Notice is hereby given that a Meeting of the Community and Strategy Committee will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Wednesday, 6 May 2020

1pm

Council Chamber
15 Forth Street, Invercargill

 

Community and Strategy Committee Agenda

OPEN

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Julie Keast

 

 

Mayor Gary Tong

 

Councillors

Don Byars

 

 

John Douglas

 

 

Paul Duffy

 

 

Bruce Ford

 

 

Darren Frazer

 

 

George Harpur

 

 

Ebel Kremer

 

 

Christine Menzies

 

 

Karyn Owen

 

 

Margie Ruddenklau

 

 

Rob Scott

 

 

IN ATTENDANCE

 

Group Manager - Community and Futures

Rex Capil

Committee Advisor

Alyson Hamilton

 

 

Contact Telephone: 0800 732 732

Postal Address: PO Box 903, Invercargill 9840

Email: emailsdc@southlanddc.govt.nz

Website: www.southlanddc.govt.nz

 

Full agendas are available on Council’s Website

www.southlanddc.govt.nz

 

 


Terms of Reference – Community and Strategy Committee

 

TYPE OF COMMITTEE

Council committee

RESPONSIBLE TO

Council

SUBCOMMITTEES

None

LEGISLATIVE BASIS

Committee constituted by Council as per schedule 7, clause 30 (1)(a), LGA 2002.

Committee delegated powers by Council as per schedule 7, clause 32, LGA 2002.

MEMBERSHIP

The Community and Strategy Committee is a committee of the whole Council.  The mayor and all councillors will be members of the Community and Strategy Committee. 

FREQUENCY OF MEETINGS

Six weekly or as required

QUORUM

Seven

SCOPE OF ACTIVITIES

The Community and Strategy Committee is responsible for:

       providing advice to Council on the approaches that it should take to promote the social, economic, environmental and cultural well-being of the District and its communities and in so-doing contribute to the realisation of Council’s vision of one District offering endless opportunities

       to provide leadership to District communities on the strategic issues and opportunities that they face

       to develop relationships and communicate with stakeholders including community organisations, special interest groups and businesses that are of importance to the District as a whole.

•      assessing and providing advice to Council on:

-    key strategic issues affecting the District and Council

-    community development issues affecting the District and Council

-    the service needs of the District’s communities and how these needs might best be met

-    resource allocation and prioritisation processes and decisions. 

•      developing and recommending strategies, plans and policies to the Council that advance Council’s vision and goals, and comply with the purpose of local government as specified in the Local Government Act 2002

•      monitoring the implementation and effectiveness of strategies, plans and policies

•      developing and approving submissions to government, local authorities and other organisations

•      advocating Council’s position on particular policy issues to other organisations, as appropriate

•      considering recommendations from community boards and Council committees and make decisions where it has authority from Council to do so, or recommendations to Council where a Council decision is required.

It is also responsible for community partnerships and engagement.  This includes:

•      monitoring the progress, implementation and effectiveness of the work undertaken by Great South in line with the Joint Shareholders Agreement and Constitution.

•      allocations of grants, loans, scholarships and bursaries in accordance with Council policy

•      international relations 

•      developing and overseeing the implementation of Council’s community engagement and consultation policies and processes. 

The Community and Strategy Committee is responsible for overseeing the following Council activities:

•      community services

•      district leadership.

DELEGATIONS

Power to Act

The Community and Strategy Committee shall have the following delegated powers and be accountable to Council for the exercising of these powers:

a)        approve submissions made by Council to other councils, central government and other bodies

b)        approve scholarships, bursaries, grants and loans within Council policy and annual budgets

c)        approve and/or assign all contracts for work, services or supplies where those contracts relate to work within approved estimates.  

d)        monitor the performance of Great South.. 

Power to Recommend

The Community and Strategy Committee«name of entity» has authority to consider and make recommendations to Council regarding strategies, policies and plans.

FINANCIAL DELEGATIONS

Council authorises the following delegated authority of financial powers to Council committees in regard to matters within each committee’s jurisdiction.

Contract Acceptance:

            accept or decline any contract for the purchase of goods, services, capital works or other assets where the total value of the lump sum contract does not exceed the sum allocated in the Long Term Plan/Annual Plan and the contract relates to an activity that is within the scope of activities relating to the work of the Community and Strategy committee

            accept or decline any contract for the disposal of goods, plant or other assets other than property or land subject to the disposal being provided for in the Long Term Plan

Budget Reallocation

The committee is authorised to reallocate funds from one existing budget item to another. Reallocation of this kind must not impact on current or future levels of service and must be:

            funded by way of savings on existing budget items

            within the jurisdiction of the committee

            consistent with the Revenue and Financing Policy

LIMITS TO DELEGATIONS

Matters that must be processed by way of recommendation to Council include:

•      amendment to fees and charges relating to all activities

•      powers that cannot be delegated to committees as per the Local Government Act 2002 and sections 2.4 and 2.5 of this manual.

Delegated authority is within the financial limits in section 9 of this manual.

STAKEHOLDER RELATIONSHIPS

This committee will maintain and develop relationships with:

            Community Boards

            Great South

•      Milford Community Trust

•      Destination Fiordland.

The committee will also hear and receive updates to Council from these organisations as required.

CONTACT WITH MEDIA

The committee chairperson is the authorised spokesperson for the committee in all matters where the committee has authority or a particular interest.

Committee members do not have delegated authority to speak to the media and/or outside agencies on behalf of Council on matters outside of the board’s delegations.

The group manager, community and futures will manage the formal communications between the committee and the people of the Southland District and for the committee in the exercise of its business.   Correspondence with central government, other local government agencies or official agencies will only take place through Council staff and will be undertaken under the name of Southland District Council.

 


Community and Strategy Committee

06 May 2020

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

ITEM                                                                                                                                                                                  PAGE

Procedural

1             Apologies                                                                                                                                                                7

2             Leave of absence                                                                                                                                                7

3             Conflict of Interest                                                                                                                                             7

4             Public Forum                                                                                                                                                         7

5             Extraordinary/Urgent Items                                                                                                                        7

6             Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                                                               7

Reports

7.1         Chairperson's Report                                                                                                                                       9

7.2         SDC Holiday Programme - January 2020                                                                                            11

7.3         Customer Satisfaction Survey Report November 2019 - January 2020                           23

7.4         District Heritage Fund Application Summary and Financial Report                                 37

7.5         5G Rollout in Southland                                                                                                                               43

7.6         Community Board Plans Update                                                                                                            47

7.7         Strategy Development Work Programme Update                                                                      53

7.8         Research and Analysis – COVID-19 Projects Update                                                                  63

7.9         Big Picture Workshop and Strategic Workshop Summary                                                     71

7.10       Community Well-beings and Strategic Issues Overview - March - April 2020             89


1             Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

2             Leave of absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

3             Conflict of Interest

 

Committee Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision-making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4             Public Forum

Notification to speak is required by 5pm at least two days before the meeting. Further information is available on www.southlanddc.govt.nz or phoning 0800 732 732.

 

5             Extraordinary/Urgent Items

To consider, and if thought fit, to pass a resolution to permit the committee to consider any further items which do not appear on the Agenda of this meeting and/or the meeting to be held with the public excluded.

Such resolution is required to be made pursuant to Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987, and the Chairperson must advise:

(i)            the reason why the item was not on the Agenda, and

(ii)          the reason why the discussion of this item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

(a)           that item may be discussed at that meeting if-

(i)        that item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

(ii)       the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

(b)          no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

6             Confirmation of Minutes

6.1             Meeting minutes of Community and Strategy Committee, 11 February 2020  


Community and Strategy Committee

6 May 2020

 

Chairperson's Report

Record No:             R/20/4/9414

Author:                      Alyson Hamilton, Committee Advisor

Approved by:         Rex Capil, Group Manager Community and Futures

 

  Decision                                        Recommendation                                  Information

 

 

 

Purpose of Report

The purpose of the report is to provide an update to the Community and Strategy Committee on activities of the chairperson from 27 February through to 26 March 2020.

 

Kia ora and welcome to the Community and Strategy Committee meeting.

Items of interest that I have been involved are as follows:

·    viewing of webinar “The Slippery Slope to Corruption” sponsored by the Serious Fraud Office

·    along with Councillor Duffy and community partnership leader Karen Purdue - attended a Catlins Partnership meeting held at Balclutha

·    assisted with the setup of a welfare centre at the Tokanui Hall due to travellers, mainly those passing through the Catlins, being stranded due to flooding with no booked accommodation

·    attendance at Waimumu Field Days and assisted at the Southland District Council site

·    along with councillors, attended the strategic workshop held over a three day period

·    attendance at Southland youth futures advisory meeting

·    attendance at the recent Waihopai Toetoe Community Board formal meeting

·    attendance at the final meeting of the Welcoming Communities Advisory Group recently held at Great South. This work has now been forwarded to individual councils for administration

·    joined Karen Purdue and Megan Seator in a discussion on going forward with Welcoming Communities with ICC representatives Rebecca Amundsen and Mary Napper

·    joined others from the community at the Southern District Arts Trust Edge of the World Exhibition event of the waka crossing the Waikawa Harbour (Awarua Runanga) 

·    meeting with Richard Gray, Fonterra, regarding the Financial & Reserve Fund along with Cr Paul Duffy, community board chair, Pam Yorke, group manager, environmental services Fran Mikulicic and team leader, resource management, Marcus Roy

·    attendance at Catlins Coast Inc meeting - Clutha District Council, Mayor Brian Cadogan and Cr Paul Goldsmith were in attendance discussing the draft community plan “Our Place - Catlins”

·    along with Cr Paul Duffy met with landowner regarding Slope Point access

·    attended Citizens Advice Bureau Southland meeting

·    met with Emergency Management Southland representatives, along with Serena Lyders and Leona Brunton to discuss flooding response

·    attended the Chair’s Forum in Invercargill

·    spoke, along with Cr Paul Duffy, at Curio Bay to the attendees of Coastal Restoration Trust NZ conference

·    attended Gore Counselling Centre monthly Executive Committee meeting.

 

Hope everyone is well in their bubbles.  The reality of movement to Level 3 is a mix of emotions. I find the reality is don’t get too excited it won’t be that much different although my husband read in the paper this morning that golf will be a permitted activity under Level 3 - not exciting for me but Pete was certainly very interested!   We have a very small bubble so it is simple, although for the older generation in our lives I am feeling their isolation!

 

 

 

Recommendation

That the Community and Strategy Committee:

a)            Receives the report titled “Chairperson's Report” dated 29 April 2020.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.  

 


Community and Strategy Committee

6 May 2020

 

SDC Holiday Programme - January 2020

Record No:             R/20/4/9554

Author:                      Kathryn Cowie, Community Liaison Officer

Approved by:         Rex Capil, Group Manager Community and Futures

 

  Decision                                        Recommendation                                  Information

 

 

 

Purpose

1        The purpose of this report is to provide the Community and Strategy Committee with an update on the SDC holiday programme that was delivered by Sport Southland in January 2020.

2        Sport Southland delivered a school holiday programme in January 2020 on six dates and in six locations around the District. The attached evaluation report from Sport Southland gives an overview of activities, attendance, feedback, key learnings and recommendations for future programme delivery.

Background

3        Southland District Council began delivering a holiday programme into the Southland District since the late 1990’s.  The delivery of this programme was then incorporated into part of the key deliverables of Venture Southland.  Sport Southland was subcontracted by Venture Southland and provided a physical activity based programme for a number of years.

4        In recent times the SDC holiday programme was delivered by Venture Southland whereby the scope of the programme began to incorporate more arts and crafts type activities alongside the physical activities and in doing so it utilised some of the resources of the ILT Kidzone Festival.

5        The SDC holiday programme continues to be very popular with families in the District.

6        In organising the proposed programme for the January 2020, a Request for Proposal was published on GETS, with providers given a deadline of 15 September to submit proposals to SDC. Following the deadline, there were no proposals received, but after direct discussions with Sport Southland they advised that they were interested in delivering the programme. They submitted a proposal which was accepted and a contract issued.

7        Due to the short timeframe available, it was agreed that the programme would be delivered on a smaller scale than previous years, but with the aim of creating a bigger impact on young people and rural communities in the future.

8        The programme consisted of six sessions in six locations around the District.

9        The attached report from Sport Southland and their presentation will give you an overview of what was delivered, attendance, key learnings and the feedback from participants.

10      Both SDC staff and Sport Southland are keen to continue working together to deliver this programme to our rural communities.

 

Recommendation

That the Community and Strategy Committee:

a)            Receives the report titled “SDC Holiday Programme - January 2020” dated 23 April 2020

 

 

 

 

Attachments

a             SDC Holiday Programme Report Final

b             SDC Holiday Programme  2020 infographic    

 


Community and Strategy Committee

06 May 2020

 

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Community and Strategy Committee

06 May 2020

 

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Community and Strategy Committee

6 May 2020

 

Customer Satisfaction Survey Report November 2019 - January 2020

Record No:             R/20/4/9552

Author:                      Jodi Findlay, Customer Contact Centre Manager

Approved by:         Trudie Hurst, Group Manager Customer Delivery

 

  Decision                                        Recommendation                                  Information

 

 

 

Purpose

1        The purpose of the report is to provide the Community and Strategy Committee with the results of the Customer Satisfaction Survey and Net Promoter Score (NPS) for November 2019 - January 2020.

 

Executive Summary

2        As part of the 2018-28 Long Term Plan, it was identified by staff that there was the opportunity to have an independent research company complete the Request for Service (RFS) customer satisfaction and NPS surveys.

 

Recommendation

That the Community and Strategy Committee:

a)            Receives the report titled “Customer Satisfaction Survey Report November 2019 - January 2020” dated 20 April 2020.

 

 


 

Analysis

Findings and opportunities

3        Over the course of the three months, customer support have achieved a positive NPS score of 52, this is up from a baseline score of 34 from the previous year.

4        Customers’ satisfaction with the first point of contact sits at 72% satisfaction for the three month period. This continues to remain at a high level and reflects the results staff see with internal quality assurance training in the contact centre.

5        Customer support will continue to monitor the feedback from the report and engage with activity managers to recognise excellence and improve where necessary.

Attachments

a             SDC Customer Satisfaction Report 7 February 2020    

 


Community and Strategy Committee

06 May 2020

 

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Community and Strategy Committee

6 May 2020

 

District Heritage Fund Application Summary and Financial Report

Record No:             R/20/4/9642

Author:                      Louise Pagan, Communications Manager

Approved by:         Rex Capil, Group Manager Community and Futures

 

  Decision                                       Recommendation                                 Information

 

 

 

Purpose

1        The purpose of this report is to give the committee a summary of the applications to the Southland District Council Heritage Fund from the March round. These applications seek grants to assist with the day-to-day running of local museums, heritage centres or similar type organisations within the Southland District Council boundaries.

Executive Summary

2        Eligible museums, groups and organisations can apply to the District Heritage Fund once a year for assistance with operational costs. There are two funding rounds – one in September and one in March. The recommended amount for distribution for this round is $29,500. The total amount for distribution for the year is $63,981.

3        Four applications have been received for the current funding round. They are:

1    11

Central Southland Vintage Machinery Club

 

Request assistance towards operational costs such as power, insurance, rates, bank fees.

Restoring heritage items for the public to view.

 

Total Project $9,000

 

 

 

Amount Requested $7,000

Recommendation

$6,000

 

2    12

Fiordland Vintage Machinery Club

 

Request assistance towards operational costs such as power, rates, insurance, and general operating costs.

Vintage machinery museum open to the public 7 days per week.

 

Total Project $10,575

 

 

 

Amount Requested $7,000

Recommendation

$6,000

 

3    13

Otautau Museum

 

Request assistance towards operational costs for the museum such as power, insurance, rates and general expenses.

Local museum, open to the pubic two days per week and by request.

 

Total Project $8,897

 

 

 

Amount Requested $7,682

Recommendation

$7,000

 

4    14

Rakiura Heritage Trust

 

Request assistance towards operational costs for the heritage centre.

Local museum open to the public 7 days per week.

 

Total Project $99,280

 

 

 

Amount Requested $12,000

Recommendation

$10,500

 

5        The financial report for the District Heritage Fund up to 31 March 2020 is as follows:

Recommendation

That the Community and Strategy Committee:

a)            Receives the report titled “District Heritage Fund Application Summary and Financial Report” dated 21 April 2020.

 

b)           Determines that this matter or decision be recognised as not significant in terms of Section 76 of the Local Government Act 2002.

 

c)            Determines that it has complied with the decision-making provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 to the extent necessary in relation to this decision; and in accordance with Section 79 of the act determines that it does not require further information, further assessment of options or further analysis of costs and benefits or advantages and disadvantages prior to making a decision on this matter.

 

d)           Approves the allocation of funds from the District Heritage Fund as follows:

 

1

Central Southland Vintage Machinery Club

$6,000

2

Fiordland Vintage Machinery Club

$6,000

3

Otautau Museum

$7,000

4

Rakiura Heritage Trust

$10,500

 

e)            Approves the financial summary for the District Heritage Fund to 30 March 2020.

 

 

 


 

Background

6        The District Heritage Fund was established in 2013 and collects about $63,000 a year via the District heritage rate to support the operational costs of District museums, heritage groups and organisations.

Issues

7        Applicants have all met the criteria of the fund.

8        Any funds that are not distributed in this funding round are retained in the District Heritage Fund reserves.

Factors to Consider

Legal and Statutory Requirements

9        This aligns with Council’s Community Assistance Policy.

Community Views

10      Funding for this is through rates, and all stakeholders can make submissions on the suitability and amount of the fund during the Long Term Plan or Annual Plan process.

Costs and Funding

11      The fund is funded by the district heritage rate.

Policy Implications

12      The criteria and awarding of this fund meets Council’s Community Assistance Policy.

Analysis

Options Considered

13      The options for consideration are either to awards the grants to the applicants or to decline the applications.

Analysis of Options

Option 1 – Award the grants

Advantages

Disadvantages

·        fulfil Southland District Council’s commitment to offer and award grants to museums and heritage groups and organisations to assist with operational costs.

·        Southland District Council would not fulfil its commitment of offer and award grants to District museums and heritage groups and organisations to assist with operational costs.

 


 

Option 2 – Decline the grants

Advantages

Disadvantages

·        there is more money in the District Heritage Fund.

·        museums and heritage groups and organisations struggle to cover operational costs.

 

Assessment of Significance

14      Under Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy, the awarding of this fund is not considered significant.

Recommended Option

15      Option 1 – award the grants.

Next Steps

16      Applicants will be advised of the outcome of their applications and payment of grants will be arranged.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report. 

 


Community and Strategy Committee

6 May 2020

 

5G Rollout in Southland

Record No:             R/20/4/9464

Author:                      Karen Purdue, Community Partnership Leader

Approved by:         Rex Capil, Group Manager Community and Futures

 

  Decision                                        Recommendation                                  Information

 

 

 

Background

1        At a previous Community and Strategy meeting staff were asked to look into details around the rollout of 5G in Southland.

What is 5G

2        5G stands for 5th generation. It’s the latest cellular network after 2G, 3G, and 4G. The 5G network is more technologically advanced and implementation has begun in Aotearoa New Zealand.

Trials and Rollouts

3        In NZ, 5G has already been launched by Spark and Vodafone in limited locations, with further rollout planned into 2020. Spark trialled 5G in Alexandra and has since extended 5G to parts of Westport, Twizel, Tekapo, Hokitika and Clyde. Vodaphone launched 5G in parts of Auckland, Wellington, Christchurch and Queenstown in December 2019.

4        The rollout will use similar wavelengths to those used for 2G, 3G and 4G. For example, the trial in Alexandra used the 2.6 GHz band, which is used in other parts of the country for 4G. The government has announced that a slightly higher 3.5 GHz wavelength is being auctioned for use in early 2020.

5        Further into the future, higher frequency bands (like 26 GHz) may be used. This wavelength is known as millimetre waves. Radio frequency use is regulated in NZ to avoid issues with interference, to co-ordinate internationally, and because it’s a commercial resource.

Network infrastructure

6        Rolling out 5G will require new infrastructure. There are opportunities for telecommunication companies to share infrastructure to reduce costs and make 5G more accessible, particularly in rural areas. There is already a Rural Connectivity Group established between operators so they can share resources and expand coverage for 4G, and this forum could potentially be used to roll out and expand 5G as well. Sharing infrastructure would reduce the number of structures that would be installed, which could reduce some aesthetic concerns. Visual impacts are also regulated by the Ministry for the Environment.

    Potential Benefits

7        5G is seen as an attractive technology because:

·       it is faster. 5G will have faster upload and download speeds compared to 4G. For companies that need to access large datasets, the shorter download speeds will have massive productivity benefits. A trial in Alexandra, Otago reported speeds 5-20 times faster than existing 4G

·       it has lower latency. 5G will have a shorter delay before you can access the content you are downloading – with entertainment benefits (eg streaming and gaming) as well as educational ones (eg downloading multi-media resources in schools). It will also enable new technologies and applications in transport (including driverless cars), medicine and other areas

·       it offers more connectivity. More devices will be able to connect to each other – like better remote control of the gadgets in your house from your phone

·       it has a larger network capacity. 5G will have a greater capacity for volume of traffic so more people can livestream the same event without buffering issues.

8        NZ is physically isolated and 5G enables better connectivity with the rest of the world. Adopting 5G in line with the international community will ensure communication channels are compatible, enable research and development of new technologies, and enable use of new tools to help improve our lives.

9        Within NZ, rural connectivity is an ongoing issue. 5G offers potential for improvement over services currently available if significant investment and co-operation between the network operators is in place. The Rural Connectivity Group could play a role in bringing 5G to rural areas.

10      5G will be needed to enable new technologies such as self-driving carsin-home elder and medical support, and use in industries such as manufacturing or precision farming.

Why are some people concerned about 5G?

11      5G presents exciting opportunities that have the potential to improve many areas of peoples’ lives by facilitating more access to more technology. Some may see this expansion of technology as detrimental, raising issues of privacy, surveillance, and displacement of certain types of jobs. It’s important that any benefits are weighted against these concerns.

12      Radio waves used by 5G are a type of radiation, so it’s reasonable to ask whether this poses a risk and, if it does, to ensure people are not exposed beyond safe thresholds. Radiation is the way that energy travels through space and there are many different types. Light, for example, is a form of radiation that is so common that we often don’t think of it in that way.

13      Radiation that has frequencies higher than that of visible light, like the ultraviolet radiation rays in sunlight, and X-rays, can damage the cells in our bodies, potentially causing cancer if exposure is high. These types of waves are called ‘ionising radiation’, which reflects their ability to break the chemical bonds in molecules, which can damage cells. So exposure to sunlight is linked with skin cancer for those who spend a lot of time in the sun without protection.

14      In contrast, the radio waves used for 5G have frequencies that are ten thousand times too low to damage molecules (so are called ‘non ionising’). The only fully documented way 5G radio waves can cause harm is through their heating effect and this can only happen at very high intensities.

15      Radio waves can heat our body if we are over-exposed to them. However, these effects can only occur when exposed directly to a very powerful source so that the heat builds up enough to damage tissue before it dissipates. 5G sources are simply not powerful enough to cause damage in this way.

16      As the thermal effects of radio waves are well-understood, the limits at which they can potentially begin to cause harm are clearly defined. NZ has set its own standards, which are much lower than this limit (about 50 times lower). This means that there is a large safety margin built into our standard.

17      In practice, the public has a far lower radio wave exposure than the NZ limit. This low exposure is checked by independent monitoring undertaken at cell sites every year.

18      Thermal effects are well-understood and research in this area continues to be monitored. In NZ, the Ministry of Health has an expert advisory committee that monitors and reviews all new research. The World Health Organization (WHO) also continually investigates possible health effects, as well as other international groups like the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority. The Swedish Authority released a robust and comprehensive review this year, quoting “no health risks with weak electromagnetic fields have been established.”

19      There have been some concerns about the security of the 5G network, because it is more reliant on software than 4G and uses cloud computing. NZ’s Government Communications Security Bureau (GCSB) is aware of this and will act to prevent and minimise security risks to our communication technologies as we adapt to the new technology.

20      The currently available scientific evidence makes it extremely unlikely that there will be any adverse effects on human or environmental health. NZ needs to continue to monitor the risks of exposure and ensure that they are within the international safety standard, as well as keeping a close watch on any new research.

Southland Rollout

21      At present there is no clarity around sites or timeframes for 5G. Providers have not published their intentions in this regard.

22      The current priority for providers at present is delivery of the blackspots and other planned project rollouts.

23      It should be noted, in New Zealand, all network providers rolling out a 5G network must comply with the Resource Management Act (RMA) 1991, including the National Environmental Standards for Telecommunications Facilities (NESTF). These regulations include compliance to the New Zealand Radiofrequency Field Exposure Standard which sets maximum exposure limits for the public. The current NZ exposure standard already covers 5G.

24      When a mobile network operator proposes a new cell site, they must submit pre-commencement reports to the local council to show that the requirements in the NESTF and the exposure standard will be met for each cell site covered by the NESTF. This includes taking into account exposure from other telecommunications facilities in the vicinity as well. If the report shows that the cell site will generate exposures at or above 25% of the public exposure limit, further reporting to the local council is required. If a facility or network operator cannot comply with requirements in the NESTF, the proposed facility will be “non-complying”.

25      The following links may be helpful in providing other information about 5G

https://www.pmcsa.ac.nz/topics/5g-in-aotearoa-new-zealand/

https://www.health.govt.nz/publication/interagencycommittee-health-effects-non-ionising-fields-report-ministers-2018

https://www.health.govt.nz/yourhealth/healthy-living/environmental-health/radiation-environment/cellsites-and-5g/5g-questions-andanswers

https://www.health.govt.nz/system/ files/documents/topic_sheets/5g-and-health-aug19.pdf

https://www.mbie.govt.nz/dmsdocument/7483-5g-information-pack-pdf

 

 

Recommendation

That the Community and Strategy Committee:

a)            Receives the report titled “5G Rollout in Southland” dated 28 April 2020.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.  

 


Community and Strategy Committee

6 May 2020

 

Community Board Plans Update

Record No:             R/20/4/9501

Author:                      Kelly Tagg, Community Partnership Leader

Approved by:         Rex Capil, Group Manager Community and Futures

 

  Decision                                        Recommendation                                  Information

 

 

 

Purpose

1        The purpose of this report is to provide a further update on the community board plan project process and to share the vision and outcomes agreed by each of Council’s nine community boards.

Executive Summary

2        The community leadership team continues to work on the development and implementation of nine community board plans across the Southland District.  These plans are reflective of Council’s new governance structure following the October local body elections.

3        The development of these plans has involved (to date) community consultation through meetings, surveys and externally facilitated workshops. 

4        It has been the community leadership team’s intention to have the vision and outcomes in place for each board by early 2020 so as to provide guidance around the development of activity management plans and the Long Term Plan 2031.

Process

5        In January 2020, board members were sent the following information;

•     summary documents from the elected members workshop in their respective area

•     a full copy of the relevant community board workshop summary document (including draft actions) from the workshop held in their community board area 

•     youth survey summary

•     community survey summary

•     business survey summary

•     community board area map

6        Workshops with each board to review the above information have been held and all boards have now settled on their vision and outcomes. 

7        Some boards have also further refined their actions and further work to develop this process is ongoing.

8        The Fiordland Community Board and previously the Te Anau Community Board had been working to develop a community plan for quite some time and on 10 March held a workshop in Te Anau to talk to the wider community about the “Fiordland Community Futures Plan”.  This workshop was presented by Sarah Greaney, on behalf of the Fiordland Community Board, with some behind the scenes support from staff with regards to advertising and development of the presentation that was shown to the community on the night. 

 

Recommendation

That the Community and Strategy Committee:

a)            Receives the report titled “Community Board Plans Update” dated 21 April 2020.

 

b)           Determines that this matter or decision be recognised as not significant in terms of Section 76 of the Local Government Act 2002.

 

c)            Determines that it has complied with the decision-making provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 to the extent necessary in relation to this decision; and in accordance with Section 79 of the act determines that it does not require further information, further assessment of options or further analysis of costs and benefits or advantages and disadvantages prior to making a decision on this matter.

 

 


 

Summary of visions and outcomes

Ardlussa Community Board

Vision: 

Ardlussa is a community that cares and looks after each other, is alive with enthusiasm, is a good environment to bring up families and is respectful of its environment. 

Outcomes:

•     a connected, inclusive and vibrant Ardlussa community

•     a community that attracts people, businesses and visitors

•     a community where council fosters leadership, partnerships and community engagement.

Fiordland Community Board

Vision:

Fiordland is a thriving and connected community of people that welcomes visitors, embraces sustainability and takes care of its natural environment.

Outcomes:

•     a community that attracts business, investment, people, and visitors

•     a community that sustainably protects and enhances its natural environment in a regenerative manner

•     a community that enriches its lifestyle through cohesive, well thought out planning for growth

•     a community that is connected, functional, safe and healthy, with access to excellent services.

Northern Community Board

Vision:

The Northern area of Southland will be a healthy, caring, connected, vibrant, welcoming, diverse and progressive community.

Outcomes:

•     a progressive and flourishing economy creating opportunities for growth and employment

•     a safe and healthy community with access to quality facilities and services

•     a connected, involved and thriving community.

Oraka Aparima Community Board

Vision:  A vibrant, sustainable, connected community focused on the locals and welcoming to visitors.

Outcomes:

•     Oraka Aparima is a strong and involved community

•     Oraka Aparima value the environment and ensure that it is healthy and protected for the future

•     our strong economy is supported by a broad range of services

•     our infrastructure is efficient, cost effective to meet current and future needs.

Oreti Community Board

Vision:

A strong unified community creating plentiful opportunities and embracing innovate ideas to ensure an exciting future. 

Outcomes:

•     a progressive and thriving economy creating opportunities for growth and development

•     a healthy, safe community with access to quality facilities, amenities and services

•     our infrastructure is efficient, cost effective and meets current and future needs

•     our natural and built environment is clean, healthy and attractive

Stewart Island/Rakiura Community Board

Vision:

Stewart Island Rakiura is a connected community that manages growth and has a sustainable future.

Outcomes:

•     a cohesive and connected community, recognising that many of our ratepayers don’t reside on the Island full time

•     Kaitiakitanga – guardianship and protection of Stewart Island’s pristine natural environment

•     a community that has fit for purpose, sustainable infrastructure

•     a community that plans for its future – recognising its unique challenges and opportunities.

Tuatapere Te Waewae Community Board

Vision:

Tuatapere Te Waewae is an attractive, vibrant and involved community

Outcomes:

•     a community that attracts businesses, people and visitors resulting in economic growth

•     a healthy, safe and connected community with access to quality services and facilities

•     a community that celebrates and protects its history and heritage.

Waihopai Toetoe Community Board

Vision:

A united, engaged community where people are valued, our assets are nurtured and our heritage and environment is respected.

Outcomes:

•     a thriving, happy and safe community with access to quality facilities, amenities and services

•     our community is connected and engaged

•     our unique natural environment is healthy and protected

•     our communities have the opportunity to celebrate their history and heritage.

Wallace Takitimu Community Board

Vision:

A self-reliant, tidy, safe, thriving community – a great place to visit and live. 

Outcomes:

•     a vibrant Wallace-Takitimu area that attracts people, businesses and visitors resulting in prosperity

•     Wallace-Takitimu is a strong, connected and inclusive community

•     a healthy, safe community with access to quality facilities, amenities and services

•     a community where Council fosters community engagement.

Next Steps

9        The vision and outcomes for all boards will be shared internally with staff and it is hoped that they will assist them to develop activity management plans which will also feed into the development of the Long Term Plan.

10      Further discussions to take place with the boards at upcoming workshops to refine and develop action plans and/or objectives.

11      Staff recognise that a stronger relationship with iwi is essential and an approach has been made to iwi to discuss and plan a way forward for more meaningful engagement.

12      Prior to New Zealand moving into alert level 4 during the COVID-19 pandemic, staff from the services and assets and community leadership teams had been planning to hold workshops with the community boards in May so as to give members an opportunity to discuss options for delivering the activity, service delivery and level of service requirements that they may wish to have included in the Long Term Plan.  New dates will be set for these workshops in due course. 

13      Several boards have also indicated they wish to have further discussions with their communities about their vision and outcomes and the development of actions/objectives that will be delivered in partnership.   Staff will provide support throughout this process.

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    


Community and Strategy Committee

6 May 2020

 

Strategy Development Work Programme Update

Record No:             R/20/4/9413

Author:                      Michelle Stevenson, Strategy and Policy Manager

Approved by:         Rex Capil, Group Manager Community and Futures

 

  Decision                                        Recommendation                                  Information

 

 

 

Purpose

1        The purpose of this report is to provide the Community and Strategy Committee with an update on strategy development and work programme that will assist Council with the further integration of the strategic framework and alignment to the activities Council delivers to its communities.

 

Executive Summary

2        At its 3 December 2019 meeting, the Community and Strategy Committee endorsed the Community and Futures Research and Analysis Work Programme transitioning to investigate an identified Council strategy deficit, and supported working towards a programme of work to progress strategy development over at least the next five years.

3        Strategy development will help provide the crucial link between Council’s vision and community outcomes, and plans and activities we have in place to deliver services to our communities.  This link between community outcomes and activities undertaken by Council will ensure that all Council activities are moving together towards the same vision for the District.

4        It is anticipated that strategy development will provide clear frameworks for the role that Council plays in addressing identified priorities.  When we understand and have a clear strategy for our own direction, we can better partner with those who share the same values.

5        Outside of the legislatively required strategies for the Long Term Plan (LTP), Council has a number of existing strategies that include plans of action and some long term thinking.  It will be part of the strategy development work to review existing strategies of Council to ensure they are high level to set out the vision and priorities to achieve the long-term District outcomes, and that they align to the current way of working for the future of the Southland District.

6        The strategy and policy team, in their initial discussions around strategy development, recognise that to be able to identify what strategies are needed to tackle the big issues for Southland, Council will need to look beyond the three year LTP planning cycle.  As part of the strategy development programme, consideration will include Council facilitating the development of a 30 year integrated strategic plan for Southland.

7        Southland District Council is in a unique position, whereby not having a large number of existing strategies to review or amend, there is an opportunity to ensure that what is developed is fit-for-purpose and future focused.  The opportunity also exists to not be clouded by previously written strategies and start from a clean platform.

8        On 11 March 2020, the World Health Organisation (WHO) declared covid-19 as a global pandemic.  Council has a leading and important role in helping to shape the future of the Southland district, and influencing the future of the region and nation.  Having clear strategy to determine Council’s role in this future will be even more important following COVID-19 in the months and years to come.

9        A strategy development work programme will be developed over the following months, and a further report for discussion and endorsement provided to the Community and Strategy Committee on this progress at its 8 July meeting.

 

Recommendation

That the Community and Strategy Committee:

a)            Receives the report titled “Strategy Development Work Programme Update” dated 21 April 2020.

 

b)           Determines that this matter or decision be recognised as not significant in terms of Section 76 of the Local Government Act 2002.

 

c)            Determines that it has complied with the decision-making provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 to the extent necessary in relation to this decision; and in accordance with Section 79 of the act determines that it does not require further information, further assessment of options or further analysis of costs and benefits or advantages and disadvantages prior to making a decision on this matter.

 

d)           Notes that a report for discussion and endorsement of a strategy development work programme will be provided to the Community and Strategy Committee at its 8 July meeting.

 

 


 

Background

10      As part of the Long Term Plan 2018-2028 process, Council of the previous triennium identified the need to invest in planning for the future, and endorsed an approach to undertake big picture research and analytics work.

11      As a result of the consultation undertaken in 2017 – 2018 the Council confirmed in the Long Term Plan 2018-2028 the following:

12      This resulted in the Community and Futures Research and Analysis programme of work, which included: demographic trends, central government influence, natural hazard risks, technological change, economic trends and affordability, environmental considerations and intergenerational shifts.

13      Throughout 2018 and 2019, the above programme of work was progressed and resulted in a number of work streams getting underway to assist Council in preparing for the future and beginning to gather the information needed to inform decision-making for the future of Southland.

14      At its 3 December 2019 meeting, the Community and Strategy Committee endorsed the Community and Futures Research and Analysis Work Programme transitioning to investigate an identified Council strategy deficit, and supported working towards a programme of work to progress strategy development over at least the next five years.

15      At the end of 2019, staff from strategy and policy undertook preliminary discussions with consultants Rebecca McElrea and Sandra James to discuss Council’s strategy development and begin discussions around a potential framework to move us forward over the next five years.

16      This workshop covered the context of why Council needs to move forward with strategy development, what we define as a strategy, how a framework will be developed, and the alignment to Councils activity development and delivery.

17      As mentioned above, strategy development as a means of investing in community futures is part of the 2018-2028 LTP mandate to increase our investment in community planning, and ensure we understand, plan for and respond to the changes and opportunities for the future of the District.

Issues

18      As previously identified, Council has an opportunity for extensive strategy development in the upcoming years. 

19      In a number of instances Council has relied heavily on other external partners and agencies to determine strategies for the region, and to some degree by default, the District.  This has meant that Council has not recently invested in any significant way in its own strategies as a District.

20      The implications of this is evident where Council does not have a clear framework or agreed direction of the role it plays in addressing identified priorities. This in turn means that current action and future planning for the role of Council in specific circumstances is unclear. 

21      To provide practical examples, if Council had a Southland District Accessibility Strategy it would provide Council with a guide to enhance people’s independence and ability to participate, engage in and benefit from Council services; and the removal of barriers that might prevent people from participating fully in community life.  A Youth Development Strategy might give direction to Council and guide policies to provide the support and services to give opportunities for youth.  A Southland District Housing Strategy would clarify Council’s role and future direction for housing within the District.  While these are very specific examples, they illustrate in principle the importance of strategy development to provide clear and agreed direction for the role of Council in addressing priorities for the District.

22      A further example from Hastings District Council as to why they needed a Play Strategy;

“Currently our playgrounds are managed by an asset replacement strategy only, without any consideration to demand or need in particular areas. Furthermore, the provision of play opportunities for those outside the 0-10 year age group currently occurs by default rather than explicit planning. On this basis, it was identified that there was a need for Council to consider recreational facilities in a holistic manner rather than reacting to individual approaches from the community to upgrade or provide new facilities in a piecemeal way. A strategy that would guide and direct the provision of play opportunities within the District over the next 10 years was considered essential to improve the provision of appropriate play opportunities and ensure the efficient and effective utilisation of Council’s existing and any proposed new recreation facilities.”

23      And from Christchurch City Council in their Public Open Space Strategy;

“The Public Open Space Strategy sets out a vision for public open space over the next 30 years, the time span of the Urban Development Strategy. It provides a vision, goals, objectives and priorities to guide the efforts of the Council and its partners in the provision, development and maintenance of public open space.”

24      While there are no determinations yet as to what strategies Council may need to achieve community outcomes, it is valuable to understand why there is a need to develop a programme of work in this area.

25      It will be of benefit to the communities of Southland to have clear Council strategies for the District that will provide the crucial link between our community outcomes and the activities that Council delivers on behalf of its communities. 

26      When we understand and have a clear strategy for our own direction over the next 10, 20 and 30 plus years, we can better partner with stakeholders who share the same values, align to and inform regional strategy work, and ensure that Council is better positioned to respond to national strategy development and direction.

27      The strategy development work programme project will assist Council in the long term to be clear in who we are (purpose), what is needed (analysis and assessment), where we are heading (direction), and what we need to do to get there (approach).

28      Undertaking a stocktake of the current situation, reconciling by way of gap analysis and assessment, and reviewing existing Council strategies will be part of the strategy development work to ensure they are high level to set out the vision and priorities to achieve the long-term District outcomes.

29      The work undertaken to date in the community and futures research and analysis work has laid the foundations for strategy design and development.  A programme will be at least a five year programme of work, likely longer, and will require extensive Council and community engagement and participation throughout.

30      Recognition of strategies (national, regional, district) and strategy development will help provide the crucial link between Council’s strategic framework including vision, mission, community outcomes and strategic priorities; and activities and activity management plans that are currently prepared to support the delivery of services by way of informing the work programmes to our communities.  This link between the strategic framework and activities undertaken by Council will ensure that all Council activities are aligned towards achieving the same vision for the District.

31      This is illustrated by the following diagram:

32      It is anticipated that strategy development will provide clear frameworks for the role that Council plays in addressing identified priorities.

33      The strategy and policy team recognise that to be able to identify what strategies are needed to tackle the big issues for Southland, Council will need to look beyond the three year LTP planning cycle.  Therefore, as part of the strategy development programme, consideration will include Council facilitating the development of a 30 year integrated strategic planning approach for Southland.

34      It is also acknowledged that in order to complete a programme of work over at least a five year period, ensuring capacity is factored into the strategy and policy team work programme will be required, and/or outsourcing work to external contractors likely on a case by case basis.  If funding allocated in the 2021-2031 LTP and 2024-2034 LTP for investing in our community future planning was unavailable or diminished, this would impact what could be completed within the work programme.  The implications would likely be less strategy development work undertaken, or the period of time required extended and a less integrated strategic approach overall.

COVID-19 implications

35      On 11 March 2020, the World Health Organisation (WHO) declared covid-19 as a global pandemic. NZ developed an alert system with levels from 1-4. On Monday 23 March the NZ alert level was raised to a 3 and it was declared that the alert level would rise to a 4 by 11.59pm on Wednesday 25 March.  This meant that the nation went into to lockdown for four weeks with only essential services running and the majority of New Zealanders staying inside their houses to help reduce the spread of covid-19.    

36      As a result of the pandemic there will be widespread impacts within our communities, including but not limited to, an increase in unemployment and widespread economic and social disruption anticipated for some time.   

37      Council has an important role in helping to shape the future of the district and influencing the future of the region and nation. Having clear strategy to determine Council’s role in this future will be even more important following COVID-19 in the years to come.

Factors to Consider

Legal and Statutory Requirements

38      There are no legal or statutory requirements to consider at this time.

39      However, it is important to acknowledge that Council has commissioned and completed work in research and analysis as part of the 2018-2028 Long Term Plan, which is a statutory requirement for Council.

Community Views

40      As part of the Long Term Plan 2018-2028 consultation document and subsequent submission process the issue of investing in our community future planning was highlighted and the preferred option was to invest in this approach.

41      No specific community views have been sought in relation to the development of a framework that assists Council in progressing a programme of work in strategy development.

42      As this work progresses over a number of years there will be significant community engagement and consultation in the preparation and finalisation of any strategies that Council determines appropriate.

Costs and Funding

43      The costs associated with the development of a framework for strategy development are met within existing budgets allocated through Council’s 2018-2028 LTP.

44      If future funding in the 2021-2031 LTP and 2024-2034 LTP were unavailable or diminished, this would impact the quantum of work that could be completed within the programme of works developed.  The implications would be less capacity within the strategy and policy team and opportunity for out-sourcing to undertake strategy development work. 

Policy Implications

45      There are no policy implications in developing a programme of work for strategy development.

Analysis

Options Considered

46      There are two options for Council to consider in this report. 

Option 1: support the progression of a strategy development work programme

Option 2: request staff investigate other options

Analysis of Options

Option 1 – support the progression of a strategy development work programme

Advantages

Disadvantages

·        supports the 2018-2028 LTP mandate to increase investment in community future planning

·        will provide the crucial link between Council’s vision and community outcomes and the plans and activities to deliver services to communities

·        ensures Council is well placed to understand the role it plays in addressing identified priorities

·        Council will take a lead role in initiating discussions with communities around short, medium and long term strategy development

·        will build on the work already undertaken through the Community and Futures Research and Analysis Work Programme

·        will help guide Council towards stakeholders and partners who share the same or similar values

·        none identified

 

Option 2 – requests staff investigate other options

Advantages

Disadvantages

·        there may be an alternative to strategy development that has not been fully considered

·        the identified strategy deficit may not be addressed

·        the momentum of previous research and analysis work may be slowed or lost

 

Assessment of Significance

47      This programme of work is not considered significant in relation to Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

48      As strategy development work evolves over the following years, there will be significant community and stakeholder involvement, and will likely increase in significance throughout these periods.

Recommended Option

49      Staff recommend option 1 to the committee, which supports the progression of the strategy development work programme.

50      The progression of this work will help close the gap between Council’s strategic framework (vision, mission, community outcomes and strategic priorities) and the activities that Council undertakes and the associated activity management plans.  It will also help determine and clarify the role that Council will take in addressing identified priorities within the District, region and on the national stage.

Next Steps

51      A strategy development work programme will be developed over the next few months, and a further report for discussion and endorsement provided to the Community and Strategy Committee on this progress at its 8 July meeting.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.  

 


Community and Strategy Committee

6 May 2020

 

Research and Analysis – COVID-19 Projects Update

Record No:             R/20/4/9643

Author:                      Michelle Stevenson, Strategy and Policy Manager

Approved by:         Rex Capil, Group Manager Community and Futures

 

  Decision                                        Recommendation                                  Information

 

 

 

Purpose

1        This report is to inform the Community and Strategy Committee of COVID-19 specific projects currently being undertaken by Council’s strategy and policy team.

Executive Summary

2        COVID-19 is a global pandemic, and while some short term impacts are becoming apparent, the medium-long term global, national, regional and local impacts of COVID-19 are largely still unknown and in a constant state of change.

3        At 11.59pm on Wednesday 25 March New Zealand entered a level 4 lockdown period, whereby only essential and critical to life services remained operational.  Prior to this, New Zealand closed its borders to all non-residents.  The intention, to eliminate COVID-19 from New Zealand and to avoid the devastating repercussions seen across the globe.  New Zealand is expected to remain at level 4 until 11.59pm Monday 25 April, at which time the alert level will drop to level 3 and remain there for a minimum of a two week period.

4        As a result, there is expected significant and long term social, health and economic impacts for the country.  Southland, with widespread enterprise in tourism, agriculture and farming, reliance on international visitors, workers and markets, will not be immune to these impacts.  This will include, but not be limited to, an increase in unemployment and widespread economic and social disruption anticipated for some time. 

5        Staff are undertaking a number of work streams to better understand the likely impacts of COVID-19 on Southland communities, and what Council’s role may be in varying scenarios. This may range from considerations of Council’s best role is to do nothing, enable, facilitate, influence and/or lead.

6        Work streams around a wellbeing scan, lessons learned from previous events, reassessment of the significant forecasting assumptions to inform the Long Term Plan 2021-2031, the platform from which to consider reprioritisation of Council work streams and services, and analysis of a number of other key issues are being considered.

7        It is the intention for staff to present their preliminary analysis and any recommendations to the executive leadership team by late May, and accordingly to Council by the end of June 2020.

8        Staff recommend that the committee endorse the projects that are underway to inform discussions on the COVID-19 impacts for Southland and Council and maintain a watching brief as global, national, regional and local implications emerge.

 

Recommendation

That the Community and Strategy Committee:

a)            Receives the report titled “Research and Analysis – COVID-19 Projects Update” dated 24 April 2020.

 

b)           Determines that this matter or decision be recognised as not significant in terms of Section 76 of the Local Government Act 2002.

 

c)            Determines that it has complied with the decision-making provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 to the extent necessary in relation to this decision; and in accordance with Section 79 of the act determines that it does not require further information, further assessment of options or further analysis of costs and benefits or advantages and disadvantages prior to making a decision on this matter.

 

d)           Endorses the projects that are underway to inform discussions on the COVID-19 impacts for Southland and Council and maintain a watching brief as global, national, regional and local implications emerge.

 

 


 

Background

9        On 11 March 2020, the World Health Organisation (WHO) declared COVID-19 as a global pandemic. On Monday 23 March the New Zealand alert level was raised to level 3 and it was declared that the alert level would rise to level 4 by 11.59pm on Wednesday 25 March.  Prior to this, New Zealand closed its borders to all non-residents.  This meant that the nation went into lockdown for at least four weeks with only essential services running and the majority of New Zealanders staying inside their houses to help reduce the spread of COVID-19

10      New Zealand is expected to remain at level 4 until 11.59pm Monday 27 April, at which time the alert level will drop to level 3 and remain there for a minimum of a 2 week period.

11      As a result the flow-on social, health and economic effects of the pandemic will be significant and of some duration.  Southland has extensive enterprise in tourism, agriculture and farming, and with a reliance on international visitors, workers and markets, will not be immune.  There will be widespread impacts within our communities, including but not limited to, an increase in unemployment and widespread economic and social disruption anticipated for some time. 

12      Council has an important role to play in leading and facilitating discussions around social and economic recovery/restart, and ensuring that essential services under the purpose of Local Government are maintained.  This will require analysis and discussion of what services Council provides, how we prioritise existing and future work streams to ensure the needs of communities are met, now and into the future. 

13      To this end, the Group Manager Community and Futures reprioritised the work of the strategy and policy team to immediately focus on projects to better understand the impacts of COVID-19 for Southland and for Council.

Issues

14      This is a global pandemic and the medium-long term global, national, regional and local impacts of COVID-19 are largely still unknown and in a constant state of change.

15      Strategy and policy staff have refocused their work to undertake COVID-19 specific priority work, including analysis, understanding and impacts of legislative changes from central government as a result of COVID-19, a District wellbeing scan, re-analysis of the significant forecasting assumptions, and the principles that may determine if and/or why reprioritisation of work streams could be considered.

Wellbeing scan

16      Staff have undertaken a significant literature review of COVID-19 related articles from across the globe, relating to many key areas including tourism, education, health, environmental, social, employment, agriculture and farming, and travel.  Staff have recorded insights on what the future will be like for people in the Southland District and for Council. Staff are in the process of analysing these insights and other relevant data and will present their view on the early indications of the ‘new world’ in a scan, which will be structured under the four wellbeing’s. It is intended that this wellbeing scan will include guidance on how Council could lead, facilitate and support communities through and after the COVID-19 pandemic.

 

Lessons from previous events

17      Staff are evaluating past events (such as pandemics, financial crises, acts of terrorism and natural disasters) that have impacted both nationally and globally.  Analysis is being given to a wide range of literature in order to provide a balanced view and to identify what trends exist that can help Council better understand, and prepare for, the recovery/restart phase as a result of COVID-19.

 

Significant forecasting assumptions - review

18      Staff are undertaking a review of how Council’s significant forecasting assumptions, endorsed at the 30 January 2020 Council meeting, may need to be reconsidered.  This discussion will form the basis of how we move forward with a revised ‘baseline’ of assumptions for the Long Term Plan 2021-2031.  A literature review is being undertaken to substantiate any recommendations to revise existing assumptions.

 

Reprioritisation of Council services and work streams - considerations

19      Staff are currently working towards an understanding of the platform from which Council would reprioritise the services it delivers and the work streams it has underway and planned.  Given the significant and long term impacts anticipated following COVID-19, it is expected that Council will need to consider in-depth the work that it undertakes on behalf of its communities, and the services that it provides and the levels expected for those services.

20      This analysis, with a basis in global and national literature, will provide the platform for discussion and decision making to determine, in particular, the next steps in the process of Council’s Long Term Plan 2021-2031. 

21      This will also provide our activity managers with a basis from which to consider and/or reconsider current and future work streams.

 

Analysis of Southland Regional Development Strategy (SoRDS) and Southland Murihiku Destination Strategy

22      Preliminary work has been started on an assessment of how SoRDS and the Southland Murihiku Destination Strategy might be viewed in light of COVID-19 impacts from a Council perspective.  This work is in the very early stages and will progress as capacity within the strategy and policy team allows, and as data from businesses within Southland becomes more readily available to provide a state of play in the region and District. There is some work currently underway through Great South that will contribute to Council specific assessment and analysis.

 

Additional projects

23      In addition to the projects above, strategy and policy staff will conduct analysis of the impacts of COVID-19 on global/national/regional economic policy, economic indicators, and employment indicators as more information becomes available, and as the team has capacity to undertake the work.

24      While all the projects have a strong Southland District and Council lens, consideration is being given to key external stakeholders and the direction and related information coming from these agencies.  Staff will remain inclusive of stakeholder positions and information as it evolves in this fast pace environment.  

 

 

Factors to Consider

Legal and Statutory Requirements

25      There are no legal or statutory requirements to be considered in this report.

26      It is important to note that the research and analysis work currently being undertaken by strategy and policy may be used to inform future discussions and decision making around the Long Term Plan 2021-2031 and 2024-2034, which is a statutory requirement of Council. 

Community Views

27      No specific community views have been sought in relation to this report.

28      The strategy and policy team staff have researched widely articles and literature from around the globe to inform their thinking in relation to COVID-19 and the possible implications for Southland in these early stages.  The views sourced have been extensive to ensure that a balanced view point if provided, and from as many key themes and topics as possible in the short space of time.

Costs and Funding

29      All costs associated with this work are met within existing budgets.  There are no additional costs expected.

Policy Implications

30      There are no specific policy implications with this work.

31      As noted above, this work may be used to inform future discussions and decision making relating to the Long Term Planning process, and could therefore have influence around Council policy decisions.

Analysis

Options Considered

32      There are three options to be considered in this report.

Option 1 – endorse the projects underway to inform discussions on the COVID-19 impacts for Southland and Council and maintain a watching brief

Option 2 – request staff investigate COVID-19 impacts for Southland and Council more in-depth and for an extended period

Option 3 – request staff cease all further work on COVID-19 projects and return to business as usual work plan

Analysis of Options

Option 1 – endorse the projects underway to inform discussions on the COVID-19 impacts for Southland and Council and maintain a watching brief

Advantages

Disadvantages

·        the research and analysis undertaken to date is a snap shot in time and can be used to inform discussions around the current significant forecasting assumptions for the Long Term Plan.  These assumptions inform the activity management plans

·        the analysis will help guide conversations around work prioritisation and the rationale for reconsidering levels of service and currently scheduled work plans

·        work can get underway to inform discussions around Councils options to act, in light of likely and already evident COVID-19 impacts

·        Council can utilise the analysis to share with stakeholders and neighbouring councils to better inform a District and regional response

·        the analysis is a snap shot in time and in a rapidly changing environment may be outdated or ill-informed without in-depth and on-going analysis being undertaken

·        Council may not be positioned to respond quickly to changing situations if analysis of likely COVID-19 impacts changes significantly

·        acknowledges that BAU work for the strategy and policy team will be compromised as and when further COVID-19 analysis work is required

Option 2 – request staff investigate COVID-19 impacts for Southland and Council more in-depth and for an extended period

Advantages

Disadvantages

·        greater understanding of COVID-19 specific impacts may be realised in a shorter time period

·        Council may be positioned to respond with haste where able, if more in-depth analysis and understanding is undertaken

·        Council would maintain a heightened understanding of COVID-19 specific impacts for the District and be well positioned to inform and influence stakeholders

·        global, national, regional and local impacts of COVID-19 are largely still unknown and in a constant state of flux.  On-going work at this early stage could be a poor use of resource in the larger picture

·        business as usual (BAU) work will be compromised if current resource utilised to further this work

·        Council’s strategy and policy team were at full capacity prior to undertaking COVID-19 specific research and analysis work.  Resource to undertake legislatively required BAU work would need to be considered

Option 3 – request staff cease all further work on COVID-19 projects and return to business as usual work plan

Advantages

Disadvantages

·        the existing work streams of strategy and policy will continue without further delay

·        analysis needed to inform discussions around work prioritisation and the rationale for reconsidering levels of service and currently scheduled work plans would not be undertaken to a sufficient level

·        Council may not have the information and analysis it needs around Councils options to act, in light of likely and already evident COVID-19 impacts

·        Council may have a limited understanding of likely impacts short, medium and long term for the communities of Southland as a result of COVID-19

 

Assessment of Significance

33      The work at this stage is not considered significant in relation to Councils Significance and Engagement Policy.

34      If actions as a result of the analysis progresses however, the significance of this will increase.  The cumulative impact of matters relating to COVID-19 will mean that there is a greater degree of importance and likely consequences for the following, as determined in Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy (2017):

·     the current and future social, economic, environmental or cultural wellbeing of the District or region;

·     people who are likely to be particularly affected by or interested in, the issue, proposal decision or matter; and

·     the capacity of Council to performs its role, and the financial and other costs of doing so.

 

35      Staff view that the project work currently underway is not of a current nature or significance that requires consultation.

Recommended Option

36      Staff recommend option 1, to endorse the projects underway to inform discussions on the COVID-19 impacts for Southland and Council and maintain a watching brief.

37      The loss of BAU capacity for the strategy and policy team, and the potential for additional resource required to undertake this work, may negatively outweigh the gains achieved by undertaking further analysis at this time.  Under option 1, staff will maintain a watching brief of the situation, and following discussions with the chief executive and group manager community and futures, would seek to reallocate resource to this work as and when required.

Next Steps

38      It is the intention for staff to present their preliminary analysis and any recommendations to the executive leadership team by late May, and accordingly to Council by the end of June 2020.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report. 

 


Community and Strategy Committee

6 May 2020

 

Big Picture Workshop and Strategic Workshop Summary

Record No:             R/20/4/9566

Author:                      Rex Capil, Group Manager Community and Futures

Approved by:         Steve Ruru, Chief Executive

 

  Decision                                        Recommendation                                 Information

 

 

 

Purpose

1        The purpose of this report is to confirm the Big Picture Workshop and Strategic Workshop findings and to then give consideration to these when reviewing and updating the draft strategic framework as part of the Long Term Plan 2021-2031 development.

Executive Summary

2        As part of the 2019-2022 triennium Council induction programme, Council has recently participated in two workshops with a longer term and strategic focus.

3        On 31 January 2020 Alicia McKay facilitated “The Big Picture’ workshop with councillors and executive leadership team members.

4        On 19-21 February 2020 Council staff facilitated a strategic workshop with Council elected members including the mayor, councillors and community board chairs.

5        The workshops provided the opportunity to generate conversations and thinking about the big issues and longer term challenges facing the District as a whole and Council specifically.

6        A number of the key themes and findings have been captured to assist with developing an approach to undertake next steps and to align and integrate where possible with the Long Term Plan 2021-2031 process.

7        There will be consideration given to the impact of COVID-19 on the short term response and medium to long term recovery and restart phases. The work being undertaken in this area will be reported back to Council once completed. However, it is important to recognise the big picture and strategy workshop purpose was for Council to consider the 10 to 30 year horizon for the district. To this end the workshop sessions will assist Council in staying on strategy albeit that it may decide to alter the approach that is pursued in the short term as a result of the impacts of events, like COVID-19, which will inevitably occur at different stages of its strategic journey.

 

Recommendation

That the Community and Strategy Committee:

a)        Receives the report titled “Big Picture Workshop and Strategic Workshop Summary” dated 24 April 2020.

 

b)        Determines that this matter or decision be recognised as not significant in terms of Section 76 of the Local Government Act 2002.

 

c)         Determines that it has complied with the decision-making provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 to the extent necessary in relation to this decision; and in accordance with Section 79 of the act determines that it does not require further information, further assessment of options or further analysis of costs and benefits or advantages and disadvantages prior to making a decision on this matter.

 

d)        Endorses the key outcomes, big issues and future planning priorities identified at the Big Picture Workshop on 31 January 2020 – being:

 

Key Outcomes

-      happy, healthy Southlanders

-      resilient, engaged communities

-      thriving, sustainable economy

The Big Issues

-      climate change

-      infrastructure investment

-      funding constraints and options

-      Council’s economic and social remit

-      iwi and partner relationships

-      service delivery structures

Future Planning Priorities

-      show leadership through infrastructure spend

-      boost local economy and support industry

-      support managed retreat for declining communities

-      foster community self sufficiency

-      invest in strategic partnerships

-      long term funding and investment strategy

-      central government relationship strategy

-      approach iwi to consider new ways to build relationships

e)        Endorses the principles from the Strategic Workshop on 19-21 February 2020 – being:

-      community well-being – understanding Council (the organisation) needs to change how it thinks, operates and makes decisions and move toward the implementation of the four well-beings in our decisionmaking approach and what we do

-      environment – understanding and recognising the increasing community and generational awareness of kaitiakitanga - that the guardianship and protection of the environment – regeneration ideals surpass sustainability

-      future generations – taria te wa and manaakitanga – recognising and acknowledging that Council has to advance long term thinking with the communities it serves, the concept of caring for others and that it is ok for conversations to be about the next 50-100 years

-      Tikanga Maori and cultural authenticity – recognising the responsibility to embrace tikanga or cultural beliefs and value set of tangata whenua – drawing on the traditional principles of stewardship and guardianship for others.

 

f)         Notes that staff will integrate the themes and principles as part of the next stages of the LTP 2021-2031 including reviewing and revising the draft strategic framework.

 

g)        Note that staff will give consideration to the findings and direction provided when developing the strategy development work programme required to be undertaken to support the next stages of the longer term integrated strategic planning approach for the District.

 

h)        Note that staff will report back to the Committee on the COVID-19 research work being undertaken and how this might be best incorporated into Council’s short to medium term approach to pursuing its strategy once this research work has been completed in the next two months.

 

i)          Recommend to Council that it endorse and adopt the key outcomes, big issues and future planning priorities identified at the Big Picture Workshop on 31 January 2020 and the principles from the Strategic Workshop on 19-21 February 2020.

 

j)          Recommend to Council that it support the integration and incorporation of the themes and principles into the next stages of the LTP 2021-2031 process including reviewing and revising the draft strategic framework.

 

k)        Recommend to Council that it support the integration and incorporation of the themes and principles into the strategy development work programme required to be undertaken to support the next stages of the longer term integrated strategic planning approach for the District.

 

 


 

Background

8        As part of the 2019-2022 triennium Council induction programme, Council has recently participated in two workshops with a longer term and strategic focus.

9        As further context, Council at its 19 June 2019 meeting received the report titled “Big Picture Workshop and Strategic Workshop Summary” and “Noted the draft strategic framework for the Long Term Plan 2031”.

10      The draft strategic framework presented to the June 2019 meeting was developed following a series of workshops in March 2019 (involving the Youth Council as well as Council) and May 2019. The feedback from these workshops was acknowledged and informed the draft strategic framework as detailed and noted in the following table:

Mission: Working together for a better Southland

 

Vision: “Southland – one community offering endless opportunities”

Community Outcomes

·   Environment - Kaitiakitanga for future generations

·   Culture - Inclusive, connected communities

·   Economic - A diverse economy creating healthy and affordable lifestyles

·   Social - Empowered communities with the right tools to deliver the best outcomes

Strategic Priorities:

·   Improve how we work to build resilience

·   Better preparing our communities and council for future changes

·   Provision of appropriate infrastructure and services

·   Support healthy environments and sustainable communities

 

11      Following on from the recent Big Picture Workshop and Strategic Workshop it is appropriate for this triennium’s (2109-2022) Council to consider the draft strategic framework and review, revise and refine it as required.

12      A further report will be presented to Council at its 20 May 2020 meeting to enable it to consider the findings from the recent workshops and review and revise as required the draft strategic framework to be incorporated into the draft Long Term Plan 2021-2031.

The Big Picture Workshop

13      On 31 January 2020 Alicia McKay facilitated a workshop with councillors and executive leadership team members.

14      The workshop was intended to generate discussion and hard thinking about the big issues facing Southland District in the long term, and where and how Council can play a leadership role in that. Attachment A provides a summary of the findings from the day.

15      The key findings from the day can be broken down into key outcomes, the big issues and future planning priorities.

16      Key outcomes identified for the District are:

-        happy, healthy Southlanders

-        resilient, engaged communities

-        thriving, sustainable economy.

17      The big issues identified were:

-        climate change

-        infrastructure investment

-        funding constraints and options

-        Council’s economic and social remit

-        iwi and partner relationships

-        service delivery structures.

18      Future planning priorities identified for the district are:

-        show leadership through infrastructure spend

-        boost local economy and support industry

-        support managed retreat for declining communities

-        foster community self sufficiency

-        invest in strategic partnerships

-        long term funding and investment strategy

-        central government relationship strategy

-        approach iwi to consider new ways to build relationships.

19      The workshop provided an opportunity for all involved to participate and contribute in a constructive and positive way. The constant throughout the day was the recognition of the importance to be prepared to have the conversations and to consider the challenges and opportunities from a long term, intergenerational future perspective.

Strategic Workshop

20      On 19-21 February 2020 Council staff facilitated a strategic workshop with Council elected members including the mayor, councillors and community board chairs.

21      The sessions throughout the 2 ½ days involved interactive sessions delivered by Dr Ganesh Nana (BERL), Kristin Dunne (Tourism Bay of Plenty), mayor and councillors and Council staff.

22      The aims of the strategic workshop were to develop

-        an understanding of the ecosystem and wider context council operates in

-        a shared understanding of the strategic challenges and opportunities facing the District, region and local government as we look to the future

-        a view on how Council might best plan for and provide leadership at a District and regional level in relation to the strategic challenges it and the District’s communities face

-        an understanding of the purpose and need for longer term planning (30 years) and commit to achieving a shared vision for the District

-        an understanding of the collective responsibility required to achieve strategic goals and the approach needed to pursue to realise the future vision for the District and region

-        the shared understanding required and prioritise how Council (the organisation) needs to function if it is to provide the leadership needed for the District and region to be successful

-        a way to build on the Big Picture Workshop findings from 31 January 2020.

23      Key themes that were identified throughout the workshop included:

-        how communities are viewed can vary and can be considered by way of communities of place; communities of interest; communities of identity

-        a need for recognition and consideration of those who are not in the room or at the table – iwi, young, migrants as examples

-        a recognition that business as usual is not business as usual anymore and that traditional systems and models are not keeping up with disruptors

-        a fundamental role of local government is that it is close to community and Council is representative of its community and Council exists to serve its community

-        the stakeholders of Council are much more than ratepayers and are not defined by geographic boundaries

-        the reintroduction of the four well-beings (social, economic, environmental, cultural) as the purpose of local government in the Local Government Act 2002 has provided the opportunity to consider the wider wellbeing benefits and costs when decisionmaking

-        the well-beings consideration assists in defining value by being consistent with values. To understand this we need to consider decisions against our values

-        values are related to being guardians of the taonga, a strong sense of turangawaewae and acknowledging that we recognise the mandate of tangata whenua and the community in the decisionmaking required

-        engaged communities isn’t the same as engaging with communities

-        a recognition of requiring an open mind to new ways of doing things and the recognition of Council needing to move from the traditional ‘power and control’ model to offset the imbalance of power in the community

-        a need to focus on communication and engagement – cannot expect the people to come to us – Council needs to go where the people are

-        the concept of a hub is much broader than a physical location – it involves a social connectedness of people and connected services that help build stronger communities.

24      The four key principles recognised as a result of the workshop include:

-        community well-being – understanding Council (the organisation) needs to change how it thinks, operates and makes decisions and move toward the implementation of the four well-beings in our decisionmaking approach and what we do

-        environment – understanding and recognising the increasing community and generational awareness of kaitiakitanga - that the guardianship and protection of the environment – regeneration ideals surpass sustainability

-        future generations – taria te wa and manaakitanga – recognising and acknowledging that Council has to advance long term thinking with the communities it serves, the concept of caring for others and that it is ok for conversations to be about the next 50-100 years

-        Tikanga Maori and cultural authenticity – recognising the responsibility to embrace tikanga or cultural beliefs and value set of tangata whenua – drawing on the traditional principles of stewardship and guardianship for others.

25      A point that was raised early at the workshop was the recognition of iwi absence in the room and it initiated the bigger conversation regarding Council’s overall relationship with iwi. Throughout the workshop it became increasingly important as a topic and theme and is recognised as a relationship development priority.

Issues

26      Council needs to confirm the Big Picture Workshop and Strategic Workshop findings and to then give consideration to these when reviewing, revising and updating the draft strategic framework as part of the next stages of the Long Term Plan 2021-2031 development.

27      As with long term strategic planning activities there are a number of philosophical and political ideological issues that can be raised. In this regard there is no right or wrong or even resolution to matters raised but more a recognition that there are differing views that need to be considered.

28      The other significant point highlighted at both of these workshops was the recognition that change is difficult to advance; that the change required will take time; that this is a process that involves both Council and stakeholders and therefore is reliant on a collective will to participate and change; that in fostering and encouraging change there needs to be a recognition of the need to change habits and create new habits.

29      Some of the specific issues and challenges identified included:

-        how do Council and community/stakeholders connect?

-        how does Council (as an organisation) create the environment to support the change required in the way of working?

-        how do we recognise a lot of the change required relies on strong relationships and mutual respect from the various parties involved?

-        how does Council get the message of its strategic framework, direction and associated change that is happening or required outside of Council chambers – both externally to the communities/stakeholders and internally to its operations and service deliverers?

-        how is it recognised that this is not just a Council issue – it is a challenge for the community as much as for Council that requires leadership from and within the community?

30      It is important that Council recognises the challenges ahead of it and that it is provided with the relevant and appropriate detailed information to best make informed decisions.

31      There is the need to ensure that systems and processes are developed that support the change recognised and required.

32      The opportunities that have been identified in discussing the thinking required to deal with the long term challenges has meant that Council has focussed its thinking to address and consider alternatives. This has also allowed for different conversations starting to be had. While this might be challenging to the status quo it also provides an opportunity for Council to advance its role in the representative leadership and civic leadership areas of responsibility. This is not always easy, but is necessary.

COVID-19

33      As we are aware New Zealand is currently in a national state of emergency as a result of the COVID-19 global pandemic event. The community wellbeing impact of COVID-19 at an international, national, regional, district and local level is still to be well understood and is speculative in nature at this early stage.

34      There will be the need for Council to undertake various pieces of work to understand in more detail the impact of the COVID-19 event to the district. It is intended this will require the pieces of work to be planned and its development phased to occur as the event unfolds and associated insights are developed and impacts realised.

35      Currently, in the mitigation and response phase, Council’s Strategy and Policy team has initiated some analysis and assessment work which will assist in informing some of Council’s corporate performance planning work, Great South has been involved in collecting information relating to business impacts across the region, Emergency Management Southland has also been collecting information relating to community welfare related matters. Council’s Community Leadership team has also been working alongside community elected representatives and community leaders in considering response issues.

36      As we move into the recovery and rebuild phases there will be other series of work required to be undertaken to assist with analysis and assessment of the impact. This work will still focus on the short to medium term in the interim and the longer term strategy work that Council has undertaken will remain as the foundation for Council’s vision and direction. In this regard it is important Council stays on strategy but realises it can alter or amend its shorter term plans and work programmes to deal with the immediate needs.

37      Some recent literature and information that has come through from Destination Think and McKinsey and Company sums up the phases and stages to consider in dealing with COVID-19 in the immediate and short term.

38      This first slide from Destination Think recognises the phases to progress through in dealing with the COVID-19 event over time. 

39      The second slide from McKinsey and Company recognises the scenario planning required at the various levels or stages of the planning process in dealing with the COVID-19 event in these early stages. 

40      To provide a context in this scenario based planning approach we have been operating at level 1 and it is now recognised we need to switch to level 3 to assist in making informed decisions for the shorter term based on data, research, expert insights and analysis.

41      This work, separate to the longer term strategy work required, will become a focus in response to COVID-19 and the immediate and shorter term plan prioritisation and work programme decisions that need to be made. It is about staying on strategy and adapting the approach taken in the short to medium term to how Council might head towards its long term strategic focus.

42      The approach to be pursued in the short to medium term still needs to be developed. It is intended that this work will be developed and discussed with Council in the next three months once the research work currently under development to provide data and insights into the likely impacts of COVID-19 is available. 

Factors to Consider

Legal and Statutory Requirements

43      There are no legal or statutory requirements related to the workshops. However, the themes and principles will inform the Long Term Plan 2021-2031 strategic framework which is a requirement of the Local Government Act 2002.

Community Views

44      Community views will be considered as part of the Long Term Plan 2021-2031 whereby the strategic and long term thinking and direction will be considered.

45      The community engagement processes will also allow Council to inform and provide greater level of detail and clarity on issues that the community requires an awareness of.

46      Community views and community understanding will be important for the future consideration of the long term thinking required and the associated principles recognised as important for Council.

Costs and Funding

47      There are no extraordinary costs or funding requirements as a result of the workshops. The workshops were planned and part of the work programmes and budget for the 2019 – 2020 financial year.

Policy Implications

48      There are no policy implications related to the workshops findings. The information identified and themes and principles identified will assist in refining and confirming the strategic framework development as part of the Long Term Plan 2021-2031.

Analysis

Options Considered

49      There are two options to consider – (1) Agree and endorse the Big Picture Workshop key outcomes, big issues, future planning priorities and the Strategic Workshop principles are an accurate representation of the workshop discussions or (2) Do not agree that the Big Picture Workshop key outcomes, big issues, future planning priorities and the Strategic Workshop principles are an accurate representation of the workshop discussions.

Analysis of Options

Option 1 – Agree and endorse the Big Picture Workshop key outcomes, big issues, future planning priorities and the Strategic Workshop principles are an accurate representation of the workshop discussions.

Advantages

Disadvantages

·        provides a good summary record of the respective workshop discussions to be used to support future planning and prioritisation discussions

·        assists staff with developing the next stages of the Long Term Plan 2021-2031 and reviewing and refining the draft strategic framework

·        provides direction to the organisation and communities as they contemplate the issues and opportunities available to them

·        supports the development and focus for the next phases of community engagement and clarification of key messages.

 

·        could be viewed as limiting and narrowing the focus of the planning process prematurely

·        does not recognise that planning processes are fluid and subject to short term changes which Council has limited influence over.

 

Option 2 – Do not agree that the Big Picture Workshop key outcomes, big issues, future planning priorities and the Strategic Workshop principles are an accurate representation of the workshop discussions.

Advantages

Disadvantages

·        reopens the conversation to ensure clarity is achieved and agreement is able to be reached

·        assists in closing the loop by getting clarification and correcting any matters that not are agreed with so they can be confirmed accordingly.

·        if agreement is not reached then does not assist with providing clarity of direction

·        makes it difficult to confirm the overall direction and purpose and deliver key messages to the community

·        creates uncertainty for staff and communities around the future focus and key points for consideration as part of the Long Term Plan 2021-2031 development process.

 

Assessment of Significance

50      This is not recognised as significant in terms of the Significance and Engagement Policy.

Recommended Option

51      It is recommended by staff that the Community and Strategy Committee endorse the Big Picture Workshop key outcomes, big issues, future planning priorities and the Strategic Workshop principles are an accurate representation of the workshop discussions.

Next Steps

52      If the Community and Strategy Committee approve the recommendations a report will be prepared for full Council recommending it adopt the key outcomes, big issues and future planning priorities identified at the Big Picture Workshop on 31 January 2020 and the principles from the Strategic Workshop on 19-21 February 2020 to support their integration and incorporation into the next stages of the LTP 2021-2031 process and strategy development work required as part of an integrated strategic planning approach for the District.

53      There is a sense of understanding across the organisation for the need to continue to progress and develop the principles into the way of working for Council and community. It is recognised that the changing focus and revised approach will take time to transition. It will require refinement and be phased and staged. The two priorities to be undertaken concurrently include

-        development of an overarching community well-being framework to support the Southland District Council strategic approach by July 2020

-        recognition and incorporation into the next stage milestones and processes associated with the Long Term Plan 2021-2031 development – including an ongoing review of the strategic framework and supporting the development of activity management plans.

 

Attachments

a             The Big Picture Strategic Workshop Summary - 31 January 2020    

 


Community and Strategy Committee

06 May 2020

 

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Community and Strategy Committee

6 May 2020

 

Community Well-beings and Strategic Issues Overview - March - April 2020

Record No:             R/20/4/9565

Author:                      Rex Capil, Group Manager Community and Futures

Approved by:         Steve Ruru, Chief Executive

 

  Decision                                        Recommendation                                  Information

 

 

 

Report Purpose

1        This community well-beings and strategic issues overview report is prepared and presented to the Community and Strategy Committee as part of its standard order paper each meeting, as far as is practicable.

2        This report is intended to inform the committee of recent developments, points of interest and points for consideration as part of the overall strategic context and community well-beings (social, economic, environmental, and cultural) discussions that Council is part of – nationally, regionally and locally.

3        The report is also used to provide insight of ‘happenings’ from other regions that maybe of interest and relevance to the District. This provides a wider strategic context on a national and regional scale to assist in Council’s understanding of issues and areas of impact occurring elsewhere.

4        Importantly, the report aims to initiate discussion and conversation amongst councillors and communities to support the opportunity to participate and contribute to Council’s direction setting and positioning with regards to the multi stakeholder environment it operates in.

5        It is intended the format and content of the report is divided into five headings – reflecting the four well-beings plus other regional happenings. The topics covered under each of the headings are a selection of recent articles and publications and are summarised with the associated link attached from where the information is sourced and/or the full document attached when relevant.

6        Recently feedback has been received following the big picture and strategic workshops as to how we incorporate the need for longer term views and developing a proactive approach to remain abreast of strategic issues that may/will impact on the District communities and then subsequently Council. This report is one way in which Council is attempting to be proactive in recognising and highlighting topical strategic issues and it is intended to evolve the approach to generate discussions and forums to continue to build and grow the understanding of Council and communities. This is a work in progress.

7        The bulk of this report was prepared pre COVID-19. However, it is important to recognise many of the issues and situations have not disappeared as a result of COVID-19 and the purpose of local government as per section 10 (1) (b) of the Local Government Act 2002 is to promote the social, economic, environmental, and cultural well-being of communities in the present and for the future. This purpose is as significant today as it was pre COVID-19 for Council and the district it serves.

8        The purpose is also explicit in recognising that local government should be giving consideration to future generations and communities. The big picture and long term focus is important to assist Council in making decisions that have intergenerational impact and also relate to services and assets that have a 50 – 100 year life. Local government has an important role to play in making decisions today that will impact on generations to come – and the Te Tauihu Intergenerational Strategy referenced at the end of this report provides a good example of the value in this approach.

 

Social Well-being

9        For the purpose of this report we consider social well-being to reflect topics related to how people and communities engage in work, study and social activities.

10      The following is a summary of a selection of recent articles and publications relating to the social well-being topic.

 

Engaged communities. How community-led development can increase civic participation

11      The Helen Clark Foundation and BERL co publication discusses the notion that informed and engaged communities are central to a healthy democratic society and given their importance, local government should be striving to foster engaged communities.

12      The report talks about creating genuine opportunities for vibrant and authentic engagement which requires a focus on process.

13      Local government has to walk the talk and step into their role as enablers of community led development to create space for communities to thrive and be engaged. The recommendations address how local government can support different types of community – the communities of place, interest and identity all relate to people.

14      Empowering community-led development is complex, iterative, long term in nature, requires patience and perseverance from all parties involved. 

15      The report identifies that local government must commit to fostering genuinely engaged communities to improve the lives of the people they represent. The report is attached as attachment A.

 

Point to note:

16      Of particular interest for Southland District Council is to recognise a lot of the messaging identified in the publication is similar to that being progressed as part of the wider community leadership approach championed with its communities.

 

Education and staffing

17      At the start of most calendar years there is much discussion around staffing issues at schools – nationally and regionally. This has again been highlighted here in Southland.

18      Schools play an important role in developing and building the social fabric of the communities they serve. This is very much the case in rural areas and certainly in Southland District.

19      The following links reflect the issues and provide a local and national focus on the situation –

https://i.stuff.co.nz/southland-times/southland-top-stories/118633550/southland-schools-have-relief-staff-on-standby-for-start-of-school-year

https://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=12303016

 

Point to note:

20      It is important that Southland District Council is aware of any pressures placed on schools and communities as a result of teacher shortages and the wider implications of such. Council can have a supporting role in advocacy, futures planning and strategy development and a community leadership role in supporting communities in dealing with the implications of the societal pressures and changes facing the District.

 

Rural industries and staff shortages

21      Labour supply issues and the continued development of programmes to support young workers into rural employment remains an important topic for Council and communities.

22      The following link reflects the issues and provides a regional and local perspective on the situation – https://i.stuff.co.nz/southland-times/118969061/staff-shortages-hurting-rural-industries-in-southland

 

Point to note:

23      Of particular interest for Southland District Council is the need to remain abreast of what can continue to be done to assist rural Southland industries and young Southlanders in bridging the gap in labour demand and supply. It is important that this matter is continued to be supported by investing in the services from Great South to support Southlanders in the rural workforce and related industries. This is important as the impact of COVID-19 is understood with regards to worker displacement and unemployment

 

Maori workforce grows 50 percent in five years

24      BERL has completed a think piece considering the points related to a growing Maori population and the related differences in the age structure compared to the overall New Zealand population.

25      The following link provides an article from BERL which looks at this point - https://berl.co.nz/economic-insights/community-development-government-and-fiscal-policy-maori-economy-migration-and

 

Point to note:

26      While there is still a lot of analysis and interpretation of this information to occur it is important for Council to be aware of the developing trends as it feeds into the changes in work and employment matters for the future which will impact on Southland communities demographic and population age structures and diversity.

 

Economic Well-being

27      For the purpose of this report we consider economic well-being to reflect topics related to how financial and human made physical assets impact on how people live, deliver services and work together as a society.

28      The following is a summary of a selection of recent articles and publications relating to the economic well-being topic.

 

KPMG Agribusiness Agenda 2019

29      The KPMG Agribusiness Agenda marks a significant milestone with it being the 10th year of being published. The document is attached as attachment B.

30      The document reflects on how the food sector has evolved, details progress in transitioning from volume to value, recognises the global environment of rapid and disruptive change, considers the pulse of the industry and what is necessary to maintain relevance in the future, and consider the impacts of the fusion of technologies of the fourth industrial revolution to enable the first Global Agrarian Revolution.

31      This contributes to the industry’s discussion of disruption, innovation and adaptation. It discusses the acceleration of both global farming systems and trends and the greater awareness and knowledge of consumers and their demands in relation to products. Understanding such trends gives the sector a strong base to build further innovation and value creation and to ensure a viable and sustainable food and fibre sector into the future.

 

Ministry for Primary Industries: Situation and outlook for primary industries December 2019

32      The report outlines the state of New Zealand’s primary industries and their prospects for growth over the next four years. It recognises that to enable the primary industries to continue to thrive then it is important to have up to date, reliable information on the challenges and opportunities facing New Zealand’s primary industry sectors.

33      The document is attached as attachment C.

 

Point to note:

34      The primary sector industries are significant contributors to the Southland economy and it is important that Council continues to remain abreast of the opportunities and challenges facing the sector. The primary sector is an important contributor to the overall community well-being of the district and has implications much wider than just the economic well-being of communities. 

 

Environmental Well-being

35      For the purpose of this report we consider environmental well-being to reflect topics related to how the natural environment impacts on how communities align resources and support resource allocation and usage required to live a sustainable life.

36      The following is a summary of a selection of recent articles and publications relating to the environmental well-being topic.

 

For the after-comers

37      The Maxim Institute has prepared a think piece which is timely in building on the recent discussions Council has had around community well-beings, value being related to values, the natural environment and how what we do now will shape the legacy we leave to the generations to come. It discusses the obligations related to being good stewards in taking care of something that belongs to someone else and passing it on undamaged or in an improved state.

38      The following link provides access to the article https://flintandsteelmag.com/article/for-the-after-comers-2/

 

Tourism industry working to ensure a sustainable future

39      It is recognised these articles and the conversation pieces were gaining traction pre COVID-19. While the issues may be needing to be considered in a different environment now, it would seem they are still significant and important discussions to be had as the tourism industry and its future is reimagined and recreated post COVID-19.

40      Over recent years the government has produced its tourism strategy and New Zealand Tourism Industry Aotearoa has recently released its own updated strategy for 2025 and beyond. As part of these discussions the topics of sustainability and environmental impact are raised. The following links provide reference to these points

https://crux.org.nz/national-news/tourism-industry-working-to-ensure-a-sustainable-future/

https://thespinoff.co.nz/society/20-01-2020/the-nz-tourism-industry-cannot-afford-to-ignore-the-elephant-in-the-room/

 

When will NZ be real about our scary future?

41      Climate change impact continues to generate a lot of discussion and the following article provides insights for consideration relating to the topic and actions or inactions related to it.

42      The following link provides access to the article https://www.newsroom.co.nz/@comment/2020/02/03/1012805/when-will-nz-be-real-about-scary-future#

 

Points to note:

43      Southland District Council recognises the global nature of the environmental well-being issues and opportunities on the table at the moment. This supports a shift in thinking to gain an understanding of the global and national influencers and externalities that impact on Southland and what it means in having to prepare for situations outside of New Zealand and Southland control.

44      As the associated environmental issues are considered from a global perspective it is becoming increasingly apparent that the impacts on the District communities can be quite significant and creating awareness and supporting the building of resilience is important for Council to cognisant of and contribute too.

45      While the above points to note were written pre COVID-19, the impact of the global environment on Southland district is no better illustrated than by this event.

 

Cultural Well-being

46      For the purpose of this report we consider cultural well-being to reflect topics related to how people live and work together and includes cultural and community identity, traditions and customs and common values and interests.

47      The following is a summary of a selection of recent articles and publications relating to the cultural well-being topic.

 

Migrant and cultural integration and identity

48      Over recent times the cultural make-up of the New Zealand and Southland population has diversified with the increase of migrant labour and a more mobile and transient labour force.

49      Migration and the implications of such raise points related to integration and social mobility. It also brings to the forefront for community consideration issues related to cultural values, the essence of place and sense of belonging and societal change as a result of a more diverse population.

50      The Maxim Institute has recently republished some think piece articles which are timely in providing some insights and lessons from the past and from other countries.

51      The articles also consider cultural identity issues related to New Zealand and the results of colonisation and identity in New Zealand.

52      The following links provide access to the Maxim Institute think pieces https://flintandsteelmag.com/article/the-challenges-of-integration-lessons-from-britain/

https://flintandsteelmag.com/article/reconciliation-colonisation-and-identity-in-aotearoa-new-zealand/

 

Points to note:

53      Southland District Council recognise the greater diversity of the Southland and New Zealand population and the associated opportunities and challenges this can involve.

54      The topic has been discussed as part of recent strategic workshop presentations and identified the need for decision makers to consider those ‘not at the table’ and recognising the difference in measuring value based on different values.

 

Regional Happenings – Tasman, Nelson and Marlborough

55      This section aims to provide information recently highlighted relating to an area/region elsewhere in New Zealand.

56      The area/region identified in this report is top of the south – Tasman, Nelson and Marlborough.

57      The articles identified below highlight some insights and significant developments occurring in the top of the South, related to destination management and a Te Tauihu intergenerational strategy.

58      In what is a common topic nationally, and one that Southland District Council has been involved with in regards the development of the Southland Murihiku Destination Strategy,  the Nelson Regional Development Agency discusses the transition from being a regional tourism organisation to including destination management and what this has meant to the NRDA:

 

NRDA’s Mark Rawson on making the move into destination management

By Shannon Williams

Funding increases from both the private and public sector is a key outcome following the transition from being a regional tourism organisation to including destination management, according to Nelson Regional Development Agency chief executive Mark Rawson.

Speaking to the Ticker following his presentation at the recent Tourism Export Council of New Zealand conference in Auckland, Rawson said the level of both public and private sector investment had increased in real terms.

As an RTO, funding for NRDA from local government investment in tourism totalled $660,000 in 2016, while private sector investment came in at $100,000. In 2019, this increased to approximately $900,000 and $350,000 respectively.

“We’ve managed to maintain and grow some public sector investment into the sector as a result of the structure,” said Rawson.

“Because of the way we are structured, we do have the opportunity to leverage our other parts of the business. There is quite a bit of benefit for the sector in leveraging funding from the other areas of NRDA activity, such as talent attraction and business development,” he said.

Rawson said NRDA had almost 200 businesses invest in it last year to help deliver our services.

“Partners are the most important things for us. They are absolutely critical to our success as a region. If we can’t get buy-in from them, we are more than likely not able to carry out our longer-term plans.”

As an RTO, Rawson said Nelson Tasman had a strong destination marketing focus, with key functions including international and domestic marketing, conventions and business events, and i-SITE management.

“Tourism is New Zealand’s number one export, and one of the largest employers in the country. There’s a whole lot of factors that start to become really important in how to grow the economy. That’s why we have followed the DMO model,” he said.

“Moving into destination management meant the organisation could position Nelson Tasman as a place where talent and investment would want to be. We can connect our people and companies with opportunities to grow and innovate; we can promote the destination as a place of choice for higher-value visitors who visit in from March to November, and we can put more focus on partnerships with the public and private sectors to build stakeholder engagement and drive NRDA’s role in strategy execution.”

Rawson said Nelson Tasman had invested a lot to get its digital presence right, and this paid off with a 40% increase in website traffic to nelsontasman.nz.

“We invested a reasonably serious chunk of money into it over the last two years, to get us digitally fit. This year has been about the deployment of that.”

Rawson said approximately $200,000 had been invested across all digital channels and activities plus one human resource over three years.

Rawson said transforming into a DMO helped galvanise a wider sector of community support for the visitor sector.

“We have a better capacity to respond to challenges, we have wider stakeholder buy-in and we have improved the sector’s relevance amongst other sectors with similar challenges, such as talent, infrastructure and investment,” he said.

“We have been able to align our talent and visitor marketing activity and have better access to investment programmes and improved engagement in regional infrastructure planning. We also have better leverage when it comes to public and private funding.”

Rawson said the upcoming summer season was looking positive.

“We’ve had a slightly later kick-off to the season but by all accounts it’s starting to look really good and we’re hearing good things from our operators. Last year we had a bit more of an extended season, pushing into autumn, so we’re confident that will happen this season,” he said.

“Travel trends are changing a bit, which is really helpful in addressing those seasonal challenges we have. The domestic market is playing a huge role in that as well. Kiwis are changing when they travel; it’s not always in peak season and they’re often travelling later in the year when there aren’t as many people around.”

He said 2020 will see a lot of work put into its destination management plan in partnership with Marlborough.

“Getting an integrated visitor sector plan to address those challenges is one of our key goals for next year. Getting those things aligned would be helpful. On top of that we are looking at ways we can get 150,000 local ambassadors for our region. A big focus of that piece of work will be creating lower footprint journeys across the region, and we already some operators doing that, which is great.”

59      The other topic of interest as Southland District Council looks to consider the implications of some of the recent strategic and big picture conversations is around intergenerational planning and the well-beings conversations. Attachments D and E include a PowerPoint presented in November 2019 and the recently released draft of the Te Tauihu Intergenerational Strategy.

60      As some context, the Te Tauihu Intergenerational Strategy is an initiative aiming to develop a roadmap for Marlborough, Nelson and Tasman to realise the full potential of the whole of the top of the south region.

61      The initiative is led by Wakatu Incorportaion in partnership with all three councils; the business community; Nelson Marlborough Institute of Technology; and whanau, hapu, and iwi across Te Tauihu.

62      This is a first for Te Tauihu. It is a coming together of the parties to develop a shared strategy that focuses on the wellbeing of the whanau (people), putea (economy) and Taiao (environment) across the whole region.

63      The concept was that by all being involved – from industry and iwi toi communities and councils – and working more closely together, then all can draw on the shared knowledge and resources; increase the influence and potential of the region; and deliver longer term, interconnected planning that benefits all.

64      The attachments provide a very good story and understanding of where Te Tauihu has come from and where it is going.

65      Based on the recent work undertaken by this Council it is relevant as it considers how best it wishes to advance its big picture and long term views thinking based on a wellbeing framework and intergenerational decisionmaking.

 

 

Recommendation

That the Community and Strategy Committee:

a)            Receives the report titled “Community Well-beings and Strategic Issues Overview - March - April 2020” dated 24 April 2020.

 

 

Attachments

a             engaged-communities-report-min

b             agribusiness-agenda-report-2019

c             2019-SOPI-December

d            Te Tauihu Intergenerational Strategy

e             DRAFT Te Tauihu Strategy    

 


Community and Strategy Committee

06 May 2020

 

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Community and Strategy Committee

06 May 2020

 

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Community and Strategy Committee

06 May 2020

 

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Community and Strategy Committee

06 May 2020

 






























Community and Strategy Committee

06 May 2020

 

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