Notice is hereby given that a Meeting of the Community and Strategy Committee will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Wednesday, 11 November 2020

1pm

Council Chamber
15 Forth Street, Invercargill

 

Community and Strategy Committee Agenda

OPEN

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Julie Keast

 

 

Mayor Gary Tong

 

Councillors

Don Byars

 

 

John Douglas

 

 

Paul Duffy

 

 

Bruce Ford

 

 

Darren Frazer

 

 

George Harpur

 

 

Ebel Kremer

 

 

Christine Menzies

 

 

Karyn Owen

 

 

Margie Ruddenklau

 

 

Rob Scott

 

 

IN ATTENDANCE

 

Group Manager, Community and Futures

Rex Capil

Committee Advisor

Alyson Hamilton

 

 

Contact Telephone: 0800 732 732

Postal Address: PO Box 903, Invercargill 9840

Email: emailsdc@southlanddc.govt.nz

Website: www.southlanddc.govt.nz

 

Full agendas are available on Council’s Website

www.southlanddc.govt.nz

 

 


Terms of Reference – Community and Strategy Committee

 

TYPE OF COMMITTEE

Council committee

RESPONSIBLE TO

Council

SUBCOMMITTEES

None

LEGISLATIVE BASIS

Committee constituted by Council as per schedule 7, clause 30 (1)(a), LGA 2002.

Committee delegated powers by Council as per schedule 7, clause 32, LGA 2002.

MEMBERSHIP

The Community and Strategy Committee is a committee of the whole Council.  The mayor and all councillors will be members of the Community and Strategy Committee. 

FREQUENCY OF MEETINGS

Six weekly or as required

QUORUM

Seven

SCOPE OF ACTIVITIES

The Community and Strategy Committee is responsible for:

       providing advice to Council on the approaches that it should take to promote the social, economic, environmental and cultural well-being of the District and its communities and in so-doing contribute to the realisation of Council’s vision of one District offering endless opportunities

       to provide leadership to District communities on the strategic issues and opportunities that they face

       to develop relationships and communicate with stakeholders including community organisations, special interest groups and businesses that are of importance to the District as a whole.

•      assessing and providing advice to Council on:

-    key strategic issues affecting the District and Council

-    community development issues affecting the District and Council

-    the service needs of the District’s communities and how these needs might best be met

-    resource allocation and prioritisation processes and decisions. 

•      developing and recommending strategies, plans and policies to the Council that advance Council’s vision and goals, and comply with the purpose of local government as specified in the Local Government Act 2002

•      monitoring the implementation and effectiveness of strategies, plans and policies

•      developing and approving submissions to government, local authorities and other organisations

•      advocating Council’s position on particular policy issues to other organisations, as appropriate

•      considering recommendations from community boards and Council committees and make decisions where it has authority from Council to do so, or recommendations to Council where a Council decision is required.

It is also responsible for community partnerships and engagement.  This includes:

•      monitoring the progress, implementation and effectiveness of the work undertaken by Great South in line with the Joint Shareholders Agreement and Constitution.

•      allocations of grants, loans, scholarships and bursaries in accordance with Council policy

•      international relations 

•      developing and overseeing the implementation of Council’s community engagement and consultation policies and processes. 

The Community and Strategy Committee is responsible for overseeing the following Council activities:

•      community services

•      district leadership.

DELEGATIONS

Power to Act

The Community and Strategy Committee shall have the following delegated powers and be accountable to Council for the exercising of these powers:

a)        approve submissions made by Council to other councils, central government and other bodies

b)        approve scholarships, bursaries, grants and loans within Council policy and annual budgets

c)        approve and/or assign all contracts for work, services or supplies where those contracts relate to work within approved estimates.  

d)        monitor the performance of Great South.. 

Power to Recommend

The Community and Strategy Committee«name of entity» has authority to consider and make recommendations to Council regarding strategies, policies and plans.

FINANCIAL DELEGATIONS

Council authorises the following delegated authority of financial powers to Council committees in regard to matters within each committee’s jurisdiction.

Contract Acceptance:

            accept or decline any contract for the purchase of goods, services, capital works or other assets where the total value of the lump sum contract does not exceed the sum allocated in the Long Term Plan/Annual Plan and the contract relates to an activity that is within the scope of activities relating to the work of the Community and Strategy committee

            accept or decline any contract for the disposal of goods, plant or other assets other than property or land subject to the disposal being provided for in the Long Term Plan

Budget Reallocation

The committee is authorised to reallocate funds from one existing budget item to another. Reallocation of this kind must not impact on current or future levels of service and must be:

            funded by way of savings on existing budget items

            within the jurisdiction of the committee

            consistent with the Revenue and Financing Policy

LIMITS TO DELEGATIONS

Matters that must be processed by way of recommendation to Council include:

•      amendment to fees and charges relating to all activities

•      powers that cannot be delegated to committees as per the Local Government Act 2002 and sections 2.4 and 2.5 of this manual.

Delegated authority is within the financial limits in section 9 of this manual.

STAKEHOLDER RELATIONSHIPS

This committee will maintain and develop relationships with:

            Community Boards

            Great South

•      Milford Community Trust

•      Destination Fiordland.

The committee will also hear and receive updates to Council from these organisations as required.

CONTACT WITH MEDIA

The committee chairperson is the authorised spokesperson for the committee in all matters where the committee has authority or a particular interest.

Committee members do not have delegated authority to speak to the media and/or outside agencies on behalf of Council on matters outside of the board’s delegations.

The group manager, community and futures will manage the formal communications between the committee and the people of the Southland District and for the committee in the exercise of its business.   Correspondence with central government, other local government agencies or official agencies will only take place through Council staff and will be undertaken under the name of Southland District Council.

 


Community and Strategy Committee

11 November 2020

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

ITEM                                                                                                                                                                                  PAGE

Procedural

1             Apologies                                                                                                                                                                7

2             Leave of absence                                                                                                                                                7

3             Conflict of Interest                                                                                                                                             7

4             Public Forum                                                                                                                                                         8

5             Extraordinary/Urgent Items                                                                                                                        8

6             Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                                                               8

Reports

7.1         Chairperson's Report                                                                                                                                    15

7.2         District Initiatives Fund September 2020 Allocations                                                               17

7.3         District Heritage Fund Application Summary and Financial Report                                 27

7.4         Sport NZ Rural Travel Fund Application Summary and Financial Report - September 2020 Round                                                                                                                                                                     31

7.5         Creative Communities Funding Scheme Summary of Grants Awarded                         37

7.6         Review of the Stewart Island/Rakiura Visitor Levy - Update and Timeline                   41

7.7         Southland Regional Development Agency Letter of Expectation                                     71

7.8         Milford Opportunities Project Update                                                                                               81

7.9         Public Service Reform Agenda Update                                                                                               93

7.10       Update on Council's Strategy Development Programme                                                    101

7.11       Our Southland District Community - Vision 2050 Project                                                    111

7.12       Community Well-beings and Strategic Issues Overview - October 2020                     129


 

                Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

1             Leave of absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

2             Conflict of Interest

 

Committee Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision-making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

3             Public Forum

Notification to speak is required by 12noon at least one clear day before the meeting. Further information is available on www.southlanddc.govt.nz or phoning 0800 732 732.

 

4             Extraordinary/Urgent Items

To consider, and if thought fit, to pass a resolution to permit the committee to consider any further items which do not appear on the Agenda of this meeting and/or the meeting to be held with the public excluded.

Such resolution is required to be made pursuant to Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987, and the Chairperson must advise:

(i)            the reason why the item was not on the Agenda, and

(ii)          the reason why the discussion of this item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

(a)           that item may be discussed at that meeting if-

(i)        that item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

(ii)       the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

(b)          no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

5             Confirmation of Minutes

6.1             Meeting minutes of Community and Strategy Committee, 09 September 2020


 

Community and Strategy Committee

 

OPEN MINUTES

 

 

Minutes of a meeting of Community and Strategy Committee held in the Council Chamber, 15 Forth Street, Invercargill on Wednesday, 9 September 2020 at 1pm.

 

present

 

Chairperson

Julie Keast

 

 

Mayor Gary Tong

 

Councillors

Don Byars

 

 

John Douglas

 

 

Paul Duffy

 

 

Bruce Ford

 

 

Darren Frazer

 

 

George Harpur

 

 

Christine Menzies

 

 

Karyn Owen

 

 

Margie Ruddenklau

 

 

Rob Scott

 

 

 

APOLOGIES

 

Councillor Ebel Kremer

 

 

 

IN ATTENDANCE

 

Group Manager, Community and Futures

Rex Capil

Committee Advisor

Alyson Hamilton

 


1             Apologies

 

There was an apology from Councillor Ebel Kremer.

 

Resolution

Moved Cr Menzies, seconded Cr Frazer  and resolved:

That the Community and Strategy Committee accept the apology.

 

 

2             Leave of absence

 

There were no requests for leave of absence.

 

 

3             Conflict of Interest

 

There were no conflicts of interest declared.

 

 

4             Public Forum

 

Lou Evans (Chief Activator) for COIN South addressed the meeting outlining the activities undertaken by COIN South as a collaborative network that supports and provides new businesses with experts, skills and the funding to become successful.

 

The Chair thanked Lou Evans for her attendance and presentation to the committee.

 

 

5             Extraordinary/Urgent Items

 

There were no Extraordinary/Urgent items.

 

 

6             Confirmation of Minutes

 

Resolution

Moved Cr Scott, seconded Cr Frazer  and resolved:

That the minutes of Community and Strategy Committee meeting held on 8 July 2020 be confirmed as a true and correct record of that meeting.

 

Reports for Recommendation

 

 

7.1

Draft Significance and Engagement Policy

Record No: R/20/8/47010

 

Intermediate Policy Analyst - Carrie Adams and Communications Manager - Louise Pagan were in attendance for this item.

Mrs Adams advised the purpose of this report is for the Community and Strategy Committee to consider the draft Significance and Engagement Policy.

The committee noted that feedback was sought and that it is proposed that the committee recommend to Council that it endorse the draft policy for public consultation.

 

 

 

Resolution

Moved Cr Ruddenklau, seconded Cr Menzies  recommendations a to c, d with additions (as indicated) e and f and resolved:

That the Community and Strategy Committee:

a)            Receives the report titled “Draft Significance and Engagement Policy” dated 31 August 2020.

 

b)           Determines that this matter or decision be recognised as not significant in terms of Section 76 of the Local Government Act 2002.

 

c)            Determines that it has complied with the decision-making provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 to the extent necessary in relation to this decision; and in accordance with Section 79 of the Act determines that it does not require further information, further assessment of options or further analysis of costs and benefits or advantages and disadvantages prior to making a decision on this matter.

 

d)           Considers the draft Significance and Engagement Policy and provides feedback as follows:

 

Ø  include around the mountain cycle trail as a strategic asset

Ø  amendment to the iwi reference

Ø  investigate possible impact of including the wharves/water structures as a strategic asset

 

e)            Endorses the draft Significance and Engagement Policy.

 

f)             Recommends to Council that it release the draft Significance and Engagement Policy for public consultation in accordance section 82 of the Local Government Act 2002, from 4 November to 4 December 2020.

 

 

Reports

 

 

8.1

Chairperson's Report

Record No: R/20/8/48082

 

Chairperson Julie Keast presented this report.

 

 

Resolution

Moved Chairperson Keast, seconded Cr Frazer  and resolved:

That the Community and Strategy Committee:

a)            Receives the report titled “Chairperson's Report” dated 26 August 2020.

 

 

 

8.2

SDC Holiday Programme - Proposal for January 2021 and Southland District Active Communities Advisor Proposal

Record No: R/20/8/31808

 

Community Liaison Officer - Kathryn Cowie was in attendance for this item.

 

Sport Southland representatives Luciana Garcia and Michelle Greenwood were in attendance in support of this item.

 

Mrs Cowie advised the purpose of this report is to gain approval from the committee for the SDC holiday programme proposal for January 2021, and to provide Council with a proposal for how the programme could be developed further beyond 1 July 2021 as part of the 2021-2031 long term planning process.

 

 

 

Resolution

Moved Cr Scott, seconded Cr Frazer  and resolved:

That the Community and Strategy Committee:

a)            Receives the report titled “SDC Holiday Programme - Proposal for January 2021 and Southland District Active Communities Advisor Proposal” dated 31 August 2020.

 

b)           Determines that this matter or decision be recognised as not significant in terms of Section 76 of the Local Government Act 2002.

 

c)            Determines that it has complied with the decision-making provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 to the extent necessary in relation to this decision; and in accordance with Section 79 of the act determines that it does not require further information, further assessment of options or further analysis of costs and benefits or advantages and disadvantages prior to making a decision on this matter.

 

d)           Endorses the proposal from Sport Southland for the January 2021 Southland District Council school holiday programme

 

e)            Notes the business case for the Southland District active communities advisor and will consider the proposal as part of the Long Term Plan 2021 – 2031, requesting staff to develop options with Sport Southland for implementation.

 

 

8.3

Community Partnership Fund - Summary of Confirmed Criteria

Record No: R/20/8/47513

 

Community Liaison Officer - Tina Harvey was in attendance for this item.

 

Mrs Harvey advised the purpose of the report is to provide a summary of the criteria set for the Community Partnership Fund by each of the nine community boards.

 

 

Resolution

Moved Cr Ford, seconded Cr Harpur  and resolved:

That the Community and Strategy Committee:

a)            Receives the report titled “Community Partnership Fund - Summary of Confirmed Criteria” dated 25 August 2020.

 

 

 

8.4

Catlins Tourism Partnership Group

Record No: R/20/8/48225

 

Community Partnership Leader - Karen Purdue was in attendance for this item.

 

 

Resolution

Moved Cr Menzies, seconded Cr Ford  and resolved:

That the Community and Strategy Committee:

a)            Receives the report titled “Catlins Tourism Partnership Group” dated 26 August 2020.

 

 

 

8.5

Southland District - Wellbeing Indicators Snapshot - August 2020

Record No: R/20/8/31210

 

Strategy and Policy Manager - Michelle Stevenson and Community and Futures Administrator - Shanin Brider and were in attendance for this item.

 

 

Resolution

Moved Cr Owen, seconded Cr Menzies  and resolved:

That the Community and Strategy Committee:

a)    Receives the report titled “Southland District - Wellbeing Indicators Snapshot - August 2020” dated 31 August 2020.

 

 

 

8.6

Impact of Covid-19 on our Community and Voluntary Sector

Record No: R/20/8/48140

 

Community Partnership Leader - Karen Purdue was in attendance for this item.

 

 

Resolution

Moved Cr Ruddenklau, seconded Cr Harpur  and resolved:

That the Community and Strategy Committee:

a)            Receives the report titled “Impact of Covid-19 on our Community and Voluntary Sector” dated 26 August 2020.

 

 

 

8.7

Community Well-beings and Strategic Issues Overview - August 2020

Record No: R/20/8/41538

 

Group Manager Community and Futures - Rex Capil was in attendance for this item.

 

 

Resolution

Moved Cr Menzies, seconded Cr Ruddenklau  and resolved:

That the Community and Strategy Committee:

a)            Receives the report titled “Community Well-beings and Strategic Issues Overview - August 2020” dated 14 August 2020.

 

 

 

 

The meeting concluded at 3.05pm.                      CONFIRMED AS A TRUE AND CORRECT RECORD AT A MEETING OF THE Community and Strategy Committee HELD ON WEDNESDAY, 9 SEPTEMBER 2020.

 

 

 

DATE:............................................................................................

 

 

 

CHAIRPERSON:........................................................................

 


Community and Strategy Committee

11 November 2020

 

Chairperson's Report

Record No:             R/20/10/64041

Author:                      Alyson Hamilton, Committee Advisor

Approved by:         Rex Capil, Group Manager Community and Futures

 

  Decision                                        Recommendation                                  Information

 

 

 

Purpose of report

Kia ora and welcome to the Community and Strategy Committee meeting.

Items of interest that I have been involved are as follows:

·    attendance at the bowel cancer screening team presentation (including inflatable bowel) at Tokanui Tavern. Organised by the clinical nurse at the Tokanui Health Centre

·    organised meet the candidates events at Tokanui and Wyndham on behalf of the Waihopai Toetoe Community Board.  Councillor Duffy chaired these meetings which were attended by seven candidates.  All candidates for Invercargill and Te Tai Tonga electorates were invited

·    advice of the Gore Counselling executive meeting.  Demand for counselling services continues

·    advice of the Citizens Advice Bureau Annual General Meeting scheduled 1 September 2020. First meeting of Southland Youth Futures Advisory Board to be followed by Southland Youth Futures Forum

·    along with Rex Capil met with representatives from Tourism Industry Aotearoa and discussed their organisations Covid-19 response/support for members (Southland District Council is a member) Another good opportunity to hear from an industry group which is relative and has an impact on our residents.  They are actively involved in central government’s tourism futures taskforce looking to make the most of this unique opportunity to reset to a sustainable tourism future

·    attended the Waihopai Toetoe Community Board workshop

·    attended the Community Board Chairs Forum

·    addressed the North Invercargill inner wheel meeting about Welcoming Communities

·    attended the National Council of Women NZ Southland Branch suffrage breakfast along with Councillor Menzies

·    as a trustee for Whakamana Te Waituna I attended the Ngai Tahu presentations to Crown officials at Te Rua Aroha Marae at Bluff of projects planned under the jobs for nature programme. Councillor Duffy, Fran Mikulicic and Margaret Ferguson attended the presentation.  Fran Mikulicic was formally welcomed onto the marae.

·    attended the Gore Counselling executive meeting and attended a community dinner organised by two local champions at Tokanui Rugby Club.  Great opportunity for locals to mix and mingle during spring season when so many regular events are on hold.  Approximately 75 people attended

·    accepted the Social Club’s invitation to Steve Ruru’s farewell

·    attended the Long Term Plan workshop

·    attended the South Catlins Charitable Trust AGM

·    attended the Community Trust South AGM

·    viewed a webinar on the 3 Waters Data Evidence Insights

·    attended the Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency annual partnership meeting

·    attended the Zone 5 & 6 meeting at Ashburton with Councillors Menzies and Scott

·    attendance at the CAB Board meeting

·    attendance at the Thriving Southland Catchment Group forum; Speaker Melissa Clark-Reynolds - A leading thinker around innovation in disruptive times

·    represented the mayor at the SIT Community Advisory dinner

·    attended the All in for Arts - He Waka Toi E Eke Noa Nei Tātou - The Great NZ Arts Journey breakfast presentation at He Waka Tuia.

 

Recommendation

That the Community and Strategy Committee:

a)            Receives the report titled “Chairperson's Report” dated 30 October 2020.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.  

 


Community and Strategy Committee

11 November 2020

 

District Initiatives Fund September 2020 Allocations

Record No:             R/20/10/62755

Author:                      Megan Seator, Community Liaison Officer

Approved by:         Rex Capil, Group Manager Community and Futures

 

  Decision                                       Recommendation                                  Information

 

 

Purpose

1        The purpose of this report is to give the Community and Strategy Committee a summary of the applications received for the District Initiatives Fund, and staff recommendations for the funding amounts to be allocated based on the criteria and amount available to be granted. Decisions on these applications are sought from the committee.

Executive Summary

2        The Southland District Council District Initiatives Fund is available to groups and organisations to assist with a broad range of projects and initiatives in Southland that are of benefit to at least two community boards areas. There are two grant rounds – one that closes on 30 September and one on 31 March.

3        Ten applications have been received for the current funding round and funding available for distribution is $38,080. Staff have recommended amounts totalling $17,500 for six of the applications, and are asking for discussion on four applications.

 

District Initiatives Fund Application Summary - September 2020

Total amount requested:                        $56,058.97

Total to distribute:                                  $38,080

Total amount of recommendations:      $17,500 (plus four “committee to discuss”)

 

1

Southern REAP Incorporated

 

Requests funding to support the “drive my life” community mentoring driver licensing programme.

 

Total Project Cost        

$13,513.52

 

Amount Requested       

$9,213.62

 

Communities benefited (as described by the applicant)

Programmes to be delivered in Ardlussa, Waihopai Toetoes, and Oreti community board areas

 

Recommendation

$6,000

 


 

2

Mossburn Golf Club Incorporated

 

Requests funding to plant trees to enhance the golf course and provide future revenue.

 

Total Project Cost        

$2,726.15

 

Amount Requested       

$2,454.15

 

Communities benefited (as described by the applicant)

Northern community board area primarily but also wider Southland as it is a popular golf club

 

Recommendation

Committee to discuss

 

3

Southland Softball Association

 

Requests funding for playing diamonds and softball fences as a part of the development of a new facility at Surrey Park, Invercargill.

 

Total Project Cost        

$264,000

 

Amount Requested       

$15,000

 

Communities benefited (as described by the applicant)

Softball players throughout the Southland District who will travel to this facility as a central hub. There is currently one softball club in the District (Wallacetown) with its players living in Wallacetown, Winton, Thornbury, Otauatu, Waianiwa and Riverton

 

Recommendation

Committee to discuss

 

4

Volleyball Southland Incorporated

 

Requests funding to develop a beach volleyball facility on Otepuni Avenue, Invercargill.

 

Total Project Cost        

$48,368

 

Amount Requested       

$10,000

 

Communities benefited (as described by the applicant)

Players throughout the Southland District will travel to use this facility. Volleyball is popular with Filipino dairy farmers

 

Recommendation

Committee to discuss

 

5

Southland Pony Club

 

Requests funding to assist with the costs of flying national trainers to Southland to instruct senior pony club members across the clubs.

 

Total Project Cost        

$3,000

 

Amount Requested       

$2,500

 

Communities benefited (as described by the applicant)

All communities in the Southland District with pony clubs

 

Recommendation

$1,500

 

 

6

Northern Southland Community Resource Centre Charitable Trust

 

Requests funding towards senior programmes (tai chi, senior café sessions, Soup & Chat, Christmas gathering) and the gardening programme.

 

Total Project Cost        

$2,391.20

 

Amount Requested       

$2,391.20

 

Communities benefited (as described by the applicant)

Benefits residents of Northern, Oreti, and Ardlussa community board areas

 

Recommendation

$1,500

 

7

Parenting Place Charitable Trust

 

Requests funding to assist with delivering “attitude” sessions in schools in the Southland District. The Attitude programme helps students focus on their strengths, self-esteem, mental health, and relationships.

 

Total Project Cost        

$24,948

 

Amount Requested       

$3,000

 

Communities benefited (as described by the applicant)

4,750 students in the Southland District area

 

Recommendation

$2,500

 

8

South Coast Environment Society Incorporated

 

Requests funding to assist with the delivery of three sets of educational workshops on the topics of growing your own food, money saving, and earth crafts.

 

Total Project Cost        

$3,554

 

Amount Requested       

$2,500

 

Communities benefited (as described by the applicant)

Participants to come from across the Southland District to attend workshops

 

Recommendation

Committee to discuss

 

9

Waimea Plains Ploughing Championship

 

Requests funding to assist with costs associated with running the New Zealand Ploughing Championship.

 

Total Project Cost        

$37,405

 

Amount Requested       

$6,500

 

Communities benefited (as described by the applicant)

Ardlussa, Oreti, and Northern community board areas (the areas where events are being held)

 

Recommendation

$4,500

                

 

10

Northern Southland Riding for the Disabled

 

 

Requests funding for operating expenses and coaches.

 

 

Total Project Cost        

$13,800

 

 

Amount Requested       

$2,500

 

 

Communities benefited (as described by the applicant)

Riders come from Ardlussa, Northern, and Fiordland community board areas

 

 

Recommendation

$1,500

Recommendation

That the Community and Strategy Committee:

a)            Receives the report titled “District Initiatives Fund September 2020 Allocations” dated 27 October 2020.

 

b)           Determines that this matter or decision be recognised as not significant in terms of Section 76 of the Local Government Act 2002.

 

c)            Determines that it has complied with the decision-making provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 to the extent necessary in relation to this decision; and in accordance with Section 79 of the act determines that it does not require further information, further assessment of options or further analysis of costs and benefits or advantages and disadvantages prior to making a decision on this matter.

 

d)           Approves the allocation of funds from the District Initiatives Fund as follows:

 

1

Southern REAP Incorporated

$6,000

2

Mossburn Golf Club Incorporated

Committee to discuss – requesting $2,454.15

3

Southland Softball Association

Committee to discuss – requesting $15,000

4

Volleyball Southland Incorporated

Committee to discuss – requesting $10,000

5

Southland Pony Club

$1,500

6

Northern Southland Community Resource Centre Charitable Trust

$1,500

7

Parenting Place Charitable Trust

$2,500

8

South Coast Environment Society Incorporated

Committee to discuss – requesting $2,500

9

Waimea Plains Ploughing Championship

$4,500

10

Northern Southland Riding for the Disabled

$1,500

 

 

 

 

Background

4        Southland District Council’s community assistance activity seeks to contribute to a district of ‘proud, connected communities that have an attractive and affordable lifestyle’ by enabling Southland’s communities to be desirable places to live, grow up, work, run a business, raise a family and enjoy a safe and satisfying life. Through providing financial assistance by way of grant funding, community groups and individuals are supported to undertake their desired activities.

5        A review of the community assistance activity was completed in early 2019. The purpose of this review was to ensure that Council is providing assistance in a considered and prudent manner to ensure efficient and effective outcomes for the communities they support.

6        It was recommended that there should be a significant change in the way that Council administers the Community Initiatives Fund. Subsequently, in July 2019 Council resolved to disestablish the Community Initiatives Fund and to establish the Community Partnership Fund.

7        As a part of this resolution, it was decided that the Community Partnership Fund would be allocated in two parts. The first part being district applications which will be heard through the Community and Strategy Committee. For clarity, this will be referred to as the “District Initiatives Fund”. While the second part being distributed by community boards who have the authority to grant funds for local applications.

8        The aim of the fund is to support facilities, amenities, programmes, activities and events at a District level. For the purposes of this fund, the term “district-level” is defined as at least two community board areas.

9        For the 2020/2021 financial year, there is $38,080 available for distribution through the District Initiatives Fund. For future financial years, the amount available for allocation is to be determined in the LTP 2021-2031.

Criteria

10      The purpose of the Southland District Council District Initiatives Fund is to support the development and implementation of initiatives within the Southland District area that are at a scale that provides benefits to the District as a whole or are of benefit to at least two community board areas. This includes the following:

§ Non-council owned facilities and amenities

§ Sport and recreational opportunities

§ Community programmes, activities, or events

11      The criteria for the District Initiatives Fund is as follows:

§ There will be two funding rounds per year closing on 31 March and 30 September

§ The aim of the fund is to support facilities, amenities, programmes, activities and events at a district level

§ For the purposes of this fund, the term “district-level” is defined as at least two community board areas

§ The fund is available to non-profit community organisations and community groups regardless of their legal status

§ Applications must include the completed application form and any other supporting information

§ The fund is a subsidy based scheme - applicants must contribute a reasonable amount towards the cost of the project

§ Level of assistance is based on the merit of the project and potential benefits to the community

§ Funding is not allocated retrospectively

§ In the case where the applicant is based outside of Southland District - the allocation is assessed on the proportion of members and/or beneficiaries from the District

Recommendations

12      The funding recommendations included in this report were developed in balance with the following considerations:

§ Amount of funding being requested

§ Amount of funding available for allocation

§ Total project cost

§ Scope of district benefit

§ Amount of self-fundraising and self-contribution

§ Funding sought from elsewhere

Issues

13      Four applications in this funding round do not have funding recommendations made by staff and it is recommended that the committee discuss these applications. Given this is the first round of the District Initiatives Fund, staff want to allow for the committee to discuss the applications that are particularly unique in nature and/or less clear as to whether they fit the criteria of the District Initiatives Fund.

14      The decisions made by the committee will likely set a precedent for what the committee will and will not fund in future funding rounds. The precedents made by the committee will influence the funding recommendations made by staff in future funding rounds.

Factors to Consider

Legal and Statutory Requirements

15      The granting of this fund aligns with Council’s Community Assistance Policy.

Community Views

16      Advertising of fund application deadlines is carried out well in advance of those dates to enable people to apply.

17      A small number of community groups applied to both Community Partnership Funds and the District Initiatives Fund for the same project. Staff advised the community groups that applying for both the Community Partnership and District Initiatives Fund is discouraged on the basis that it is essentially the same funding “pot” whereby the Community Partnership Fund is for projects at a community level while the District Initiatives Fund is for projects at a district level. All of the community groups were understanding of this. Staff offered advice as to which their project would be most suited towards and the community groups made a decision accordingly.

Costs and Funding

18      For the 2020/2021 financial year, there is $38,080 available for distribution through the District Initiatives Fund.

Policy Implications

19      There are no policy implications to consider.

Analysis

Options Considered

20      The options are to either approve grants to applicants pursuant to the funding criteria or to decline the applications.

Analysis of Options

Option 1 – Approve grants to applicants pursuant to the funding criteria

Advantages

Disadvantages

·        support community groups to achieve local initiatives

·        there are no disadvantages

 

Option 2 – Declines

Advantages

Disadvantages

·        there will be more money in the District Initiatives Fund for the next funding round

·        eligible groups and organisations may not be able to carry out their projects

·        council is not meeting its commitment to help fund community projects and initiatives

 

Assessment of Significance

21      This is not considered significant.

Recommended Option

22      The recommended option is “option 1 - allocates funding pursuant to the funding criteria”.

Next Steps

23      Advise applicants of the outcome of the funding allocations and payments made accordingly.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report. 

 


Community and Strategy Committee

11 November 2020

 

District Heritage Fund Application Summary and Financial Report

Record No:             R/20/10/61268

Author:                      Tina Harvey, Community Liaison Officer

Approved by:         Rex Capil, Group Manager Community and Futures

 

  Decision                                       Recommendation                                  Information

 

 

Purpose

1        The purpose of this report is to give the committee a summary of the applications to the Southland District Council Heritage Fund from the September 2020 round.  These applications seek grants to assist with the day to day running of local museums, heritage centres or similar type organisations within the Southland District Council boundaries.

Executive Summary

2        Eligible museums, groups and organisations can apply to the District Heritage Fund once a year for assistance with operational costs.  There are two funding rounds – one in September and one in March.  The recommended amount for distribution for this round is $37,514.

3        Five applications were received for the current funding round.  They are:

1      Thornbury Vintage Tractor Club

Request assistance towards operational costs.

Total Cost $4,650

Amount Requested $4,000                                  Recommendation $3,500

2     Riverton Heritage and Tourist Centre Trust

Request assistance towards operational costs.

Total cost $55,007

Amount requested $ 37,914                                Recommendation $19,000

3     Waikawa District Museum Inc

Request assistance towards operational costs.

Total cost $11,250

Amount requested $11,250                                  Recommendation $6,500

4     Switzers Museum Waikaia Inc

Request assistance towards operational costs.

Total cost $12,062

Amount requested $8,000                                   Recommendation $6,500


 

5     Wyndham and Districts Historical Society

Request assistance towards operational costs.

Total cost $3,424

Amount requested $3,000                                   Recommendation $2,000

The financial report for the District Heritage Fund up to 30 September 2020 is as follows

 

Recommendation

That the Community and Strategy Committee:

a)            Receives the report titled “District Heritage Fund Application Summary and Financial Report” dated 2 November 2020.

 

b)           Determines that this matter or decision be recognised as not significant in terms of Section 76 of the Local Government Act 2002.

 

c)            Determines that it has complied with the decision-making provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 to the extent necessary in relation to this decision; and in accordance with Section 79 of the act determines that it does not require further information, further assessment of options or further analysis of costs and benefits or advantages and disadvantages prior to making a decision on this matter.

 

d)           Approves the allocation of funds from the District Heritage Fund as follows:

 

1

Thornbury Vintage Tractor Club Inc

$3,500

2

Riverton Heritage and Tourist Centre Trust

$19,000

3

Waikawa District Museum Inc

$6,500

4

Switzers Museum Waikaia

$6,500

5

Wyndham and Districts Historical Society

$2,000

 

e)            Approves the financial summary for the District Heritage Fund.

 

 

Background

4        The District Heritage Fund was established in 2013 and collects about $63,000 per annum via the District heritage rate to support the operational costs of District museums, heritage groups and organisations.

Issues

5        Applicants have all met the criteria for the fund.

6        Any funds that are not distributed in this funding round are retained in the District Heritage Fund reserves.

Factors to Consider

Legal and Statutory Requirements

7        This aligns with Council’s Community Assistance Policy.

Community Views

8        Funding for this is through rates, and all stakeholders can make submissions on the suitability and amount of the fund during the Long Term Plan or Annual Plan process.

Costs and Funding

9        This fund is created by the district heritage rate.

Policy Implications

10      The criteria and awarding of this fund meets Council’s Community Assistance Policy.

Analysis

Options Considered

11      The options for consideration are either to award the grants to the applicants or to decline the applications.

Analysis of Options

Option 1 – Award the grants

Advantages

Disadvantages

·        fulfil Southland District Council’s commitment to offer and award grants to museums and heritage groups and organisations to assist with operational costs

·        Southland District Council would not fulfil its commitment of offer and award grants to District museums and heritage groups and organisations to assist with operational costs.

Option 2 – Decline the grants

Advantages

Disadvantages

·        there is more money in the District Heritage Fund.

·        museums and heritage groups and organisations struggle to cover operational costs.

 

Assessment of Significance

12      Under Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy, the awarding of this fund is not considered significant.

Recommended Option

13      Option 1 – award the grants.

Next Steps

14      Applicants will be advised of the outcome of their applications and payments of grants will be arranged. 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report. 

 


Community and Strategy Committee

11 November 2020

 

Sport NZ Rural Travel Fund Application Summary and Financial Report - September 2020 Round

Record No:             R/20/10/62785

Author:                      Kathryn Cowie, Community Liaison Officer

Approved by:         Rex Capil, Group Manager Community and Futures

 

  Decision                                       Recommendation                                  Information

 

 

Purpose

1        Southland District Council administers funding on behalf of the Sport New Zealand Rural Travel Fund. The purpose of this fund is to assist with transport expenses associated with participating in regular local competitions. Sports clubs and school-based clubs with young people between five and 19 years are eligible to apply.

Executive Summary

2        Four applications have been received for this round of funding, which closed on 30 September 2020. The amount for distribution for the 2020/2021 year is $18,717. The remainder will be carried forward to the March 2021 funding round.

3        A summary of the four applications with recommendations for funding are as follows:

4    11

Fiordland Athletic Club

 

To assist with the cost of members travelling around the district for various competitions.

 

Km travelled: 4,000

Recommendation as per travel formula

$1,200

 

4    12

Otara Pony Club

 

To assist with the cost of members travelling around the district for various equestrian competitions.

 

Km travelled: 7,000

Recommendation as per travel formula

$1,200

 

4    13

Riversdale Tennis Club

 

To assist with the cost of students travelling around the district for regular competitions.

 

Km travelled: 1,320

Recommendation as per travel formula

$400

 


 

4    14

Te Anau Tennis Club

 

To assist with the cost of students travelling around the district for regular competitions.

 

Km travelled: 6,750

Recommendation as per travel formula

$1,200

 

The financial report for the fund up to 30 September 2020 is as follows:

 

Recommendation

That the Community and Strategy Committee:

a)            Receives the report titled “Sport NZ Rural Travel Fund Application Summary and Financial Report - September 2020 Round” dated 2 November 2020.

 

b)           Determines that this matter or decision be recognised as not significant in terms of Section 76 of the Local Government Act 2002.

 

c)            Determines that it has complied with the decision-making provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 to the extent necessary in relation to this decision; and in accordance with Section 79 of the act determines that it does not require further information, further assessment of options or further analysis of costs and benefits or advantages and disadvantages prior to making a decision on this matter.

 

d)           Approves the allocation of funds for the Sport NZ Rural Travel Fund as follows:

 

1

Fiordland Athletics Club 

$1,200

2

Otara Pony Club

$1,200

3

Riversdale Tennis Club

$400

4

Te Anau Tennis Club

$1,200

 

e)            Approves the financial report up to 30 September 2020.

 

 


Background

4        Southland District Council has administered the rural travel fund on behalf of Sport New Zealand since 2012. The fund was launched by Sport NZ in response to concerns raised by councils about the lack of participations in sport by young people living in rural communities.

Issues

5        The applicants have met the requirements of the fund.

6        A travel formula based on the number of kilometres travelled has been applied to the applications.

Factors to Consider

Legal and Statutory Requirements

7        The fund is administered in accordance with the Sport NZ/Southland District Council investment schedule, including terms and conditions, for 2020/2021.

Community Views

8        The fund subsidies are appreciated by sports and school-based clubs within the district.

Costs and Funding

9        Grants are covered by the funding provided by Sport NZ.

Policy Implications

10      The process meets Sport NZ requirements.

Analysis

Options Considered

11      The options for consideration are to either award grants to the applicants to assist with travel costs or decline the applications.

Analysis of Options

Option 1 – Award grants to recipients

Advantages

Disadvantages

·        fulfil Southland District Council’s agreement to administer the Sport NZ rural travel fund on behalf of Sport NZ.

·        Southland District Council will not fulfil its obligation to administer the Sport NZ rural travel fund as per the investment schedule.

Option 2 – Not award grants to applicants

Advantages

Disadvantages

·        there are no advantages.

·        Southland District Council would not fulfil its obligation to administer the Sport NZ rural travel fund as per the investment schedule.

Assessment of Significance

12      Under Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy, this is not considered to be significant.

Recommended Option

13      Option 1 – award grants to applicants.

Next Steps

14      Applicants will be advised of the outcome of their application and payment of grants arranged.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report. 

 


Community and Strategy Committee

11 November 2020

 

Creative Communities Funding Scheme Summary of Grants Awarded

Record No:             R/20/11/64485

Author:                      Shanin Brider, Community & Futures Administrator

Approved by:         Rex Capil, Group Manager Community and Futures

 

  Decision                                        Recommendation                                  Information

 

 

Grants Summary

1        Creative New Zealand allocates Council $33,840 a year to fund arts in the community, with the following criteria:

•    broad community involvement – the project will create opportunities for communities to engage with and participate in arts activities

•    diversity – the project will support the diverse arts and cultural traditions of communities and enrich and promote their uniqueness and cultural diversity

•    young people – the project will enable and encourage young people to engage with and actively participate in the arts.

2        Creative New Zealand stipulates that community representatives are part of the decision-making committee. Council has set up a community committee made up of seven representatives from across Southland District, Cr Margie Ruddenklau, and myself providing administrative support.

3       Under the Creative New Zealand criteria, the community committee makes the decisions on the grants and so the following is a summary of those decisions:

4    11

ILT Stadium Christmas Variety Show

 

Annual Christmas variety show held at Stadium Southland for one night only

 

Total cost of project $81,700

 

 

 

Amount requested $2,500

Decision

$2,500

 

 

 

 

5    12

Maui and the Genie

 

Bi-annual all school production produced and performed by Balfour School

 

Total cost of project $2,217

 

 

 

Amount requested $1,500

Decision

$1,500

 

 

 

 

6    13

Baroque Music Concert

 

Baroque music concert tour – community concert and musical outreach event

 

Total cost of project $3,400

 

 

 

Amount requested $2,200

Decision

$2,200

 

 

 

 

7    14

Copeisolation – Laire Purik

 

A series of photographs of Stewart Island residents taken during the recent

Covid-19 lockdown, showing how island residents coped.  (The committee decided to contribute an extra $85 for the purchase of a hardcover book to be made available at the library on Stewart Island/Rakiura)

 

Total cost of project $22,877

 

 

 

Amount requested $2,975

Decision

$3,060

 

 

 

 

8    15

Toi Rakiura Arts Trust – Ian Sinclair’s My Secret Life

 

An evening of musical entertainment with Ian Sinclair who is a flamenco guitarist.  An opportunity to experience flamenco music and hear about Ian’s life as a reporter, journalist and musician.

 

Total cost of project $1,517

 

 

 

Amount requested $400

Decision

$400

 

 

 

 

9    16

Abstract Art Mural Workshop

 

Active teaching of abstract art with Steph McDonald a local Riverton artist via two workshops being held in Riverton.  The committee agreed to fund the materials for the project but not the artist’s time.  The committee felt the cost involved to attend the workshop should be increased to cover this cost.

 

Total cost of project $2,445

 

 

 

Amount requested $2,045

Decision

$850

 

 

 

 

10  17

Arts Enrichment – Dipton School

 

Enriching children’s knowledge skills, access and participation to creative and performing arts through an extension project.

 

Total cost of project $1,110

 

 

 

Amount requested $1,110

Decision

$1,110

 

 

 

 

11  18

The Happiness Project – Tuturau School

 

Engaging a professional arts practitioner, children will experience all elements of performing arts and production elements.  The arts practitioner will mentor the creative direction of the process from script writing to performance.

 

Total cost of project $4,748

 

 

 

Amount requested $2,229

Decision

$2,229

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

12   19

Way of the World

 

The project aims to involve up to 30 young people aged between 8 and 18 in a full-scale theatre production.  It will also engage the services of two local professional musicians, sound and lighting technicians, set builders, stage crew and wardrobe and costume specialists.

 

Total cost of project $8,350

 

 

 

Amount requested $6,450

Decision

$6,450

Financial Report

13     The following is a snapshot of the available funds the committee has to allocate.  Please note the carry over amount from the previous funding round.  Very few applications were received due to the Covid-19 lockdown.

 

Recommendation

That the Community and Strategy Committee:

a)            Receives the report titled “Creative Communities Funding Scheme Summary of Grants Awarded” dated 3 November 2020.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report. 

 


Community and Strategy Committee

11 November 2020

 

Review of the Stewart Island/Rakiura Visitor Levy - Update and Timeline

Record No:             R/20/10/60863

Author:                      Carrie Adams, Intermediate Policy Analyst

Approved by:         Rex Capil, Group Manager Community and Futures

 

  Decision                                        Recommendation                                 Information

 

 

Purpose

1        The purpose of this report is to provide the Community and Strategy Committee (the committee) with an update on the review of the Stewart Island/Rakiura visitor levy. It is recommended that the committee endorse the proposed work plan and timeline for completion of this work.

Executive Summary

2        Council is able to collect a levy from visitors to Stewart Island/Rakiura and use those funds for:

•     providing services, facilities and amenities for island visitors; or

•     mitigating environmental effects of visitors.

3        When the Stewart Island/Rakiura Visitor Levy Policy was adopted by Council, it endorsed keeping the quantum of the levy at $5, until a strategic review of service delivery to Stewart Island/Rakiura has taken place, as well as determining the appropriate quantum of the levy. 

4        Work on Stewart Island/Rakiura service sustainability is ongoing.  A review of the quantum and policy upon which the visitor levy is collected and distributed, is one component of this review.    

5        This report outlines a project plan to complete the review of the visitor levy in a comprehensive manner, within identified timeframes.

6        Under s.4 of the Southland District Council (Stewart Island/Rakiura Visitor Levy) Empowering Act 2012 (the Empowering Act), a levy is a sum of money collected from visitors arriving as freedom travellers, and revenue is money collected on behalf of Council by approved operators. For this report, to ensure clarity, both types of money collected (levy and revenue) will be referred to as ‘levy’.

 

Recommendation

That the Community and Strategy Committee:

a)            Receives the report titled “Review of the Stewart Island/Rakiura Visitor Levy - Update and Timeline” dated 30 October 2020.

 

b)           Determines that this matter or decision be recognised as not significant in terms of Section 76 of the Local Government Act 2002.

 

c)            Determines that it has complied with the decision-making provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 to the extent necessary in relation to this decision; and in accordance with Section 79 of the act determines that it does not require further information, further assessment of options or further analysis of costs and benefits or advantages and disadvantages prior to making a decision on this matter.

 

d)           Endorses the plan and timeframe proposed to complete the review of the Stewart Island/Rakiura Visitor Levy Policy and the Stewart Island/Rakiura Visitor Levy Bylaw.

 

e)            Notes that formal consultation regarding any change to the levy quantum is proposed to occur in line with the 2022-2023 Annual Plan process.

 

f)             Notes that staff will report back to the Community and Strategy Committee to provide an update on progress at its April 2021 meeting.

 

 


 

Background

The current policy and bylaw

7        Council currently has a Stewart Island/Rakiura Visitor Levy Policy (the current policy) and a Stewart Island/Rakiura Visitor Levy Bylaw (the current bylaw).  The current policy and bylaw came into effect on 1 July 2019.

8        Council sets and collects the levy from people who visit Stewart Island/Rakiura through the current policy and bylaw, and through contractual agreements with approved operators.

9        The current policy and bylaw became operative, and the levy started being collected, in October 2013. The levy collected is currently $5 per person. Particular people are not required to pay the levy such as Stewart Island/Rakiura residents and ratepayers, and people visiting who are under 18 years.

10      As is required under the Empowering Act and the current bylaw, levies collected have been used to fund activities used by or for the benefit of visitors, and to mitigate the adverse effects of visitors on the Island.

11      Levy funds are allocated by the Stewart Island/Rakiura Visitor Allocation Levy Subcommittee (the levy subcommittee).  The current policy provides funding allocation guidelines for the subcommittee to consider, but allocations are at the subcommittee’s complete discretion. The current policy also allows the levy subcommittee to commit to paying funds to an applicant in future years.

12      The table below shows information on the funds that have been collected since the current bylaw and policy came into effect.

Table one: funds collected from visitors to Stewart Island/Rakiura

year ended

$ (gst excl)

number of visitors

June 2014
(9 months)

113,567

26,120

June 2015

133,251

30,648

June 2016

158,511

36,457

June 2017

159,372

36,656

June 2018

193,143

44,423

June 2019

191,267

43,991

June 2020

159,169

36,609

 

 

 

Scope of review

13      When Council last reviewed the bylaw and policy, it endorsed keeping, “the amount of the levy at $5 until such time as the strategic review of service delivery on Stewart Island/Rakiura has taken place and determines the proposed amount of $15 to be appropriate.” A review of the quantum also entails a review of the bylaw and the policy upon which the visitor levy is collected and distributed.

14      Determining a new levy amount based on predicted tourist growth, future funding commitments and the ability of Council to enforce collection of the levy, is only one aspect of the review of the current policy. Other issues and opportunities include:

•     considering the potential types of activities that can be funded, consistent with the Empowering Act, and the time period for which funding can be committed

•     looking at potential funding commitments for the levy over a period of five to 10 years

•     reviewing the policy with a view to determining annual funding that might be made available for distribution from the levy fund.

Review process

15      Changing the quantum of the levy requires that both the current policy and bylaw be formally reviewed.  The current policy and bylaw were adopted on 7 February 2019 and came into effect on 1 July 2019.  They are due for review within six years of adoption, so no later than 7 February 2024.  It is open to Council to review the policy and bylaw at any time.   

16      The current policy requires that, ‘in the event an increase in the levy or revenue amount is considered, public consultation will occur via the Southland District Council Annual/Long Term Plan process and a bylaw amendment process’. If Council decides to increase the levy amount, the increase will not take effect until 1 October in the year following the decision to adopt the plan ie, approved operators will receive 15 months lead in time before they start collecting the new amount.”  This is also included in the contract between approved operators and Council, for the collection of levy funds. 

17      This means that formal consultation for reviewing the quantum of the levy must align with the LTP and/or Annual Plan (AP) process.  A change in the quantum of the levy may only be adopted by Council in June, to coincide with the LTP/AP review cycle.  A new levy amount would begin to be collected 15 months later, from October of the year following adoption.

Issues

Proposed process and timing of review

18      It is proposed that the review of the levy be progressed so that any changes to the quantum and the outcome of review of the current policy and bylaw are adopted by Council as part of the 2022-23 Annual Plan. 

19      There are several reasons for this, including:

•     review of Council services to Stewart Island/Rakiura and the Revenue and Finance Policy.  This work is providing dollar figures and policy statements, to accurately assess the funding needs and mechanisms for providing Council services to Stewart Island/Rakiura.  This information needs to be analysed specifically in light of the visitor levy, and incorporate the provision of non-Council services to Stewart Island/Rakiura, which are eligible for levy funding.  This was not possible until the reviews referred to above were completed, but is now in a position to be done

•     whilst visitor numbers to Stewart Island/Rakiura were higher in winter 2020 compared to the previous winter season, it would be highly advantageous to have data from the 2020-21 summer season to better inform visitor forecasting figures, in light of the Covid-19 effects on tourism 

•     the importance of pre-consultation with stakeholders.  There is a high level of interest in the visitor levy and it is paramount that a robust process is followed.  Meaningful pre-consultation can only occur once analysis of funding needs (that are eligible for levy funds) is completed. Pre-consultation should not be rushed through.

20      In light of these factors, it is not possible to complete this work, which also includes formal consultation, hearings, deliberations and adoption, in time to be included in the LTP 2021-31.

21      Accordingly, the project plan outlined below illustrates a feasible timeframe to ensure that the review is completed to a high standard, and any proposed changes can be consulted on in the 2022-23 Annual Plan.   

Table two: project plan for review of current policy and quantum of levy

Proposed action

Completion date

Stewart Island/Raikiura visitor levy needs assessment for both Council and non-Council services, potential funding commitments over 10 year period to support any proposed increase to the levy amount and policy changes

January 2021

Review of policy and bylaw 

February 2021

Completion of 10 year levy funding plan, which includes forecasting future revenue streams and incorporates visitor numbers for the summer 2020/21 season

April 2021

Pre-consultation with approved operators

May-June 2021

Pre-consultation with stakeholders (includes staff members, iwi, members of the Stewart Island/Rakiura community and stakeholders involved with the levy)

June - July 2021

Obtain feedback and request the levy subcommittee to recommend - that Council endorse draft changes to policy/bylaw for formal consultation

August 2021

Obtain feedback and request the Stewart Island/Rakiura Community Board recommend – that Council endorse draft changes to policy/bylaw for formal consultation

September 2021

Obtain feedback and request the Community and Strategy Committee recommend - that Council endorse draft changes to policy/bylaw for formal consultation

November 2021

Council endorse draft changes to policy/bylaw for formal consultation

December 2021

Formal public consultation period, as part of 2022-23 Annual Plan consultation process

March 2022

Hearings

April 2022

Deliberations

May 2022

Adoption of changes to current policy and bylaw, and adoption of 2022-23 Annual Plan

June 2022

New policy and bylaw come into effect (if quantum of levy is changed)

October 2024

 

Factors to Consider

Legal and Statutory Requirements

The Empowering Act

22      The Empowering Act provides that Council may make bylaws in accordance with the Local Government Act 2002 (LGA) to prescribe:

•      the rates of levies that may be imposed on or in respect of ‘visitors’, and

•      the means by which those levies are to be collected.

 

23      The Empowering Act defines revenue as being collected “by an approved operator in accordance with a contract entered into for the purpose with the Council”. Levy means “the sum of money collected under bylaws made under this act.” Under the Empowering Act, arrangements with approved operators fall outside of the scope of the bylaw.

 

Consultation

24      Council is required to undertake consultation on this policy and bylaw in accordance with the special consultative procedure outlined in ss.83 and 86 of the LGA.

25      The current policy and Council’s contracts with approved operators will require Council to consult on any change to the amount of levy imposed through the 2022-23 Annual Plan process.

LGA financial requirements

26      Under the LGA, Council is required to manage its finances prudently and in accordance with sound business practice. It is also required to make adequate provision for meeting its forecast expenditure requirements. Collectively, these provisions suggest that Council should have a clear analysis supporting any projected increase in funding required. In the case of the Stewart Island Visitor Levy, such an assessment should have regard to the range of services that need to be provided, whether by Council or other service providers, to meet the needs of visitors.

Contractual obligations

27      The approved operators are only required to collect revenue through their contractual commitments with Council. The current bylaw and Empowering Act do not place any obligations on the approved operators. Council cannot force/require the approved operators to collect the revenue from passengers. Under the contract they have the option to terminate the contract by giving six months’ notice of termination. Termination cannot take place during the peak months of October to April (inclusive).

28      Under the contracts with approved operators, Council is required to consult via its Annual Plan process before the amount of levy is increased and provide 15 months’ notice of the increase to the approved operators. A variation to the contract (regarding changing the amount of revenue to be collected) is made by giving notice in writing. It does not require agreement by the approved operators.

29      If any of the current approved operators terminated their contract with Council, alternative collection methods would have to be established.

Community Views

30      Council is aware of the high level of interest and sense of ownership by the Stewart Island/Rakiura community regarding the levy.  The pre-consultation and formal consultation process as proposed will ensure that all who wish to provide feedback have an opportunity to do so.

31      When the policy and bylaw were last reviewed, the community was generally opposed to increasing the quantum of the levy.  Staff are aware that since the last review, the Stewart Island/Rakiura community have become more receptive to the concept of a change in the quantum of the levy.  This is due to an increased understanding of the costs and challenges to providing services to Stewart Island/Rakiura.

Costs and Funding

32      It is proposed that costs associated with staff time, advertising, travel and legal advice will be met within current budgets.

33      Full costs will be outlined as the review progresses, including a ten year funding plan for the levy.

Policy Implications

34      There are no policy implications to endorsing the timeframe for review of the current policy and bylaw outlined in this report.

35      If changes are made to the current policy and bylaw, there are policy implications for:

•        visitors to Stewart Island/Rakiura

•        future applicants to the levy

•        Council, including the committee and levy subcommittee

•        potential changes to Council’s Revenue and Finance Policy

•        the approved operators and other transport providers to the Stewart Island/Rakiura, and

•        local business and tourism operators on the Stewart Island/Rakiura.

Analysis

Options Considered

36      The following reasonably practicable options have been identified.

•        option 1 – that the committee approve the review of the current policy and bylaw according to the project plan outlined in this report.

•        option 2 – that the committee propose a different way forward.

Analysis of Options

Option 1 – approve project plan for review of the current policy and bylaw

Advantages

Disadvantages

·        ensures development of a new levy amount based on predicted visitor numbers, future visitor funding needs and the ability of Council to enforce collection of the levy

·        allows for robust pre-consultation and consultation

·        summer 2020-21 visitor numbers may be incorporated into revenue stream forecasting, in light of the effects of Covid-19 on tourism

·        complies with requirements in the current policy and contracts with approved operators, that quantum of levy be reviewed in line with the LTP/AP

·        ensures Council meets its LGA financial requirements of having a clear analysis supporting any projected increase in funding required, and any consequent proposed levy increase

·        provides accountability to ensure a set timeframe is followed for this work.

·        setting an appropriate quantum for the levy is part of establishing a strategic funding plan for facilities and services on Stewart Island/Rakiura, such as jetties.

·        people in the community and councillors may be of the view that the levy review should be completed sooner

·        there may be consultation fatigue in the community because the last review was relatively recent

·        the community may not support proceeding with any changes to the levy quantum or allocation before the policy and bylaw are legislatively required to be reviewed.

 

 


 

Option 2 – propose a different way forward

Advantages

Disadvantages

·        would give further clarity on councillors’ views regarding review of the levy quantum and the current policy/bylaw.

·        may not comply with the requirement that any change to the levy quantum be reviewed in line with LTP/AP

·        if timeframe for review is accelerated, will not have benefit of summer 2020-21 visitor numbers to aid in forecasting revenue streams

·        if timeframe for review is accelerated, may compromise Council meeting its LGA financial requirements of having a clear analysis supporting any projected increase in funding required, and any consequent proposed levy increase

·        if timeframe for review is accelerated, risk that consultation process will not be completed in a robust manner.

Assessment of Significance

37      In this report the committee is being asked to endorse a plan for completion of a review of the current policy and bylaw.  This decision has been assessed as being of lower significance in relation to Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy and the LGA.

Recommended Option

38      Staff recommend that the committee proceed with option 1 and endorse the project plan and timing for review of the current policy and bylaw.

Next Steps

39      If the committee endorses the plan and timing as proposed, staff would proceed with the review of the policy and bylaw as outlined in this report.  The current policy and quantum would be used until a new policy and bylaw come into effect on 1 October 2024.

40      If Council proposes a different way forward, staff will outline next steps in line with the approach taken.

 

Attachments

a             Current Stewart Island Rakiura Visitor Levy Policy

b             Current Stewart Island Rakiura Visitor Levy Bylaw    

 


Community and Strategy Committee

11 November 2020

 

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Community and Strategy Committee

11 November 2020

 

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Community and Strategy Committee

11 November 2020

 

Southland Regional Development Agency Letter of Expectation

Record No:             R/20/10/61960

Author:                      Melissa Brook, Governance and Democracy Manager

Approved by:         Rex Capil, Group Manager Community and Futures

 

  Decision                                       Recommendation                                  Information

 

 

Purpose

1        The purpose of the report is to present to the Community and Strategy Committee the letter of expectation sent to the Southland Regional Development Agency (Great South) from the Mayoral Forum on behalf of the four Southland local authorities.

Executive Summary

2        Each year, Southland District Council and its partner shareholding local authorities set the direction and general priority areas for the Southland Regional Development Agency (Great South) through the letter of expectation. 

3        The letter of expectation is drafted and sent by the chair of the Mayoral Forum following feedback from the Southland councils.  It sets the high-level outcomes that the shareholders wish to see delivered by Great South.

4        Priorities raised by Council at its workshop on 7 October 2020 have been provided to the Mayoral Forum to assist in building the letter of expectation.

5        The quantum of funding allocated to each of these priority areas gives direction to Great South as to where Council has its focus and has been amended from the most recent instruction to Great South to align with the priorities highlighted by Council prior to the Covid-19 pandemic.

6        Following the receipt of the letter of expectation, Great South will prepare a draft Statement of Intent (SoI).  The draft SoI will include outputs that Great South will provide to deliver on the outcomes highlighted in the letter of expectation.  The draft SoI will be provided to Council for comment and feedback when received in early December.

 

Recommendation

That the Community and Strategy Committee:

a)            Receives the report titled “Southland Regional Development Agency Letter of Expectation” dated 30 October 2020.

 

b)           Determines that this matter or decision be recognised as not significant in terms of Section 76 of the Local Government Act 2002.

 

c)            Determines that it has complied with the decision-making provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 to the extent necessary in relation to this decision; and in accordance with Section 79 of the act determines that it does not require further information, further assessment of options or further analysis of costs and benefits or advantages and disadvantages prior to making a decision on this matter.

 

d)           Notes that the letter of expectation has been provided to Great South and that by 1 December 2020, Great South will provide Council with a draft Statement of Intent to consider and provide comment on in accordance with the Southland Regional Development Agency’s constitution.

 


 

Background

7        At its meeting on 25 September, the Southland Mayoral Forum approved the following timeline for the letter of expectation process:

·    end September / early October – letter of expectation workshops held

·    19 October – Mayoral Forum meeting to discuss letter of expectation

·    30 October – letter of expectation provided to Great South.

8        Council subsequently held a workshop to discuss its priorities for Great South on 7 October 2020.  At the workshop the following broad priorities were discussed:

·    focus on Southland’s strengths

·    greater diversification and resilience within the economy

·    economic development, but not at the expense of compromising environmental and community outcomes

·    greater digital connectivity across the region

·    tourism projects, with an emphasis outside of the Invercargill City boundary

·    support existing business and the retention of our existing business, noting this is predominantly farming, by assisting with diversification.

9        The discussion was focused predominantly on economic development and business support, but tourism and events were also considered important to Southland’s regional development and the post Covid-19 recovery.

10      Council discussed a move back to the ‘pre-Covid’ priorities and level of investment in the areas of focus of Great South.  This level of investment has been included in the letter of expectation.

11      Invercargill City Council has held a similar workshop and the outcomes of that workshop, the Southland District Council workshop, and feedback from both Gore District Council and Environment Southland was delivered at the Mayoral Forum meeting on 19 October 2020.   From this meeting the letter of expectation has been drafted and delivered to Great South. The letter of expectation is included as an attachment to this report.

Next Steps

12      Having received the letter of expectation, Great South will now develop a draft Statement of Intent (SoI) demonstrating how it intends to meet the expectations set by the shareholding councils.

13      On receipt of the draft SoI, Council will review and provide feedback to the Great South board.  The board will consider the feedback and amend the draft SoI where necessary, providing a finalised SoI to Council prior to 30 June 2021. 

14      Prior to the finalisation of the SoI, Council, in conjunction with the other shareholding councils will need to negotiate the core costs of operating Great South with the Great South Board.  As of the 2021/2022 year, a formula is included in the shareholders’ agreement outlining the responsibility of meeting the costs for each council.  The core costs are to be unanimously agreed by the councils.  For budgeting purposes, staff have assumed that the cost to SDC will be the same as in the current financial year ($500,000). Based on the current core costs to operate Great South, under the formula expressed in the shareholders’ agreement, the likely cost to SDC would decrease, enabling redirection of that funding to contract or other priority areas of regional development.

15      Council has also recently undertaken discussions with Destination Fiordland regarding funding of the RTO.  Should Council determine that all or any of the $200,000 should be redirected to Great South, this will be subject to further negotiations of Council’s expectations of Great South for service delivery in this area.

Factors to Consider

Legal and Statutory Requirements

16      Part 5 of the Local Government Act 2002 (the act) specifically refers to council controlled organisations and Schedule 8 specifically refers to statement of intent requirements.

17      As well as complying with the act, the parties also have responsibilities to meet with regards the Southland Regional Development Agency Ltd constitution and the Southland Regional Development Agency Ltd shareholders agreement.

18      These obligations have been considered and form the basis and rationale behind the process being undertaken.

Community Views

19      Council has previously consulted on the establishment of the Southland Regional Development Agency and associated areas of focus for regional development.

20      Having the draft SoI available during the development of the Long Term Plan enables the community to consider the role of regional development as a part of the whole Southland District story when engaging on the Long Term Plan.

Costs and Funding

21      The quantum of the allocations are consistent with previous decisions of Council and are included within the draft budgets for the 2021/2022 financial year.

Policy Implications

22      There are no identified policy implications.

 

Attachments

a             Great South Letter of Expectation 2021-22 (signed final)    

 


Community and Strategy Committee

11 November 2020

 

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Community and Strategy Committee

11 November 2020

 

Milford Opportunities Project Update

Record No:             R/20/11/64662

Author:                      Simon Moran, Community Partnership Leader

Approved by:         Rex Capil, Group Manager Community and Futures

 

  Decision                                        Recommendation                                  Information

 

 

Purpose

1        The purpose of this report is to provide the committee with a general update on the Milford Opportunities Project (MOP).

Background

2        The MOP is a multi-agency project with a governance group comprised of representatives from MBIE, Department of Conservation (DOC), Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency, Ngai Tahu, Southland District Council (SDC), Queenstown Lakes District Council (QLDC), and Business. The group is independently chaired by Dr Keith Turner.

3        All funding agreements require contracting parties and SDC as a party that initiated this project has assumed that responsibility.

4        The MOP was initially received government funding of $250,000 (Stage 1 – delivered by WSP-Opus) through MBIE as part of the launch announcements for the Southland Regional Development Strategy. It was quickly identified that the project was significantly larger than the amount of funding available and discussions began to have that increased. Subsequently, SDC and MBIE have signed a funding agreement for $3 million to further develop the project. The $3 million was allocated from the International Visitor Levy (IVL).

5        In 2019 a Request For Proposal (RFP) for Stage 2 was publicly tendered and was won by Stantec. Stantec are working with Boffa Miskell and other sub-contractors to complete the project

Update

6        In July the Milford Opportunities Project (the Project) undertook its first national public engagement campaign. The Project received over 1200 responses and there were a number of additional people who clicked onto the website for a look at what was being done albeit they didn’t then respond to the survey questionnaire.

7        In October the Milford Opportunities Project undertook its final round of public engagement seeking comment on the options.

8        The focus of the recent engagement has been twofold, firstly setting up and running the second nationwide engagement campaign, which started on 5 October and finished to 30 October and secondly, carrying out one-on-one conversations with key stakeholders, both locally and nationally.

9        The engagement campaign, again web-based, set out the options decided on from the long list, all feedback so far and the work carried out by the programme development team. At the time of writing, there was just over 300 responses and more are expected in the next 10 days from stakeholders who are sending them in separately.

10      The engagement was broken down into six key areas – Te Anau, transport, the Milford Corridor, conservation, Milford Sound Piopiotahi and behind the story of Milford Sound Piopiotahi. Each of these areas had a set of options/ideas and people were invited to comment on each one (attached is a word document version of the engagement.).

11      A strong advertising campaign was undertaken, with advertisements on radio, Herald online, Stuff, Kia Ora (the Air NZ magazine), in local newspapers, in the Southland App, on social media. Public meetings were also held in Te Anau, Milford Sound Piopiotahi, Queenstown and Invercargill and a meeting with national bodies was held in Wellington. During the month the five reference groups met and discussed these options as well.

12      The results of the engagement will feed into the final reports to and decision-making of the governance group about what will make up the master plan.

13      The Project’s website is www.milfordopportunities.nz

Next Steps

14      Following the engagement the governance group will meet again on November 17 to consider the feedback received. On December 8 they will then consider the project team’s recommendations on the various options and make their decision on what will be in the Master Plan. The project team will then prepare the final Master Plan (electronic and hard copy versions) including animation and the linking of the supporting information.

15      The Master Plan will provided the Government with the objective recommendations from the Project’s governance group for the future management and development of the Milford experience including specific recommendations for Milford Sound Piopiotahi and the road corridor from Te Anau.

16      The Master Plan will be provided to the relevant Ministers and publicly released before the end of June 2021

 

Recommendation

That the Community and Strategy Committee:

a)            Receives the report titled “Milford Opportunities Project Update” dated 3 November 2020.

 

 

Attachments

a             October 2020 engagement    

 


Community and Strategy Committee

11 November 2020

 

You can give feedback on the ideas below through one or more of the following:

·    the website throughout October www.milfordopportunities.nz

·    by filling in this Word document table and emailing back.

·    by discussing with us ideas over the phone or in a Zoom meeting.

 

Contents

Te Anau and its district – a destination. 2

Develop new transport models to manage visitor flows. 6

Give visitors choice on the Milford Corridor. 9

Conservation supported by tourism.. 15

Encouraging visitors to experience the full Milford Sound Piopiotahi story. 17

Behind the story of Milford Sound Piopiotahi 22

 

It is important to understand that some things are considered as fundamentals to the master planning process and therefore do not appear as ideas for discussion and comment, such as:

·    Ngāi Tahu values of mātauranga tuku iho, kaitiakitanga, tikanga, utu and manaakitanga are incorporated into the storytelling

·    Ownership of Ngāi Tahu culture, practices, rituals and stories is held by Ngāi Tahu.

Equally some very valid ideas raised by people and organisations during the project’s earlier stages do not appear as they are considered likely to occur as a direct result of some of the catalysts ideas that are listed here. For example, enhancing the Southern Scenic Route to Invercargill from Te Anau and strengthening connections from Te Anau east and south are most likely to occur if other proposed ideas are implemented.

Te Anau and its district – a destination

The Milford Opportunities Project sees Te Anau as the hub for visiting Milford Sound Piopiotahi and a destination in its own right. It believes it is essential to support the Fiordland Community Board, Destination Fiordland and Great South in the development of a destination management strategy and the implementation of that strategy.

We are working with Ngāi Tahu to consider how their identity will be expressed in Te Anau. These initiatives would also be subject to local authority planning management. Some ideas for the strategy work are to:

Idea

Description

Redesign the Te Anau waterfront and town centre

Making as much as possible of the Te Anau waterfront and town centre assets; this idea could see the development of such things as lakefront hot pools, walking and cycling paths and new landscaping. Initiatives would be designed to improve the year-round experience for residents and visitors alike.

Create new walking/cycling tracks connecting into Te Anau

This concept would build up the range of supplementary walking and cycling experiences (of different durations) that visitors could undertake from the town. The objective would be to strengthen the range of Te Anau-based experiences on offer and encourage visitors to see the town as both a regional accommodation and experience hub. This would lead to visitors both basing themselves in Te Anau and staying for longer.

Develop a Te Anau transport hub/bus interchange

This hub is essential for providing the starting point for a bus focused visitor transport model into Milford Sound Piopiotahi.  It would enable a reduction in rental and private vehicle numbers into Piopiotahi and visitor access to be spread out more evenly throughout the day, giving a better experience and strengthening Te Anau as a regional accommodation hub.

Develop a Milford corridor and Piopiotahi experience hub in Te Anau

This hub would deliver visitors information on Fordland’s cultural significance, history, natural environment, geology and conservation. It would contain static and interactive interpretation displays, audio-visual and guided experiences. It plays an essential role anchoring the start of the Milford Sound Piopiotahi experience in Te Anau. It would be an attraction in its own right and be joined to the Te Anau transport hub/bus interchange.

Develop new family-friendly experiences in the basin

As part of a drive to strengthen Te Anau as a visitor hub, existing sites such as a Brod Bay campground could be developed into family friendly short stay or short stop experiences. This could see the inclusion of additional short loop walks, toilets, observation points, a forest observation tower at canopy level, and linkages to adjoining sites of interest, such as the Hidden Lakes.

Develop new transport models to manage visitor flows.

The Milford Opportunities Project governance group is recommending controlling access into Milford Sound Piopiotahi. The development of new transport models will help to manage visitor flows. Two general models being looked at are shown in the table below. Note: Ngāi Tahu whānui, recreationists that require private vehicles (such those with boats, heavy equipment, or hunters, walkers and trampers) and commercial services for Piopiotahi would be provided access under both models.

 

Idea

Description

Mixed access option A

This option is largely public transport focused with a mix of tour bus, hop-on hop-off and non-stop buses designed to support a more immersive visitor experience on both the Milford Corridor and in Milford Sound Piopiotahi. Low or zero carbon buses would be used.

However, under this model some pre-permitted self-drive visitor parking would still be retained at Milford Village (potentially 60% less than current levels) and along the Milford Road corridor. Access to parking at key visitor locations could be balloted and/or priced in advance of arrival to reduce congestion. Those camping or staying at accommodation would also be allowed private vehicle access.

New infrastructure improvements to the road corridor would be required to facilitate safer overtaking/stopping to accommodate larger visitor numbers to destinations along the corridor.

Mixed access option B

Under this option the vast majority of visitors would be required to access Piopiotahi and the Milford Road corridor via bus (with some limited exceptions where this is entirely impractical). This is a public transport model focused on a mix of tour bus, hop-on hop-off and non-stop buses designed to support a more immersive visitor experience on both the Milford Road and in Milford Sound Piopiotahi. Low or zero carbon buses would be utilised.

Under this model no self-drive visitor parking would be retained at Milford Village. Those camping or staying at accommodation would be allowed permitted private vehicle access only as far as their pre booked accommodation location.


 

Give visitors choice on the Milford Corridor

Creating a Milford Corridor experience for visitors is another goal for the governance group. It is suggesting the Milford Corridor experience be improved to strengthen the options available to visitors. Ideas under consideration include:

Idea

Description

Create a strong national park entry where the road enters Fiordland National Park

The objective of this idea is to clearly define the transition into Fordland National Park and give visitors a sense of crossing a threshold. This crossing over experience comes with an expectation on visitors that they will adopt appropriate behaviours when inside the park because they are now somewhere different – somewhere special. The threshold could be marked in many different ways such as with sculptural elements, kūwaha, signage and/or landscaping.

Develop the Knobs Flat experience hub

Knobs Flat has the potential to be a key interpretive hub for the Milford Road experience. This could involve the development of a series of covered shelters containing interpretation displays, pūrākau, interpretive nature trails, observation points and a network of loop tracks. Much of the current footprint at Knobs Flat is already highly modified but is close to forests of high conservation value.

Develop the Knobs Flat accommodation hub

Because of its location and modified site footprint, Knobs Flat has the potential to become a key accommodation location along the Milford Road. With improved landscaping the site could be developed to accommodate tent and campervan sites and simple cabins. Potential also exists for a lodge to be developed and for cultural elements to be expressed via the built landscape. 

Create a super track head within the Divide area

This iconic new visitor node would include interpretation, toilets and a shelter and new track sections. It centralises access, linking numerous longer tracks together. It also potentially facilitates access to a series of shorter walks and key observation points, such as Key Summit.

For mana whenua it represents a modern reinstatement of the Whakatipu Trail and serves as a wānanga (living classroom) for Ngāi Tahu.  It recognises ngā ara tawhito (trails) which are an integral part of Ngāi Tahu culture.

The technical challenges of achieving this concept are significant and implementation would be dependent on a detailed feasibility analysis. 

Upgrade short stop options along Milford Road corridor

Increase the range and quality of short-stop areas that visitors can stop at. In most instances these sites are already established close to the road but lack appropriate interpretation, (e.g. Lake Gunn Walk) small loop tracks, viewing areas and cultural narrative. Improvements would be aimed at enabling greater accessibility for those with mobility restrictions (such as disabled, older adults and children). An objective would be to let the widest possible range of visitors feel the wairua (spirit) of the place.

Enhance the Cascade Creek campsite

Camping opportunities along the Milford Corridor are in high demand. Through improved landscaping and some additional infrastructure, such as toilets, existing camping opportunities can be expanded and enhanced at Cascades Creek. Because of flooding risks this site is not considered

appropriate for other facilities (such as small cabins). 

Investigate options in the upper and lower Hollyford Valley

In appropriate locations minimal impact road end/track enhancements, extensions and/or new tracks could be established. This could form part of reconnecting the Whakatipu Trail. It also links to the idea of creating a super track head.

Homer Tunnel portals (short stop)

This strong well engineered observation portal (sheltered from rock and avalanche risks) would offer a safe viewing location on the Milford Sound Piopiotahi side of the Homer tunnel. It would offer good sightlines over the alpine environment and into Piopiotahi and the best opportunity for passive (non-interactive) observation of kea


 

Conservation supported by tourism

A key pillar of the Milford Opportunities Project is conservation and using funds raised by tourism to meet costs of improved conservation, access, infrastructure, operations and mana whenua aspirations. To achieve this the governance group is considering:

Idea

Description

Tourism funding conservation

Charges could be applied to support a broad range of conservation and land management initiatives. These initiatives would likely include predator control, the reintroduction of native fauna (such as kakapo and tieke) following successful predator control, weed management, marine biosecurity surveillance, soil control, conservation research into key ecosystems and species, and mana whenua narration costs. Charges could also be used to support the visitor experience in areas such as infrastructure maintenance, visitor interpretation, visitor safety and emergency response.


 

Encouraging visitors to experience the full Milford Sound Piopiotahi story

The Milford Opportunities governance group wants to encourage visitors to stay longer in Milford Sound Piopiotahi and contribute to the local economy by developing a compelling suite of experiences and redesigning the Milford village to reflect its world-class status. Options being looked at include:

Idea

Description

Create a compelling sense of arrival into Piopiotahi

This sense of arrival can be achieved through better landscaping (naturally framing key viewshafts), clearing visual pollution and potentially the introduction of pou whakairo.

Establish a new Piopiotahi visitor hub

This facility plays multiple roles serving as a place of arrival and departure (via bus), a location for booking visitor experiences, a place to eat, a refuge from inclement weather and natural hazards and a place to learn about the wonders of Piopiotahi. It also provides mana whenua a purpose-built space for active transfer of knowledge and use of cultural materials.

Develop new visitor accommodation

This accommodation at a minimum would serve walking tours and other Piopiotahi activities. It is envisaged as being a modest scale accommodation facility (say with 125 beds) with potentially two standards catering for high end and tourist/walker standards.

Redevelop the tourist boat terminal

This idea would see the existing boat terminal redeveloped as a lower profile structure that serves as a transfer terminal building (like an airport) rather than as a visitor centre. Use of the visitor hub for ticketing/validation would reduce the time visitors are waiting in this location.

Restrict access of  cruise liners in the inner sound from impacting sight lines of Mitre Peak

This would involve revising policies around cruise liners within Milford Sound Piopiotahi to reduce visual and environmental impacts, smoke emission and tsunami risks.

Remove fixed wing plane runway from Piopiotahi (via a phased withdrawal)

Undertake the phased removal (for example with a three to five-year notice period) of the fixed wing plane runway. This would free up what is very scarce flat space at Piopiotahi for a broad range of visitor uses such as a visitor hub and experience centre, spectacular viewing lines, coastal walks and tracks, and helipads. The use of helicopters would remain.

Develop new walking tracks and observation points in Piopiotahi

These loop walks and observation points would afford views and cultural narration to Bowen Falls, Mitre Peak, Devils Arm, and rivers. There is potential for elevated walks (above the current hotel and to the top of Bowen Falls) that could add spectacular view points to those at sea level.

Establish an interpretive Marine Centre in Piopiotahi

This facility is envisaged to play a key marine education role. It would be used to deliver / reinforce conservation messages and interpret the marine reserve. It would contain a range of open aquarium tanks containing fish, static and interactive interpretation displays, and audio-visual experiences. Mana whenua could be employed in the delivery of mātauranga and kaitiakitanga.

Incorporate the commercial port (Deep Water Basin) into the visitor experience

This idea links the existing commercial operations into the overall visitor experience (rather than attempting to hide this activity). Through a series of walkways and observation points visitors would be able to observe activity and have it interpreted but be kept at a safe distance.  The potential also exists to leverage the fresh seafood story by serving seafood.

Relocate resident accommodation

Establishing new resident accommodation would enable better quality, more compact housing to be developed in a safer location and this would free up scarce flat land for visitor purposes.


 

Behind the story of Milford Sound Piopiotahi

The opportunity exists to reassess how we are governing, managing, and developing Milford Sound Piopiotahi. The telling of the Piopiotahi story also needs to be brought together in a fresh coherent and visionary way.  The area’s infrastructure needs to protect both the natural environment and visitors to ensure it remains a world class natural environment. To achieve this, we are considering the following ideas:

Idea

Description

Development and management decisions could be led by one governance entity

In order to streamline management and development decisions associated with Milford Sound Piopiotahi and the Milford Road corridor, a single governance entity could be established.

Rebrand to recreate the Piopiotahi story

Milford Sound Piopiotahi would benefit from a rebranding initiative that ideally would form part of a wider full redesign of the sub-regional tourism proposition. This would reinforce the objectives of the project and would drive home to potential visitors that there are multiple opportunities on offer rather than just a few.

Develop better facilities and infrastructure for basic services such as water, wastewater, power and communication

Much of the infrastructure within Milford Sound Piopiotahi and the Milford Road corridor is old and under pressure from visitor demands and the impacts of the natural environment. More robust fit for purpose infrastructure up to modern environmental standards should now be developed.  Appropriate access and separation between users of Deep Water Basin is currently being investigated.

 


Community and Strategy Committee

11 November 2020

 

Public Service Reform Agenda Update

Record No:             R/20/10/60974

Author:                      Rex Capil, Group Manager Community and Futures

Approved by:         Ross McNeil, Interim Chief Executive

 

  Decision                                        Recommendation                                  Information

 

 

Purpose

1        The purpose of this report is to provide an overview to the Community and Strategy Committee on recent happenings in the broader subject area of the public service reform agenda.

2        This report details the central government activity that is occurring in the public service reform area which involves various parts of the public service, that may have some form of impact on local government and its function, and therefore form, in the future. There is an overall strong centralisation theme to the public service reform agenda from central government. As a result it is suggested these sorts of changes and the reform agenda may cumulatively drive the biggest change to the local government sector since the amalgamations of 1989 in upcoming years.

Context – Future of Local Government

3        In the management report presented to the Council meeting on 29 September 2020 a section related to the “Future of Local Government” noted:

“Local Government New Zealand (LGNZ) and Society of Local Government Managers (SOLGM) are advancing work to scope a future of local government work stream which will look at the changing role of the sector, particularly in light of the extensive changes that are likely to occur as a result of the three waters reform and resource management reform processes.

The work stream will have a particular focus on the role of local government in supporting community wellbeing and how this might further evolve in the future including the relationship between central and local government, the relative importance of the civic leadership role played by the sector and community led development.

The reducing role of the local government sector in both the infrastructure provision and regulatory service areas are likely to have an impact on the number, shape and form of local authorities in the future. This is expected to include discussion about whether it remains relevant to have a distinction between regional and territorial local authorities.”

4        The consistency of messaging was reinforced in the September 2020 edition of The First Edition – Southland District Council’s magazine. Specifically, some of the points noted include:

“Nobody can say for sure what local government will look like in five years, but one thing is certain – it will look very different than it is today.”

“Central government’s ongoing reforms of vocational education, the district health board model and new Public Service Act mean that as a territorial authority we are operating in a new world, with new thinking and new processes required. Work is well underway at a national level in scoping what the role of local government will be going forward, taking into account our legislative obligation to the four aspects of community wellbeing – social, economic, environmental and cultural.”

“It is a time of change for local government. He sees council’s primary role evolving from that of infrastructure management and service provision to helping to position and lead communities to meet the opportunities and challenges that the future will bring.”

“A comprehensive review of the resource management system led by retired Court of Appeal Judge Tony Randerson QC recommends the repeal and replacement of the Resource Management Act 1991 and new strategic planning legislation. The Randerson report says it’s outside our terms of reference but we strongly recommend there’s reform of local government.”

“Alongside the RMA review there is the three waters reform process through which central government has indicated a move to form multi regional water entities to take over the delivery of water, wastewater and stormwater services from local authorities. These sorts of changes will cumulatively drive the biggest change to local government since the amalgamations of 1989.”

“In terms of how that will affect local government he says there will be a much stronger focus on what are the needs of the communities, how are those needs met and how are they best delivered?”

“He believes the structural reform of local government will be the secondary issue. The bigger issue will be what is it that local government’s doing and how do we continue to define and implement that delivery piece.”

“That’s some of the opportunity – how do local authorities achieve that broader wellbeing and have that integrated planning which is hopefully more consistent and efficient across the country? It requires collaborative planning by a wide range of agencies, from council, health and justice to infrastructure providers such as NZ Transport Agency, power companies and telephone companies.”

5        The LGNZ sector brief received on the 7 October 2020 from Stuart Crosby, President of LGNZ again reinforced similar themes. He commented:

“… comes at a time of reform for the wider local government sector, across three waters and freshwater, as well as significant change in indigenous biodiversity and the Resource Management Act.

As part of the three waters reform discussion, a clear message from right across the sector has been that there needs to be careful consideration around how councils will continue to promote the wellbeing of their communities during and after the three waters reform process.

We’ve heard you loud and clear. This is an issue that is bigger than three waters. The future of local government, and how communities steer their individual destinies, is vital to their wellbeing and the wellbeing and prosperity of our nation.”

“Given the scale of the proposed three waters reforms, any discussion around them that does not fulsomely discuss the future of local government as a whole is not a discussion that we think is fair or acceptable.

It is National Council’s view that reform discussions have to consider what the role and function of local government will be in the future, to ensure that our system of local governance continues to function, and that communities aren’t disenfranchised by these reforms.”

“To progress this issue, LGNZ and the SOLGM have developed a joint proposal that will front foot how the sector wishes to address the question of “What is the future of local government?”

“The interregnum period during the election will be a good time to further develop this, with a view to briefing the incoming Minister of Local Government after the formation of the Government.”

Public Sector – Three Waters

6        The following points were highlighted in the September 2020 edition of The First Edition – Southland District Council’s magazine:

“Leading the charge is the government’s reform of three waters service delivery, which promises to bring the biggest change to the way local government operates since the amalgamations of 1989.

Three waters refers to drinking water, wastewater and stormwater, and the delivery of these services, which is currently done by territorial authorities including Southland District Council, is under the microscope.

The three waters sector faces many challenges, including rising costs, increasing environmental standards, climate change and seasonal pressure from tourism. These challenges, along with recommendations from the inquiry into the Havelock North water supply contamination incident in 2016, mean that our business as usual will have to change.

The government inquiry into Havelock North drinking water identified widespread systemic failure of suppliers to meet the standards required for the safe supply of drinking water to the public, and made a number of urgent recommendations.

This inquiry highlighted that, in many parts of the country, communities cannot be confident that drinking water is safe or that good environmental outcomes are being achieved. This work also raised concerns about the regulation, sustainability, capacity and capability of a system with a large number of localised providers, many of which are funded by relatively small populations.

The regulatory parts of the reforms are well advanced with the development of new legislation and the creation of Taumata Arowai, the new, independent water services regulator. This new Crown entity is currently being built and will become responsible for drinking water regulation once a separate Water Services Bill, currently before Parliament, is passed. This is expected in mid 2021.

In July this year, the government announced a $761 million funding package to provide post Covid-19 stimulus across the country to improve three waters infrastructure, support a three year programme of reform of local government water service delivery arrangements and support the establishment of Taumata Arowai.

In August, Southland District Council opted into the first stage of central government’s three waters reform process. This part was voluntary but it came with the incentive of SDC getting access to $13.5 million of that funding stimulus package, provided that we signed a memorandum of understanding and supplied a work plan on how the money will be spent. Opting in signals that Council agrees with the need for reforms and the new delivery model proposed.”

Public Sector – Resource Management

7        On 5 August 2020 the Minister for the Environment released the Randerson Committee’s report setting out the findings and recommendations of its review of the Resource Management Act. The committee was asked to, and has, delivered a fundamental review of the resource management system.

8        It is important to note that the findings are still to be considered and accepted by government, however there is a strong and collective view that there will be change.

9        The report recommends substantial changes to the present system with the aim of establishing more enduring solutions and to this end major new pieces of interrelated legislation are recommended:

·    the repeal of the Resource Management Act 1991 (RMA) and its replacement with new legislation suggested be named the Natural and Built Environments Act (NBEA)

“The focus of the NBEA would be on enhancing the quality of the environment and on achieving positive outcomes to support the wellbeing of present and future generations. This would include recognition of the concept of Te Mana o te Taiao which refers to the importance of maintaining the health of our natural resources, such as air, water, soil, and their capacity to sustain life. This new focus would be achieved through a system designed to deliver specified outcomes, targets and limits for both natural and built environments.

Significant changes to processes are recommended including stronger national direction and the introduction of combined plans for each region.

It is expected these changes would result in clearer direction, reduced complexity and opportunity for enhanced environmental quality.”

·    new legislation suggested be named Strategic Planning Act

“This would set long term strategic goals and facilitate the integration of legislative functions across the resource management system. These would include functions exercised under the new Natural and Built Environments Act, the Local Government Act, the Land Transport Management Act and the Climate Change Response Act.

This legislation is also designed to integrate land use planning with the provision of infrastructure and associated funding and investment. Regional spatial planning will play a critical part in delivering the intended outcomes for the resource management system. The new legislation would include strategic planning for urban growth and responding to change, measures to respond to the effects of climate change, and the identification of areas unsuitable for development due to their natural values or importance to Maori.”

·    new legislation suggested be named Managed Retreat and Climate Change Adaptation Act

“Managing the effects of climate change has been a significant focus of the review. It concluded that the complexities of the process of managed retreat (for example in coastal areas) required new discrete legislation.”

10      The report also identifies the importance of providing for a much more effective role for Maori throughout the resource management system.

·   it is suggested a future resource management system should provide a direct role for Maori in decision making and in the design of measures and processes to give effect to the principles of Te Tiriti

·   it is also recommended the creation of a National Maori Advisory Board with a range of functions including providing advice to government and oversight of the resource management system from the perspective of mana whenua.

11      The report also emphasises the success of the new resource management system will depend on the capacity and capability of all involved in it. It suggests it is essential that substantially increased funding and resources be provided by both central and local government if the objectives of the new system are to be realised.

12      The report also raises two matters it explicitly identifies that are outside the terms of reference for the review. These are:

·    reform of local government

“It has become clear to us that the resource management system would be much more effective if local government were to be reformed.

The existence of 78 local authorities in a nation of just five million people is difficult to justify. Much could be achieved by rationalisation along regional lines, particularly in improving efficiencies, pooling resources, and promoting the co-ordination of activities and processes.

Reform of local government is an issue warranting early attention.”

·    rights and interests of Maori in freshwater resources

“The Panel’s view is that it would be desirable for the Crown and Maori to address and resolve this issue sooner rather than later. Without such a solution, we believe the allocation and use of water rights will continue to pose significant difficulties for all those involved in the system.”

13      The report is a first step in a reform process involving the potential for significant change in government policy and the form of future legislation.

Public Sector – Extending the Government Procurement Rules

14      The Ministry of Business Innovation and Employment (MBIE) is currently undertaking a public consultation to understand the potential benefits, opportunities and other impacts of extending the government procurement rules to a wider set of government entities in the New Zealand public sector.

15      The New Zealand public sector encompasses a broad range of government entities that include:

·   Ministries and departments, eg MBIE

·   Crown entities, eg Accident Compensation Corporation (ACC) and district health boards

·   Crown Research Institutes, eg National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research Ltd (NIWA)

·   Public Finance Act Schedule 4A Companies, eg City Rail Link Ltd

·   School Boards of Trustees

·   Public Finance Act Schedule 4 Organisations, eg Fish and Game councils

·   Officers of Parliament, eg The Controller and Auditor General

·   Universities

·   State Owned Enterprises, eg KiwiRail Ltd

·   Regional and Territorial Authorities.

16      Government procurement is regulated in New Zealand by the Government Procurement Rules. Currently it is mandatory for approximately 135 government entities to apply the rules.

17      Most government entities are ‘encouraged’ to apply the rules as good procurement practice. This includes a significant proportion of the remainder of the New Zealand public sector, including 2,400 school board of trustees and 78 regional and territorial authorities.

18      The diagram below shows that a significant proportion of New Zealand’s public sector is not required to apply the rules:

19      In the current policy settings, Government is limited in its ability to influence government procurement policies in the State and Public Sector, implement system wide improvements to procurement practices and achieve greater public good that is spent each year by the government sector.

20      The public consultation MBIE is undertaking in this space will assist in informing the policy development process and advice to ministers, which directly or indirectly could impact on the local government sector in the future.

State Services – Health Service Delivery

21      On 16 June 2020 the Health Minister released the final report of the Health and Disability System Review which makes far reaching recommendations.

22      The Minister noted:

“It sets out a path towards a better, more sustainable health system with clear lines of accountability. One that is more responsive to the needs of local communities and that better tailors services to the way that people live their lives. This is particularly important when it comes to improving health outcomes for those most in need including Maori, Pacific people, the disabled and rural communities.”                                      

23      The review’s recommendations include:

·   shifting to a greater focus on population health

·   creating a new Crown Entity, provisionally called Health NZ, focused on operational delivery of health and disability services and financial performance

·   reducing the number of DHBs from the current 20 down to 8-12 within five years, and moving to fully appointed boards

·   creating a Maori Health Authority to advise on all aspects of Maori Health Policy and to monitor and report on the performance of the system with respect to Maori

·   greater integration between primary and community care and hospital/specialist services.

24      The Minister also noted:

“Cabinet has accepted the case for reform, and the direction of travel outlined in the review, specifically changes that will reduce fragmentation, strengthen leadership and accountability and improve equity of access and outcomes for all New Zealanders.

That means we are committing to an ongoing programme of reform to build a stronger health and disability system. Decisions on individual recommendations will be taken to Cabinet over coming months and into the next term of Parliament.

Make no mistake, reforming our health and disability system is a massive undertaking, and will not happen overnight. Meaningful change and improvement will take concerted effort over many years.

This is a once in a generation opportunity to back our world class doctors, nurses and other health staff and deliver a truly national health and disability system.”

Public Service – Public Service Act 2020

25      On 23 July 2020 Parliament passed the new Public Service Act 2020, which repealed and replaced the State Sector Act 1988.

26      The minister of state services noted:

“The changes in this bill lock in and expand the thinking and practices of collaboration that this government has been championing.

It is no longer possible for any one single agency to fix the really big and complex problems New Zealand faces today. Policy and operational silos take you only so far.

The State Sector Act 1988 was designed for its time and since then there have been major social, economic and technological changes, many of them on a global scale.

The new act gives the public service the tools and organisational agility to work together to tackle the most challenging, intergenerational issues and deliver services in ways that work best for New Zealanders.

The naming of the act itself also signals a shift in focus, placing a clear emphasis on service to New Zealand individuals and communities as the key focus and motivation for all public service agencies and activities.”

 

Recommendation

That the Community and Strategy Committee:

a)            Receives the report titled “Public Service Reform Agenda Update” dated 30 October 2020.

b)           Determines that this matter or decision be recognised as not significant in terms of Section 76 of the Local Government Act 2002.

 

c)            Determines that it has complied with the decision-making provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 to the extent necessary in relation to this decision; and in accordance with Section 79 of the act determines that it does not require further information, further assessment of options or further analysis of costs and benefits or advantages and disadvantages prior to making a decision on this matter.

 

d)           Notes the central government activity that is occurring in the public service reform area may have some form of impact on local government and its function, and therefore form, in the future.

 

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report. 

 


Community and Strategy Committee

11 November 2020

 

Update on Council's Strategy Development Programme

Record No:             R/20/10/61863

Author:                      Robyn Rout, Policy Analyst

Approved by:         Rex Capil, Group Manager Community and Futures

 

  Decision                                        Recommendation                                  Information

 

 

Purpose

1        The purpose of this report is to:

·            update the Community and Strategy Committee (the committee) on work that has been completed on the strategy development work programme

·            outline that staff believe more information is required on a district vision, before staff complete Council’s internal strategy development work.

Executive Summary

2        In July 2020, this committee endorsed staff undertaking work on a strategy development programme.

3        Staff have completed a stocktake of Council’s strategies and plans, and have identified other relevant regional and national strategies. All of the strategies have been categorised in relation to Council’s community outcomes and the community wellbeings.

4        While undertaking work to prioritise particular strategies for development and to amend Council’s strategic framework, it has been identified that Council is missing information.

5        Staff believe the pinnacle of Council’s organisational framework should be a district vision – a community vision for the district as a whole that outlines the aspirations doe the district and what the district should be like in the future.

6        Council’s vision should then closely align to the district vision, while also considering and encompassing the community wellbeings. This will ensure Council is not acting in a silo, and is in tune with, responsive to, and serving our community.

7        For these reasons, staff do not believe they can proceed to develop an amended strategic framework or accurately identify and prioritise Council’s internal strategies, without more information on a vision for the district.

8        In accordance with a report also being presented at this meeting, staff are recommending that Council facilitate and develop a ‘Vision 2050 Project’ for the district as a whole. This work would modify a component of the strategy development programme endorsed by this committee on 8 July 2020– to investigate a 10-year strategy for the Southland District.

9        When sufficient information has been captured through the Vision 2050 Project, staff would then proceed and finalise internal strategy development plans, amend Council’s strategic framework, and develop strategy implementation plans. It is anticipated this work would start near the end of next year (2021).

Recommendation

That the Community and Strategy Committee:

a)        Receives the report titled “Update on Council's Strategy Development Programme” dated 30 October 2020.

 

b)        Determines that this matter or decision be recognised as not significant in terms of Section 76 of the Local Government Act 2002.

 

c)         Determines that it has complied with the decision-making provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 to the extent necessary in relation to this decision; and in accordance with Section 79 of the act determines that it does not require further information, further assessment of options or further analysis of costs and benefits or advantages and disadvantages prior to making a decision on this matter.

 

d)        Notes that on 8 July 2020, the Community and Strategy Committee endorsed a strategy development work programme to be undertaken from 2020 through to 2024.

 

e)        Notes the work staff have been doing on the strategy development work.

 

f)         Notes that staff believe the development of a district vision and wider community input is necessary to progress strategy development and implementation plans, and to amend Council’s strategic framework.

 

g)        Notes that a report on this agenda, ‘Our Southland district community – Vision 2050 Project’, proposes facilitating the development of a 2050 vision for the district.

 

h)        Notes that if Council endorses the Vision 2050 Project, it is anticipated staff would be able to continue progressing the development of Council’s internal strategy development programme, late in 2021.

 

 

 


 

Background

Community future planning work

10      As part of the Long Term Plan (LTP) 2018-2028 process, Council (of the previous triennium) identified the need to invest in planning for the future, and endorsed an approach to undertake big picture research and analysis work.

11      In the LTP 2018-2028 Council confirmed that it would invest in developing a district-wide community future planning model to help make decisions about the activities and services Council will provide in the future. This work was to assist Council in preparing for the future and to begin to gather the information needed to inform decision-making for the future of Southland. In the LTP 2018-2028, funding was allocated to this work, including $250,000 in 2021 (note - budgets will be reconsidered through the 2021-31 LTP process).

12      In response to the LTP decision making, the community and futures research and analysis programme of work was developed. This included strategy development work, to increase our investment in community planning, and ensure we understand, plan for and respond to the changes and opportunities for the future of the district.

13      A strategy sets out the vision and priorities to achieve long-term district outcomes. It is a high-level document which addresses the major issues, principles and beliefs of Council in broad terms.

Risk

14      In June 2020, Council adopted the top 10 strategic risks effective from July 2020. The fourth risk identified for Council is ‘inadequate, incomplete or lack of strategy/policy impacts the wellbeing of the District’. The strategy development work programme is the first step in the process of mitigating some of this risk to Council.

Progression on strategy development work to date

15      At the end of 2019, staff from the strategy and policy team undertook preliminary discussions with consultants Rebecca McElrea and Sandra James, to discuss Council’s strategy development and begin discussions around a development programme to move us forward over the next five years.

16      On 3 December 2019, this committee endorsed the community and futures research and analysis work programme transitioning to investigate an identified Council strategy deficit, and supported working towards a programme of work to progress strategy development over at least the next five years.

17      On 8 July 2020, the committee endorsed:

·            undertaking a strategy development work programme from 2020 to 2024, from which strategy development and implementation plans will be completed

·            developing an organisational framework to integrate and align the activities Council delivers to its communities (that integrates Council’s mission, vision, community outcomes, strategies and implementations plans)

·            investigating a 10-year strategy for Southland, that will align Council’s strategic priorities to Council’s vision, and link to Council’s purpose and values

·            presenting a comprehensive five-year strategy implementation plan to the committee by December 2020.

Issues

Completed work

Stocktake

18      Staff have completed a stocktake of strategies and other high-level policy statements, standards and plans that are relevant to Council. This includes documents produced by Council, and produced by other organisations in the district, the Southland region, and other areas of New Zealand. All of these strategies have been aligned to the community wellbeings outlined in the Local Government Act 2002 (LGA) and to Council’s community outcomes. Although it is likely additional documents will be found, the current stocktake includes 289 documents. Some of these documents are very relevant to people in the district and to Council, while others are of low relevance.

19      Council’s suite of strategies is as follows.

·            Financial Strategy

·            Infrastructure Strategy

·            Open Spaces Strategy

·            Stewart Island Visitor Strategy 2010-2015

·            Southland District Council s17A Service Delivery Review Strategy Project Plan

·            Forest Estate Investment Strategy 2015-2025

·            Enforcement Strategy and Prosecution Policy

·            Roading Procurement Strategy

·            Inclusive Communities’ Strategy 2009

·            The Southland District Story Strategy 2017

·            Around the Mountains Cycle Trail Strategy

·            Customer Support Strategy

Undertaking a gap analysis for a five-year strategic development plan

20      Staff have also commenced work to identify the internal strategies Council might need and that should be prioritised. A list of possible strategies has been identified. Criteria have also been developed, that staff intend to apply as a prioritisation/needs assessment tool, to identify the strategies Council should develop and when. The draft criteria, to determine need and priority, are whether a potential strategy is:

·            directly linked to Council’s vision

·            directly linked to the community wellbeings in the LGA

·            relates to current and anticipated issues

·            already covered (guidance is given) by other district, regional or national strategies/standards /plans etc

·            practical to implement and to use (the strategy can’t be too specific or too high level, and the suite of strategies should provide guidance on all areas of decision making and there shouldn’t be too many strategies)

·            the extent that an issue is particularly complex (technical, related to other issues, diverse views on the issues, large number of stakeholders etc)

·            the amount Council is likely to spend in that area

·            the number of people impacted or interested in the matter

·            the potential impact of a strategy (consequence if not implemented, potential for change etc).

Amending the strategic framework

21      Staff have also begun work to amend Council’s strategic framework. It is intended the framework will incorporate potential strategies and establish a clear hierarchy for how Council will operate. Vision statements will link down to particular community outcomes Council wants to achieve, that will be visioned through strategies, and actioned through a number of plans.

More information is required

22      Staff believe that in order to identify and prioritise appropriate strategies, and in order to amend Council’s strategy framework, more information is required.

23      Currently, there is not a clear community vision on where the district should be in the future. Some community views have been captured in community engagement work for the LTP and through the development of community board plans. However, staff believe this information is not sufficient to guide Council’s strategy development, as an entire community perspective is required – where all stakeholders, groups, minorities, etc are involved in forming a district vision.

24      Staff believe that Council’s vision should closely reflect the community’s vision, while also considering the community wellbeings. Aligning a community and Council vision would ensure Council is not acting in a silo, and is in tune with, responsive to, and serving our community.

25      In terms of proceeding and amending the strategic framework, a community vision (the apex of the framework and ultimately what Council is trying to achieve) is missing. This absence makes it difficult to identify and prioritise appropriate strategies. It is also hard to determine what strategies should be developed and prioritised (completing the required gap and need assessment), as staff do not have sufficient knowledge of community views on what people in the district see as current and anticipated issues (that Council might prioritise addressing through strategy development).

26      For this reason, staff are proposing to facilitate and develop a ‘Vision 2050 Project’ for the district as a whole, and the details of this project are outlined in a report titled ‘Our Southland district Community – Vision 2050 Project’ in this meeting agenda.

27      On this basis, staff are requesting the committee note that a component of the strategy development work programme that was endorsed by this committee on 8 July 2020 may be modified (pending the committee’s decision on the Vision 2050 Project). The committee previously endorsed investigating a 10-year strategy for the Southland District. Staff are now proposing to facilitate the development of the ‘Vision 2050 Project’ instead.

Factors to Consider

Legal and Statutory Requirements

28      Council is required to have an infrastructure strategy and a financial strategy as part of its LTP. Aside from these requirements, there are no other legal requirements to have strategies.

29      As part of Waka Kotahi/the New Zealand Transport Agency’s procurement manual, Council is also required to have a Roading Procurement Strategy, which is an additional (non-legislative) strategy requirement.

30      The LGA does place obligations on Council that relate to having a strategic approach.

31      The committee will be aware, section 10 of the LGA outlines that the purpose of local government includes promoting the social, economic, environmental, and cultural well-being of communities, in the present and for the future.

32      In preforming its role, Council must also act in accordance with a number of principles (section 14 of the LGA). Council should:

·          give effect to its identified priorities and desired outcomes in an efficient and effective manner

·          make itself aware of, and have regard to, the views of all of its communities

·          take account of the diversity of the community, and the community’s interests within the District, when making a decision

·          take account of the interests of future and current communities, when making a decision

·          take account of the likely impact of any decision on each aspect of well-being, when making a decision

·          provide opportunities for Māori to contribute to its decision-making processes

·          actively seek to collaborate and co-operate with other local authorities and bodies to improve the effectiveness and efficiency with which it achieves its identified priorities and desired outcomes.

These principles outline that Council should consider a diverse range of community views and the community wellbeings when it performs its role, and consider current and future community interests. Council should also effectively and efficiently give effect to its priorities and desired outcomes.

Community Views

33      Some engagement work was undertaken in 2019 to prepare for the 2021-31 LTP. In a survey, 77 people from local community groups and community events gave feedback, and generated the following views on the district’s future.

  

 

34      Council is also aware of strategic thinking within our community, as community boards have been generating community board plans. These plans outline a vision for each board, the outcomes the boards would like to achieve, and action plans have been generated to try and achieve the boards’ visions.

Costs and Funding

35      The costs associated with the development of a work programme and framework for strategy development are currently met within existing budgets allocated through Council’s LTP 2018-2028.

36      If future funding in LTP 2021-2031 was unavailable or diminished, this would impact the quantum of work that could be completed. The implications would be less internal capacity and external resource support to undertake strategy development work.

Policy Implications

37      There are no policy implications in developing a programme of work for strategy development.

38      As work progresses and community and Council strategies are developed, there may be policy discussions to be undertaken with Council at future dates.

Assessment of Significance

39      This matter has been assessed as being a lower level of significance in relation to Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy and the LGA.

Next Steps

40      The proposed next step, as is outlined in this report and in the report on this agenda about the ‘Vision 2050 Project’, is to facilitate the development of a long-term vision for the district.

41      As the Vision 2050 Project progresses, staff would resume work on Council’s internal strategy development programme. It is anticipated that by late 2021, enough information would be captured on a vision and on current and anticipated issues in the district, to finalise internal strategy development plans, amend the strategic framework, and develop strategy implementation plans. Staff would then report back to this committee with a proposal, in early 2022.

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report. 

 


Community and Strategy Committee

11 November 2020

 

Our Southland District Community - Vision 2050 Project

Record No:             R/20/10/59879

Author:                      Michelle Stevenson, Strategy and Policy Manager

Approved by:         Rex Capil, Group Manager Community and Futures

 

  Decision                                       Recommendation                                  Information

 

 

Purpose

1        The purpose of this report is to seek endorsement from the Community and Strategy Committee for Council staff to undertake the facilitation and development of the “Our Southland District Community – Vision 2050” project for the district as a whole.

2        This report also provides examples of similar work that has been undertaken by individual councils across the country over the past decade and how this work can be used to support and assist the development of this project.

Executive Summary

3        Council, as a district leader, has a role to play in facilitating collaboration and alignment across central and local government, community groups and agencies.  The “Our Southland District Community – Vision 2050” project is an opportunity to lead an approach for strategic focus on community outcomes and a future vision for the district.  This approach can assist Council to determine its own strategic direction that aligns with and supports outcomes to achieve the district vision.

4        Throughout this report there are a number of examples to illustrate the work of other councils who have worked in this space and developed a vision for their district.  These examples are an opportunity for Southland District Council to view an approach of a way of working that shows the principles of small council big community in action, and to see the outcomes that this can achieve.

5        This approach would be a new way of working for Southland District Council, and it is important to acknowledge that it will take time and patience to work through an understanding of Council’s role in supporting the long-term aspirations of a district vision 2050. 

6        The examples provided illustrate the relationship of a district vision to Council’s Long Term Plan process, and the commitment and alignment required for Council to invest in the infrastructure and services that support the vision of the district.  The approach recognises a district vision is not implemented solely through the development of strategies and documents internally within the Council, but through close relationships with many organisations, groups and individuals that have a role to play for delivering services within the district. 

7        For “Our Southland District Community – Vision 2050”, success would see Council’s vision closely align to the district’s vision, and the support of Council and all stakeholders in achieving the outcomes identified. 

8        Staff recommend that the committee endorse Council staff undertaking the facilitation and development of the “Our Southland District Community – Vision 2050” project.

9        If endorsed by the committee, staff across community leadership, communication and engagement and strategy and policy teams will report back to the committee in early 2021 with an approach to facilitation of the “Our Southland District Community – Vision 2050” project. 

Recommendation

That the Community and Strategy Committee:

a)            Receives the report titled “Our Southland District Community - Vision 2050 Project” dated 30 October 2020.

 

b)           Determines that this matter or decision be recognised as not significant in terms of Section 76 of the Local Government Act 2002.

 

c)            Determines that it has complied with the decision-making provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 to the extent necessary in relation to this decision; and in accordance with Section 79 of the act determines that it does not require further information, further assessment of options or further analysis of costs and benefits or advantages and disadvantages prior to making a decision on this matter.

 

d)           Notes the benefit in the development of the “Our Southland District Community – Vision 2050” project to assist in leading an intergenerational, community wide, collaborative approach to long term planning for the district as a whole.

 

e)            Recognises the value in the development of the “Our Southland District Community – Vision 2050” project in assisting to position and support the alignment of future council and community aspirations; and will foster increased partnership opportunities with communities and collaboration between agencies.

 

f)             Endorses Council staff undertaking the facilitation and development of the “Our Southland District Community – Vision 2050” project as part of the strategy and policy, communications and engagement and community leadership teams’ work programmes; and being integral for the development of the Long Term Plan 2024-2034.

 


 

Background

10      In response to the 2018-2028 Long Term Plan decision making, the Community and Futures Research and Analysis Programme of work was developed. This included a number of work streams such as demographic trends, technological change, economic trends and affordability, central government influence, environmental considerations and risks and intergenerational shifts. 

11      In December 2019, this committee endorsed the Community and Futures Research and Analysis Work Programme transitioning to investigate an identified Council strategy deficit – at a Council and community level – and programme of work to progress Council’s strategy development over a five year period to ensure we, as a Council, could plan for and respond to the changes and opportunities for the future of the district.

12      In June 2020, Council adopted the top 10 strategic risks effective from July 2020.  The fourth risk identified for Council is ‘inadequate, incomplete or lack of strategy/policy impacts the wellbeing of the district’.  The strategy development work programme for Council’s internal strategies was identified as the first step to support Council in mitigating this risk and assisting it in making future informed decisions aligned to community needs, aspirations, visions and plans. This in turn will assist council in prioritisation conversations with its communities and resource allocation decisions to deliver on Council’s business.

13      As noted in a separate report on this meeting agenda, it is recognised this strategy development programme of work will benefit from being included as part of the Vision 2050 project proposed in this report, and should be developed once enough information towards a district vision has been captured.

14      In developing the Long Term Plan (LTP) 2021-2031 a number of observations have been made and feedback received from a cross section of stakeholders.  This has related to the process having limited wider community involvement; limited community understanding and engagement with the process; potential lack of alignment and lack of an overall cohesive approach related to community and Council views; and limited alignment between community and Council aspirations.

15      Significantly, the approach to Council’s LTP has recognised a limited investment in time and process development in understanding and recognising the wider, diverse and ‘all of community’ needs, aspirations, visions and other groups and agency plans.

16      It should be recognised the observations and feedback received should not be taken as a criticism or failing of the past or current processes. What it represents is an opportunity to build on and adopt improvement as Council and the district communities advance on the community planning and community engagement journey to ensure our communities are best placed to progress in the future.

17      As part of preparing for this project a robust and extensive research and analysis approach has been undertaken with other local authorities to be informed and understand how they have developed, adapted and aligned their approach to this type of work. It is acknowledged this type of approach and work programme is not new to the local government sector with some individual councils having been involved in delivering on this approach for a decade and longer.

18      The concept design for this project has also considered the impending sector reform agenda recognised by Local Government New Zealand (LGNZ) and Society of Local Government Managers (SOLGM). This project will support how Council can best assist Southland district communities in preparing for the impacts and outcomes of what could eventuate as being the most significant reform seen by the sector since 1989.

19      The LGNZ and SOLGM approach looks to recognise the significant role of councils in assisting to position and provide political leadership to communities to meet the opportunities and challenges that lay ahead in the future. This will see the need for more innovative thinking and ways of working, including increased service delivery partnership opportunities with communities and collaboration between agencies.

20      The “Our Southland District Community – Vision 2050” project is the next stage of an important journey for the Southland district community and Southland District Council.

Approach

21      In considering the strategic planning approach and developing the long term thinking required for strategy development, it is recognised the community and Council have been on a journey over the past few years to begin to connect the dots and build the bridge between Council and community.

22      It is also recognised that this process is in its early stages and while progress has been made there is still further work to be undertaken. This includes developing the next stage of strategy development work to support the alignment of the Council and community focus and for the Council approach to reflect the community and wider stakeholder involvement aligned to a collaborative and multi-agency approach.

23      It is expected the “Our Southland District Community – Vision 2050” project will be developed and delivered to assist in informing the LTP 2024-2034 (and LTP 2027-2037 and beyond) and will reflect that Council is part of a wider system of leadership, multiagency service delivery approach and enables community led development.

24      This will also promote the opportunity for the district’s nine community board plans to contribute and align to the thinking around a district vision, and be agile and responsive to this vision, while also supporting and progressing outcomes through local initiatives and the LTP development.

25      The LTP 2021-2031 process has evolved and developed with a Council service delivery focus. On reflection this has promoted the opportunity to consider how this process can involve the community more and be more representative of the diversity that makes up the community residents and stakeholders.

26      This process review has also recognised the need to facilitate and initiate engagement opportunities at an earlier stage and through a variety of community engagement tools and techniques to consider the Southland District Community Vision 2050 from a whole of district perspective. Hence the need to signal early and plan in advance for the development of the LTP 2024-2034.

27      Council as a district leader, has a role to play in facilitating collaboration and alignment across central government, local authorities and community groups and agencies.  The “Our Southland District Community – Vision 2050” project will provide a forum for that collaboration and help identify a strategic focus on community outcomes and future vision for the district.  This approach can then assist Council to determine its own strategic focus that aligns with the wider vision of the district, and all those who work, live and play within it. By working together, we will achieve more than by working separately.

28      This means a fundamental shift in approach from preparing a Council plan and going out to the community asking what they think of what Council is going to do; to developing a district vision with a longer term focus to 2050, from which, Council’s LTP process and development would reflect the district’s vision and recognise Council partnering with multi agency stakeholders to deliver its services as part of a wider community wellbeing approach.

29      The wider community wellbeing approach will mean a broader use of engagement tools and methods that reflect and recognise community diversity and enhance the capability for fair and equitable representation and inclusive involvement. This will mean the delivery of a suite of engagement opportunities over a period of time to ensure extensive coverage of community views.

30      A focus of engagement will be on the principles related to

·        place based leadership

·        stakeholder relationship management

·        collective impact and codesign development

·        engaged communities – not just engaging with communities

·        respect for diversity and future generations

·        consideration of wellbeing of/for all.

31      The overall approach and concept design for the project is attached as attachment A to this report.

32      The attachment illustrates the approach: with the engagement techniques shown in the centre aiming to build the bridge between council and community; to support the community focus component of the project (represented on the left hand side); to then inform and support the Council focus (represented on the right hand side) to assist council with prioritisation and resource allocation decisions as part of the LTP process contributing to delivery of the district vision 2050.

Context - examples

33      In developing the concept design and approach to the “Our Southland District Community – Vision 2050” project a number of examples from other Councils have been sourced and considered. A snapshot of examples follows to assist in providing the context of this work and illustrate how it has been advanced by other Councils over the past decade and longer.

 

Rotorua Lakes Council

https://www.rotorualakescouncil.nz/SiteCollectionImages/Vision_2030/2017/RLC_W_Img_V2030_Header_041217.png

34      Vision 2030 – The Rotorua Way establishes a way forward for the Rotorua district and drives everything Council does, working with the community to achieve a positive future.

35      Rotorua Lakes Council is committed to delivering on its part in progressing Rotorua 2030 recognising that it is one of many stakeholders with a responsibility to do so. Rotorua Lakes Council commitment to Vision 2030 is reflected in Council’s long term plan and annual plans and assists in focussing the Council to operationalise the resource allocation and prioritisation decisions based on this commitment.

36      Vision 2030 - The Rotorua Way provides the direction for Council guiding its long term, annual and spatial plans and aligns with other strategic approaches with other partners providing for an overall integrated planning approach. This assists Council in decision making around key projects and initiatives with the future focussed plans, key projects and initiatives being recognised as Council’s way in supporting the wider district in how it will deliver Vision 2030.

 

 

 

 

Waipa District Council

 

37      In 2009 Waipa District Council commenced a project called ‘Waipa 2050’ to assist in managing growth in a co-ordinated and sustainable way.

38      A key component of this was to identify the community’s vision and plan for growth. The community visioning and engagement process followed a thorough inclusive community process and research and analysis of other informing documents. This led to the development of a “base case” report which provided a snapshot of the district footprint. It provided information on the opportunities, constraints and issues the Waipa District face. This included 14 profile statement reports which provided information on a variety of topics including demographics, social services, tourism, urban growth, waste water, water supply, stormwater, transportation, other services, economic development, culture and heritage, landscape, the physical environment, and strategic policy and planning frameworks.

39      The 2009 strategy was reviewed in 2017.

40      The Waipa 2050 strategy is also implemented within the Council’s 10 year plan. The 10 year plan makes provision for Council investment for infrastructure requirements and associated work programme to service the investment areas identified in the Waipa 2050 strategy.

41      It also recognises that Waipa 2050 will not be implemented solely through the development of strategies and documents internally within Waipa District Council but it will be implemented through a close relationship with the organisations, groups and individuals that have a role to play for delivering services in the district – including tangata whenua, community service providers, government agencies, transport providers, utility providers, private sector providers and neighbouring authorities.

42     

Waikato District Council

43      Waikato 2070 has been developed to provide guidance on appropriate growth and economic development that will support the wellbeing of the Waikato district.

44      The growth strategy is a guiding document that Waikato District Council uses to inform how, where and when growth occurs in the district over the next 50 years. The growth indicated in Waikato 2070 has been informed by in-depth analysis and combines economic, community and environmental objectives to create liveable, thriving and connected communities. The growth direction within Waikato 2070 will ultimately inform long term planning and therefore affect social, cultural, economic and environmental wellbeing.

45      The strategy takes a broad and inclusive approach to growth over the long term, taking into account its economic, social, environmental, cultural and physical dimensions. Waikato 2070 is concerned with the growth and development of communities throughout the district, including rural and urban environments.

46      Waikato 2070 is unique, it takes an integrated approach to future growth in the Waikato district, combining economic and community development with future land use and infrastructure planning. The document will inform rural and urban communities, businesses, investors, iwi, governments, neighbouring local authorities and council itself, to help deliver and achieve the communities’ vision. Whilst enabling growth, Waikato 2070 aims to do this in a way that protects the environment which is essential for the health and wellbeing of the people.

Queenstown Lakes District Council

47      In 2018, the Queenstown Lakes District Council mayor convened a diverse group of thinkers to reflect the many voices in the district and key concepts, including tākata whenua, the rich heritage of the area, today's diverse communities, and the business and tourism perspectives. This progressed to a group of approximately 50 people in a bigger workshop environment including perspectives from disabled people, voices from both young and the elderly, iwi, farming, community support and development services, ethnic minorities, and representation from central government.

48      Further community engagement delivered the resulting community vision - titled 'A Unique Place. An Inspiring Future | He Wāhi Tūhāhā. He Āmua Whakaohooho'. In March 2019, the Council unanimously agreed to commit to the vision as a guiding document to inform future decision making and planning. 

Issues

49      As discussed in a report earlier on the agenda by Mrs Rout ‘Update on Council’s strategy development programme’, Southland district does not currently have a clear vision on where it should be in the future.  And while there are some initial views captured in community engagement work for the LTP and through the development of community board plans, this is not adequate, nor appropriate to determine an all of district vision. 

50      The lack of a district vision makes the work of Council in developing its own strategies more difficult, and potentially ill-informed.  In an ideal process, Council would understand the priorities and aspirations of the district to then align both its strategic direction and work streams to support accordingly.

51      There is an opportunity through development of the “Our Southland District Community – Vision 2050” project for Council to facilitate a district vision, formed through codesign with all stakeholders, groups, minorities and interested parties that will support the alignment of future Council and community aspirations.

52      The examples from other councils identified above show the value of longer term, intergenerational, strategic thinking and planning processes. It is important all involved do not underestimate the time and resource commitment required to deliver these extensive community engagement type projects alongside multi agency partners.

53      The opportunity to connect the local, district, regional and national planning frameworks and processes to support the wellbeing of the Southland district people and places will highlight a variety of issues and opportunities. It is important to recognise these issues will take time to work through and stakeholder relationship work will take time to partner and collaborate. It is important stakeholder management opportunities are not forced and roles, responsibilities and expectations are defined at the start of codesigning the process.

54      While it is the intent to build the approach from early in the 2021 calendar year aiming to inform the LTP 2024-2034 process, it is important to recognise that the LTP 2021-2031 is being completed in this time period also, so the two programmes of work will be delivered concurrently.  While this is not necessarily seen as an external facing issue it may cause internal resourcing pressures which will need to be managed.

55      The concept of developing a wider vision for and with the Southland district as a whole has not been undertaken previously. This concept leads into aligning the Council approach to reflect a broader community approach and will take time and education to assist in understanding the approach and associated way of working.

56      As part of this project and the associated programme of work it is also important for Council and the communities to remain abreast of any broader local government sector reform agendas involving LGNZ and SOLGM and the government. Without predetermining and speculating what a potential reform agenda might look like it is important the functions and purpose of local government are understood to ensure Council best represents its communities considering any changes and disruptors on the horizon. This project will assist with that and provides an opportunity for engagement that can be inclusive of all in the Southland district community.

Factors to Consider

Legal and Statutory Requirements

57      There are no legal or statutory requirements to undertake this longer-term strategic thinking and community visioning type project. However, section 10 of the LGA outlines that the purpose of local government is:

(a)   to enable democratic local decision-making and action by, and on behalf of, communities; and

(b)   to promote the social, economic, environmental, and cultural well-being of communities in the present and for the future.

58      In preforming its role, Council must also act in accordance with a number of principles (section 14 of the LGA). Council should:

·        give effect to its identified priorities and desired outcomes in an efficient and effective manner

·        make itself aware of, and have regard to, the views of all of its communities

·        take account of the diversity of the community, and the community’s interests within the district, when making a decision

·        take account of the interests of future and current communities, when making a decision

·        take account of the likely impact of any decision on each aspect of well-being, when making a decision

·        provide opportunities for Māori to contribute to its decision-making processes

·        actively seek to collaborate and co-operate with other local authorities and bodies to improve the effectiveness and efficiency with which it achieves its identified priorities and desired outcomes.

59      These principles outline that Council should consider a diverse range of community views and the community wellbeings when it preforms its role, and consider current and future community interests.

Community Views

60      Community views have not been explicitly sought on this matter. However, this is consistent with the ‘investing in community futures’ work stream that was consulted on as part of the LTP 2018-2028 and which has been resourced accordingly as a result of that consultation process.

61      A significant amount of community engagement will occur as part of the programme delivery over the course of the project in the next three to five years.

62      Some preliminary strategic thinking within our individual communities, and through community boards generating community board plans has already begun. These plans outline a vision for each board, the outcomes the boards would like to achieve, and action plans to achieve the boards’ visions.  These plans would be reviewed in line with a district vision, and any other stakeholder, agency and group plans that will help guide the board with their 10 year planning for the LTP 2024-2034.

Costs and Funding

63      The project will be managed to be delivered within existing allocated budgets.

64      If any extra support is required by the need to engage with technical experts for subject matter specific work that is unable to be delivered in house then this will be brought back to the committee for consideration.

Policy Implications

65      There are no policy implications associated with this project.

Analysis

Options Considered

66      There are two practicable options for Council to consider.  These are:

Option 1 – endorse Council staff undertaking the facilitation and development of the “Our Southland District Community – Vision 2050” project

Option 2 – do not support Council staff undertaking the facilitation and development of the “Our Southland District Community – Vision 2050” project

 

Analysis of Options

Option 1 – Endorse council staff undertaking the facilitation and development of the “Our Southland District Community – Vision 2050” project

Advantages

Disadvantages

·        Council will have a greater understanding of the long-term vision of the district

·        Council will understand a vision derived from a wide spectrum of the district including broad stakeholders, wide spanning demographics, minority groups, interest groups, and cross TLA boundary groups operating in the district, amongst others

·        promotes buy-in to a codesign approach in achieving the district vision

·        Council will show commitment to being an agile, and responsive partner and facilitator within the district

·        in aligning to a district vision, Council can operate a way of working that mirrors how the district functions and what our people aspire it to be

·        endorsing the facilitation and development of the vision 2050 project is in keeping with Council’s approach to small council, big community

·        aligns with evolving changes in local government, and anticipated legislative changes

·        captures views from groups and minorities that council may not normally hear from which better informs council business

·        leading the district in identifying and achieving long term and intergenerational wellbeing

·        Council’s internal strategy development work programme will be delayed by approximately 18 months

·        delays amending Council’s strategic framework

·        lack of strategic focus in the short to medium term, may compromise informed and strategic decision making 

 

Option 2 – Do not support Council staff undertaking the facilitation and development of the “Our Southland District Community – Vision 2050” project

Advantages

Disadvantages

·        staff resource across community and futures group can be reallocated to other work streams

·        Council’s vision may not reflect a district vision

·        Council is at risk of operating in a silo and not in tune with or responsive to the communities it serves

·        misses an opportunity for Council and community relationship building

·        may not be acting in accordance with all principles under section 14 of the LGA

·        Council misses an opportunity to show leadership through facilitating a district vision

 

Assessment of Significance

67      This matter has been assessed as being a lower level of significance in relation to Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy and the LGA.

Recommended Option

68      Staff recommend option 1, that the committee endorse Council staff undertaking the facilitation and development of the “Our Southland District Community – Vision 2050” project.

69      As identified in the report from Mrs Rout earlier on this agenda ‘Update on Council’s strategy development programme’, staff request the committee to consider that Council’s vision should closely reflect the district’s vision. In aligning a district and Council vision, Council would not be operating in a silo, and ensure it is in tune with, responsive to, and serving the district.

Next Steps

70      If endorsed by the committee, staff across community leadership, communication and engagement and strategy and policy teams will develop an approach to facilitation of the “Our Southland District Community – Vision 2050” project, and report back to the committee early in 2021. 

71      A significant amount of community engagement will occur as part of the programme delivery over the course of the project in the next three to five years.

72      As the vision 2050 project progresses, with this committee’s endorsement, staff would look to resume work on Council’s internal strategy development by early 2022, once enough information of a district vision has been captured.

Attachments

a             Our Southland District Community - Vision 2050 Project A3    

 


Community and Strategy Committee

11 November 2020

 

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Community and Strategy Committee

11 November 2020

 

Community Well-beings and Strategic Issues Overview - October 2020

Record No:             R/20/10/61186

Author:                      Rex Capil, Group Manager Community and Futures

Approved by:         Ross McNeil, Interim Chief Executive

 

  Decision                                        Recommendation                                  Information

 

 

Report Purpose

1        This community well-beings and strategic issues overview report is prepared and presented to the Community and Strategy Committee as part of its standard order paper each meeting, as far as is practicable.

2        This report is intended to inform the Committee of recent developments, points of interest and points for consideration as part of the overall strategic context and community well-beings (social, economic, environmental, and cultural) discussions that Council is part of – nationally, regionally and locally.

3        This report recognises the purpose of local government, as per section 10(1)(b) of the Local Government Act 2002, is to promote the social, economic, environmental, and cultural well-being of communities in the present and for the future.

4        The report is also used to provide insight of ‘happenings’ nationally and/or from other regions that maybe of interest and relevance to the District. This provides a wider strategic context on a national and regional scale to assist in Council’s understanding of issues and topics of impact occurring elsewhere.

5        Importantly, the report aims to initiate discussion and conversation amongst councillors and communities to support the opportunity to participate and contribute to Council’s direction setting and positioning with regards to the multi stakeholder environment it operates in.

6        The format and content of the report is divided into five headings – reflecting the four well-beings plus other national/regional happenings. The topics covered under each of the headings are a selection of recent articles and publications and are summarised with the associated link attached from where the information is sourced and/or the full document attached when relevant.

 

Social Well-being

7        For the purpose of this report we consider social well-being to reflect topics related to how people and communities engage in work, study and social activities.

8        The following is a summary of a selection of recent articles and publications relating to the social well-being topic.

Place and community: building a fair recovery

9        LGIU (Local Government Information Unit) is a local authority membership organisation which the GM Community and Futures receives updates from. The members are councils and other organisations with an interest in local government from across England, Wales, Scotland, Ireland and Australia.

10      Place and Community is the second pillar to be launched of the LGIU’s Post Covid Councils project. It follows Sustainable Futures and the two are related in many ways – the principle of sustainability underpinning recovery, globally, nationally and locally.

11      The Place and Community theme is fundamentally about relationships – relationships between place, local economies and people, and between place, people, communities and equality.

https://lgiu.org/publication/post-covid-councils-place-and-community/

Community mobilisation – unlocking the potential of community power

12      This report offers a how-to guide for public bodies - particularly local authorities - interested in mobilising the communities that they work with. It defines a mobilised community as one that knows what it wants, knows what resources it has at its disposal, and has a plan for how to use them. Getting communities to this point is the first stage in unlocking ‘community power’. By this we mean communities’ ability to – with support – deploy their own skills and resources to define and address many of the challenges they face.

13      The full document is attached as attachment A.

Dear Jacinda, please lead a transformative government

14      The article acknowledges the major shift taking place in public attitudes, from accepting what governments do as being the prerogative of governments, to increasingly wishing to be engaged with decisions which affect them.

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/dear-jacinda-please-lead-transformative-government-peter-mckinlay

Election 2020: Local Government’s HUGE responsibility

15      It has been suggested New Zealand electors have just put in place the most powerful central government for decades.

16      So how does this create a huge responsibility for local government? Every single one of Labour’s major policy initiatives directly or indirectly involves working with communities and co-opting local government as an important delivery agent. Think affordable housing, think three waters, think RMA reform, consider what may be the top priority, addressing the recommendations of the Simpson review of the health and disability system with its emphasis on community led health prevention as the new focus.

17      Each of these goes directly to the heart of the question how best to promote community well-being and for that matter, what constitutes communities?

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/election-2020-local-governments-huge-peter-mckinlay

 

Economic Well-being

18      For the purpose of this report we consider economic well-being to reflect topics related to how financial and human made physical assets impact on how people live, deliver services and work together as a society.

19      The following is a summary of a selection of recent articles and publications relating to the economic well-being topic.

 

Initiative for dairy sector

20      An article in Dairy Farmer describing how Agritech NZ founder Peter Wren-Hilton has been working with various agencies over the past 18 months to grow the agritech sector in New Zealand and is now eyeing international growth opportunities for Agritech NZ.

https://farmersweekly.co.nz/section/dairy/view/initiative-for-dairy-sector?utm_source=GlobalHQ&utm_campaign=9f5706f2a0-DF_EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2020_05_10_CMS&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_4f497899e6-9f5706f2a0-193644923

 

The future of travel – discover the next normal and travel with purpose in regional Australia

21      A new report from Wander, a transformational travel company with a network of luxury, eco-aware accommodation in Australia. Founded on the knowledge and science of travel having transformative power, Wander provides a space that reconnects guests with nature and invites them into the story of the local community.

22      This paper is the collaboration of current research and discussion on how the travel industry must look forward and re-invent itself in an uncertain world.

23      It explains how regional travel might be just the thing we need to kick start economic renewal, and how nature-based tourism can provide what we need to transform and reconnect as human beings.

https://wander.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2020/09/THE-FUTURE-OF-TRAVEL_2020_WANDER.pdf

 

Environmental Well-being

24      For the purpose of this report we consider environmental well-being to reflect topics related to how the natural environment impacts on how communities align resources and support resource allocation and usage required to live a sustainable life.

25      The following is a summary of a selection of recent articles and publications relating to the environmental well-being topic.

Our Atmosphere and Climate 2020

26      Our Atmosphere and Climate 2020 is the latest in a series of environmental reports produced by the Ministry for the Environment and Stats NZ.

https://mcusercontent.com/ebebf9501bcd56a598aa9f357/files/057dc747-5be1-453f-ab90-2541c3969e5d/our_atmosphere_and_climate_2020_embargoed.pdf

https://mcusercontent.com/ebebf9501bcd56a598aa9f357/files/3d92ed3c-8865-4e89-9e77-2cd10620d540/OAC2020_summary_english_version_embargoed.pdf

https://www.mfe.govt.nz/overview-our-atmosphere-climate-2020


 

In 2021 we must focus on how we travel, not where

27      B Corp Intrepid Travel identifies five factors redefining the new era of travel. These are:

-     Go slower

-     Go into the wild

-     Go on your own terms

-     Go to regenerate, not just sustain

-     Go on a human-powered adventure

https://bthechange.com/in-2021-we-must-focus-on-how-we-travel-not-where-c0984edb955c

 

Cultural Well-being

28      For the purpose of this report we consider cultural well-being to reflect topics related to how people live and work together and includes cultural and community identity, traditions and customs and common values and interests.

29      The following is a summary of a selection of recent articles and publications relating to the cultural well-being topic.

Northland councils making history by considering Maori wards together

30      Northland is making New Zealand local government history as neighbouring councils look at whether to bring in new Māori wards.

31      Dr Mike Reid, Local Government New Zealand (LGNZ) principal policy adviser, said having Northland's four councils considering Māori wards at the same time was a first.

https://www.nzherald.co.nz/northern-advocate/news/northland-councils-making-history-by-considering-maori-wards-together/XOITFZPJ3BUR2GCJMRMPT4XRVI/

 

Justice Joe Williams on te reo Maori, and synthesising Aotearoa law

32      Supreme Court Justice Joe Williams grew up aware of the inherent conflicts within Project Aotearoa, our growing nation, every day.

33      He hails from an iwi called Ngāti Pūkenga. He was asked about the integration of Māori kaupapa, tikanga, into the modern legal system and about te reo Māori.

https://i.stuff.co.nz/national/122794406/justice-joe-williams-on-te-reo-mori-and-synthesising-aotearoa-law?fbclid=IwAR2K_-ggsunBYEHXjZ5LoiPoswFUQkmZxAsPOMQT-S-e_JHQYJf-irhv6qY

 

Coming home

34      New Zealanders are cutting their overseas adventures short, packing up their lives in more exciting locations, running from rolling lockdowns and heading home. They’re bringing connections and skills. The kiwi diaspora is reversing.

https://www.rnz.co.nz/programmes/the-detail/story/2018767639/coming-home

National/Regional Happenings – The future is already here

35      This section aims to provide information recently highlighted relating to an area/region elsewhere in New Zealand or a topic or initiative of national interest.

36      The link below highlights a presentation from Melissa Clark-Reynolds for Audit NZ where she talks about digital disruption and makes observations relevant to the Covid-19 situation and our communities and various sectors.

https://auditnz.parliament.nz/good-practice/information-updates/2020/future-is-already-here

 

Recommendation

That the Community and Strategy Committee:

a)            Receives the report titled “Community Well-beings and Strategic Issues Overview - October 2020” dated 27 October 2020.

 

 

Attachments

a             Community-Mobilisation-FINAL    

 


Community and Strategy Committee

11 November 2020

 

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