraging development of new initiatives.

34      Increasing the opportunities and instances of blending arts and other events and sectors together: e.g conservation and art. There is evidence this is already happening within the District and Riverton township is a good example with the murals on buildings.

35      Look at increasing collaboration between funders. This may be as simple as those involved with managing the Creative Communities Scheme working together. Or it may be more complex collaborative public, philanthropic and private funding for key initiatives such as a regional arts trail which has been long sought by many in the sector.

36      The link for the Murihiku Arts strategy is  https://artsmurihiku.co.nz/about/murihiku-regional-arts-strategy-2020-2030/

 

 

Recommendation

That the Community and Strategy Committee:

a)            Receives the report titled “Murihiku Regional Arts Strategy 2020-2030” dated 14 January 2020.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report. 

 


Community and Strategy Committee

11 February 2020

 

Central Government Agency and National Stakeholder Relationship Management

Record No:             R/20/1/189

Author:                      Kelly Tagg, Community Partnership Leader

Approved by:         Rex Capil, Group Manager Community and Futures

 

  Decision                                        Recommendation                                  Information

 

 

 

Background

1.       Council’s community partnership leaders (CPLs) were tasked with supporting and participating in Council and central government agency and national stakeholder relationship development forums. 

2.       Specifically, they were asked to work together to develop a networking opportunity with central government agencies and NGOs including but not limited to the likes of MBIE, Sport NZ, Creative NZ, Tourism NZ and Tourism Industry Aotearoa.

3.       The CPLs arranged meetings with representatives from the Tourism Infrastructure Fund, the Cycle Trails Fund and the Responsible Camping Fund at MBIE, the fund manager for EQUIP at the Ministry of Culture and Heritage, Welcoming Communities, Creative New Zealand and Sport New Zealand (spaces and places, insights team, play team).

4.       The CPLs also arranged to visit with staff from the Hastings District Council to discuss the work they have been doing in the community planning space. 

Learnings and observations

MBIE

5.       The CPLs met with representatives from the Tourism Infrastructure Fund (TIF) and the Provincial Growth Fund (PGF) at MBIE.  Discussions were had about both current and future funding opportunities for SDC via both these funds.

6.       Specific discussions were had with MBIE staff about funding opportunities for the Ulva Island Jetty and Golden Bay redevelopment.

7.       An update on the Maintaining the Quality of Great Rides Fund was also provided – this fund supports projects that maintain and improve completed sections of the Great Rides of Nga Haerenga, the New Zealand Cycle Trail (NZCT).  Two million in funding for eligible projects is provided each year. 

8.       Applications must be for well-defined projects that:

·    can be delivered within agreed time frames and deadlines

·    will take no more than six months to complete

·    are ready for construction, and

·    have all required land access and resource consent permissions approved.

9.       Applications should not be submitted if projects are still in the planning phase.

10.     Funding can't be used to extend Great Rides beyond start and/or end points that have been approved by us and NZCT Inc.

11.     Successful projects will be jointly funded by MBIE and the eligible Great Rides organisation which must be able to provide at least 50% of the total cost of the project.  The maximum amount of government funding available for a project is $300,000.  The minimum amount of government funding available for a project is $10,000 which means that the minimum cost of a project must be $20,000 allowing for the 50% co-funding. 

12.     Staff were also advised of the New Zealand Cycle Trail Enhancement and Extension Fund – this fund supports projects by eligible organisations that improve and extend Nga Haerenga, the New Zealand Cycle Trail.  Six million in funding is available each year to eligible organisations whose projects will extend or improve the Great Rides of New Zealand Cycle Trail.

13.     SDC also met with the team who administer the Responsible Camping Fund. 

14.     For your information the government had previously announced that a further $8 million was being made available for the 2019/2020 summer to continue to help encourage responsible camping around New Zealand.

15.     The summer 2019/2020 responsible camping funding was available for operating costs including education and enforcement projects, ambassador programmes, as well as temporary facilities like showers and toilets.

16.     The funding was not available for capital costs. Applications for capital projects, such as permanent shower or toilet blocks, carparks should be directed to the Tourism Infrastructure Fund.

17.     For the last application round funding was subject to the following principles:

·        initiatives had to be in place for the 2019/2020 peak season

·        initiatives had to be for education, enforcement and/or ambassador programmes and temporary facilities for the summer,

·        where councils have a significant number of similar investments proposed (eg for a range of campsites and/or other infrastructure) they were asked to prioritise

·        funding was not available for permanent infrastructure in most cases (that should be applied for through the Tourism Infrastructure Fund)

·        funding will not be provided for initiatives that are in direct competition with the commercial sector

·        regional and inter-agency initiatives were promoted

·        staffing costs were consistent throughout the country

·        initiatives would be funded for a maximum six-month period only (Labour Weekend to Anzac Weekend), although peak season will vary between regions, and

·        all initiatives should be subject to a post-season review to determine their effectiveness or otherwise.

18.     Local authorities who requested funding for monitoring and enforcement activities were encouraged to take an ambassador approach, educating campers on responsibilities and promoting compliant behaviour.

19.     Local authorities were encouraged to pilot new and innovative approaches to address the issues caused by freedom camping that can be shared potentially with other councils. They should identify initiatives that would maintain social licence, and reduce the negative environmental impacts of unmanaged freedom camping.

20.     Listed below are some of the initiatives that have been funded to date. This is not an exclusive list:

·    operating costs (if not included in any Tourism Infrastructure Fund application)

o servicing of toilet/ablution blocks, includes cleaning, replacement of hand towels, toilet paper, soap etc

o pumping out waste tanks and associated costs

o servicing of rubbish and recycling facilities

·    education, monitoring and enforcement

o monitoring of campsites

o dealing with complaints

o monitoring of rubbish and recycling facilities and toilet facilities

o liaison with Police, NZTA, local roading authorities

o signage, information brochures

o salaries, uniforms, travel allowances for wardens/ambassadors

o training costs

o vehicle costs (lease or purchase)

21.     The MBIE website also has information about the number of visitors who did some freedom camping during their visit to New Zealand and their total spend.   This can be found here: https://www.mbie.govt.nz/immigration-and-tourism/tourism-research-and-data/tourism-data-releases/international-visitor-survey-ivs/international-visitor-survey-analysis-and-research/freedom-camping-by-international-visitors-in-new-zealand/

22.     At this stage we are unsure if the responsible camping fund will be offered again for the 2020/2021 summer.  If it is offered again and Council is interested in pursuing this opportunity, some pre-planning may be required. 

23.     Of note, the current camping ground regulations are currently under review. 

Ministry of Culture & Heritage

24.     The CPLs met with Michael Frew from the Ministry of Culture & Heritage.  Mr Frew is the fund manager for Heritage EQUIP which provides funding and advice to help private owner’s earthquake strengthen their earthquake prone heritage buildings.  The fund provides both upgrade works grants and professional advice grants. 

25.     Heritage listed buildings can apply for funding for up to two thirds of the cost of engineering and seismic assessments and buildings with 34% compliance of the new building standard. 

26.     Michael Frew will be in Southland in February 2020 and meetings have been arranged with Council’s building department, the Winton Community Board, Winton heritage building owners and the Winton Business Association.  

27.     More information is available from https://heritageequip.govt.nz/ 

Welcoming Communities

28.     The CPLs met with June Rout from Welcoming Communities.  She provided further information about the Welcoming Communities Standard including the eight key elements being;

1.   Inclusive leadership

2.   Welcoming communications

3.   Equitable access

4.   Connected and inclusive communities

5.   Economic development, business and employment

6.   Civic engagement and participation

7.   Welcoming public spaces

8.   Culture and identity

29.     More information can be found at https://www.immigration.govt.nz/about-us/what-we-do/welcoming-communities/the-welcoming-communities-standard

30.     Ms Rout also provided examples of the Welcoming Communities work being undertaken around the country and staff discussed the work that SDC has been involved with.  Here are some examples from the Welcoming Communities Canterbury website with short film clips showing welcoming workplaces.  https://www.wccanterbury.com/welcoming-workplaces

31.     Further consideration of the eight elements will be given as part of the development of the community board plans.

Creative New Zealand

32.     The CPLs also met with Briar Munro from Creative New Zealand.  Discussions were had about the Creative Communities Fund that SDC administers on behalf of Creative New Zealand. We also learned about the key aspects of Creative New Zealand’s strategy.  Creative New Zealand encourages, promotes and supports the arts in New Zealand for the benefit of all New Zealanders through funding, capability building, their international programme and advocacy.  Staff also discussed the recently released Murihiku Arts Strategy and what that may mean for Southland. 

33.     Ms Munro also spoke of some interesting “arts” projects happening around New Zealand and Australia particularly with regards to art in public spaces. 

34.     Further information about the medium-term strategic direction for Creative New Zealand to achieve their vision of “dynamic and resilient New Zealand arts, valued in Aotearoa and internationally” can be found here https://www.creativenz.govt.nz/about-creative-new-zealand/corporate-documents/statement-of-intent-2016-2021

Sport New Zealand

35.     Luciana Garcia, general manager of Sport Southland, met the CPLs at Sport New Zealand and introduced them to several of their team members.

Sport New Zealand – Spaces & Places – Julian Todd

36.     Mr Todd spoke to the CPLs about the Community Sports Strategy that was released by Sport New Zealand in 2015 and how Sport New Zealand’s focus areas are around the following;

·    play – promoting the power of play

·    healthy active learning – an action under New Zealand’s Child and Youth Wellbeing Strategy

·    youth sport – keeping young people in sport and realising their potential

·    diversity and inclusion – actively promoting diversity and inclusion of all cultural and demographic backgrounds within their areas of influence. 

37.     https://sportnz.org.nz/assets/Uploads/attachments/About-us/Com-Sport-Strategic-Plan.pdf

38.     Other work currently being undertaken by Sport New Zealand that may be of interest to Southland communities is the development of an online guide that will assist clubs to merge into one new entity.  Mr Todd spoke of the challenges that clubs face and acknowledged they wanted to protect their history however, this often comes at a cost of defeating their future. 

39.     Once the online tool has been developed, Sport New Zealand will do roadshows around the country to roll out the tool.  Mr Todd also advised of the Greytown example where multiple clubs have merged into one entity and employ a staff member in a paid position that works in the middle of town to support all the clubs.  The community leadership team will follow up on this example as it be able to be duplicated for our shared services model in Southland. 

40.     Mr Todd also advised that several of the regional sporting trusts have their own local strategies in place and that Southland is currently working on theirs.  Some of the more successful local strategies included changing conversations and changing behaviours at the political level and even considering opportunities for cross boundary funding and accessibly of assets and services. 

41.     Mr Todd also spoke of the importance of considering the wider community use of new and existing Council and community facilities. 

Sport New Zealand – Insights Team – Hamish McEwen

42.     Mr McEwen spoke of the insights tool which aims to help organisations in the sport and recreation sector to better understand their participants. 

43.     Sport New Zealand is also sharing its data with SOLGM for use in its SOLGM data warehouse software.

44.     Of note, Mr McEwen also spoke of the general social survey that is regularly undertaken by Stats New Zealand and provides information on the well-being of New Zealanders aged 15 years and over.  It covers a wide range of social and economic outcomes and shows how people are faring.  In particular, the survey provides a view of how well-being outcomes are distributed across different groups within New Zealand. 

45.     From the survey, Mr McEwen advised that the number one thing that new migrants join is a sports club.  He also mentioned how membership in clubs can increase physical activity and create a social connection which is important to address the social issue of loneliness.

1                Sport New Zealand – Play Team – Mark Curr

46.     Mr Curr works in a dual role 0.6 for Hutt City Council and 0.4 for Sport New Zealand.  He talked about how play is no longer about playgrounds which is a big shift in thinking. 

47.     The CPLs were enlightened of the core principles of play being:

·    how proximity matters – create mini play destinations “around the corner”.  Having opportunities to play close to home

·    play everywhere – make play easy by integrating it into dead time in unexpected places

·    family-friendly cities – make play more inclusive and appealing to the whole family; multigenerational play opportunities. 

48.     Mr Curr also said that space, time and permission are important parameters for play eg landowners putting up signs saying “please use this swing” or “please build a fort” or having signs at libraries that say “please come and play at our libraries”. 

49.     Mr Curr was able to provide real examples about what is happening in other locations too.  The Greater Wellington Regional Council put a basketball hoop in a carpark and gave out basketballs to everyone that lived within 1 km of the car park. 

50.     In Palmerston North a “golden” basketball was placed near a basketball hoop and people came to play with it and left it there.  No one in the community wanted to be responsible for stealing the basketball. 

51.     In Papamoa beach there is a “library” of frisbees and balls that people can use while they are visiting the beach and then return to the library for other visitors to use. 

52.     Sport Southland are also actively working in this space and the community leadership team plans to have further discussions around how Council and Sport Southland can work more collaboratively. 

53.     Sport New Zealand staff also indicated their willingness to assist at a local level.

 

Learnings from other small towns in New Zealand

54.     The CPLs were impressed with the scale of artworks they observed on their journey from Wellington to Hastings.  A slide show presentation with examples will be provided at the meeting.

Learnings from Hastings District Council

55.     The CPLs attended a community hui at the Flaxmere community centre which was organised by staff at Hastings District Council and also attended by members of the Flaxmere Community Planning Group and the Maraekakaho Community Planning Group.

56.     By way of background, Hastings District Council (HDC) is made up of the mayor and 14 councillors.  HDC has one community board being the Rural Community Board.  It is made up of six members, four elected by the rural community of the Hastings District and two council appointees.  The Rural Community Board represents Hastings district’s four rural subdivisions of Maraekakaho, Kaweka, Poukawa and Tutira. 

57.     HDC assists clusters of neighbourhoods (not community boards) to come up with a community plan. No two communities are the same, which means no two plans are identical – some have priorities around play spaces or encouraging further education, others are focused on job creation or safety. 

58.     HDC currently has 11 community plans, one is under review and three are under development.

59.     Each plan has a council officer assigned as the relationship manager. 

60.     HDC’s role is to help a community consult with its residents and then develop a plan, and then assist with the processes and relationship-building that grows from the plan. It might be that council advises on how to lodge a resource consent, advises which charitable organisation might consider a funding request, or introduces the community to the appropriate central government organisation. Having a community plan also means council is aware of the wishes of a community so when it is working on its own plans it can ensure goals don’t clash.

61.     Some of the Hastings community plans have been in place for up to 13 years, having been reviewed several times. Concrete results have come out of them: upgraded playgrounds, new public access to rivers, the opening of community gardens, and the development of garden tool collections for sharing.

62.     The process for the development of a community plan is that communities approach council around a specific issue (eg social issues, coastal erosion, waste issues) and HDC contracts an independent consultant to run the process which takes council out of writing the plan.  The plan is then submitted to council for endorsement. Most plans are aspirational with a list of actions that directly link back to council.  Importantly, the plans are community-led.  Council’s role is to support the communities to achieve their actions. 

63.     Members from the Flaxmere Community Planning Group were closely involved with HDC as council assisted the group during the consultation process.

64.     The representative from Maraekakaho described the role of the council relationship manager as vital to the success of the plan as they provided guidance to the community and helped navigate the community through council. 

65.     The Flaxmere Community Plan is run by a charitable trust and the plan focuses on social/health/elderly/sport and recreation.  A key driver of the plan was a desire to help its community change its own attitudes to their own community which they believe will, in turn, change the public perception of the community. 

66.     The Flaxmere Planning Committee is a mix of stakeholders and residents, they also co-opt members as required and develop a second level of representation – people who can’t/don’t attend meetings but keep up to date and provide support when they can.  The committee also holds external contracts with the Hawkes Bay DHB and they firmly believe in setting the standard for what they want as a community and don’t accept second best.  A copy of the Flaxmere Community Plan can be found at https://www.hastingsdc.govt.nz/assets/Document-Library/Community-Plans/Flaxmere/flaxmere-community-plan-2016-2019.pdf

67.     By comparison the Maraekakaho Plan is more strategic in its approach and has eight main aims including improving road safety for all users, building community spirit, protecting and enhancing the waterways that flow through the area, and increasing awareness and action on all aspects of residents’ health - mental and physical.  Their plan is available to view at https://www.hastingsdc.govt.nz/assets/Document-Library/Community-Plans/Maraekakaho/Maraekakaho-Community-Plan-2017-2022.pdf

68.     SDC staff asked how HDC and its communities measure success with regards to their community plans.  HDC responded that when actions have been achieved they look at the “so what” – so what does this mean for the community - what is better.  Also what is the impact for the community, sharing successes, HDC consider how they support communities to achieve success and have three monthly monitoring meetings.  Plans are highlighted in local newsletters and they share stories on facebook, newsletters and their website.  The communities also have dedicated council communications team support.

69.     Kev Carter – the HDC grants adviser also addressed the hui and advised that council had recently implemented a new grants framework and included in that was the installation of “smarty grants” an online tool for lodging and tracking funding applications.

70.     Interestingly HDC also have some different grants funding available;

a.   Community events support which provides funds to not-for-profit groups holding community events on a council park or in a council facility – these funds can assist with park or facility hire

b.   Rural Halls Maintenance Fund – assists rural communities with the maintenance, upgrading and strengthening of private and council-owned halls for the benefit of the rural community

c.   Marae Development Fund – assists with marae preservation and development, with projects assessed against eligibility criteria set out in HDC’s Marae Development Fund Policy.

d.   Waste Minimisation Fund – supports the development of innovative solutions for reducing waste which involves providing financial assistance to local waste minimisation and management initiatives that contribute to achieving the goals of the HDC Waste Minimisation and Management Plan 2018.

71.     HDC also has a strong focus on social procurement outcomes when purchasing goods and services in the community.

72.     Both SDC and HDC staff were keen to continue to relationship with SDC looking to host HDC at a future opportunity.

 

 

Recommendation

That the Community and Strategy Committee:

a)            Receives the report titled “Central Government Agency and National Stakeholder Relationship Management” dated 23 January 2020.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report. 

 


Community and Strategy Committee

11 February 2020

 

Chairperson's Report

Record No:             R/20/1/2527

Author:                      Alyson Hamilton, Committee Advisor

Approved by:         Rex Capil, Group Manager Community and Futures

 

  Decision                                        Recommendation                                  Information

 

 

 

Purpose of report

1        The purpose of the report is to provide an update to the Community and Strategy Committee on activities the chairperson has been involved since the establishment of the committee on 1 November 2019. This report covers the period from 3 December 2019 to 3 February 2020.

2        The report also provides the opportunity for Cr Keast as committee chairperson to present an overview of the issues she has been involved with.

3        Items of interest include the following:

·     attendance at the Pioneer Women’s Memorial Trust function held at Gore District Council where recipients of bursaries and other local scholarships were acknowledged

·     attendance at the Whakamana Te Waituna Trust meeting

·     attendance at the Matura Licensing Trust dinner held at Croydon Lodge

·     attendance at opening of the NZ Transport Agency Edendale Bypass

·     attendance at WasteNet Advisory Group meeting

·     along with Councillor Duffy attended the opening of the information panel for the George Aitken Memorial Walk at the Waikawa Domain

·     confirmed position for installation of replacement Welcome to The Catlins signage

·     assisted by Councillor Ruddenklau and Councillor Scott interviews were held for the Southland District Council Centennial Bursary, Valmai Robertson - Creative New Zealand Arts Scholarship and Outward Bound Scholarship.

Councillors commented on the very high calibre of enthusiastic applicants.

 

 

Recommendation

That the Community and Strategy Committee:

a)            Receives the report titled “Chairperson's Report” dated 3 February 2020.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.  

 


Community and Strategy Committee

11 February 2020

 

Southland Settlement Hierarchy Report 2019

Record No:             R/20/1/871

Author:                      Rex Capil, Group Manager Community and Futures

Approved by:         Steve Ruru, Chief Executive

 

  Decision                                        Recommendation                                  Information

 

 

 

Introduction

1        In 2019 Council commissioned BERL to prepare a report to consider the type and quantity of service provision across the various settlements that make up the Southland district.

2        Council staff collected data using a standard template and sourced from various local contacts and provided this to BERL.

3        The overall purpose for undertaking the project was to start the collection of information to be utilised to support and inform decisionmaking regarding the future provision of services.

4        It is important to note the service provision conversation required is much wider than just considering council services. Hence the settlement hierarchy project involves considering service provision from a wider community perspective.

5        It is also important to note the information collected represents a point in time and that things change.

6        The methodology developed by BERL is based on international examples and adapted for the Southland district. There is no single methodology or formula that is used internationally to determine service provision standards or determine what is appropriate. It is subjective in nature and relies on a large number of determinants and variable factors which alter in terms of significance and priorities depending on the community and the context at the time.

7        The project supports gaining a better understanding of the range of services and facilities that are available in the various settlements across the district and supports conversations to be had in looking at the future retention and development of local services at the most appropriate level.

8        The project provides a very good assessment of service provision across the district and will assist as longer term planning and integrated strategic planning opportunities for the region progress in the short to medium term.

 

Observations

9        The report touches on various matters and points for consideration as part of considering service provision for the wider community. This will assist with enhancing the community led development approach as service provision is the domain of multiple agencies.

10      The factors relevant to service provision vary depending on the service being provided, the expectations of the service providers, the expectations of the service consumers, the quantity and quality of the provision, the willingness to resource an appropriate level of service and the ability to access by way of travel and other technological means appropriate service provision.

11      This topic will continue to be of interest to decision makers related to the provision of services, as well as consumers of services, as resource allocation pressures continue to be a reality. This represents the fundamental principle of economics – that of scarcity and the fact that there is finite or limited resource available for allocation which may not necessarily match demand or expectations. This therefore requires decisions to be made about how to allocate resources efficiently and effectively in order to satisfy the needs being provided for.

12      The allocation of resource and provision of services is a topic that affects service providers much wider than Council.

13      It affects the public sector including central government service providers (health, education, social development, transport etc.) as well as local government service provision.

14      It affects private sector service provision and primarily whether it is profitable and sustainable to provide private services like retail and trade and professional services in a community.

15      It affects the non profit sector service provision and whether the demand exists for the uptake and delivery of community based activities like non government organisations, community organisations, clubs and societies etc.

16      All these impact on the hierarchy of service provision for a settlement or community and all have various ‘tipping points’ for sustainable service delivery.

17      Another important factor identified as part of the service provision discussion and settlement hierarchy of service provision is the relative availability based on regional and sub regional provision. As transport and technology means have advanced the ability to access and availability of service provision needs have also changed. This impacts on the location of where services are delivered from and to, and how the services may be delivered. This will remain an ever changing and evolving subject for discussion as the pace of change in terms of the supply of the service intensifies while the expectations for and demand of the services may not change at the same pace.

18      Overall the findings identified in the report attached are positive for the Southland district. It seems that by grouping settlements into appropriate tiers of classification the service provision requirements across the district are well catered for. It is reassuring in that very few settlements are considered remote or under provided for and these can be explained in relation to proximity to other settlements.

19      It is important Council continues to work with other service provision agencies and the community boards and community organisations to monitor the provision of services (not just Council services) and adapt and develop as the needs change across the district.

20      This type of work is evolving and the community leadership and community partnership work is proactively delivering opportunities as required. As an example an initial stakeholder forum is being facilitated by Council officers with various stakeholders, service providers and local community representatives in the Northern Southland area as potential impacts of Kingston growth unfolds.

21      The Southland Settlement Hierarchy Report 2019 is an effective resource to assist with initiating and developing the conversations required to consider future service provision opportunities and decisions across the Southland district.

 

 

Recommendation

That the Community and Strategy Committee:

a)            Receives the report titled “Southland Settlement Hierarchy Report 2019” dated 4 February 2020.

 

 

Attachments

a             Southland Settlement Hierarchy Report 2019    

 


Community and Strategy Committee

11 February 2020

 

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Community and Strategy Committee

11 February 2020

 

Community Well-beings and Strategic Issues Overview - January 2020

Record No:             R/20/1/795

Author:                      Rex Capil, Group Manager Community and Futures

Approved by:         Steve Ruru, Chief Executive

 

  Decision                                        Recommendation                                  Information

 

 

 

Report Purpose

1        At its inaugural meeting for the 2019-2022 triennium the Community and Strategy Committee received the community well-beings and strategic overview report.

2        It is intended this community well-beings and strategic issues overview report will be prepared and presented to the Community and Strategy Committee as part of its standard order paper each meeting, as far as is practicable.

3        This report is intended to inform the committee of recent developments, points of interest and points for consideration as part of the overall strategic context and community well-beings (social, economic, environmental, cultural) discussions that Council is part of – nationally, regionally and locally.

4        The report will also be used to provide some insights of ‘happenings’ from other regions that maybe of interest and relevance to the District. This provides a wider strategic context on a national and regional scale to assist in Council’s understanding of issues and areas of impact occurring elsewhere.

5        Importantly the report aims to initiate discussion and conversation amongst councillors and communities to support the opportunity to participate and contribute to Council’s direction setting and positioning with regards to the multi stakeholder environment it operates in.

6        It is intended the format and content of the report is divided into five headings – reflecting the four well-beings plus other regional happenings. The topics covered under each of the headings are a selection of recent articles and publications and are summarised with the associated link attached from where the information is sourced and/or the full document attached when relevant.

 

Social Well-being

7        For the purpose of this report we consider social well-being to reflect topics related to how people and communities engage in work, study and social activities.

8        The following is a summary of a selection of recent articles and publications relating to the social well-being topic.

 

Reflecting on the decade ahead

9        These articles address views on the big issues of the next decade being many and varied. The articles are suggesting most will be carried over from the last decade. The difficulty and importance of these will intensify and how we respond will shape this coming decade.

10      It suggests some of the big issues in New Zealand over the next 10 years will be social changes. It identifies that they tend to come slowly in New Zealand but when they do happen they tend to stick and governments rarely turn the clock back.

11      The discussion is not about whether we agree with these issues but more importantly how we attempt to understand them and recognise the implications of them on our communities.

12      The articles as per the links below provide some food for thought:

https://www.stuff.co.nz/opinion/118454886/the-five-big-issues-for-the-next-decade

https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/118295862/this-is-us-new-zealands-brightest-reflect-on-the-decade-ahead

 

Point to note:

13      It is important for the Southland District Council to remain abreast of the social changes occurring and the impact on the communities it serves. It will have a role to play in advocacy, strategy development alongside communities and a community leadership role in supporting communities in dealing with the implications of the social changes being dealt with.

 

United Nations – Global Sustainable Development Report 2019

14      The United Nations – Global Sustainable Report 2019 – published in September 2019 – emphasised “that strong political will and commitment will be required to make the needed transformations.”

15      It also raises concerns that progress on most sustainable development goals (SDGs) has gone into reverse. It considers that in-depth transformation to achieve the SDGs requires systemic change and systemic change requires leadership committed to that. Common themes from across the globe relate to concern over inequality, corruption, and poor public services.

16      The article and report below provide information related to this issue:

https://www-devex-com.cdn.ampproject.org/c/s/www.devex.com/news/opinion-it-always-seems-impossible-until-it-s-done-96229/amp

https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/content/documents/24797GSDR_report_2019.pdf

 

Point to note:

Of particular interest for the Southland District Council is to remain abreast of the relevant sustainable development goals, how they link and align with the community well-beings and social changes occurring. While the issues may seem global in nature many relate directly and indirectly to issues impacting on communities in the district.

 

Economic Well-being

17      For the purpose of this report we consider economic well-being to reflect topics related to how financial and human made physical assets impact on how people live, deliver services and work together as a society.

18      The following is a summary of a selection of recent articles and publications relating to the economic well-being topic.

Agri-sector matters

19      The Agrisector to grow but faces reset article suggests strong commodity prices and global demand will continue to support New Zealand’s agriculture sector. However the environmental and regulatory challenges that face the sector will mean further challenges will continue to create headwinds for the sector.

20      There is also positive information relating to opportunities and hopes for younger generations to realise the types of futures available in the agritech sector

21      It is interesting to note also an example of the international writings relating to farming and the agriculture sector in relation to food production and food supply in the future.

22      The following articles provide some interesting food for thought and raise important points for consideration for all New Zealanders to consider:

https://www.pressreader.com/new-zealand/otago-daily-times/20200102/282196537874419

https://www.odt.co.nz/rural-life/rural-people/agritech-worker-raising-awareness-diverse-careers

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2020/jan/08/lab-grown-food-destroy-farming-save-planet?CMP=Share_AndroidApp_Copy_to_clipboard

 

Point to note:

23      The Southland District Council will need to continue to understand the primary sector challenges and opportunities as it progresses its LTP 2031 work and also any integrated strategic planning work out beyond the 2050 horizon.

 

Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) review of fees, levies and charges

24      The CAA is proposing some significant changes to its fees, levies and charges which may impact significantly on the agricultural sector It is recognised that with any substantial changes the impacts on costs are passed on to the end user.

25      The following links provide greater detail:

https://www.stuff.co.nz/business/farming/118478805/caa-hiking-industry-fees-by-over-5-to-meet-upgrade-costs

https://www.aviation.govt.nz/about-us/what-we-do/how-we-are-funded/review-of-caa-fees-levies-charges-2020/

https://www.aviation.govt.nz/assets/about-us/funding-review-2020-discussion-document.pdf

 

Point to note:

26      The Southland District Council to monitor how the CAA review progresses and work alongside interested parties as it progresses.

 

Environmental Well-being

27      For the purpose of this report we consider environmental well-being to reflect topics related to how the natural environment impacts on how communities align resources and support resource allocation and usage required to live a sustainable life.

28      The following is a summary of a selection of recent articles and publications relating to the environmental well-being topic.

 

Water quality – not a town vs. country issue

29      The debate and discussion continues on the water quality issues facing New Zealand. While it seems there is agreement on the ultimate goal of improving water quality it seems there is continued disagreement on what needs to be done to achieve it and the pace and scale of change required.

30      There are some interesting conversation starters in this article:

https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/politics/opinion/118495519/everyone-wants-clean-water-its-time-for-david-parker-to-tell-us-how-much-it-will-cost

 

Point to note:

31      Southland District Council will remain abreast of this topic from a national, regional, district and local perspective as various developments impact on council and communities directly and indirectly. The implications are significant and this will remain a topic high on Council’s agenda.

 

PCE Report: The “uncomfortable truth” about tourism, emissions and investment

32      The tourism industry’s share of New Zealand’s total carbon emissions has been revealed as a new government report identified climate change as the greatest long-term risk to the sector – and one that is impacting investment decisions today.

33      The Parliamentary Commissioner for the Environment’s new report, Pristine, popular… imperilled? The environmental consequences of projected tourism growth, estimated that the emissions from tourism activity within NZ made up 9% of total of total domestic emissions in 2017.

34      Presenting the report, the environmental commissioner, Simon Upton, said: “Tourism is facing an emissions challenge related to long-haul travel for which there is simply no solution on the horizon.”

“Domestic emissions, who knows, they might become manageable, but at the global level there have to be serious doubts about whether tourism in its current shape and form can continue if we are to have a chance of heading off the worst consequences of climate change. That is the very uncomfortable truth of the matter I think.”

He added: “The seriousness of that challenge is widely appreciated in the industry and this came through – people are thinking about the issue, and those that can do something about it are responding often quite impressively in part of course because it is something their customers are increasingly attuned to.”

“But all of us, let’s be frank, live with reliance on a means of transport that is predicted to one of the biggest contributors to using up whatever remaining atmospheric budget of carbon we can afford to emit. On this environmental score alone, I have encountered a measure of fatalism that leaves people with little to say. What can you say?”

35      The full report can be found at the link:

https://www.tourismticker.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/12/Report-Tourism-Pristine-popular...-imperilled-Embargo.pdf

Overtourism – call to define tourism limits

36      This was followed up with various articles relating to ‘overtourism’ and associated challenges for local communities, councils and other infrastructure providers. It also raised the topic of social license and longer term sustainability issues as a result of what is being experienced in some parts of New Zealand now.

37      At the same time, pressures were identified as a result of a decline in the number of visitors to Te Hikoi Museum, recognised as a tourist attraction for the Southland region. Therefore it is important to understand the global and national effects and what the ripple effect can be to the Southland region and district, even if such ‘overtourism’ pressures may not be being felt directly in Southland.

38      The following links provide some insights from recent articles produced

https://www.odt.co.nz/regions/wanaka/call-define-tourism-limits

https://www.newshub.co.nz/home/travel/2019/12/queenstown-wanaka-locals-say-area-can-t-keep-up-with-increasing-tourist-numbers.html

https://www.noted.co.nz/planet/planet-planet/overtourism-new-zealand-growing-problem?fbclid=IwAR3DYqs5C2-PEZqn04M2jWsDnGvNwTQCnVIPFYdDbTlgwlo4bOvWrWIHeYU

https://www.odt.co.nz/regions/southland/plea-encourage-visitors-te-hikoi-museum

 

Point to note

39      Of particular interest for Southland District Council is to remain abreast of the global and national conversations occurring relating to tourism development and work alongside Great South in taking all points into consideration as initiatives from the Southland Murihiku Destination Strategy and community plans are rolled out over the next decade.

 

Cultural Well-being

40      For the purpose of this report we consider cultural well-being to reflect topics related to how people live and work together and includes cultural and community identity, traditions and customs and common values and interests.

41      The following is a summary of a selection of recent articles and publications relating to the cultural well-being topic.

 

We will hit five million this year - so how big is too big for New Zealand?

42      A continued conversation on the New Zealand population and what does a New Zealander look like and what does it mean to be a New Zealander. There are good video/audio representations included as part of this article – dealing with migration, labour supply, housing, social and infrastructure related matters – related to urban and rural differences.

43      The following link provides balanced insights and the video/audio links offer further insights:

https://www.stuff.co.nz/opinion/118586130/we-will-hit-five-million-this-year--so-how-big-is-too-big-for-new-zealand?%3Fcid=facebook.post&cid=facebook.post

 

Point to note:

44      Council continue to work alongside the Community Boards and the communities represented to build strong community led development initiatives that reflect and represent the needs of the communities in the future. It is important that a multi agency approach be fostered and promoted to ensure community views are understood and actioned from the communities themselves.

 

Te reo Maori on a ‘pathway towards extinction’

45      A sobering article offering food for thought as we look to consider the issues to be considered in understanding the future challenges for te reo and tikanga and other cultural and heritage related matters.

46      The following link provides the insights:

https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/education/118654781/te-reo-mori-on-a-pathway-towards-extinction

 

Point to note:

47      It is important council continues to build the community led development approach to work alongside iwi and other agency providers to ensure cultural heritage development occurs at the local community level

 

Regional Happenings – Palmerston North and Manawatu

48      This section aims to provide information recently highlighted relating to an area/region elsewhere in New Zealand.

49      The area/region identified in this report is Palmerston North and Manawatu.

50      The articles identified below highlight some insights and significant developments occurring in Palmerston North/Manawatu, related to

-     Technology incubator development for the agritech sector with the Callaghan Innovation has partnering with Sprout to build on the investor group backing Sprout receives from two iconic New Zealand companies, Fonterra and Gallagher, as well as global venture capital firm Finistere Ventures and Israel’s most active venture investor, OurCrowd

-     https://www.linkedin.com/posts/linda-stewart-nz_sprout-accelerator-first-for-nzs-agritech-activity-6613249182360756224-Yt3A/

-     https://www.sproutaccelerator.com/blog/first-for-nzs-agritech-innovators

-     Agritech was recognised as a strength and point of difference for the region through CEDA’s work with McKinsey & Company in 2017, given the cluster of businesses and organisations that are based in Manawatū. These include Massey University, UCOL, FoodHQ, the crown research institutes AgResearch, Plant and Food Research, and the Ridddet Institute, Fonterra Research and Development Centre, Sprout, and now the Rural Innovation Lab. Representatives from all these organisations and more, including iwi and Māori, were involved in the creation of the strategy –

-    

-     https://www.newshub.co.nz/home/rural/2019/10/major-agritech-strategy-launched-for-manawat.html

-     https://ceda.nz/latest-news/manawatu-agritech-strategy-recognised-by-ednz-award/?utm_source=60+Seconds+with+CEDA&utm_campaign=aba39057ff-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2019_11_06_01_36&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_21e40e8314-aba39057ff-1211592875

-     To attract tertiary graduates and encourage people to choose Manawatū as a place to begin and grow their career, CEDA is partnering with NxtStep, a leading graduate employment and careers platform in New Zealand. Nationally, NxtStep advertises roles across 60 sectors, from agriculture to technology, manufacturing, planning and resourcing to marketing and communications and more. Manawatū-based companies already featuring on the platform include some of the region’s largest employers like Toyota, Fonterra, FMG, and Mainfreight. As a result of the partnership a dedicated Manawatū recruitment platform has been developed – manawatu.nxtstep.co.nz. The platform features Manawatū specific employers and employment opportunities, a mixture of interesting and engaging lifestyle content and a series of interviews with young professionals who are based here in the region – giving an authentic insight into the lifestyle and career opportunities.

-     https://manawatu.nxtstep.co.nz/

 

 

Recommendation

That the Community and Strategy Committee:

a)            Receives the report titled “Community Well-beings and Strategic Issues Overview - January 2020” dated 19 January 2020.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.