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Notice is hereby given that an Ordinary Meeting of Southland District Council will be held on:

 

Date:                      

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Wednesday, 16 September 2015

1pm

Council Chambers
15 Forth Street
Invercargill

 

Council Agenda

 

OPEN

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Mayor

Mayor Gary Tong

 

Deputy Mayor

Paul Duffy

 

Councillors

Lyall Bailey

 

 

Stuart Baird

 

 

Brian Dillon

 

 

Rodney Dobson

 

 

John Douglas

 

 

Bruce Ford

 

 

George Harpur

 

 

Julie Keast

 

 

Ebel Kremer

 

 

Gavin Macpherson

 

 

Neil Paterson

 

 

IN ATTENDANCE

 

Chief Executive

Steve Ruru

 

Committee Advisor

Fiona Dunlop

 

 

 

 

Contact Telephone: 0800 732 732

Postal Address: PO Box 903, Invercargill 9840

Email: emailsdc@southlanddc.govt.nz

Website: www.southlanddc.govt.nz

 

Full agendas are available on Council’s Website

www.southlanddc.govt.nz

 

 

 



Council

16 September 2015

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

ITEM                                                                                                                                   PAGE

Procedural

1          Apologies                                                                                                                        7

2          Leave of absence                                                                                                           7

3          Conflict of Interest                                                                                                         7

4          Public Forum                                                                                                                  7

5          Extraordinary/Urgent Items                                                                                          7

6          Confirmation of Council Minutes                                                                                7

Reports - Policy and Strategy

7.1       Alcohol Licencing Fee-Setting Bylaw 2015 - Oral Submissions                              9

7.2       Alcohol Licensing Fee-Setting Bylaw 2015                                                              17

7.3       Alcohol Control Bylaw 2015                                                                                       49

7.4       Annual Plan 2016/2017                                                                                                65

Reports - Operational Matters

8.1       Management Report                                                                                                    77

8.2       Building Consents and Values for July 2015                                                           89

8.3       Resource Consents and Other Resource Management Act Items - July 2015    99

8.4       Dog Control Annual Report                                                                                     103

8.5       Southland District Council's Annual Report 2015 to the Alcohol Regulatory and Licensing Authority                                                                                                                     111

8.6       Change of Classification of parts Te Anau Gardens Recreation Reserve         117

8.7       Council Action Sheet                                                                                                121

Reports - Governance

9.1       Hollyford Conservation Trust                                                                                  125

9.2       Community Governance Project                                                                             133

9.3       Southland Museum and Art Gallery Trust Board - Statement of Intent 2015/2016 147

9.4       Minutes of the Manapouri Community Development Area Subcommittee Meeting dated 12 May 2015                                                                                                                159

9.5       Minutes of the Lumsden Community Development Area Subcommittee Meeting dated 15 June 2015                                                                                                                    161

9.6       Minutes of the Edendale-Wyndham Community Board Meeting dated 26 May 2015        163

9.7       Minutes of the Resource Management Committee Meeting dated 27 March 2015 165

9.8       Minutes of the Resource Management Committee Meeting dated 12 June 2015 167

9.9       Minutes of the Riverton/Aparima Community Board Meeting dated 8 June 2015 169

9.10     Minutes of the Te Anau Community Board Meeting dated 10 June 2015          171

9.11     Minutes of the Woodlands Community Development Area Subcommittee Meeting dated 15 December 2014                                                                                                      173

9.12     Minutes of the Woodlands Community Development Area Subcommittee Meeting dated 2 March 2015                                                                                                                 175

9.13     Minutes of the Policy Review Committee Meeting dated 28 January 2015        177

9.14     Minutes of the Activities Performance Audit Committee Meeting dated 28 January 2015                                                                                                                                     179

9.15     Minutes of the Activities Performance Audit Committee Meeting dated 18 February 2015                                                                                                                                     181

9.16     Minutes of the Activities Performance Audit Committee Meeting dated 18 March 2015  183

9.17     Minutes of the Activities Performance Audit Committee Meeting dated 22 April 2015    185

9.18     Minutes of the Activities Performance Audit Committee Meeting dated 3 June 2015      187

9.19     Minutes of the Activities Performance Audit Committee Meeting dated 24 June 2015    189

9.20     Minutes of the Riverton Harbour Subcommittee Meeting dated 21 April 2015 191

9.21     Minutes of the Balfour Community Development Area Subcommittee Meeting dated 27 May 2015                                                                                                                     193

9.22     Minutes of the Riversdale Community Development Area Subcommittee Meeting dated 27 May 2015                                                                                                                     195

9.23     Minutes of the Thornbury Community Development Area Subcommittee Meeting dated 26 May 2015                                                                                                                197

9.24     Minutes of the Colac Bay Community Development Area Subcommittee Meeting dated 28 May 2015                                                                                                                     199

9.25     Minutes of the Lumsden/Balfour Water Supply Subcommittee Meeting dated 1 December 2014                                                                                                                             201

9.26     Minutes of the International Relations Committee Meeting dated 26 February 2015        203

9.27     Minutes of the Policy Review Committee Meeting dated 18 February 2015      205

9.28     Minutes of the Policy Review Committee Meeting dated 1 April 2015                207

9.29     Minutes of the Policy Review Committee Meeting dated 24 June 2015              209

Public Excluded

Procedural motion to exclude the public                                                                            211

C10.1  Provision of Local Election Services and Appointment of Electoral Officer     221

C10.2  Disposal of endowment land, Wyndham                                                                257

C10.3  Public Excluded Minutes of the Council Meeting dated 5 August 2015             265

C10.4  Public Excluded Minutes of the Activities Performance Audit Committee Meeting dated 18 February 2015                                                                                                        267

C10.5  Public Excluded Minutes of the Activities Performance Audit Committee Meeting dated 28 January 2015                                                                                                         269

C10.6  Public Excluded Minutes of the Activities Performance Audit Committee Meeting dated 18 March 2015                                                                                                            271

C10.7  Public Excluded Minutes of the Activities Performance Audit Committee Meeting dated 22 April 2015                                                                                                               273

C10.8  Public Excluded Minutes of the Activities Performance Audit Committee Meeting dated 3 June 2015                                                                                                                    275

C10.9  Public Excluded Minutes of the Activities Performance Audit Committee Meeting dated 24 June 2015                                                                                                               277

C10.10 Public Excluded Minutes of the International Relations Committee Meeting dated 26 February 2015                                                                                                             279

C10.11 Public Excluded Minutes of the Policy Review Committee Meeting dated 18 February 2015                                                                                                                                     281

C10.12 Public Excluded Minutes of the Resource Management Committee Meeting dated 27 March 2015                                                                                                                 283  

 


Council

16 September 2015

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1          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

2          Leave of absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

3          Conflict of Interest

Councillors are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision-making when a conflict arises between their role as a councillor and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Public Forum

Notification to speak is required by 5pm at least two days before the meeting. Further information is available on www.southlanddc.govt.nz or phoning 0800 732 732.

 

5          Extraordinary/Urgent Items

To consider, and if thought fit, to pass a resolution to permit the Council to consider any further items which do not appear on the Agenda of this meeting and/or the meeting to be held with the public excluded.

Such resolution is required to be made pursuant to Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987, and the Chairperson must advise:

(i)      The reason why the item was not on the Agenda, and

(ii)     The reason why the discussion of this item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

(a)     That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

(i)      That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

(ii)      the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

(b)     no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

6          Confirmation of Council Minutes

6.1         Meeting minutes of Council, 26 August 2015

 


Council

16 September 2015

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Alcohol Licencing Fee-Setting Bylaw 2015 - Oral Submissions

Record No:        R/15/9/16287

Author:                 Fiona Dunlop, Committee Advisor

Approved by:       Fiona Dunlop, Committee Advisor

 

  Decision                             Recommendation                        Information

 

  

 

Schedule of Oral Submitters for Alcohol Licensing Fee-Setting Bylaw 2015

1        The following are the oral submitters to be heard by Council on the Alcohol Licensing Fee-Setting Bylaw 2015.

 

Time

Submitter

Speaker

Page Number

1.00 pm

Hospitality NZ - Southland Branch

John McHugh and Gus Dermody

10

1.20 pm

Orepuki Tavern

Alastair McCracken

13

1.30 pm

Robert Wason

Lionel Wason

14

 

 

Recommendation

That the Council:

a)         Receives the report titled “Alcohol Licencing Fee-Setting Bylaw 2015 - Oral Submissions” dated 9 September 2015.

 

b)         Thank the oral submitters for their attendance.

 

 

Attachments

a         Oral Submitters Alcohol Licensing Fee-Setting Bylaw 2015 View    

 


Council

16 September 2015

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Council

16 September 2015

Description: sdclogo

 

Alcohol Licensing Fee-Setting Bylaw 2015

Record No:        R/15/8/14345

Author:                 Michael Sarfaiti, Environmental Health Manager

Approved by:       Bruce Halligan, GM - Environment and Community

 

  Decision                             Recommendation                        Information

 

  

 

Purpose

1       To hear submissions on the Draft Alcohol Fee-Setting Bylaw 2015 and to deliberate on those submissions.

Executive Summary

On 24 June 2015, Council endorsed the draft Alcohol Licensing Fee-Setting Bylaw 2015 for public consultation.  The draft Alcohol Licensing Fee-Setting Bylaw 2015 was publicly notified and submissions were invited on the proposal. Submissions closed at 5.00 pm on Monday, 27 July 2015.  A total of nine submissions were received and of these, four submitters have asked to be heard. 

Recommendation

That the Council:

a)         Receives the report titled “Alcohol Licensing Fee-Setting Bylaw 2015” dated 3 September 2015.

b)         Determines that this matter or decision be recognised as not significant in terms of Section 76 of the Local Government Act 2002.

c)         Determines that it has complied with the decision-making provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 to the extent necessary in relation to this decision; and in accordance with Section 79 of the Act determines that it does not require further information, further assessment of options or further analysis of costs and benefits or advantages and disadvantages prior to making a decision on this matter.

d)         Receives the submissions on the proposed Alcohol Licensing Fee-Setting Bylaw 2015.

e)         Deliberates on the draft Alcohol Licensing Fee-Setting Bylaw 2015.

f)          Instructs staff to make any changes to the draft Alcohol Licensing Fee-Setting Bylaw 2015 as required.

 


 

Content

Background

3        On 20 May 2015, Council heard submissions on the draft Long Term Plan, three of which related to alcohol licensing fees.  The submitters were concerned about the large increase in the prescribed fees introduced by the Sale and Supply of Alcohol (Fees) Regulations 2013.  A comparison of the fees is in Attachment A

4        The submitters referred Council to the Gore and Central Otago District Councils that had dropped all of their premises by one risk rating level, resulting in those premises paying less fees. 

5        In a workshop on this issue Councillors agreed that the alcohol licensing business unit should be funded 10% from rates, and indicated that the amount of rates needed to fund an across the board drop in risk rating would not be acceptable (another $30-40,000). 

6        On 24 June 2015, Council adopted the draft Alcohol Licensing Fee-Setting Bylaw 2015, and publicly notified and invited submissions on the proposal closing at 5.00 pm on Monday, 27 July 2015.  A total of nine submissions were received and of these, four submitters have asked to be heard.  A booklet of all submissions received is in Attachment B.  It is now necessary to hear and deliberate on the submissions received.

7        The proposed Alcohol Fee-Setting Bylaw 2015, that incorporates staff recommendations as a result of the consultation process up to the time of writing this report, is in Attachment C.

Issues

8        Six submitters are opposed to the bylaw, two in support and one neutral.  Significantly, the Hospitality Association of New Zealand (HANZ) and the Mataura Licensing Trust (MLT) are both opposed to it as were all the submitters who were publicans. Note though that two submitters who are in the hospitality industry supported the draft bylaw.   

 

9        There were too few responses to draw any conclusions on the overall views of other types of licensees, being clubs, grocery stores and supermarkets. 

 

10      The following issues are discussed in the Deliberations Booklet in Attachment D, that will also be provided in hardcopy form on the day of the hearing.

 

Issue 1 - Proposed 10% discount on annual fees

11      The draft bylaw proposes to introduce a 10% discount on annual fees payable.  While some submitters support this approach, others request that Council drop fee categories instead.

 

Issue 2 - Alignment with the Central Otago and Gore District Councils

12      Alignment with these Councils is being sought by some submitters with regard to dropping fee categories.

 

Issue 3 - Recognition of exemplary behaviour and systems

13      Some submitters believe that discounts should be introduced to recognise exemplary behaviour and systems.  I am not aware that any Council has developed such criteria.


 

14      The Ministry of Justice advises on its website:

 

            Flexibility for territorial authorities to adjust fee category

            Territorial authorities can reduce the fee category of an applicant by one level (for example, from high to medium) where it considers this appropriate in the circumstances.

 

            Reductions cannot be made below the lowest category.  TAs will need to decide under what circumstances, if any, they would reduce the fee category of a licensee.  For example a reduction may be appropriate to:

·                      recognise licensees who demonstrate exemplary behaviour and systems

·                      lower fees for premises with multiple licences where the costs to the TA are significantly lower than typical for each licence of that type

·                      recognise local knowledge or circumstances that mean that a lower fees category better reflects the TA's costs in respect of a particular premises.

15      Council then is able to develop criteria for exemplary licensees if it wishes to do so.  Examples of criteria could be relating to:

·              Training of staff.

·              Fire safety compliance.

·              Crime prevention through environmental design (CPTED).

·              Courtesy vehicles.

·              Advertising and signage restrictions.

·              Alcohol service restrictions after certain times.

·              Banning known practices which encourage patrons to drink quickly.

·              Clear rules of conduct for patrons.

Issue 4 - Risk ratings

16      Submitters raised the following concerns about risk ratings:

·              Tavern/hotel off-licences should not have the same risk rating as a supermarket off-licence, given the difference in volumes sold.

·              Off-premises consumption is the greatest risk.

·              A more lenient approach should be taken because Southland pubs are struggling.

·              Golf clubs are low risk and should not have to reduce hours in order to achieve the “very low” risk rating. 

Factors to Consider

Legal and Statutory Requirements

17      Council is enabled to stop the bylaw making process at any time, the Sale and Supply of Alcohol (Fee-setting Bylaws) Order 2013 enables Council to create the proposed bylaw, it is not mandatory. 

18      Regulation 6(4) of the Sale and Supply of Alcohol (Fees) Regulations 2013 enables Council to reduce fee categories:

“A territorial authority may, in its discretion and in response to particular circumstances, assign a fees category to premises that is one level lower than the fees category determined under subclause (1); but no premises may be assigned a category lower than very low.”

Community Views

19      A copy of the statement of proposal was mailed to all licensees in the District, and the draft bylaw was publicly notified in accordance with the special consultative procedure, the latter being recommended by staff for public consultation.

20      Note that there was no legal requirement to adopt the special consultative procedure for the making of this bylaw:

 

·              The bylaw provisions in the Local Government Act 2002 (LGA) do not refer to SSLA bylaws and that Act does not refer to LGA procedure.

·              Section 405(4) of the Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act 2012 provides that a Council, when making fee-setting bylaws, “must to the extent that is reasonably practical having regard to the circumstances of the particular case, consult the persons the authority has reason to believe are representative of interest likely to be substantially affected by the bylaw.”  The only persons likely to be substantially affected are the licence holders. 

 

Costs and Funding

21      The proposed bylaw is affordable but not sustainable beyond about three years, it is drafted to have effect for one year.

22      I would expect almost all councils will eventually have to have fee-setting bylaws to raise fees, assuming that the government does not increase the statutory default fees.

23      If Council accepts the recommendation of this report concerning the dropping of risk ratings, then this would have to be funded by one or both of the following:

 

·              More rates funding of the alcohol licensing business unit; and

·              Focus on efficiencies in the business unit. 

 

Policy Implications

24      There are no policy implications. 

Analysis

Options Considered

25      The options are whether to hear the submissions on the draft Alcohol Fee-Setting Bylaw 2015 and to continue, or to hear the submissions and decide to stop the process, and/or to develop criteria for reduction in risk rating.


 

Analysis of Options

26      Option 1 - To hear the submissions on the draft Alcohol Fee-Setting Bylaw 2015 and to continue the adoption process

 

Advantages

Disadvantages

·             Recommended by Council’s solicitor, if Council is wishing to reduce fees in a blanket manner.

·             Recognises the concerns of some in the hospitality industry.

 

·             Higher fee increases needed in
Years 4 and 7. 

·             Does not have the support of some in the hospitality industry.

27      Option 2 - To hear the submissions and stop the process

 

Advantages

Disadvantages

·             Will enable fees to remain at the same level for a longer period.

·             This would be supported by a number in the hospitality industry if the decision was also made to drop fees by one level.

·             This does not achieve an immediate reduction in fees, if Council chooses to develop risk rating reduction criteria.

 

 

28      Option 3 - To drop all licence holders by one risk rating level

Advantages

Disadvantages

·             Supported by a number in the hospitality industry that would prefer Council to drop the fees by one level. 

·             Council has indicated that the rates required to fund this would not be acceptable.

·             A lost opportunity to introduce an incentive to achieve a reduction, by meeting certain exemplary criteria.

29      Option 4 - To request staff to develop criteria for reduction in risk rating

Advantages

Disadvantages

·             Would have the support of many in the hospitality industry.   

·             May reduce alcohol related harm.

·             A way to recognise exemplary licensees. 

·             A way to support on-licensed premises, recognising that the benefit of these premises to our communities, such as:

Provide a controlled drinking environment which assists to reduce alcohol related harm.

Community development/economic.

Vibrancy.

A place for community meetings.

 

 

·             Risks such as low stakeholder engagement, not reaching agreement with stakeholders. 

·             Other councils may not wish to develop criteria.

·             The government is required to review the fees by late 2017, this may (or may not) result in amendments to the fees regulations including recognition of performance. 

·             “Bleeding edge” risks:

Not reaching agreement with the industry on the criteria for exemplary licensees. 

Low stakeholder engagement.

A likely belief that most if not all HANZ members will qualify for the discount with little effort.

Would be inconsistent with other local councils that do not recognise exemplary licensees in their fees and charges. 

·             The government is required to review the fees by late 2017, this may (or may not) result in amendments to the fees regulations including recognition of performance. 

Assessment of Significance

30      This review is considered to be not significant in accordance with Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy. 

Recommended Option

31      To adopt the bylaw as an interim measure and develop criteria for reduction in risk rating (Options 1 and 4).

Next Steps

32      A report will be presented to Council on 28 October 2015, at which time Council will decide on the options in this report and also to decide on any other matters raised during submissions.

 

Attachments

a         Fees Comparison View

b         Submissions booklet View

c         Alcohol Licensing Fee-Setting Bylaw 2015 View

d         Deliberations booklet View    

 


Council

16 September 2015

 

Attachment B

 

Fees Comparison

 

 

Fees under the Sale of Liquor Act 1989

 

Type of licence

Application fee (incl GST)

Renewal fee

On licence

$793.24

$793.24

Off licence

$793.24

$793.24

Club licence

$793.24

$793.24

Special licence

$64.40

 

On licence - BYO

$134.93

$134.93

Off licence - Caterers/Auctioneers

$134.93

$134.93

Manager’s certificate

$134.93

$134.93

Temporary Authority

$134.93

$134.93

 

 

Fees under the Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act 2012

 

Type

Fees are set  out in the Sale and Supply of Alcohol(Fees) Regulations 2013

Application/Renew/ Variation Fee (incl GST) *

Annual Fee (incl GST) **

On/Off/Club

(new, renewal or variation)

The fee will be calculated using an assessment of factors:

•       Type of premises

•       Latest opening hour you operate

•       Number of enforcements you have had

 

(Please see Tables 1 and 2 to help calculate your fees)

 

 

Very Low

$368.00

$161.00

Low

$609.50

$391.00

Medium

$816.50

$632.50

High

$1,023.50

$1,035.00

Very High

$1,207.50

$1,437.50

 

Special

Application fees will be calculated according to the size and frequency of the event or events

 

 

Class 3

1 or 2 small events
(fewer than 100 people

$63.25

N/A

Class 2

1 to 3 medium events
(100 - 400 people), or

3 - 12 small events
(fewer than 100 people)

$207.00

N/A

Class 1

A large event (400+) people, or

More than 3 medium events
(100 - 400 people), or

More than 12 small events
(fewer than 100 people)

$575.00

N/A

 

Managers

New or Renewal

 

All

 

$316.25

 

N/A

 

Other

 

 

 

Temporary Authority

Section 136 (2)

$296.70

N/A

Temporary Licence

Section 74

$296.70

N/A

Permanent Club Charter

Section 414

$632.50

N/A

Extract from Register

Section 66 (2)

$57.50

N/A

 


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16 September 2015

 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Council

16 September 2015

 

Description: U:\Users\cooperd\AppData\Local\Microsoft\Windows\Temporary Internet Files\Content.Outlook\KH362I8K\Alcohol Fee-Setting Bylaw 2015.jpg


Council

16 September 2015

 

SOUTHLAND DISTRICT COUNCIL

 

ALCOHOL LICENSING FEE-SETTING BYLAW 2015

 

 

Pursuant to Section 405 of the Act and the Sale and Supply of Alcohol (Fee Setting Bylaws) Order 2013 the Southland District Council makes the following bylaw.

 

 

1          TITLE AND COMMENCEMENT

 

(a)        This bylaw is the Alcohol Licensing Fee-Setting Bylaw 2015.

 

(b)        This bylaw comes into force on 19 September 2015 and applies to licences with an anniversary date between 1 October 2015 and 30 September 2016.

 

 

2.         INTERPRETATION

 

(a)   “Act” means the Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act 2012.

 

“Regulations” mean the Sale and Supply of Alcohol (Fees) Regulations 2013.

 

(b)   Unless the context otherwise requires words and phrases used in the Act and                   Regulations shall have the same meaning in this bylaw.

 

 

3.       ANNUAL FEE REDUCTION

 

The annual fee payable by a licensee of premises for which an on licence, off licence or club licence is held shall be the annual fee specified in the regulations less
10%.

 

 

 


Council

16 September 2015

 

Alcohol Fee-Setting Bylaw Hearing - 16 September 2015

Issue

Decisions needed

Discussion

1.   Proposed 10% discount on annual fees

 

 

a. Should the draft bylaw be adopted, that reduces annual fees by 10%?

 

b. If Council wants to investigate discounts for exemplary licensees (Issue 3 below), should the bylaw be adopted for a limited period of say one year?

The draft bylaw will achieve an immediate response to the industry’s concerns. It is affordable though not sustainable.

 

Consultation on the bylaw indicates that it is not the solution that many in the industry are seeking, and for this reason is not achieving what it set out to do - acceptably respond to the industry’s concerns. 

 

Council will determine at the hearings whether the submitters would appreciate a 10% reduction in annual fees for one year, if the decision is made to develop criteria (Issue 3 below). 

Notes:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2.   Alignment with the Central Otago and Gore District Councils

 

 

a. Does Council believe that fees should be aligned with these councils in dropping fees by one risk rating level?

 

 

1       Council is aligning with every other council in New Zealand, in not dropping fees. The fees were calculated to enable councils to fully recover their alcohol licensing costs without rates funding. 

2       Dropping risk ratings without having to meet any criteria is a missed opportunity to minimise alcohol related harm and encourage responsible drinking at licensed premises.

3       In dropping fees further, rates funding will be required.  Council has already decided to fund alcohol licensing by 10%.

Notes:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3.   Recognition of exemplary behaviour and systems

 

 

a. Does Council believe that staff should develop criteria for exemplary behaviour and systems, to qualify for fee reduction?

 

b. If yes, should this criteria be apply to on-licenses only, or also to clubs, off-licenses and special licences?

An alcohol licence is a licence to sell a legal drug that causes tremendous harm in the District. Advice from the Medical Officer of Health and the Police is that alcohol harm in the District is as significant as anywhere else in New Zealand. 

Incentivising exemplary behaviour and systems would therefore be of benefit to the public, in minimising alcohol related harm.  I am not aware that any Council has developed criteria to recognise exemplary licensees.

4       Any criteria developed for off-licences would have to apply to all types of off-licence (grocery stores and supermarkets), and this will have some opposition from the hospitality industry (refer discussion below on risk ratings).  Significant alcohol harm can occur in clubs and events and so club and special licenses also could benefit from incentives.

5       It will take some time to research criteria and “bleeding edge” problems can be expected. Low stakeholder engagement (both industry and agency) could also be a problem.

Notes:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4.   Risk ratings

 

 

a. Does Council believe that the risk ratings developed by the government are not appropriate for some premises in the District?

The government did extensive national research when identifying risk factors for alcohol licensing fees, and concluded for example that supermarkets had the same risk as bottle stores.  Council will certainly be in a legally challenging position if it wished to recognise new types of licenses premises (eg, based on volumes sold) and provide discounts that apply only to these new types.

6   

Notes:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Council

16 September 2015

Description: sdclogo

 

Alcohol Control Bylaw 2015

Record No:        R/15/4/7674

Author:                 Michael Sarfaiti, Environmental Health Manager

Approved by:       Bruce Halligan, GM - Environment and Community

 

  Decision                             Recommendation                        Information

 

  

 

 Purpose

1        To adopt the draft Alcohol Control Bylaw 2015. 

Executive Summary

2        Council is required to review the Public Places Liquor Control Bylaw 2005 if it wishes to continue to have an Alcohol Ban Bylaw.  The practical effect of the current bylaw is the alcohol ban in the Te Anau Central Business District.  The Police and the Te Anau Community Board (TACB) recommend its continuation.  The report recommends the adoption of the draft Alcohol Control Bylaw 2015, that continues the effect of the existing bylaw, and has been updated in line with current legislation. 

 

Recommendation

That the Council:

a)         Receives the report titled “Alcohol Control Bylaw 2015” dated 3 September 2015.

b)         Determines that this matter or decision be recognised as not significant in terms of Section 76 of the Local Government Act 2002.

c)         Determines that it has complied with the decision-making provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 to the extent necessary in relation to this decision; and in accordance with Section 79 of the Act determines that it does not require further information, further assessment of options or further analysis of costs and benefits or advantages and disadvantages prior to making a decision on this matter.

c)         Adopts the statement of proposal and summary of information concerning the draft Alcohol Control Bylaw - Attachment A.

d)         Directs that the statement of proposal, summary of information and a description of how persons interested in the proposal can present their views to Council be publicly available at all Council offices libraries and on the Council’s website for a period of not less than one month.

e)         Publicly notifies and invites submissions on the proposal commencing Saturday, 19 September 2015 and closing at 5.00 pm on Monday, 19 October 2015. 

f)          Sets the day Tuesday, 8 December 2015 to hear any person who wishes to present his or her views to Council.

 

Content

Background

3        Council was required to review the Public Places Liquor Control Bylaw 2005 by 28 September 2015, if it wished to continue to have an Alcohol Ban Bylaw. 

4        While the bylaw is district-wide, its practical effect has been limited to Te Anau only as  that is the only township with an alcohol ban.  I am not aware that any other township that has requested a temporary ban in recent times. 

5        The adoption of the Freedom Camping Bylaw 2015 and the unexpected need to re-consult concerning the Dog Control Bylaw 2015 took priority over this proposed Alcohol Control Bylaw 2015 (the bylaw), and it was considered that consultation on this bylaw along with the other two would be excessive concurrent consultation, not to mention that the Long Term Plan consultation had just been completed at that time. 


 

6        This is postponement is legally acceptable as bylaws continue in effect after their review due date, as described in the Local Government Act 2002:

160A   Bylaw not reviewed within specified time frame revoked

A bylaw … is revoked on the date that is two years after the last date on which the bylaw should have been reviewed under that section.

7        Due to a legislative amendment in 2012, the criteria for review has become more onerous, and this is discussed below. 

About Alcohol Bans and the 2012 Legislative Amendment

8        The following is an extract from the website of the Health Promotion Agency, a Crown Health Entity:

“Alcohol bans are usually introduced because of concern about disorderly behaviour and criminal offending linked to the consumption of alcohol in public places.  This is seen as detrimental to businesses and visitors as people think the area is not a safe place to visit.

An alcohol ban prohibits the possession or consumption of alcohol in certain locations and at certain times.

Territorial authorities are able to make alcohol control bylaws under Section 147 of the Local Government Act 2002 following a full community consultation process.

The Local Government (Alcohol Reform) Amendment Act 2012 has made changes to the way alcohol bans can be imposed in response to recommendations from the Law Commission.

The area where an alcohol ban may be imposed includes any public place.  This means, for example, that an alcohol ban can be imposed in a private car park if drinking is causing problems.  Previously alcohol bans could be imposed only in a public place under the control of the territorial authority.

There is now a greater responsibility on the territorial authority to justify the alcohol ban.  A ban must be a reasonable limitation on rights and freedoms and there must be evidence of a high level of crime or disorder that was caused or made worse by alcohol consumption. 

Any bylaw must be appropriate and proportionate in the light of that crime or disorder.  (Previously the territorial authority had only to prove alcohol would be present in a public place on a specified day and that it was likely to lead to disorder or offensive behaviour, fighting or assault.)

There is also provision for regulations to be made to require signage to ensure people know where the limits of the alcohol ban area are.”


 

Views of the Police

9        Acting Inspector Maggie Windle has submitted to Council that Police support the bylaw continuing as is.  Her letter is in Attachment B

Views of the Te Anau Community Board

10      On 1 April 2015 the Policy Review Committee considered the review of the bylaw, and made a recommendation to staff to seek feedback from the TACB prior to presenting a draft bylaw to Council.  On 29 April 2015 the TACB considered this issue and recommended that the current bylaw continues in effect without any changes.  The memo from the Area Officer in Te Anau formally advising of the resolution is in Attachment C

Issues

Updates

11      The content of the bylaw continues the effect of the current bylaw, and has been updated as follows:

·                      Updated in line with the Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act 2012. 

·                      Change of name to “Alcohol Control Bylaw 2015” from the existing “Public Places Liquor Control Bylaw”.  ‘Alcohol’ replaces ‘liquor’ in the latest revision of alcohol legislation. 

·                      “Member of police” is changed to “constable” which is the term used in the LGA and is defined in the Policing Act as a Police employee who holds the office of constable, who is specifically trained and sworn in.

Alfresco Dining

12      It is unnecessary to make provision for alfresco exemptions, as “public place” in the bylaw does not include licensed premises. A licensed premises may include footpaths if authorised under its on-licence.

Factors to Consider

Legal and Statutory Requirements

13     The Council was required to review this bylaw by 28 September 2015, if it wishes to continue to have an Alcohol Ban Bylaw.  The delay is acceptable as discussed in the Background section of this report.

14     As the community and the Police want to continue with the current Liquor Ban Bylaw in downtown Te Anau, then the bylaw can continue under Section 147A(2) of the Local Government Act 2002, and Council is required to consult in accordance with the special consultative procedure [Section 160(3)(b)]. 

15     The Act requires Council to be satisfied that crime and disorder will return to the area if the bylaw does not continue and alcohol can be consumed there in public again [Section 147A(1)].  Council’s solicitor has reviewed the submission from the Police in Attachment B, and believes that this letter is sufficient for Council to be satisfied in terms of Section 147A(1). 

Community Views

16     Feedback from the TACB has been received, as summarised in the background part of this report.  If Council adopts the draft, then the public will be formally consulted using the special consultative procedure. 

Costs and Funding

17     There are no funding implications. 

Policy Implications

18     There are no policy implications. 

Analysis

Options Considered

19      The option is whether or not to adopt the draft Alcohol Control Bylaw 2015.

Analysis of Options

20      Option 1:   To adopt the draft Alcohol Control Bylaw 2015, with any amendments as Council sees fit. 

Advantages

Disadvantages

·          The bylaw is required to be reviewed by 28 September 2015 if the Council wishes to continue to have an alcohol control bylaw. 

·          The new policy and bylaw will reflect community expectations as indicated by the support of the TACB. 

·          Maintain the decreased level of violence in downtown Te Anau that the ban has achieved. 

·             May be seen as detrimental to businesses and visitors as people think the area is not a safe place to visit.

·             A ban is a limitation on rights and freedoms. 

21      Option 2: To not adopt the draft Alcohol Control Bylaw 2015 and allow the Public Places Liquor Control Bylaw 2005 to lapse. 

Advantages

Disadvantages

·          The opposite of disadvantages in Option 1 above. 

·             Likely to result in increased crime and disorder. 

·             Against the advice of the TACB and the Police.

Assessment of Significance

22      This review is considered to be not significant in accordance with Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy. 

Recommended Option

23      To adopt the draft Alcohol Control Bylaw 2015, with any amendments as Council sees fit. 

Next Steps

24      The drafts will go out for public consultation.  Hearings will be organised once the submission period has closed. 

25      It is proposed that the Alcohol Control Bylaw 2015 will be adopted at Council’s meeting on 9 December 2015 subject to any changes which may result from the public submission process, and come into force on 12 December 2015. 

 

 

Attachments

a         Draft Alcohol Control Bylaw 2015 View

b         Letter from Police in support of continuation  View

c         Recommendation from the Te Anau Community Board View    

 


Council

16 September 2015

 


Council

16 September 2015

 

SOUTHLAND DISTRICT COUNCIL

 

ALCOHOL CONTROL BYLAW 2015

 

 

Pursuant to Section 147 of the Local Government Act 2002 the Southland District Council makes the following bylaw:

 

 

1.0       TITLE AND COMMENCEMENT

 

(a)        This Bylaw is the Alcohol Control Bylaw 2015.

(b)        This Bylaw comes into force on 12 December 2015.

(c)        The Public Places Liquor Control Bylaw 2005 is consequently repealed.

 

 

2.0       INTERPRETATION

 

In this Bylaw unless the context otherwise requires:

 

Act means the Sale and Supply of Liquor Act 2012.

 

Alcohol has the meaning given by Section 5 (1) of the Act.

 

Alcohol Free Area means any public place identified:

(a)        In the Schedule to this Bylaw; or

(b)        In any resolution of Council pursuant to clause 4.0 of this Bylaw.

 

Constable has the meaning given by Section 2 of the Policing Act 2008.

 

Council means the Southland District Council.

 

Licensed premises has the meaning given by Section 5 (1) of the Act.

 

Public notice means a notice published once in a newspaper circulating in the area to which the notice apples.

 

Public place means:

(a)        A place that is open to or is being used by the public, whether free or on payment of a charge, and whether any owner or occupier of the place is lawfully entitled to exclude or eject any person from it and includes roads whether or not under the control of the Council and vehicles in those public places; but

(b)        Does not include licensed premises.

 

Specified period means:

(a)        For an Alcohol Free Area specified in the Schedule to this Bylaw, the days and times specified in the Schedule.

(b)        For an Alcohol Free Area established by a resolution of the Council under clause 4.0 of this Bylaw means the days, times and period specified in that resolution.


 

3.0       PROHIBITED ACTS

           

Except in accordance with clauses 5.0 and 6.0 of this Bylaw no person shall:

(a)        Consume alcohol in an Alcohol Free Area.

(b)        Bring alcohol into an Alcohol Free Area.

            (c)        Possess alcohol in an Alcohol Free Area.

 

 

4.0       ESTABLISHMENT OF ALCOHOL FREE AREA BY RESOLUTION

 

(a)        The Council may from time to time establish Alcohol Free Areas in public places for specified periods.

(b)        The Council may at any time, by resolution amend or revoke any resolution under this clause 4.

(c)        The Council shall give public notice of any resolution made under clauses 4 (a) and (b) not less than 14 days before the establishment, amendment or revocation of an Alcohol Free Area under this clause 4.

 

 

5.0       EXEMPTIONS

 

5.1       This Bylaw does not prohibit the transport of alcohol in an unopened bottle or container:

 

(a)        From licensed premises next to an Alcohol Free Area, if the alcohol was lawfully bought on those premises for consumption off those premises and it is promptly removed from the Alcohol Free Area; or

(b)        From outside of an Alcohol Free Area to licensed premises next to the Alcohol Free Area; or

(c)        From outside of an Alcohol Free Area to premises next to an Alcohol Free Area by, or for delivery to, a resident of the premises or his or her bona fide visitors; or

(d)        From premises next to an Alcohol Free Area to a place outside the
Alcohol Free Area if the transport is undertaken by the resident of those premises and the alcohol is promptly removed from the Alcohol Free Area.

 

 

6.0       DISPENSATIONS

 

6.1       The Chief Executive of the Council may from time to time on application in writing by any person and on payment of the fee prescribed by the Council, grant a dispensation from any or all of the prohibitions specified in clauses 3 and 4.

 

6.2       The dispensation may be granted without conditions or subject to such conditions as the Chief Executive thinks fit.


 

7.0       NO WARNING IN CERTAIN CIRCUMSTANCES

 

7.1       Any constable is authorised to exercise the powers under Section 170 (2) of the Local Government Act 2002 on specified dates or in relation to specified events in respect of which the Council has:

 

(a)        By public notice 14 days in advance specified the Alcohol Free Area where, and the period when, any constable can exercise those powers; and

(b)        Where it is has been practical or reasonable to do so, indicated the location of the Alcohol Free Area by one or more clearly legible notices affixed in one or more conspicuous places on or adjacent to the Alcohol Free Zone.

 

 

8.0       OFFENCES

 

            Every person commits an offence who breaches the provisions of this bylaw.

 

 

9.0       PENALTIES

 

Every person who commits an offence against this Bylaw is liable on conviction to a fine not exceeding $20,000.00.

 

 


SCHEDULE

 

The Alcohol Free Areas and Specified Periods are as follows:

 

 

 


Council

16 September 2015

 


 


Council

16 September 2015

 

 

When replying please quote:  240/20/24/1    Jenny Labruyère

 

 

 

5 May 2015

 

 

TO:                             Michael Sarfaiti (Environment Health Manager)

 

 

SUBJECT:                 Review of the Public Places Liquor Control Bylaw 2005

 

 

MEMO:

 

Your report (trim r/15/4/6241) was considered by the Te Anau Community Board at a recent meeting.

 

Following discussion on the report the Board resolved that the status quo prevail and that there be no changes to the current “Public Places Liquor Control Bylaw 2005” as it affects Te Anau Township.

 

Regards

 

 

 

 

 

Jenny Labruyère

AREA OFFICER, TE ANAU

 

 

 

 


Council

16 September 2015

 

 

 


Council

16 September 2015

Description: sdclogo

 

Annual Plan 2016/2017

Record No:        R/15/8/13719

Author:                 Susan Cuthbert, Strategy and Policy Manager

Approved by:       Rex Capil, Group Manager, Policy and Community

 

  Decision                             Recommendation                        Information

 

  

 

Purpose

1        The purpose of this report is to seek Council’s approval to a new approach for the 2016/2017 Annual Plan and the Annual Plan timetable.

Executive Summary

2        The Local Government Act 2002 (LGA) Amendment Act 2014 introduced new requirements around Annual Plans which have the effect of making the document much more streamlined and focused on financial budgets.  As a result of the changes an opportunity has arisen for Council to reconsider its internal budgeting and local estimates processes for the Annual Plan. Council staff are proposing a different process which will mean that Areas Engineers will be required to discuss any potential significant changes to projects and/or budgets informally or via workshops with their Community Boards and CDAs.

3        Council is asked to review and approve these process changes and the indicative
Annual Plan timetable.

 

Recommendation

That the Council:

a)         Receives the report titled “Annual Plan 2016/2017” dated 2 September 2015.

b)         Determines that this matter or decision be recognised as not significant in terms of Section 76 of the Local Government Act 2002.

c)         Determines that it has complied with the decision-making provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 to the extent necessary in relation to this decision; and in accordance with Section 79 of the Act determines that it does not require further information, further assessment of options or further analysis of costs and benefits or advantages and disadvantages prior to making a decision on this matter.

d)         Agrees the Annual Plan 2016/17 is likely to include significant or material differences from the content of the Long Term Plan 2015-2025 (LTP) and therefore Council intends undertaking public consultation before adopting the plan in accordance with section 95 (2A) of the Local Government Act 2002.

e)         Approves the proposed changes to the Annual Plan budgeting processes as outlined in this report.

f)          Approves the timetable for the preparation of the Annual Plan 2016/2017.


 

Content

Background

4        The Local Government Act 2002 (LGA) Amendment Act 2014 introduced new requirements around Annual Plans which have the effect of making the document much more streamlined and focused on financial budgets.

5        Council must still prepare and adopt an Annual Plan for each financial year.

6        The purpose of an Annual Plan is to:

·              Contain the proposed annual budget and Funding Impact Statement.

·              Identify any variation from the financial statements and Funding Impact Statement included in the Long Term Plan (LTP) in respect of the year.

·              Provide integrated decision making and co-ordination of the resources of the local authority.

·              Contribute to the accountability of the local authority to the community.

7        Each Annual Plan adopted must contain appropriate references to the LTP and set out the (financial) information required by Part 2 of Schedule 10 of the Act which includes:

·              Forecast financial statements.

·              Financial statements for the previous financial year.

·              Funding Impact Statement (rating).

·              Sample properties.

·              Rating base information.

·              Reserve funds.

8        This is a significant reduction in the level of requirements compared to what Council has previously included in its Annual Plan and is likely to result in a much smaller document.

9        Another change as a result of the amendments is that there is no longer a requirement to use the special consultation procedure and, if the Annual Plan does not include significant or material differences from the content of the Long Term Plan (LTP), then there is no requirement to consult.

10      The intent of these legislative changes is to streamline annual planning processes where possible so that greater effort can be made every three years around the Long Term Plan.

11      The more Council can align its planning cycles with this intent, the more it can potentially gain benefits around efficiencies and focus its resources on undertaking more effective community planning processes.

 

Issues

12      How do the LGA requirements apply to Council’s 2016/2017 Annual Plan?

Consultation

13      If Council prepares a document that follows the intent of the legislation it would be an extremely streamlined document.

14      Section 95(2A) LGA provides that the requirement to consult as set out in Section 95(2) “does not apply if the proposed Annual Plan does not include significant or material differences from the content of the Long Term Plan for the financial year to which the proposed Annual Plan relates”.

15      While the test for significance is set under Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy and requires a “major and long term effect” on the District or community, the test for “materiality” is set much lower.  Materiality is defined in Section 95A(5) as follows:

16      “For the purposes of this section, a difference, variation, or departure is material if it could, itself or in conjunction with other differences, influence the decisions or assessment of those reading or responding to the consultation document”.

17      As this wording is particularly broad, it is highly likely that any variations to the budgets affecting major projects or the cumulative effect of any carry-forwards will satisfy the test.
At this stage there are likely to be variations to the Long Term Plan budgets for the
Around the Mountains Cycle Trail and the Te Anau Wastewater Scheme.  In addition, there could be carry forwards of some water projects.

18      Given the low threshold for “materiality”, the attached timetable has been prepared on the basis that consultation will be required.

Local estimates process

19      There is an opportunity for Council to reconsider its internal budgeting and local estimates processes for the Annual Plan.  Historically, Council has allowed community boards, CDAs and individual business units to re-open the Long Term Plan budgets on an annual basis. This has resulted in a complex process that occurs over a number of months.

20      Council staff are proposing a different process for the 2016/2017 Annual Plan as follows:

·              Budgets will be set at Year 2 of the Long Term Plan.  Budget managers will only be able to request changes where the difference is significant (ideally +/- $10,000 but will depend on the community and/or activity) and there is a good reason for change.

·              Area Engineers will be notified by email of their budgets and projects for Year 2, and will be required to discuss any potential significant changes to projects and/or budgets informally or via workshops with their Community Boards and CDAs.
Any changes are to be notified to Finance, and will be collated in a report to ELT for initial approval.

·              A formal report will be included in the Community Boards and CDAs agenda for approval at the estimates meetings in October/November, confirming the final budgets and the rates (ideally no further changes will be made at these meetings).

·              Finance staff will attend estimate meetings only if there are key issues for discussion.

·                District rates setting and forecast financial statement preparation commences immediately after the budgets close, resulting in the compilation of the draft
Annual Plan being available for adoption and consultation significantly earlier than previous years.

21      Council is asked to approve these new processes.

Annual Plan project and timetable

22      The Project Manager for the 2015/2016 Annual Plan is Susan Cuthbert, Strategy and Policy Manager.

23      An indicative timetable (attached) has been prepared based on the above assumptions and the key dates are as follows:

Annual Plan Milestone

Date

First estimates report out to Community Boards and CDAs

26 October

Estimates meetings

3 November - 14 December

Council workshop to discuss draft Annual Plan

10 December

Adoption of consultation document

27 January

Public consultation

30 January – 29 February

Hearing of submissions

7 April

Deliberation of submissions

27 April

Adoption of Annual Plan

8 June 2016

 

24      Council is asked to review and approve the indicative timetable.

Factors to Consider

Legal and Statutory Requirements

25      Pursuant to section 95 of the LGA, Council is required to prepare and adopt an Annual Plan for each financial year.  Each Annual Plan must be adopted before the commencement of the financial year to which it relates.

Community Views

26      Council is required in the course of its decision-making process to give consideration to the views and preferences of persons likely to be affected by this matter.  Council should therefore consider the views of their community boards and CDAs around the proposed budgeting processes.

Costs and Funding

27      Producing a streamlined version of the Annual Plan in accordance with the legislation and streamlining the budgeting processes are likely to result in savings for the organisation given the staff time that is normally dedicated to such activities.

Policy Implications

28      The impact on the Annual Plan is outlined in this report.

Analysis

29      Options Considered

 

1.         Prepare the Annual Plan with changes to the budgeting processes as outlined in this report.

2.         Continue to compile the Annual Plan as it has been done historically.

30      Analysis of Options

 

Option 1 - Prepare the Annual Plan with changes to the budgeting processes as outlined in this report.

Advantages

Disadvantages

·        The more streamlined the planning processes are, the greater the savings of staff time and cost savings across the organisation.

·        Increased focus on the LTP budgeting process.

·        Community boards and CDAs may not want to wait until the next LTP process to undertake a detailed review of their budgets.

·        Community Boards and CDAs are required to meet informally prior to the estimates meeting to review and amend budgets.

 

Option 2 - Continue to compile the annual plan as it has been done historically.

Advantages

Disadvantages

·        Budget managers would have the opportunity to review their LTP budgets which could result in cost savings.

·        Community boards and CDAs would have the opportunity to review their LTP budgets in detail which could mean they are able to be more responsive to their communities.

·        Budget managers would have the opportunity to review their LTP budgets which could result in cost increases.

·        Greater administrative complexity.

 

Assessment of Significance

31      The matter before Council is considered to have low significance.

Recommended Option

32      Council staff recommend Option 1 - Prepare the Annual Plan with changes to the budgeting processes as outlined in this report.

Next Steps

33   Council staff will communicate the changed process to staff and Community Boards and CDAs.  Council staff will progress with the preparation of the draft Annual Plan.

Attachments

a         Annual Plan Timetable 2016/2017 (indicative) View    

 


Council

16 September 2015

 

 

No.

 

Department

Due Date

1

Report to Council approving timetable and change in process for 16 September Council meeting

Strategy and Policy/Finance

2-Sep

2

Develop guidelines for Budget managers

Finance

4-Sep

3

Contact managers allocating costs to ensure they calculate internal charges

Finance

8-Sep

4

Develop project table including variance reports

Finance

8-Sep

5

Develop template for local estimates reports

Finance/Susan C

8-Sep

6

Budget Managers workshop and budget application open for Managers

Finance

9-Sep

7

Review assumptions and put on Executive Leadership Team (ELT) agenda

Finance

9-Sep

8

Finalise timing of estimates meetings

Finance/Strategy and Policy/District Support

10-Sep

9

Send out Fees and Charges e-mail to staff asking them to review these

Finance

11-Sep

10

Send out letters to halls to consider rates

Finance

11-Sep

11

Council meeting to approve timetable and change in process

Strategy and Policy

16-Sep

12

ELT meeting to discuss timetable, assumptions, estimates approach, emerging issues 

Once timetable confirmed - put note on intranet about adoption/notification of draft, submission period, hearing dates and final adoption

Finance/Strategy and Policy/Comms

28-Sep

13

Close off for ALL local estimates meetings

Finance

5-Oct

14

Close off for relevant managers to complete allocating costs to other areas (IT, Property, Area Engineers, Records, Secretarial and Financial Services)

Finance

5-Oct

15

Close off for managers to complete estimates (includes allocations, overheads, wages, all depreciation excluding infrastructure assets)

Finance

5-Oct

16

Close off for finance to complete review of finance allocated costs (includes vehicle costs, rates, insurance, wages, all depreciation excluding infrastructure assets), also District water and sewerage BUs)

Finance

5-Oct

17

Close off for changes to fees and charges

Finance

9-Oct

18

Close off for District estimates

Finance

9-Oct

19

ELT meeting to approve changes to budgets

Finance

12-Oct

20

Venture Southland budgets required

Finance

12-Oct

21

Develop and populate Annual Plan template

Strategy and Policy

16-Oct

22

Confirmation of hall rates (updated and entered into Fulcrum budget)

Finance

16-Oct

23

First local estimate report due

Finance

26-Oct

24

First local estimate meeting with CB/CDA

Area Offices/Area Engineers/Water and Waste (and Finance)

3-Nov

25

Circulate to ELT allocation information, and fees and charges to ELT plus Draft District estimates prepared (District estimates all reviewed, variances identified, District rate increase identified, excludes changes to District rates affected by local estimates)

Strategy and Policy/Finance

4-Nov

26

ELT meeting to discuss key issues at the District estimate level (does not include District rate increase); also provide overhead allocation information and fees and charges information

Check the significance of changes (re LTP amendment needed) ELT to discuss District estimates material and background papers required for Council meetings

Strategy and Policy/Finance/Comms

9-Nov

27

Ward estimates meetings held in Chambers

18-Nov

28

Prepare Annual Plan (key issues)  and include financials

Strategy and Policy/Finance

18-Nov

29

Send draft Annual Plan and workshop papers to WP for checking

Strate and Policy

20-Nov

30

Workshop papers plus covering report due with WP

Strategy and Policy/Finance

20-Nov

31

Circulate draft Annual Plan and workshop papers to ELT and do covering report

Strategy and Policy/Finance

25-Nov

32

ELT to consider workshop papers and draft Annual Plan

Strategy and Policy/Finance

30-Nov

33

Background papers due for distribution to council for workshop meeting plus covering report

Strategy and Policy

2-Dec

34

Circulate draft Annual Plan and background papers to Council for the workshop meeting; circulate material for informal discussion with Councillors (estimated District rate increase, variances, key discussion points, changes to assumptions, proposed new rate types/changes to boundaries, background papers, fees and charges)

Strategy and Policy/Finance

3-Dec

35

Workshop to discuss draft Annual Plan with  Council 

ALL

10-Dec

36

Complete draft Annual Plan (plan to include forecast financial statements, financial statements for the previous financial year, funding impact statement (rating), sample properties, rating base information and reserves) and prepare report for adoption

Strategy and Policy/Finance/Comms

11-Dec

37

Last local estimate meeting

14-Dec

38

Send draft Annual Plan and consultation document to Word processing for checking

Strategy and Policy

14-Dec

39

Circulate draft Annual Plan and consultation document (Word version) for adoption to Council

Strategy and Policy

11-Jan

40

ELT meeting to review draft Annual Plan and consultation document

14-Jan

41

Council meeting to consider and adopt draft Annual Plan and consultation document

ALL

27-Jan

42

Graphics of consultation document completed and sent to printers

Communications

29-Jan

43

Distribute draft Annual Plan, send to Area Offices (AO to print out) and those on mailing list and put on website

Strategy and Policy

29-Jan

44

Meet with/distribute copy of draft Annual Plan to key stakeholders

Strategy and Policy

29-Jan

45

Submission period starts - advertise consultation document, call for submissions

Strategy and Policy

30-Jan

46

Draft Statements of Intent for Council Controlled Organisation (Milford Community Trust, Southland Museum Art Gallery Trust) prepared and circulated to Council/other shareholders

Chris Dolan

Jan/Feb

47

Submission period closes

29 Feb

48

Circulate full list of submissions to Councillors and Area Offices

Strategy and Policy

3-Mar

49

Refer submissions to staff for comment; refer submissions to CCOs as appropriate

Strategy and Policy

3-Mar

50

Collate officers/CBs/CDAs comments and prepare submission report

Strategy and Policy

17-Mar

51

Distribute submissions and comments to ELT

Strategy and Policy

22-Mar

52

Submission summary completed

Strategy and Policy

24-Mar

53

ELT to consider submissions

Strategy and Policy

27-Mar

54

Submissions checked by WP

Word Processing

29-Mar

55

Circulate report on submissions and hearings to Council (send copy to submitters speaking)

Strategy and Policy

1-Apr

56

Note:  Easter 25-29 March 2016

 

57

Council hear and consider submissions

ALL

7-Apr

58

Report on issues and options on Council agenda

11-Apr

59

Council meeting to deliberate

ALL

27-Apr

60

Finalise Annual Plan (write submission section, update financials and other wording changes) and prepare report for adoption -   check Council Controlled organisation section to match final Statement of Intent

Strategy and Policy/Finance

13-May

61

Send to Word Processing for checking

Strategy and Policy

16-May

62

Final Annual Plan and report to Council on Council agenda

Strategy and Policy

22-May

63

Note:  Queen’s Birthday 6 June 2016

 

64

Council meeting - Adoption Annual Plan

ALL

8-Jun

65

Print and distribute final Annual Plan (printers)

Strategy and Policy/Comms

23-Jun

66

Reply to submitters

Strategy and Policy

6-Jul

 

 


Council

16 September 2015

Description: sdclogo

 

Management Report

Record No:        R/15/8/15539

Author:                 Steve Ruru, Chief Executive

Approved by:       Steve Ruru, Chief Executive

 

  Decision                             Recommendation                        Information

 

  

 

Chief Executive

Regional Development Strategy

1        The Steering Group guiding development of the Regional Development Strategy held its final meeting at the end of July.  At the meeting, the Steering Group asked for a number of changes to be made to the draft document as it is finalised.

2        The final document is to be presented to the Mayoral Forum at its meeting on 9 September.  From there, arrangements will be made to formally present it to each of the councils along with recommendations on the next steps which need to be taken to proceed with its implementation.

Roading Service Delivery Review

3        Under the Local Government Act 2002 all local authorities are required to complete a Service Delivery Review for all services by 30 June 2017. The reviews are required to review the cost effectiveness of the current governance, funding and delivery arrangements.

4        A review of Roading Services has now been completed by Morrison Low with the final report to be presented to APAC in the near future. The review indicates that the current service delivery model is considered to be the most effective for Southland. It does highlight, however, the need to maintain an active contractor market. Officers are giving consideration to how this issue can be addressed.

Regulatory Practice Review

5        Last year, the Productivity Commission released a report on the performance of the regulatory system.  The report found that the New Zealand regulatory system is large and complex, has quality control processes that often operate under strain and that in general it is failing to keep up with new developments in practice and societal requirements.

6        Government has accepted in whole or part the 44 recommendations that were made in the report.  It has also agreed that:

·              There is a need for stronger ownership and leadership role from central government in the development of regulatory practice.

·              A greater focus needs to be placed on improving the quality of legislation passed into law.

·              There is a need to build professionalism in the regulatory workforce.  MBIE are to establish a cross government forum to contribute to initiatives designed to improve regulatory leadership and its workforce.

·              There is a need to improve regulatory review and evaluation processes.

7        The relevant central government agencies will be expected to lead the implementation of the Productivity Commission’s recommendations and the other changes that have been agreed to by central government.


 

Local Government Risk Management Agency

8        The Establishment Board which has been formed to assess whether a new
Local Government Risk Management Agency (LGRA) should be established is continuing with its work.

9        The Board has sent out a survey to all within the sector to develop an understanding of current practices and the range of risks affecting each area.  Officers have responded to this survey.

10      The work programme also provides for the following tasks to be completed:

·              Identifying the detailed risk management and financing/insurance services that may be provided to the local authority sector and how these services might be delivered.

·              Developing a three to five year plan that describes the benefits (including any risk reduction and sector efficiencies that might be achievable), likely growth and financial sustainability of an agency.

·              Developing a business case on whether to establish an LGRA.

·              Investigating whether the current 60/40 cost sharing arrangement with the Crown, or any alternatives developed, can be used to incentivise good risk management practice across the sector.

New Zealand Infrastructure Plan

11      Government released the latest 30 year New Zealand Infrastructure Plan during the last month.  The plan provides a consolidated view on likely local and central government infrastructure development over the next 30 years.  The plan notes that central and local government together are expected to spend $11 billion on infrastructure each year for the next 10 years.

12      As part of the release of the plan, government has also announced that it is to move towards the development of a national set of data standards for roading, water and buildings to enable consistent assessment methodologies to be used across the country.  It is also proposing to develop ‘centres of excellence’ to encourage the development of ‘good practice’ for the management of infrastructure.  This material will see a set of national expectations that all infrastructure providers will need to meet.

National Benchmarking Project

13      SOLGM are moving to introduce a national benchmarking initiative for New Zealand local authorities using a model that has been developed in New South Wales.  The initiative is used by approximately 80 councils in NSW and has been running for three years.

14      The reports produced through the initiative provide an assessment of Council’s performance against other participating councils on a very wide range of performance measures covering corporate leadership, financial management, operations management, risk management and workforce.  In New South Wales, some 80 councils use the benchmarking process.

15      In the New Zealand context, SOLGM are hopeful that some 40 councils will join which should provide a useful pool of councils against which to compare performance.  Given the need to focus on efficiency and our desire to identify opportunities to improve our performance, I see it as important that we take the opportunity to become involved in this initiative and so we will be taking part.  The results from the first round of benchmarking are expected to be released later this calendar year.


 

Easter Sunday Trading

16      The government has recently announced its intention to prepare an amendment to the
Shop Trading Hours Act Repeal Act 1990 that will enable territorial authorities to allow trading on Easter Sunday in defined areas.

17      It is proposed that local authorities will be able to do this through the creation of a
local bylaw.  The bylaw will need to go through the special consultative process needed to create a bylaw.

 

Environment and Community Group

18      The Draft Freedom Camping Bylaw 2015 has now been notified, with submissions closing on 8 September 2015.

19      The new Manager at Emergency Management Southland, Mr Angus McKay, has now started as of 27 July 2015.  An opportunity for Mr McKay to meet Councillors will be arranged when he is through an initial induction process.

20      Preliminary work has commenced on a Service Delivery Review in accordance with
Section 17A of the Local Government Act 2002 of the Council’s Library Services.  This is intended to be completed before Christmas for presentation to and discussion with Council.

21      A new Building Control Officer, Mr Aidan Baron, has been appointed to replace former
Senior Building Control Officer, Lyndon Paul, who left recently for a business enterprise. 
Mr Baron has previously had his own building company and will be commencing work with SDC in early September.

22      A resource consent for a serpentine quarry north of Mossburn has been publicly notified.  Submissions have now closed, with 10 received. 

23      Following the Council’s approval of the funding for the Aeromagnetic Survey of Southland funding at the 5 August meeting, a working party of staff from the respective funding councils has been formed to work with Venture Southland regarding progression.

24      The Building Control Team has been progressing the strong recommendations from the recent IANZ reaccreditation audit, with a number of these now addressed and others in progress.

Dog Control

25      Staff are making preparations in the event that Council adopts the multiple dog licensing in the proposed Dog Control Bylaw.  The licensing process that includes computer systems, forms and certificates, and procedure are being planned to ensure that the licensing system is live from the proposed commencement date of 29 August 2015.

Environmental Health

Alcohol Licensing

26      The licensing inspectors are considering the new “single area” rules in off-licence renewal applications.  This new rule means that alcohol can only be displayed in a single defined location in grocery stores and supermarkets, and that location must not be near the entrance or checkouts.  Some of our licensees may have to complete some works to comply with this new rule.

Food Licensing

27      The transition period for the new Food Act 2014 commences in March 2016. 
Council’s Environmental Health Officers are well prepared for the transition and are presently focusing on transferring as many on-licensees to the new system as they can.  On-licensed food premises (eg, tavern, restaurant) are a major group of food premises that will be required to transfer in the first year of the transition.

Resource Management

28      The Minister for the Environment has announced a revised reform programme for the Resource Management Act including the possibility of a reform bill being introduced before the end of the year.  As part of this process, the government will be proceeding with the development of four new National Policy Statements covering natural hazards, aquaculture, biodiversity and urban development.

Area Offices

29      Staff have been involved in numerous workshops including Area Offices/Libraries’ Minimum Standards Review, Lumsden CDA Roles and Responsibilities, SDC Branding,
Community Boards/CDAs Chairs, Information Management Strategic Plan, ProMapp, and Community Governance.

30      Athol CDA now has full membership with Esmay Raynes and Annabel Herbert filling the two vacancies.  This CDA also has a new Chairperson, namely Steve Wilkins, replacing Jonathan Shaw who resigned from the Subcommittee.

31      Lumsden CDA has a new member, namely Gary Maclean who replaced the late
Ted Menlove.

Milford Community Trust

32      The Trust had two vacancies to fill through the retirement of Natalie Shanks and the relocation of Real Journeys’ representative, Jane Grant.  The positions have been filled by Rosco Gaudin, owner/operator of Milford Sound Sea Kayaks, and Jason Steele, Operations Manager of Real Journeys Milford, respectively.

33      The Trust held a workshop on 21 August 2015 to discuss a ‘Review of Charging Mechanism’.  The outcome is that staff are to report back to the Trust on different options.  These options will be considered prior to the Trust preparing its Statement of Intent for 2016 – 2019,  which occurs in November 2015.

34      The Trustees have decided to put the development of an ‘open’ recreation area in the
Village Green on hold due to the local community petitioning the Trust to investigate the construction of a shelter type complex for use as a recreational area.  Trustees have agreed to meet the community to pursue this proposal.

35      The Trust has also been briefed on the proposed Milford Opportunities Project and community governance work stream.

 

Health and Safety Update

36      On 14 August 2015, the Chief Executives’ Shared Services Forum approved the Health and Safety Shared Services Project.  The mission “Working together for a safer Southland” and the vision “Safer you, safer me, safer Southland” was agreed on.

37      The Health and Safety Shared Services Project is being run by the Human Resources Managers from Invercargill City Council, Gore District Council, Environment Southland and Southland District Council.  The group is continuing to finalise the charter and action plan and is organising an extensive introductory staff training programme that will be delivered in half day sessions to all staff members (estimated 760 staff) of the four member councils. 
A separate session aimed specifically at elected members, Chief Executives and second tier Managers/Directors will also be organised.

38      Once the charter and action plan are finalised, this will be presented to the respective councils. 

39      The Contractor Management Project is well underway.  The majority of our contractors have now signed health and safety documentation and provided up to date health and safety plans.  Work is now underway with developing audit tools that are easy to use.

Policy and Community Group

Community Governance Project

40      Work continues on developing the Community Governance Project.  A Staff Working Group has been formed and includes Susan Cuthbert, Louise Pagan, Bruce Miller, Josh Webb, Shelley Dela Llana, Kelly Tagg, Bobbi Brown and Tina Geary.  The first stage of the preliminary engagement process is underway - with Group Manager Policy and Community having attended Manapouri CDA, Tuatapere Community Board, Riversdale CDA,
Balfour CDA, Otautau Community Board, Milford Community Trust, Stewart Island Community Board, Thornbury CDA, Colac Bay CDA, Winton Community Board, Riverton/Aparima Community Board and Te Anau Community Board meetings. 

41      All other Community Board and CDA meetings will be attended as part of this initial engagement process.  Feedback to date has been positive and constructive and there is an understanding of the situation and the purpose of the review leading into the Representation Review in 2017.  The project is providing a positive opportunity for Southland District Council to connect with its communities.

 

Community Planning Project

42      This project continues to evolve and with Council endorsing the approach for future planning opportunities the next phase of the project development is to liaise and meet with other multi-agency partners.  This will support clarifying the multi-agency individual objectives to ensure alignment and the planning process meets the multiple objectives. 

43      The project development phase is nearing completion and project implementation timing is positive as there are many potential community planning initiatives being considered which will follow the planning principles of this approach.  Again this project will assist in providing a positive opportunity for Southland District Council connecting with our communities.

 

Wyndham Service Delivery Community Planning Project

44      Work continues on the development of this project.  Venture Southland Community Development staff are facilitating this project on behalf of Council.  A positive staff working group meeting has been held to consider various issues relating to levels of service required from an Area Office, from a Library, the concept of a 'community hub' and how this may impact on a network across the District.

45      The next stage of the process is for Venture Southland staff to develop some detail around the various options required to be considered, this to be reviewed and discussed by SDC staff working group to then be considered by Council in late October.  Once Council has considered this approach and the options for consideration, Venture Southland staff will facilitate the community engagement process on behalf of Council.

 

Around the Mountains Cycle Trail - Official Partner Programme

46      The Official Partner Programme has recently been released to the Northern Southland business community.  Venture Southland staff have been working in the community with businesses to sign them up as official partners to the Around the Mountains Cycle Trail.  Various categories include accommodation providers, food and beverage and related activities and cycle tour operators.

 

Information Management Group

Information Management Strategic Plan (2015 - 2020)

47      The final Information Management Strategy will be presented to APAC in September once the documents have been reviewed by the Executive Leadership Team.  The document outlines a number of Key Focus Areas (KFAs) that will be used to align future and current projects and initiatives.

48      There were also a number of stakeholder workshops that allowed for feedback on the document with some changes/enhancements being incorporated.

 

•           Partnership - Making it implicit that the IM Strategy is the foundation for how the Information Management Group will operate in partnership with the various areas of Council when undertaking work outlined in the IM Strategy.  It is also important to reinforce that the partnership will require two way communication.

 

•           Engagement and Communications - There is a clear need to ensure that there is clarity around ensuring we communicate the ‘why’ and ‘how’ we undertake particular projects or activities and the impact this will potentially have on others.

 

•           Expand some of the ‘Quick Wins’ based on feedback as part of the stakeholder sessions and recently at the staff forum.

 

•           Acknowledging that Business as Usual and supporting business as usual activities is important and something that needs to be considered.

 

Digitisation Project

49      The Digitisation Business Case was approved by APAC on 5 August 2015.  Staff are now working on a Project Plan to be presented to ELT on 7 September 2015.  There are a number of work streams that need to be started prior to the end of the year.  This includes the RFP and tendering process, review of the electronic document and records management system and the recruitment of a full time fixed term position to complete the preparation of the files.

 

ProMapp Software Implementation

50      The ProMapp trainer was on-site from 26 - 28 August to provide training to the internal process champions and owners.  This training gave officers an understanding of how the software works, their roles and helped them to develop a process scoping register for their area.

51      This register is a list of the main processes and their priorities and between the champion and the owner they can prioritise the mapping of processes and the timeframes to complete.  Officers are now in the process of developing their activities register and beginning to map their processes.  The Business Improvement Team will hold informal catch-ups with champions on a regular basis to help them and provide extra training or assistance as required.

52      Additionally, in September there will be a series of brown bag lunches to launch ProMapp to all staff so they can see it in action, understand the role they play as subject matter experts and learn how it can benefit them in their everyday roles.

 

Services and Assets

General

53      The end of year processes have been occupying staff time; a lot of time spent on administration tasks to reconcile the end of year result with the original budgets and plans.  From an infrastructure perspective, once again the weather dominates the picture. 
Rain, snow and ice have all impacted on roading services in particular.

 

Around the Mountains Cycle Trail

54      Construction on Sections 6 and 7 of the trail has halted at present.  The contractor was not making progress due to weather and ground conditions.  Work will restart when conditions improve, with a completion date of 1 December.

 

Te Anau Airport - Manapouri

55      Te Anau Airport - Manapouri is about to enter into the “Summer Operational” phase with recurrent training of current staff and induction training for new staff members, mainly focusing on aircraft ground handling.  Expecting to see a slight increase in large aircraft movements again this season with an additional movement per week during the height of the season.

 

Safety

56      Further security fencing has been completed on the non-operational section of the aerodrome surrounding the helicopter hangar.  This was suggested by the Civil Aviation Authority at a routine audit.  Additional fencing around the sewerage system was completed over the winter period providing an acceptable level of protection from the public.  All fencing has been completed by the Fiordland Aero Club who holds the contract to maintain the large operational grass areas surrounding the main runway.  Additional impaired mobility access ramps and safety barriers to all entry and exit points in the terminal have been completed.

 

People

57      A regular part time ground handler has taken up a more regular flying position with one of our resident fixed wing commercial operations, who requires further part time staff to help with large aircraft ground handling movements.  The aim is to promote local aviation opportunities at the airport contracting airport community people.

 

Assets

58      Most assets are condition monitored at the airport.  Presently, there are small issues over minor water seepage through the runway surface in the recently overlayed portion of the main sealed runway.  These are being managed by the local engineer.

 


 

Projects

59     Several small projects are proposed for approval:

•           Helipads abeam the terminal building are on hold.

•           Sealing and realignment of the taxiway between the apron and grass runway with the potential of large aircraft maintenance, under consideration.

•           Workshop between Council, Airport Management and MGJV for hangar development ongoing.

 

SIESA (PowerNet)

 

Projects

60      A workshop was held on 23 August with the members of the Stewart Island/Rakiura Community Board, representatives of PowerNet and Council to discuss proposals for potential projects to upgrade the SIESA Electricity Distribution Networks (High Voltage and Low Voltage supply) on Stewart Island, the main objective being to improve the reliability of the power supply to the Oban township.  Council and PowerNet have presented five potential options to the Stewart Island/Rakiura Community Board members, who are now in a much better position to make an informed decision on which, if any, of the presented upgrade options should be implemented in the coming financial years.

61     Several other small projects are proposed for approval:

•           Connection of the new backup generator set (No. 5) to the grid.

•           Replacement of old diesel storage tanks (2x 16,000L) with two new “double skinned” 20,000L tanks to address the non-compliance of the old tanks.

•           Replacement of the old fuel pumps with two new pumps.

•           Soundproofing, additional door system and security for the three bay pole shed, as new site of the backup generator set No. 5.

•           Initiatives to improve the security of the power station site with a gate, fencing, cameras, etc.

 

Forestry (IFS)

 

Safety

62      Nil health and safety incidents reported by personnel or contractors for this period.

63      Operators within Southland District Council’s forests have included two planting crews and a tuberculosis monitoring contractor on behalf of the Animal Health Board.

64      A particularly hazardous section of road in the Waikaia Forest has been closed to all vehicles, due to extreme slippery conditions.  This hazard is actively being managed with the intention to improve its surface for re-opening when roading works are next in the area and conditions are drier.

 

Assets

65      The 2015 forest estate valuation was completed during July, by a third party consultant Chandler Fraser Keating Limited.  The tree crop value was assessed as being $11.33M as at 30 June 2015, an increase of $0.11M from 2014.  The main drivers of value change were in the lower discount rate and increases due to forest growth.  Inclusive of land value of $2.51M (no change), the total estate value (land and trees) at 30 June 2015 is $13.84M.

66      The 2015/16 harvesting programme of approximately 40,000 tonnes is currently being approved.

 

Asset Management Improvement Plan Update

67      The draft of the Southland District Council Estate Forest Management Plan has been provided to the Forest Operations Committee.  This plan helps define the management, processes and systems required to manage the forestry estate.

 

Projects

•           Options around public and recreational forest access are still to be worked through.  IFS Growth is preparing recommendations for the Council as a starting point.

 

•           The ownership status of forest land that is not currently held in freehold by the Southland District Council is being investigated with a view to transferring these parcels to freehold ownership.  This is being carried out within Southland District Council and will guide decisions around possible disposal of land from the forestry estate (eg, the area occupied by stand 29/1 at Ohai, which is small and isolated from the rest of the forest block).

 

•           Bathurst Resources are looking at conducting more exploration for coal at Ohai in the coming months.  The scope and associated compensation payments for this are currently being worked through.

 

Property

 

Assets

 

Public Conveniences

68      The upgrade at Garston is in its final stages as is the new toilet at Athol.  Jollies Hill is to be decommissioned in due course.

 

Council Offices and Other Buildings

69      The project at Invercargill to re-roof the tower block is deferred until 2016/17; to be included in other planned projects due to significant cost for scaffolding related to health and safety.

 

Water and Waste

 

Te Anau Wastewater Update

70      Council’s application for resource consent to irrigate treated wastewater to land north of the airport at Kepler has been granted.  The consent has been approved for a period of 25 years and is subject to 29 conditions laying out a rigorous monitoring and reporting programme.  Three appeals have been lodged with the Environment Court with all stating a willingness to enter mediation talks.  Court appointed mediation is currently on hold.

71      A terms of reference for a peer review has been approved by the Project Committee and were included in a request for proposals which was sent to five independent consultants. 
Pattle Delamore Partnerships (PDP) from Auckland has been appointed to undertake the review.  PDP is an engineering consultancy based largely in Auckland with some regional offices who have extensive engineering background and experience in undertaking such reviews.

72      A short term consent for continued discharge to the Upukerora and a discharge to air for the oxidation pond site are currently being processed by Environment Southland.

 

Curio Bay

73      Council is currently working with the Department of Conservation and the South Catlins Development and Environmental Charitable Trust to implement a sustainable long term wastewater treatment solution for the reserve.  This work is part of a wider project to help improve the overall visitor experience at the reserve.

74      Resource consent has been granted for an upgrade of the wastewater treatment facilities for the reserve with the long term goal of also connecting the wider community.  The treatment solution based on membrane technology would treat the effluent to an extremely high standard which is in keeping with the unique status of the area.

75      Funding for the project was approved as part of the 2015 - 2025 Long Term Plan.  Water and Waste Services staff are currently finalising a procurement plan and have appointed a Project Manager to manage the work on behalf of Council and the Trust.

 

Riverton Water Supply

76      Work has now been completed on the installation of a new borehole for the Riverton water supply.  Following this, a contract has been awarded to upgrade the treatment plant to meet new Drinking-water Standards.

77      Stage 1 of chlorine dosing and aeration to correct pH and remove iron has now been completed.  Further testing is being undertaken to enable finalisation of detailed design for Stage 2.

78      Stage 2 scope has been agreed and detailed design of the membrane filtration plant has started.

 

Stormwater Consents

79      Environment Southland is currently processing consent applications for 17 of our stormwater schemes.  Site visits for all schemes have been undertaken and at a follow up meeting Council officers tabled what we believe to be appropriate monitoring and consent conditions consistent with the scale of the activities and the potential financial implications for a small ratepayer base.

80      An initial set of conditions was amended following a meeting in late September. 
Drafted conditions were tabled and consent conditions discussed.  Suggested draft conditions were submitted to Environment Southland in late March
and since then have been awaiting further feedback.  At a meeting on 17 August, Environment Southland indicated that the applications were likely to be progressed along a similar timeline to those from other authorities.

 

Wastewater Resource Consent Renewals

81      Applications have been lodged at Environment Southland for the following wastewater resource consents:

 

•           Ohai - currently seeking affected party written approval.

 

•           Riversdale - pre-hearing meeting held February 2015, suggested draft conditions submitted to Environment Southland.  While the current application is being progressed, an alternative proposal is also being developed to help ensure that value for money can be demonstrated.

 

•           Nightcaps - pre-hearing meeting held 28 April, draft conditions currently being drafted. Feedback from draft conditions has been provided to
Environment Southland.  Once conditions are accepted by both parties, final affected party sign-off will be sought.

 

•           Riverton Rocks - written approvals have been received from all affected parties and Council is currently awaiting feedback from Environment Southland on comments on draft conditions.

 

Wastewater Projects

82      Two significant wastewater treatment projects are currently underway.

83      Te Anau and Winton inlet screens - all earthworks complete and screens installed with some outstanding electrical work at both sites and remaining pipework at Te Anau.

84      Regional desludging - preliminary work to construct watertight, lined earth bunds at Winton and Te Anau are largely complete with actual desludging having started at Winton in August.

 

Environment Southland - Water and Land 2020 and Beyond

85      Environment Southland has recently released its draft consultation document ‘Water and Land 2020 and Beyond’.  The aim is to respond to water quality and quantity issues facing the region and will form the initial basis for further work around a catchment limit setting process across the region. 

86      The draft plan sets out proposed policies and rules for extraction and discharge to water and land and defines what activities are likely to be permitted, require a consent or are prohibited.  A number of rules are likely to directly impact on a range of Council activities so it is important for Council to have active participation in the consultation process.  Closing date for comment to Environment Southland is 30 October 2015.

 

Wheelie Bin Three Strike Policy

87      Inspections have been undertaken since February although strikes will only be applied from mid-April.  In addition, there has been considerable media coverage around the matter and further PR/educational material will be supplied to front line staff prior to the policy going live.  Region wide over 270 first strikes have been applied with a low number of second strikes (less than 10) indicating people are starting to improve.  Unfortunately, Council staff have had to apply one third strike and withdraw the service at one property in the District. 
We have photographic evidence of significant contamination in the bin and have full documented records of each time a strike has been issued.

 

Work Schemes

 

Projects

•           Riversdale Community housing repair,

•           Noxious control - reserves,

•           Invercargill City Council - seat repairs throughout Queens Park,

•           Gardening tasks around Riverton.

 

 

Financial Services

Annual Report

88      Work is well advanced with development of the 2015 Annual Report.  A draft of the report text has been produced and the financial statements are currently in draft form.

89      The Auditors will be on site in early September to complete their final audit work. 
The finalised report is due to be adopted at the 7 October Council meeting.

 

 

Recommendation

That the Council:

a)         Receives the report titled “Management Report” dated 4 September 2015.

 

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report. 

 


Council

16 September 2015

Description: sdclogo

 

Building Consents and Values for July 2015

Record No:        R/15/8/13716

Author:                 Kevin  O'Connor, Manager - Building Control

Approved by:       Bruce Halligan, GM - Environment and Community

 

  Decision                             Recommendation                        Information

 

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

No.

                 2015

                       $

 

No.

                 2014

                       $

 

1.

Dwellings

16

4,410,400

13

3,539,650

2.

Additions to Dwellings

14

506,500

14

795,975

3.

Commercial/Industrial Buildings

10

1,546,355

  9

2,555,000

4.

Swimming/Spa Pools

  0

0

  0

0

5.

Heating Units

23

86,700

22

86,250

6.

Garages

  5

130,400

  8

140,209

7.

Farm Buildings

20

619,500

36

1,306,465

8.

Houses for Removal

  2

20,000

  4

252,600

9.

Cowsheds

  1

700,000

  3

734,000

10.

Miscellaneous

  2

55,000

  4

27,400

11.

Certificates of Acceptance

  1

1,400

  4

31,972

 

TOTAL

94

8,076,255

117117

9,469,521

 

 

2015

2014

Variation %

Total consents for month

94

117

19.66-

Total consents for year

94

117

19.66-

Total project values for month

8,076,255

9,469,521

14.71-

Total project values for year

8,076,255

9,469,521

14.71-

 

 

 

 

Average Residential Cost

275,650

272,280

 

Average House Area (m2)

345.87

202.08

 

 

 

 

 

Number of Inspections Carried Out

485

451

 

 

Summary/Comments:

 

Overall building consent numbers and project values for July 2015 have dropped by 20% and 15% respectively from those of July 2014.  New dwelling numbers and values are up, but there has been a drop off in farm building and dairy shed numbers.  Dwelling alterations and commercial building numbers are consistent with those of July 2014.

 

 

 

Recommendation

That the Council:

a)         Receives the report titled “Building Consents and Values for July 2015” dated 16 September 2015.

 

 

Attachments

a         Appendix A - Consents Database Graph July 2015 View

b         Appendix B - Building Consents Issued Numbers July 2015 View

c         Appendix C - Building Consents Issued Values July 2015 View     


Council

16 September 2015

 


Council

16 September 2015

 


 


Council

16 September 2015

 


 


Council

16 September 2015

Description: sdclogo

 

Resource Consents and Other Resource Management Act Items - July 2015

Record No:        R/15/8/15228

Author:                 Jenny Green, Senior Resource Management Planner - Consents

Approved by:       Bruce Halligan, GM - Environment and Community

 

  Decision                             Recommendation                        Information

 

  

 

Resource Consents and Other Resource Management Act Items - July 2015

1         Attached for the Councillors’ information is a schedule of the non-notified resource consents and other Resource Management Act items processed by the Resource Management Department staff, under delegation from the Council, during July 2015.

2         An average processing time of 16.33 working days from receipt of all required information was achieved for the 15 non-notified consents processed.  Four consents were processed outside of the 20 working day statutory timeframe - placed on-hold at the request of the applicant pending a Council resolution on the Development and Financial Contribution Policy; at the request of the applicant for a Hearing date that suited and for two applications to enable viewing and discussion of the draft decisions.

3         Also processed during this timeframe were (2) Section 127 Change of Condition applications; (1) Limited Notified application; (2) Cancelled applications; (4) withdrawn applications and (2) Section 88 applications.

4         Please note the number of applications processed was steady this month with
15 non-notified consents being processed.

5         If any Councillor has any specific query regarding an individual application, they should contact the relevant staff member who processed the application, as identified on the schedule.

 

Recommendation

That the Council:

a)         Receives the report titled “Resource Consents and Other Resource Management Act Items - July 2015” dated 24 August 2015.

 

 

Attachments

a         Council - 16 September 2015 - Resource Consents and Other Resource Management Act Items - July 2015 View     


Council

16 September 2015

 

 

Application Number

Applicant

Address

Ward

Description of Application

Working Days (from receipt of all information)

Total Costs Incurred

Processing Officer

Decision Date

2014/53121

Te Anau Clay Target Club

580 Manapouri Te Anau Highway

Te Anau

Mararoa Waimea

Te Anau Clay Target Club - New club facilities

0

675.00

Marcus Roy

13/07/2015

Withdrawn

2014/53184

L F Dainty and G J Dainty

188 Milford Road

Te Anau

Mararoa Waimea

Short term rental accommodation for up to 10 people.

30

675.00

Jennifer Green

20/07/2015

2014/53212

Glencoe Quarries Limited and R I Sutton

243 Wilson Road

Glencoe

Winton Wallacetown

Earthworks - Gravel extraction 100 000 m3 per year for 25 year period for maximum of 2 500 000 m3.

93

10970.00

Jennifer Green

2/07/2015

Limited Notified

2014/53278

Geek Chic Bro Limited

225 Milford Road

Te Anau

Mararoa Waimea

To change from a fish and chip shop and mini dairy to cafe-bar

13

859.13

Theresa Cameron

30/07/2015

Withdrawn

2015/53042

M G Smith and K J Rodger

231 Java Road

Centre Bush

Winton Wallacetown

Rural subdivision - Two lots, split consent please see 360/10/15/43

53

337.50

Jennifer Green

15/07/2015

Withdrawn

2015/53043

M G Smith and K J Rodger

231 Java Road

Centre Bush

Winton Wallacetown

Erect a dwelling breaching 150 m rule - split consent 360/10/15/42

53

337.50

Jennifer Green

15/07/2015

Withdrawn

2015/53066

Fonterra Limited

1228 Pioneer Highway

Edendale

Waihopai Toetoes

To construct new buildings associated with the existing Wastewater Treatment Plant

10

1440.00

Theresa Cameron

17/07/2015

2015/53067

C N Heath

275 Golf Course Road

Te Anau

Mararoa Waimea

Two sheds for storage

20

0.00

Olivia Krielen

14/07/2015

Cancelled

2015/53076

E T Brown and S P O'Neill and N Petrie

17 Castle Street

Riverton South

Waiau Aparima

Urban subdivision - Two Lots

23

675.00

Jennifer Green

9/07/2015

2015/53095

Taihoa Farm Trust

541 Winton Hedgehope Highway

Browns

Winton Wallacetown

Rural subdivision - Four Lots

22

950.00

Kelwyn Osborn

23/07/2015

2015/53100

Greenvale Station Limited

372A Cainard Road

Fairlight

Mararoa Waimea

Erect a shed for storage

20

480.00

Kelwyn Osborn

2/07/2015

2015/53103

Spark New Zealand Limited

69 Birchwood Road

Ohai

Waiau Aparima

Certificate of Compliance - Proposed temporary telecommunication facility

18

360.00

Kelwyn Osborn

3/07/2015

2015/53104

Te Anau Kiwi Holiday Park Limited

15 Luxmore Drive

Te Anau

Mararoa Waimea

Storage shed

20

420.00

Theresa Cameron

8/07/2015

2015/53105

Wild South Honey

429 Papatotara Road

Tuatapere - Papatotara

Waiau Aparima

New building for storage

17

675.00

Theresa Cameron

7/07/2015

2015/53108

Bobs Concrete and Building

52 Home Street

Winton

Winton Wallacetown

Urban subdivision - Two Lots

20

418.26

Marcus Roy

10/07/2015

 

2015/53110

Tisbury Dairies Limited

49 Roslyn Road

Roslyn Bush

Winton Wallacetown

Rural subdivision - Two Lots

18

480.00

Kelwyn Osborn

13/07/2015

 

2015/53113

Greendale Dairies Limited

26 Taylors Gorge Road

Browns

Winton Wallacetown

Rural subdivision - One new allotment

14

300.00

Jennifer Green

9/07/2015

 

2015/53116

HK HR Trust

100 Mewton Road

Braxton - Hamilton Burn

Mararoa Waimea

Section 127 Change of Condition Application to resource consent 360/10/13/110 - Gravel extraction

19

630.00

Marcus Roy

21/07/2015

 

2015/53118

Caldwell Contracting

4 Railway Crescent

Edendale

Waihopai Toetoes

To relocate and operate an office administration building

8

500.00

Kelwyn Osborn

8/07/2015

 

2015/53121

R S Black

111 Carran Road

Pourakino Valley

Waiau Aparima

Section 127 Change of Condition Application - Remove condition (a) of Resource Consent 60/3/98/43 so that the consent can be transferred with the sale of the property and to add new roading conditions

12

360.00

Olivia Krielen

21/07/2015

 

2015/53122

A J Kean

806 Mill Road North
Rakahouka

Winton Wallacetown

Rural subdivision - Two lots

18

794.00

Theresa Cameron

28/07/2015

 

2015/53124

T J Copland

1044 Glendhu Road
Waitane West

Winton Wallacetown

Rural subdivision - To undertake a seven lot subdivision over seven stages

5

1440.00

Kelwyn Osborn

30/07/2015

 

2015/53126

A B O'Loughlin

20 Caswell Road
Te Anau

Mararoa Waimea

Relocating a two bedroom dwelling.

4

N/A

Dianne Williams

10/07/2015

Section 88

 

2015/53127

A B Suchanski

253A Ramparts Road
Te Anau

Mararoa Waimea

Boundary adjustment - split consent- see 360/10/15/142 (surrender of easement)

15

570.00

Marcus Roy

29/07/2015

 

2015/53128

M G Smith and K J Rodger

221 Java Road
Centre Bush

Winton Wallacetown

Rural subdivision - 2 Lots - split consent please also see 360/10/15/129

5

370.00

Jennifer Green

16/07/2015

 

2015/53129

M G Smith and K J Rodger

221 Java Road
Centre Bush

Winton Wallacetown

Certificate of Compliance to establish a building platform in which to erect a dwellinghouse. Split consent also see 360/10/15/128.

5

370.00

Jennifer Green

16/07/2015

 

2015/53133

L M Gideon

6 Carrol Street
Riverton North

Waiau Aparima

Extend on existing cottage with a 4.8 m x 4.8 m extension to the north/east end

3

N/A

Nicola Petrie

17/07/2015

Section 88

 

2015/53142

A B Suchanski

253A Ramparts Road
Te Anau

Mararoa Waimea

Surrender of easement - split consent - see 360/10/15/127 (boundary adjustment)

15

N/A

Marcus Roy

29/07/2015

Cancelled

 

 


Council

16 September 2015

Description: sdclogo

 

Dog Control Annual Report

Record No:        R/15/7/12913

Author:                 Julie Gillan, Animal Control Officer

Approved by:       Bruce Halligan, GM - Environment and Community

 

  Decision                             Recommendation                        Information

 

  

 

Purpose

Section 10A of the Dog Control Act 1996 provides that every territorial authority shall report on the administration of its Dog Control Policy and dog control practices, and submit it to the secretary of local government, and give public notice of the report in a daily newspaper

Executive Summary

1    Section 10A of the Dog Control Act 1996 provides that every territorial authority shall report on the administration of its Dog Control Policy and dog control practices, and submit it to the secretary of local government, and give public notice of the report in a daily newspaper.

 

Recommendation

That the Council:

a)         Receives the report titled “Dog Control Annual Report” dated 20 August 2015.

b)         Determines that this matter or decision be recognised as not significant in terms of Section 76 of the Local Government Act 2002.

c)         Determines that it has complied with the decision-making provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 to the extent necessary in relation to this decision; and in accordance with Section 79 of the Act determines that it does not require further information, further assessment of options or further analysis of costs and benefits or advantages and disadvantages prior to making a decision on this matter.

d)         Adopts the Annual Report and authorises it to be forwarded to the Secretary of Local Government by the Manager of Environmental Health, and that the report be publicly notified as required by the Dog Control Act 1996. 

 

Attachments

a         Annual Report View    

 


Council

16 September 2015

 

DOG CONTROL ANNUAL REPORT

FOR THE 12 MONTHS ENDING 30 JUNE 2015

 

 

INTRODUCTION

 

In accordance with Section 10A of the Dog Control Act 1996, the Southland District Council (SDC) is required to publicly report each financial year on the administration of its
Dog Control Policy and its Dog Control practices [Section 10A(1)] and on a variety of
Dog Control related statistics [Section 10A(2)].

 

The primary purpose of this report is to allow the community to see how the Council is managing its Dog Control responsibilities.  This report is for the period 1 July 2014 to
30 June 2015.

 

 

DISCUSSION

 

Dog Control Policy and Practices

 

What we do

 

This activity is about providing controls for dogs to reduce any risks to public safety.  The activity involves registering dogs, investigating complaints about dogs, formulating policy on issues relating to nuisance dogs and legal responsibilities, as well as promoting responsible dog ownership. 

 

Why we do it

 

Dog control contributes to creating safe places (homes, public places and roads) through education, registration of dogs and Dog Control Officer/Ranger activities.  The activity also contributes to a treasured environment where control activities also help to protect wildlife.
In the activity, the Council must comply with the legal requirements of the Dog Control Act 1996 and associated amendments, and the Impounding Act 1955.

 

Dog Control in the Southland District

 

The Southland District Council covers a large geographical area, which includes both urban and rural dog owners.  As at 30 June 2015, there were 13,628 registrations for dogs, of which approximately 40% were pet dogs.

 

In order to deliver an Animal Control service, the Council has an Animal Control Unit consisting of one full time Dog Control Officer, one part time Dog Control Officer and one casual Dog Ranger.  Council also has three contracted Rangers who operate an as needed position.  The three Dog Control Officers have received specialised training on dog attack response procedures.

 

The Animal Control Unit has a close working relationship with key stakeholders in the community such as the Society for the Protection of Animals (SPCA), Furever Homes, local veterinarians, Police, dog clubs and other local authorities, in particular, Invercargill City Council.

 

Dog Control Enforcement Practices

 

The Animal Control Unit operates a seven day, 24 hour service. 

 

Over the last 12 months, the Unit responded to 703 complaints, compared to 868 complaints in 2013/2014, including in regard to aggressive, attacking, barking, wandering dogs and dogs that were “contained” by members of the public. 

 

Complaints received:

 

·              Dog Attacks 61.

·              Barking dogs 121.

·              Found dogs 253.

·              Dog Rush/Threaten (nil bite) 49.

·              Wandering dogs 219.

 

In addition, 256 dogs were impounded over the review period; and during the course of enforcing the Dog Control legislation and policies, 746 infringement notices were issued to dog owners. 

 

Dogs Prohibited, Leash Only and Dog Exercise Areas

 

Improvements continue in the compliance of owners in regard to not exercising their dogs in prohibited areas, and in the use of a leash in “leash only” areas. 

 

Dog Registration and Other Fees

 

Dog registration fees have remained the same for 2014/2015, at $25 per dog.

 

Fees history:

 

·              2001 to 2005, $12.50.

·              2006, $20.00.

·              2007 to 2009, $16.80.

·              2010, $20.00.

·              2011 to present, $25.00.

 

To ensure there is ongoing compliance of owners registering their dog(s), the Animal Control Unit visited all addresses where a dog had been registered the previous year but had not been re-registered in this financial year.  A reasonable number of non-registrations were identified in this exercise, resulting in more dogs being registered that were not known to Council.

 

Dog Education

 

Two Dog Control Officers from the Unit attended the Animal Control Conference in
August 2014 where Christchurch City Council presented its School Education Programme.

 

Other opportunities for education include the registration process, and patrols and site visits

The Unit also places promotional material in Council’s First Edition which is sent to all ratepayers in the Southland District Council area quarterly.

 

Council also undertook free microchipping through the province as a one-off exercise which proved very successful in 2007/2008 and as a consequence Council has since continued with the free microchipping throughout the District.  This has created a very good response from dog owners with 887 dogs being microchipped at these sessions. These occasions also provide an ideal forum for dog ownership education on a one to one basis.

 


 

Disqualified/Probationary Dog Owners and Dogs Generally

 

Over the last 12 months, four dog owners were disqualified from owning dogs.

 

Dogs that attack persons or animals, or rush at vehicles can be classified as a dangerous or menacing dog.  The owner of the dog may be liable for any damage caused by the attack. Between 1 July 2014 and 30 June 2015 three dog owners were successfully prosecuted following attacks; the dogs involved were all ordered to be destroyed by the court.

 

Barking dogs can create stress for other people.  Dogs usually bark excessively because they are bored, lonely or hungry.  The Dog Control Act requires dog owners to keep their dog under control at all times and ensure the dog receives proper care and attention and exercise.

 

Menacing and Dangerous Dogs

 

The Council classified six dogs as dangerous as a result of sworn evidence from the public.  In addition, 11 dogs were classified as menacing by breed (as per Schedule 4 of the
Dog Control Act 1996), while a further seven dogs were classified as menacing by behaviour.

 

General Information

 

Over the last year there has been an increase in the number of dogs impounded from 206 for the 2013/2014 year to 256 over the last 12 months.  This may be attributed to the now standard procedure to seize dogs following attacks.

 

Council employs casual Dog Control Officers and Rangers to improve the response to
Dog Control complaints across the District and is taking a harder line on following up on dog attacks and unregistered dogs.  There was an increase in the amount of infringement notices issued in 2014/2015 compared to 2013/2014 (746 compared to 336).  This figure is a result of decisions to take firmer action with irresponsible dog owners and dog owners that fail to microchip their dogs following several reminders.

 

Infringements issued:

 

·              Obstructed a Dog Control officer or dog ranger              2

·              Fail to supply or wilfully provided false information         3

·              Failed to comply with bylaw                                             2

·              Fail to comply Dangerous Dog classification                   2

·              Failure to comply Menacing Dog classification               6

·              Failed to implant microchip in dog                                   367

·              Kept an unregistered dog                                                 264

·              Failed to keep Dog Controlled or confined                      41

·              Failed to keep dog under control                                      53

·              Failure to provide proper care                                          5

·              Releasing a dog from custody                                         1

 

Council is required to implement the microchip requirements for dogs when they become three months old, and also for dogs classified as dangerous and menacing either by breed or action. 

 

The Department of Internal Affairs requires details of all registered dogs to be entered in a national dog database.  The details are also to include the date of birth of the owner and colour and breed of all dogs.

 

Council has experienced a very pleasing response to microchipping sessions with a number of people attending 

 

Animal Control continues to use the combined dog facility with Invercargill City Council and nurtures a positive working relationship.  The facility continues to be successful with both councils having a modern facility available that includes an office area and a room that can be used for veterinary purposes.

 

The public was consulted on a draft Dog Control Policy and Dog Control Bylaw that provides a new direction for Dog Control in the District.  The Council was proposing changes to encourage responsible ownership and to reduce dog attacks and wandering.  These include a licence to keep more than two dogs and the introduction of discounts into dog registration fees.

 

Dog Control Statistical Information

 

Category

For Period

1 July 2013 to

30 June 2014

For Period

1 July 2014 to

30 June 2015

(1)  Total:  Registrations for Dogs

Approximately 13,205 as at

30 June 2014

Approximately 13,628 as at

30 June 2015

(2)  Total:  Probationary Owners

1

0

(3)  Total:  Disqualified Owners

2

4

(4)  Total:  Dangerous Dogs - still active

12

12

•     Dangerous by Owner Conviction under s31(1)(a)

Nil

Nil

•     Dangerous by Sworn Evidence s31(1)(b)

12

12

•     Dangerous by Owner Admittance in writing s31(1)(c)

Nil

Nil

(5)  Total:  Menacing Dogs - Active

36

56

•     Menacing under s33A(1)(b)(i) - ie by behaviour

8

19

•     Menacing under s33A(1)(b)(ii) - by breed characteristics

Nil

nil

•     Menacing under s33C(1)(ii) by Schedule 4 Breed

17

37

(6)  Total:  Infringement Notices

336

746

(7)  Total:  Complaints received

868

703

 


 

CONCLUSION

 

The 12 months ending 30 June 2015 has been a positive period for the Animal Control Unit with the continuing implementation of improved procedures for complaints and thorough record-keeping particularly post attacks.

Response times for attending a complaint remain high and within target times set by Council, The unit also strive to deliver a high level of customer service through providing support to dog owners and making sure complainants receive feedback.

 

 

Description: C:\Users\KeenK\AppData\Local\Microsoft\Windows\Temporary Internet Files\Content.Outlook\B4GWE0MC\SDC08PVPS_WP-ADMSecureOut_0204_001.jpg

Julie Gillan

DOG CONTROL OFFICER

 

 


Council

16 September 2015

Description: sdclogo

 

Southland District Council's Annual Report 2015 to the Alcohol Regulatory and Licensing Authority

Record No:        R/15/8/14513

Author:                 Sarah Wilson, Environmental Health Officer

Approved by:       Bruce Halligan, GM - Environment and Community

 

  Decision                             Recommendation                        Information

 

  

 

Purpose

1        Section 199 of the Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act 2012 requires the territorial authority to prepare and send to the licensing authority a report of the proceedings and operations of its licensing committees during the year.

 

Executive Summary

2        In a letter received on 21 May 2015, the Alcohol Regulatory and Licensing Authority detailed the format it required for the Annual Report and Annual Return. 

3        Staff have prepared the report and return in accordance with the Authority’s requirements.

 

Recommendation

That the Council:

a)         Receives the report titled “Southland District Council's Annual Report 2015 to the Alcohol Regulatory and Licensing Authority” dated 20 August 2015.

b)         Determines that this matter or decision be recognised as not significant in terms of Section 76 of the Local Government Act 2002.

c)         Determines that it has complied with the decision-making provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 to the extent necessary in relation to this decision; and in accordance with Section 79 of the Act determines that it does not require further information, further assessment of options or further analysis of costs and benefits or advantages and disadvantages prior to making a decision on this matter.

d)         That the received Annual Report, including the Annual Return, for the year ended 30 June 2015 be adopted and forwarded on to the Alcohol Regulatory and Licensing Authority by the Manager of Environmental Health.

 

Attachments

a         Annual Report View

b         Attachment B - Report to Council 26 August 2015 - Annual return for 1 July 2014 to 30 June 2015 - Alcohol View    

 


Council

16 September 2015

 

SOUTHLAND DISTRICT COUNCIL’S ANNUAL REPORT

OF THE SOUTHLAND DISTRICT LICENSING COMMITTEE

FOR THE 12 MONTHS ENDING 30 JUNE 2015

 

 

Introduction

 

Section 199 of the Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act 2012 requires the territorial authority to prepare and send to the licensing authority a report of the proceedings and operations of its licensing committees during the year.

 

The Authority’s suggested format is followed in this report.

 

1.         Overview of the District Licensing Committee’s (DLC) Workload

 

The Southland District Council employs three Environmental Health Officers, all of which are appointed as Licensing Inspectors.  One of these officers specialises in alcohol licensing and processing the bulk of the applications.  The Chief Licensing Inspector is the department’s Manager.

 

Mr Bruce Halligan, Council’s Group Manager Environment and Community, is the  Secretary of the District Licensing Committee via a delegation from the Chief Executive approved by Council. 

 

The department receives clerical support to help in the smooth running of the Committee.

 

The Committee have held hearings on two days during the year. 

 

Reminders are sent out to all holders of licences and certificates advising them of the expiry date and the need to renew their licence or certificate.

 

All application forms are available for downloading off the Southland District Council’s website.

 

A total of 388 applications were received during the report period, categorised in the annual return attached. 

 

The number of licensed premises in the Southland District is largely static at 225; previously it was 227.  In the last quarter of the reporting period, four new premises established in the District. 

 

All applications received are entered into the GEAC Pathway processing system which has a tracking workflow and the ability to produce various reports on the department’s activities.  All applications are scanned and sent electronically to the reporting agencies.

 

Staff have a significant back log of premises renewal applications.  It is taking some time to process these as staff need to ensure that there is a current plan of the premises, that conditions are appropriate, etc., effectively issuing a new licence for each renewal.  Hopefully, after the three year cycle, this workload will get reduced.

 


 

2.         District Licensing Committee Initiatives

 

The DLC has no new initiatives

 

The Southland, Invercargill and Gore District Councils continue to work closely together in the implementation of the Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act. 

 

The three councils have a combined member list for their District Licensing Committees. 

 

Licensing Inspectors meet monthly with the Southland Liquor Liaison Group, made up of the agencies involved in administering the Sale and Supply of Alcohol legislation in the region, namely the Police, Public Health South, Fire Service and councils. 

 

Council is supportive of the new shared workspace with the Police, Public Health South, and Invercargill City and Gore District Councils.  The workspace is currently use limited.  In time, premises will be assessed for relative risk. 

 

District Licensing Inspectors are involved in the training of managers through a local training facility.

 

 

3.         Local Alcohol Policy

 

The Southland, Invercargill and Gore District Councils have adopted a provisional joint Local Alcohol Policy.  The Policy is subject to appeals.  It is understood that these will be heard in December 2015 by the Authority. 

 

 

4.         Current legislation

 

The Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act has introduced new controls to reduce alcohol harm.  Some changes such as the 11.00 pm default off licence hours are significant as many hotels and taverns had off licences across the bar sales well past midnight. 

 

The new default fee structure has been implemented and we have started to collect annual fees from July 2014.  During Council’s Long Term Plan consultation, the Council received a number of submissions regarding the fees for Alcohol Licences.  After hearing the submissions, Council staff investigated the adoption of a fee setting bylaw.  This has been out for public consultation.  Council has yet to decide whether to adopt the bylaw.

 

The rules concerning single alcohol areas and definition of a grocery store are proving to be issues in Southland.  While we now have Authority decisions regarding single areas, the decisions did not include copies of the plans showing the single area.  We are now waiting for the appeals on these decisions before the Committee process any further applications. 

 

Council would like to see more guidance templates of licences and decisions developed by the Ministry. 

 


 

5.         Any other matter the Agency might wish to draw to the attention of the Authority

 

            The new Act has given councils the ability to work together, and the Gore District Council, Invercargill City Council, and Southland District Council have taken advantage of this with the draft joint Local Alcohol Policy and have a shared District Licensing Agency member list. 

 

            There is some interest in developing a regional alcohol harm strategy, discussions are continuing.  In principle we can see potential benefits of such a strategy, with potential to contain content covering matters such as alcohol control on hall hiring by councils and others, alcohol at community events, and key messages around alcohol education. 

 

 

6.         Statistical Information

 

The annual return in the requested format is attached.

 

Council reference:  r15/8/14464


Council

16 September 2015

 


Council

16 September 2015

Description: sdclogo

 

Change of Classification of parts Te Anau Gardens Recreation Reserve

Record No:        R/15/8/15086

Author:                 Kevin McNaught, Strategic Manager Property

Approved by:       Ian Marshall, GM - Services and Assets

 

  Decision                             Recommendation                        Information

 

  

 

Purpose

1        This report provides information around the intention to change the classification of parts
Te Anau Gardens Recreation Reserve.  This is due to the tennis courts and the
Fiordland Community Events Centre building being built over the property boundaries.

Executive Summary

2        In September 2011 the Te Anau Community Board approved the construction of the new
Te Anau Tennis Courts and the area to be incorporated into the lease for the
Fiordland Community Events Centre as these are built on Council property.  Due to space limitations it was acknowledged that the tennis courts needed to be built over the boundary of the Local Purpose Reserve and onto the adjoining recreation reserve.  Actions are now required to rectify the reserve boundaries to allow the lease for the site to be updated.

 

Recommendation

That the Council:

a)         Receives the report titled “Change of Classification of parts Te Anau Gardens Recreation Reserve” dated 1 September 2015.

b)         Determines that this matter or decision be recognised as not significant in terms of Section 76 of the Local Government Act 2002.

c)         Determines that it has complied with the decision-making provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 to the extent necessary in relation to this decision; and in accordance with Section 79 of the Act determines that it does not require further information, further assessment of options or further analysis of costs and benefits or advantages and disadvantages prior to making a decision on this matter.

d)         Resolves that pursuant to delegated authority from the Minister of Conservation, that under Section 24 of the  Reserves Act 1977 the classifications of Lots 1 and 4 DP 482301 be changed from Recreation Reserve to Local Purpose (Community Centre and Sports Building).

 


 

Content

Background

3        New tennis courts in Te Anau were constructed at the rear of the Fiordland Community Events Centre.  The Events Centre is situated on land owned by Council and held under lease.  Due to space restrictions the tennis courts were constructed over the boundary on to the adjoining recreation reserve.  This was undertaken with the support of the Te Anau community and the approval of the Community Board.  This approval was given at its meeting on 28 September 2011.

4        The required survey to rectify the land status has been undertaken but it also identifies the existing Fiordland Community Events Centre also has a small portion of the building on the adjoining recreation reserve.

5        Lot 1 on the attached plan is the portion of the tennis courts and Lot 4 is the portion of the Fiordland Events Centre building where the classification needs to be changed.

6        The public have been notified of the intent to change the classification by notices in both the Fiordland Advocate and The Southland Times and no objections were received.

7        The end intention is to have the lease for the Fiordland Community Events Centre amended by including the tennis courts and all the land the building occupies.

Issues

8        None identified.  Following an administrative process.

Factors to Consider

Legal and Statutory Requirements

9        The process is following the requirements of the Reserve Act 1977, including this requirement for a resolution under the delegation from Department of Conservation.

Community Views

10      This project was the result of significant community support. No objections were received to the public notification to change the classification.

Costs and Funding

11      The Te Anau Community Board is funding this stage of the process as its contribution to the valuable community asset being the new tennis courts.

Policy Implications

12      None identified at this stage.

Analysis

Options Considered

13      Option 1 - Update the classification to Recreation Reserve.

14      Option 2 - Leave the status quo.

 

Analysis of Options

15      Option 1 - To update the Classification to reflect the usage of the land

Advantages

Disadvantages

The Community Centre and tennis courts will be under the same title and classification.

 

Lease can be varied to include all the land the Trust is responsible for.

·        None identified

 

16      Option 2 - Leave the status quo

Advantages

Disadvantages

·        None identified

·        Tennis courts built over classification boundary.

·        All of the courts unable to be included in the Fiordland Community Events Centre Trust lease.

 

Assessment of Significance

17      Not significant.

Recommended Option

18      Option 1.

Next Steps

19      Complete reclassification and lease variation.

 

Attachments

a         Aerial Plan of Fiordland Events Centre and Tennis Courts Original View    

 


Council

16 September 2015

 


Council

16 September 2015

Description: sdclogo

 

Council Action Sheet

Record No:        R/15/8/14704

Author:                 Fiona Dunlop, Committee Advisor

Approved by:       Fiona Dunlop, Committee Advisor

 

  Decision                             Recommendation                        Information

 

  

 

1        Action item list for Council’s information.

 

Recommendation

That the Council:

a)         Receives the report titled “Council Action Sheet” dated 16 September 2015.

 

Attachments

a         Council Action Sheet for 16 September 2015 meeting View    

 


Council

16 September 2015

 

 

Council Action Sheet - Including Public Excluded

 

 

 

 

 

 

Open Action Items

 

 

 

 

 

 

Author

Due Date

Subject

Notes

Kevin McNaught

24/12/2014

Purchase of part of the Blackmount School on behalf of the Blackmount community

Second offer been declined. Negotiations ongoing.
•Crown have accepted Council offer with Settlement at end of September. Contract signed by Council

Courtney Ellison

19/08/2015

Potential Variation to Proposed District Plan 2012 - Implementation Matters

 

Louise Pagan

19/08/2015

Community Assistance Policy - Grants and Donations

 

Courtney Ellison

19/08/2015

Potential Variation to the Proposed District Plan 2012 - Rural Settlement Areas

 

Susan Cuthbert

19/08/2015

Long Term Plan - Sealing Roslyn Road

 

Bruce Halligan

19/08/2015

Request for Funding Support for Aeromagnetic Survey of Southland - Venture Southland

 

Steve Ruru

19/08/2015

Management Report

 

Michael Sarfaiti

19/08/2015

Freedom Camping Bylaw 2015

 

Louise Pagan

19/08/2015

Southland Santa Parade

 

Mark Simpson

19/08/2015

Dryfe Street Stormwater Renewal

 

Kevin McNaught

19/08/2015

Greenhills Quarry

 

Kevin  O'Connor

19/08/2015

Building Consents and Values for June 2015

 

Jenny Green

19/08/2015

Resource Consents and Other Resource Management Act Items - May 2015

 

Jenny Green

19/08/2015

Resource Consents and Other Resource Management Act Items - June 2015

 

Rose Knowles

19/08/2015

Vacancy - Dipton Community Development Area Subcommittee

 

Bruce Halligan

19/08/2015

Proposed Transfer of Powers under the Building Act 2004 from the Department of Conservation to the Southland District Council

 

Kelly Tagg

19/08/2015

Vacancy - Nightcaps Community Development Area Subcommittee

 

Rose Knowles

19/08/2015

Vacancies - Athol Community Development Area Subcommittee

 

Steve Ruru

19/08/2015

Rehabilitation Indemnity Agreement

 

Maree Fyffe

19/08/2015

Public Excluded Minutes of the Council Meeting dated 15 July 2015

 

Steve Ruru

06/05/2015

Haast - Hollyford Highway

Letter sent to HHH on 29 April 2015.  Council is waiting for HHH to provide more information and clarification on the project before making a decision on whether to support it.

Michael Sarfaiti

09/09/2015

Dog Control Policy 2015 and Dog Control Bylaw 2015

•Note that the meeting approved the recommendations in the report.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recently Closed Action Items

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Author

Completion Date

Subject

Notes

Steve Ruru

01/09/2015

Venture Southland Governance and Fee Structure for Non-Elected Joint Committee Members

•Note that the Council Meeting approved the recommendations in the report.
•Action completed by: Steve Ruru Approval of changes has been confirmed to Venture Southland.

Steve Ruru

01/09/2015

Milford Sound Development Authority Annual Report

•Note that the Council meeting approved the recommendations in the report.
•Adoption of the Annual Report has been confirmed to MDA.
•Action completed by: Steve Ruru Approval of report confirmed to MDA.

Ian Marshall

31/08/2015

Delegated Authority to Act in Mediation for the consent for the Around the Mountains Cycle Trail

•Note that the meeting approved the recommendations in the report.
•Action completed by: Ian Marshall Delegation is noted.  Mediation is set down for 10 September 2015.

Sheree Marrah

31/08/2015

Projects from 2014/2015 to be carried forward into the 2015/2016 Financial Year

•Note that the meeting approved the recommendations in the report with an addition to d).
•Action completed by: Sheree Marrah Limehills project added to the TRIM document and all projects carried forward into 15/16 budgets.

 

 

 


Council

16 September 2015

Description: sdclogo

 

Hollyford Conservation Trust

Record No:        R/15/8/15003

Author:                 Steve Ruru, Chief Executive

Approved by:       Steve Ruru, Chief Executive

 

  Decision                             Recommendation                        Information

 

  

 

Purpose

1        To enable the Council to consider a request for support from the Hollyford Conservation Trust.

 

Executive Summary

2        The residents of the Lower Hollyford have requested that the Southland District Council remit a portion of rates paid to assist the Hollyford Conservation Trust in continuing a programme to eradicate and then control any further invasion of introduced pests.

3        Officers are of the view that it would be inappropriate to address this as a rating issue given the need to develop these policies in accordance with the Local Government Act 2002 and Local Government (Rating) Act 2002. There is also no provision at present within Council’s rates remission policies for such a remission.

4        If the Council is of the view that the project has merit and is something to which it should contribute then it would be appropriate for Council to make a grant to the Trust equivalent to the $5,000 provided by Environment Southland.

5        In coming to a view on this issue the Council needs to consider whether pest control, which would normally be seen as being outside of its core business, is an activity to which it wishes to make a contribution. It also needs to consider the potential for such a grant to set a precedent for other similar projects occurring around the district, such as the Pest Free Rakiura proposal.

 

Recommendation

That the Council:

a)         Receives the report titled “Hollyford Conservation Trust” dated 3 September 2015.

b)         Determines that this matter or decision be recognised as not significant in terms of Section 76 of the Local Government Act 2002.

c)         Determines that it has complied with the decision-making provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 to the extent necessary in relation to this decision; and in accordance with Section 79 of the Act determines that it does not require further information, further assessment of options or further analysis of costs and benefits or advantages and disadvantages prior to making a decision on this matter.

d)         Approves a grant of $5,000 to the Hollyford Conservation Trust. 

e)         Approves unbudgeted expenditure of $5,000 to enable the grant to be made and agrees that it should be funded from the District Reserve.

 

Content

Background

6        The Hollyford Conservation Trust involves all of the landowners in the Lower Hollyford. All of the landowners are ratepayers in this area.

7        Over the past few years the landowners have noticed a rapid decline in native flora and fauna due to the pressure put on the environment by introduced pests such as deer, possums, stoats and rats.

8        The residents banded together to create the Trust and then went to Central Government with a business plan to establish a link between the Department of Conservation.  The Minister was impressed with the presentation and the vision to protect this “inland Island” for future generations.

9        Through support by Ngāi Tahu and the Department of Conservation the Hollyford Conservation Project began and in less than three years the eradication project is showing results. Along with noticeable regrowth in the forest the native birdlife is returning.

10      While the Department of Conservation and Ngāi Tahu continue to support the programme the Trust still requires operational funding towards their future work programme.

 

11      An approach was made to Environment Southland and it has agreed to assist in funding the project for three years through a grant of $5,000.00 per annum.

12      The Southland District Council received a request for support in 2014, through a rating boundary change, however this could not be supported for a number of reasons.

13      In the past the Trust have argued that any assistance provided should have regard to the level of rates that property owners in the Lower Hollyford pay given the limited range of services that they receive.

14      The issue of what level of rates property owners within the Lower Hollyford should pay should be seen as a separate, unrelated issue to the question of whether Council should provide assistance for pest control works in the Lower Hollyford area. The issues relating to what constitutes a ‘fair and reasonable’ level of rating is a matter for the Council to decide in accordance with the provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 and the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002.

15      In June 2015, and since the decision of Environment Southland to support the project, this Council has received a further request for financial support. Any funds provided would be used to fund the operational activities to eradicate pests for the advancement of native species within the project area of the Lower Hollyford Valley The request received is as follows:

•        A one off allocation of $50,000.00 to recognise the historical disparity between rates paid to the Southland District Council and the services used by the Lower Hollyford ratepayers.

•        A further annual payment of between $15,000.00 and $20,000.00 that is CPI adjusted and reviewable after three years to recognise the same ongoing disparity.          

 

Issues

16      The issue before Council is whether it should provide a level of support towards the work being undertaken by the Hollyford Conservation Trust.

17      If Council decides that it should provide support then the question as to what might constitute an appropriate quantum and how that quantum is best funded will arise. It is suggested that any contribution should be consistent with that provided by Environment Southland be by way of a grant or contract for service arrangement.

18      In considering whether to make this grant the Council also needs to be mindful of the potential for other similar groups, such as the Pest Free Rakiura proposal, to seek funding from Council. 

 

Factors to Consider

Legal and Statutory Requirements

19      Council is required to determine how it funds its activities and its rating policies by following the processes outlined in the Local Government Act 2002 and the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002. It is important that Council comply with these statutory processes.

20      There is no provision within Council’s existing Rates Remission Policy to provide a remission of rates of this type.

Community Views

21      Council received this request from the Hollyford Conservation Trust as representatives of all ratepayers in the Lower Hollyford. The giving of a grant would be consistent with the views of this community.

22      Council has not specifically canvassed the views of other parts of the district community who would also be contributing given that this activity is most appropriately funded from the General rate.

 

Costs and Funding

23      Any funding provided would be unbudgeted. It is proposed that any grant provided be funded from the District Operations reserve. 

24      There are 17 ratepayers in the Lower Hollyford contributing $27,098.11 (incl GST) in rates for the 2014 - 15 year. Rates include Capital Value, Land Value and Uniform Targeted Rates.

 

Policy Implications

25      Council adopted its Community Assistance – Grants and Donations Policy at its meeting on 5 August 2015. This policy contains policy and criteria for the administration of the range of funds that are administered at a district level.

26      The application from the Hollyford Conservation Trust does not fit within any of the existing funds administered by Council. As such there is no existing policy which applies to this application.

Analysis

Options Considered

Option 1:    Current Year Grant

27     Agree to make a grant to the Hollyford Conservation Trust in the current financial year. It is proposed that a grant of $5,000 be given so as to be consistent with the grant given by Environment Southland.

Option 2:    2016/17 Grant

28     Agree in principle to provide a grant in the 2016/17 financial year and direct staff to include the proposed level of grant in the 2016/17 draft Annual Plan.

Option 3:    Status Quo

29     Under this option the Council would decide not to make a grant to the Hollyford Conservation Trust.

 

Analysis of Options

Option 1 – Current Year Grant

Advantages

Disadvantages

·        Shows a commitment by Council to support the conservation work being undertaken by the Hollyford Community Trust.

·        Allows support to be provided immediately.

·        Council has not budgeted for any grant this year. As such it has not been explicitly funded.

·        It could be argued that pest control work is outside of Council’s core business and as such is not an issue for this Council to fund.

·        May set a precedent should any similar approaches be made from similar communities in the future.

 

Option 2 – 2016/17 Grant

Advantages

Disadvantages

·        As per Option 2 however with less financial benefit to the Hollyford Conservation Trust.

·        Would provide the opportunity for Council to seek community views on the proposal via the draft Annual Plan consultation process. 

·        It could be argued that pest control work is outside of Council’s core business and as such is not an issue for this Council to fund.

·        May set a precedent should any similar approaches be made from similar communities in the future.

 

Option 3 - Status Quo

Advantages

Disadvantages

·        No additional cost to Council.

·        Recognises that pest control is not part of Council’s core business.

·        Avoids setting a precedent for funding of this type of activity.

·        No financial backing from Council could be seen as a vote of no confidence in this project which would be untrue.

 

Assessment of Significance

30      This matter is not considered to be significant in accordance with Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy. The issue being considered is whether the Council should provide a grant to support the conservation works of the Hollyford Conservation Trust.

Recommended Option

31      That Council consider making a grant of $5,000 to the Hollyford Conservation Trust if it is minded to support the Trust.

32      The quantum is consistent with the assistance given by Environment Southland.

Next Steps

33      The next steps involve communicating the Council’s decision to the Hollyford Conservation Trust.

 

Attachments

a         Letter from Hollyford Conservation Trust View    

 


Council

16 September 2015

 


 


Council

16 September 2015

Description: sdclogo

 

Community Governance Project

Record No:        R/15/8/15007

Author:                 Rex Capil, Group Manager, Policy and Community

Approved by:       Steve Ruru, Chief Executive

 

  Decision                             Recommendation                        Information

 

  

 

Purpose

1        The purpose of this report is to consider the establishment of an Elected Representative Working Group to assist with the development of the Community Governance Project.

Executive Summary

2        The Community Governance Project is progressing and the next level of engagement is required to assist in developing the concept to the next stage.

3        The report provides an update of the project design and project development phases.

4        The next stage of the engagement process involves consideration for the establishment of an Elected Representative Working Group, including a cross-section of Councillors, Community Board and CDA representatives.

 

Recommendation

That the Council:

a)         Receives the report titled “Community Governance Project” dated 26 August 2015.

b)         Determines that this matter or decision be recognised as not significant in terms of Section 76 of the Local Government Act 2002.

c)         Determines that it has complied with the decision-making provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 to the extent necessary in relation to this decision; and in accordance with Section 79 of the Act determines that it does not require further information, further assessment of options or further analysis of costs and benefits or advantages and disadvantages prior to making a decision on this matter.

d)         Agrees to establish a Community Governance Project - Elected Representative Working Group.

e)         Adopts the Community Governance Project – Elected Representative Working Group Terms of Reference.

f)          Appoints the following representatives to the Community Governance Project Elected Representative Working Group (subject to availability):

-     Mayor Gary Tong,

-     Councillor Julie Keast,

-     Councillor Ebel Kremer,

-     Councillor Brian Dillon,

-     Pam Yorke (Edendale-Wyndham Community Board Chair),

-     Andre Bekhuis (Otautau Community Board Chair),

-     Pam Naylor (Garston CDA Chair),

-     Brian McGrath (Orepuki CDA Chair).

 

Content

Background

5        The Community Governance Project has now reached the next stage in the engagement process to support the development of the concept further.

6        In getting to this point the following steps and milestones have been achieved:

·              Discussion with Council - January 2015.

·              Discussion at Executive Leadership Team Strategic Direction Workshop - April 2015.

·              Discussion at Staff Forum - June 2015.

·              Discussion with Council - June 2015.

·              Presentation to Community Board and CDA Chairs’ meeting - July 2015.

·              Establishment of Staff Project Working Group - August 2015.

·              Attendance and presentation to Community Boards, CDA Subcommittees and Community Trust meetings - including Manapouri CDA, Tuatapere Community Board, Riversdale CDA, Balfour CDA, Otautau Community Board, Milford Community Trust,
Stewart Island/Rakiura Community Board, Thornbury CDA, Colac Bay CDA, Winton Community Board, Te Anau Community Board, Riverton/Aparima Community Board - August/September 2015.

·              All other Community Board and CDA meetings will be attended in the next six months as the meeting schedule allows.

7        As part of the project implementation approach and engagement process agreed, the opportunity exists to establish an Elected Representative Working Group, involving a
cross-section of Councillors, Community Board and CDA representatives.

8        It is proposed to establish an Elected Representative Working Group with the primary objectives to:

·              Provide feedback and inform points for consideration, develop issues and options and governance requirements and opportunities for Council and District communities.

·              Provide feedback on draft discussion documents produced throughout the project development.

·              Assist and support the stakeholder and community engagement process.

·              Review the final daft Community Governance Proposal document.

9        It is anticipated the Elected Representative Working Group will meet up to three times throughout the life of this project, dates to be confirmed but suggested timing:

·                   November 2015.

·                   February 2016.

·                   November 2016.

Issues

10      It is intended any issues relating to the project development will be identified and considered throughout the life of the project and as part of the extensive engagement process to be undertaken.

11      Issues requiring consideration relating to community governance in the future include:

·              Minimum standards of service delivery across the District.

·              Consistency of representation across the District.

·              Effective and efficient service delivery.

·              Multi agency partnerships and collaboration opportunities.

·              Development of approaches that meet the District needs.

·              Understanding the wider communities of interest approach - with localism being important.

·              Being future focussed – and being appropriate for the next 20+ years.

·              Linkage to Council’s community planning approach.

·              Defining the purpose and function of community governance roles and responsibilities in relation to the Council and community requirements.

·              Understanding of the principles of representative democracy versus participatory democracy.

·              Financial implications and affordability.

Factors to Consider

Legal and Statutory Requirements

12      There are no legal or statutory requirements to establish an Elected Representative Working Group for this project.

Community Views

13      Community views are important to this project.

14      An important process in developing this project is to ensure there is significant engagement during the project design and development stages.

15      This will involve ensuring there is an opportunity for public participation throughout the life of this project.

16      This will involve various degrees of engagement across the public participation spectrum, including but not limited to:

·              Inform - provide the public with balanced information to assist in understanding the topic, issues and options and opportunities.

·              Consult - obtain public feedback on analysis, alternatives and/or decisions.

·              Involve - work directly with key stakeholders throughout the process to ensure that community views and aspirations are consistently understood and considered.

·              Collaborate - partner with key stakeholders to discuss, as required, the development of alternatives and the identification of a preferred approach.

17      The establishment of an Elected Representative Working Group will support these various degrees of engagement as part of the project development.

Costs and Funding

18      The project does not incur additional costs and does not require additional funding to complete.

Policy Implications

19      In the project development phase there are no policy implications to consider.

20      In preparing the final draft Community Governance Proposal there will be an assessment of and clarification, checking for policy and legal implications which will be considered at this point of the process.

Analysis

Options Considered

21      In relation to this report there are two options - to establish an Elected Representative Working Group for the Community Governance Project or NOT to establish an Elected Representative Working Group for the Community Governance Project.

Analysis of Options

Option 1 - Establish a Community Governance Project Elected Representative Working Group

Advantages

Disadvantages

·        Provides political representation at the project development stage.

·        Provides community representation at the project development stage.

·        Allows the opportunity to hear a cross-section of views and ideas to inform the project development.

·        Assists in developing project champions in the community who are informed and can advocate for the project development and suggested approach going forward.

·        There are no disadvantages.

 

Option 2 - Not establish a Community Governance Project Elected Representative Working Group

Advantages

Disadvantages

·        Avoids administration costs.

·        Limits political involvement and buy in to the project development.

·        Limits a significant stakeholder engagement opportunity.

·        Ignores current political structures and community representatives to provide a balanced view and insights to a strategic project.

 

Assessment of Significance

22      The establishment of an Elected Representative Working Group for the
Community Governance Project is not deemed significant in relation to Council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.

Recommended Option

23      It is recommended that Council adopt option one and establish an Elected Representative Working Group for the Community Governance Project.

Next Steps

24      The Elected Representative Working Group will be established, representatives will be informed and be involved in the project development accordingly.

 

Attachments

a         Community Governance Project - Elected Representative Working Group Terms of Reference View    

 


Council

16 September 2015

 

 

a)          

 

 

 

 

 

 

Description: sdc_print

 

 

Southland District Council

 

 

 

Community Governance Project - Elected Representative Working Group

 

Terms of Reference


Council

16 September 2015

 

                                                                                                                                                     

1             INTRODUCTION.. Error! Bookmark not defined.

2             WHAT DO WE MEAN BY COMMUNITY GOVERNANCE.. 2

3             CURRENT SITUATION – POLITICAL STRUCTURE AND REPRESENTATION.. 2

4             GUIDING PRINCIPLES.. 4

5             PROJECT SCOPE.. 5

6             ROLE OF ELECTED REPRESENTATIVE WORKING GROUP.. 5

7          METHODOLOGY AND TIMELINE.. 6

8          MEMBERSHIP………………………………………………………………………………6

9          REMUNERATION…………………………………………………………………………..6

10        ADMINISTRATION SUPPORT……………………………………………………………6

 

 

 

 


Council

16 September 2015

 

1          INTRODUCTION

1.1       There are a host of challenges and opportunities facing Council - delivering services, greater community aspirations, financial constraints, engaging communities, various consultation and communication platforms, forming new partnerships, stakeholder collaborations, multi-agency delivery, rapidly evolving technologies and changing socio economic demographics.

 

1.2       The community engagement and political structures that have evolved since 1989 have served the SDC communities well - a key question is will they serve our communities as well in the next 20 years?  The needs, aspirations and make up of our communities and associated pressures and tensions means Council needs to look at how best to serve and engage with its communities going forward.

 

1.3       It is not about what we have done previously being wrong or having failed - quite the opposite - it is about what we need to be doing looking forward building on the success of the past.

 

 

2       WHAT DO WE MEAN BY COMMUNITY GOVERNANCE

2.1       We have an opportunity to consider Southland District Council in relation to:

·                      The service delivery role it plays to broader roles concerned with strengthening community leadership and steering local and regional opportunities with a greater strategic focus

·                      Council expanding its role from a main focus related to infrastructure service delivery and regulatory compliance to a new approach concerned with community wide outcomes.

 

2.2       Community Governance can be described as a way Council is breaking down perceived organisational boundaries within communities to a revised approach in which it is facilitating a collaborative approach to achieve community outcomes. It’s a new way of Council connecting with its communities.

 

2.3       Community governance applies to collective issues that require the cooperation of multiple stakeholders and parties - eg, residents, business, voluntary not for profit sector, public sector agencies, local government.

 

2.4       It means literally governance exercised by the communities themselves, rather than for them or to them.

 

2.5       It requires a shift in thinking from a focus on governing organisations to governing communities - not necessarily defined within historical boundaries or service delivery jurisdictions.

 

2.6       It also involves a shift from a focus on a representative democracy model to a participatory democracy model. This provides a focus for members of the community being involved and making a contribution.

 

2.7       This project provides an opportunity for Council to occupy a central and leading role with local communities beyond its traditional roles.

2.8     Common elements involve:

·                      Focus on citizens and communities

·                      Multiple roles played by council

·                      Inter-agency collaboration

·                      Strategic or long term thinking

·                      Creation of a community vision and a pathway to deliver on that vision

·                      Inclusiveness

·                      Strong localist orientation

 

2.9       Community governance emphasises the concept of empowerment and identification of Council as an enabling organisation with a greater external orientation in supporting its communities.

 

 

3     CURRENT SITUATION - POLITICAL STRUCTURE AND REPRESENTATION

3.1          Council

The Southland District Council political structure consists of a mayor and 12 councillors.

Council is responsible for representing the district, developing and approving Council policy, deciding on expenditure and funding requirements, monitoring Council performance and employing the chief executive. The chief executive, in turn, employs all other staff.

 

Southland District Council was established in 1989 when New Zealand local government was reorganised. Various councils, including the Wallace County Council, Southland County Council, Stewart Island County Council and Winton Borough Council, were amalgamated to create the Southland District Council, which inherited all the assets and services, including the roading and bridges network, water and waste services in the urban areas, health and building inspections and planning.

 

Council now manages about 5,000 km of roads, 13 urban water supplies, 11 rural water supplies, 17 sewerage schemes, 34 cemeteries, community halls, 69 community housing units, 10 libraries and one mobile library service, 150 reserves and parks, and more.

 

Its role not only encompasses the management and improvement of physical assets such as roads and bridges, but also the Southland communities' social, economic, cultural and environmental interests.

 

Council is a strong advocate on behalf of Southland and continues to represent the district with central government agencies on matters such as health, community services, funding policies, education, youth and migration matters.

 

3.2          Wards

Following a representation review in 2012 Southland District Council is divided into five wards

·                      Mararoa Waimea (three councillors)

·                      Stewart Island Rakiura (one councillor)

·                      Waiau Aparima (three councillors)

·                      Winton Wallacetown (three councillors)

·                      Waihopai Toetoes (two councillors).

 

3.3          Community Boards, Community Development Area Subcommittees and other Subcommittees

Council actively promotes local input into decision-making through its eight community boards - Stewart Island/Rakiura, Winton, Wallacetown, Edendale-Wyndham, Otautau, Riverton/Aparima, Te Anau, Tuatapere - and its 19 community development area subcommittees - Athol, Balfour, Browns, Limehills/Centre Bush, Colac Bay, Dipton, Garston, Gorge Road, Lumsden, Manapouri, Mossburn, Nightcaps, Ohai, Orepuki, Riversdale, Thornbury, Tokanui, Waikaia, Woodlands.

 

Council also has a Community Trust in Milford and other subcommittees include the Stewart Island Jetties Subcommittee, the Riverton Harbour Board, and 13 Rural Water Supply Subcommittees.

 

 

 

Ward

(5)

 

Community Board

(8)

 

CDA

(19)

Mararoa Waimea - 7215

Te Anau - 3402

Athol - 85

Balfour - 135

Garston - 111

Lumsden - 483

Manapouri - 181

Mossburn - 150

Riversdale - 375

Waikaia - 102

Stewart Island Rakiura - 384

Stewart Island-Rakiura - 354

 

Waiau Aparima - 7767

 

Otautau - 1272

Riverton-Aparima - 1518

Tuatapere - 1518

 

Colac Bay - 80

Nightcaps - 294

Ohai - 296

Orepuki - 44

Thornbury - 85

Winton Wallacetown - 8874

 

Winton - 3168

Wallacetown - 933

Browns - 240

Limehills-Centre Bush - 309

Dipton - 491

Waihopai Toetoes - 5399

 

Edendale-Wyndham - 2469

Gorge Road - 545

Tokanui - 97

Woodlands - 118

 

Table 3‑1:  District Representation by Population- Current

 


 

4          GUIDING PRINCIPLES

4.1       Effective community governance reflects an ability to balance District issues as a whole and the specifics related to local communities.

 

4.2       Key guiding principles to assist in developing a direction and position relating to:

 

-     Minimum standards of service delivery across the District.

-     Consistency of representation across the District.

-     Effective and efficient service delivery.

-     Multi agency partnerships and collaboration opportunities.

-     Development of approaches that meet the District needs.

-     Understanding the wider communities of interest approach - with localism being important.

-     Being future focussed – and being appropriate for the next 20+ years.

-     Linkage to Council’s community planning approach.

-     Defining the purpose and function of community governance roles and responsibilities in relation to the Council and community requirements.

-     Understanding the principles of representative democracy versus participatory democracy.

-     Financial implications and affordability.

4.3       Community views are important to this project.

4.4       An important process in developing this project is to ensure that there is significant engagement during the project design and development stages.

4.5       This will involve ensuring there is an opportunity for public participation throughout the life of this project.

4.6       This will involve various degrees of engagement across the public participation spectrum, including but not limited to:

-           Inform - provide the public with balanced information to assist in understanding the topic, issues and options and opportunities.

-      Consult - obtain public feedback on analysis, alternatives and/or decisions.

-           Involve - work directly with key stakeholders throughout the process to ensure that community views and aspirations are consistently understood and considered.

-           Collaborate - partner with key stakeholders to discuss, as required, the development of alternatives and the identification of a preferred approach.

 

5          PROJECT SCOPE

5.1       Development of an Issues and Options Paper with consideration to the community governance definition, current situation – political structure and representation, community planning, future opportunities and challenges.

 

5.2       Gain feedback from stakeholders including staff, elected representatives, residents and ratepayers, other regional and community organisations

 

5.3       Development of an Analysis and Assessment & Concept Discussion Document

 

5.4       Development of a Project Communication and Engagement Plan prepared in conjunction with the Discussion Document

 

5.5       Development of a Community Governance Proposal to inform the Representation Review in 2017

 

5.6       Development of an Implementation Plan to assist with the development of the agreed approach

 

5.7       Development of standard policies and procedures to ensure that Council has a consistent approach for the agreed Community Governance structure.

 

 

 

 

6          ROLE OF ELECTED REPRESENTATIVE WORKING GROUP

6.1     The Elected Representative Working Group role is to:

-           Provide feedback and inform points for consideration, the development of  issues and options and governance requirements and opportunities for Council and District communities.

-           Provide feedback on draft discussion documents produced throughout the project development.

-      Assist and support the stakeholder and community engagement process.

-      Review the final daft Community Governance Proposal document.

6.2       It is anticipated the Elected Representative Working Group will meet up to three times throughout the life of this project, dates to be confirmed but suggested timing:

-  November 2015.

-  February 2016.

-  November 2016.


 

7          METHODOLOGY AND TIMELINE

7.1       It is important a thorough and inclusive internal and external engagement and concept development process is undertaken. 

 

7.2       The suggested approach - with the timeframe flexible due to 2016 local government elections - is presented:

 

Draft Issues and Options Paper prepared

August 2015

Initial engagement with Community Boards and CDAs

August 2015 – February 2016

Establishment of Staff Project Working Group

30 August 2015

Establishment of an Elected Representative Working Group – including cross section of Councillors, Community Board and CDA representatives

16 September 2015

Concept development

September – December 2015

Draft Issues and Options, Analysis and Assessment and Concept Paper to Council

February 2016

Communication and Engagement Plan prepared

February 2016

Stakeholder engagement

By July 2016

Community engagement

By July 2016

Policy and legal requirement clarifications

October 2016

Final draft Community Governance Proposal completed

November 2016

Council approval

February 2017

Proposal available to inform the Representation Review process

February – June 2017

Implementation

July 2017

 

8     Membership

8.1       The Working Group membership is to be derived from

·    Mayor

·    Councillors x 3

·    Community Board Chairs x 2

·    CDA Chairs x 2

 

9     Remuneration

9.1       Working Group members will receive travel reimbursement expenses as per existing Council policy.

 

10   Administration Support

10.1     Administrative support for the project will be provided by the Group Manager Policy and Community or delegate. 

 

 

 


Council

16 September 2015

Description: sdclogo

 

Southland Museum and Art Gallery Trust Board - Statement of Intent 2015/2016

Record No:        R/15/8/15741

Author:                 Susan Cuthbert, Strategy and Policy Manager

Approved by:       Rex Capil, Group Manager, Policy and Community

 

  Decision                             Recommendation                        Information

 

  

 

Purpose

1        The purpose of this report is to forward the Southland Museum and Art Gallery (SMAG) Trust Board’s Statement of Intent 2015/2016 (SOI) to Council as information.

Executive Summary

2        The Southland Museum and Art Gallery Trust Board’s Statement of Intent 2015/2016 has been prepared and was submitted to the Board for its consideration and approval.

3        At its meeting on 5 February 2015, the Board approved the 2015/2016 Statement of Intent and it has now been forwarded to Council as information.

 

Recommendation

That the Council:

a)         Receives the report titled “Southland Museum and Art Gallery Trust Board - Statement of Intent 2015/2016” dated 31 August 2015.

b)         Determines that this matter or decision be recognised not significant in terms of Section 76 of the Local Government Act 2002.

c)         Determines that it has complied with the decision-making provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 to the extent necessary in relation to this decision; and in accordance with Section 79 of the Act determines that it does not require further information, further assessment of options or further analysis of costs and benefits or advantages and disadvantages prior to making a decision on this matter.

d)         Receives the attached Southland Museum and Art Gallery Trust Board Statement of Intent 2015/2016.

 

Attachments

a         Southland Museum and Art Gallery Trust Board Statement of Intent 2015/2016 View    

 


Council

16 September 2015

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

a)       SOUTHLAND MUSEUM AND ART GALLERY TRUST BOARD

 

 

 

STATEMENT OF INTENT

 

 

 

 

FOR THE FINANCIAL YEAR ENDING

June 30 2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The purpose of this Statement of Intent is to:

 

Ø   State publicly the activities and intentions of this Council Controlled Organisation for the year and the objectives to which those activities will contribute; and

Ø   Provide an opportunity for shareholders to influence the direction of the organisation; and

Ø   Provide a basis for the accountability of the board to their stakeholders for the performance of the organisation.

 

This Statement of Intent covers the year 1 July 2015 to 30 June 2016.

 

 

1.          MISSION, VISION, STRATEGIC OBJECTIVES AND THE THREE YEAR PLANNING PERIOD

 

1.1        Mission Statement

Ø The Redevelopment shall showcase the lifestyles created in our Southern Frontier and capture both art and history. 

 

1.2        Vision Statement

 

Ø Southland Museum and Art Gallery is the hub that links and celebrates the stories of our people, land and culture. 

 

1.3        Key Priorities

 

Through its activities the Southland Museum and Art Gallery Trust Board will:

 

Ø  Commence the refurbishment and extension of the Museum and Art Gallery to enlarge exhibition and storage space and to enhance accessibility to the collection.

Ø  Focus the Museum and Art Gallery as a regional facility in the community through the provision of exhibitions – local, national and international.

Ø  Offer a variety of experiences to the people of Southland that they wouldn’t otherwise have access to.

Ø  Actively promote the Southland Museum and Art Gallery as a hub for other museums in the province.

Ø  Work to maintain the presence of the i-SITEIinformation Centre and work with the Department of Conservation to see what opportunities may exist for providing services on their behalf.

 

The principal activities, which contribute to the achievement of the objectives, are categorised into three areas:

 

1.        The Collections - Caring for, developing, and researching collections.

2.        The Community - Engaging communities, including iwi/Maori, in exploring the culture and heritage of Southland.

3.        The Experience - Providing access to the collections and telling the Story of Southland through exhibitions, events, publications and learning programmes.


1.4        Financial Planning Assumptions

 

The Southland Museum and Art Gallery Trust Board receives an annual grant from the Southland Regional Heritage Committee and Invercargill City Council.  Income is also generated from the Museum and Art Gallery’s shop (Momento), and cafe (Pyramid on Gala) and rental from the i-SITE/Information Centre located in the foyer, donations and entry fees for special touring exhibitions.

 

The Invercargill City Council holds the management contract from the Southland Museum and Art Gallery Trust Board who approve the management expenditure each year.

 

The Southland Museum and Art Gallery Trust owns the Museum and Art Gallery building and collections.  The existing building requires extensive refurbishment and has insufficient storage and exhibition space to enable the facility to meet the community’s needs.  The Trust has minimal building reserves and will need to attract significant funding contributions from a wide range of sources.  The cost of the proposed work is approximately $40 million.

 

1.5        Bicultural Development

 

Southland Museum and Art Gallery has developed a close working partnership with iwi through the Iwi Liaison Komiti, which has representatives from the four Southland runanga.  The Iwi Liaison Komiti meets quarterly to discuss issues relating to the collections and exhibitions.

 

 

2.          STATEMENT ON THE BOARD’S APPROACH TO GOVERNANCE

 

2.1        Role of the Board

 

The Board is responsible for the governance of the Trust.  The Board is responsible for setting the strategic direction of the Trust, approving the Statement of Intent and monitoring organisational performance.

 

2.2        Board Membership

 

The Southland Museum and Art Gallery Trust Board is a Council Controlled Organisation with eight members and three ex officio members who represent the contributing authorities.  The Board also has the authority to appoint additional members whose skills and experiences benefit the Trust and its functions.

 

Invercargill City Council                         Southland District Council

Cr D J Ludlow                                        Cr G Macpherson

Cr I L Esler                                             Cr N Paterson

Cr G J Sycamore

 

Tangata Whenua

Jane Davis

 

Appointments by the above Trustees

Gwen Neave

Wallace Jack

 

Ex officio

Manager – Paul Horner

Director of Finance and Corporate Services, Invercargill City Council – Dean Johnston – Secretary/Treasurer

 

2.3        Management of the Southland Museum and Art Gallery

 

The Southland Museum and Art Gallery Trust Board has a management contract with the Invercargill City Council for the operation of the Museum facility.  The Council employs a Museum Manager and staff.

 

2.4        Alignment with Community Outcomes

 

The Southland Museum and Art Gallery Trust contributes towards the achievement of Invercargill’s community outcomes.

 

Community Outcome

Intermediate Outcomes

Activity’s Contribution

Healthy lifestyles in a healthy environment.

Provide or promote the provision of a diverse range of excellent quality and safe indoor and outdoor recreational facilities, both natural and man-made.

Provision of a facility that enables the collections, which focus on Southland, to be stored, maintained and exhibited in conditions that ensure their long term preservation; while providing a quality visitor experience.

 

A city that is a great place to live and visit.

Promote Invercargill actively as a great place to live, work, play and visit.

 

Provide and promote a range of events that create vibrancy and build community.

 

Provision of a facility with exhibitions and events that inspire and inform visitors of Southland’s heritage and culture, provide exhibitions of local, national and international interest.

 

 

3.0        MEASURING PERFORMANCE

 

3.1        Explanation

 

The Trust has two levels of performance measures.

 

The first are high level community indicators which are set by the Trust and mirrored in the Council Long Term Plan.

 

The second set of measures are internal performance measures and of a more technical nature.

 

All targets are included in the table following with the Long Term Plan targets shown in bold italics.

 

 

 

 

3.2        The Collections

 

Objective

Goal

Target Levels of Performance 2015/16

Target Levels of Performance 2016/17

Target Levels of Performance 2017/18

Caring for Collections.

Collections are managed and preserved in accordance with established standards and cultural requirements.

Collections are maintained in optimal conditions for their long term preservation.

Prepare for building refurbishment and extension to enable internal environmental conditions to meet national/international guidelines.

 

No irreparable loss or damage is caused to collections or objects on loan.

 

Undertake building refurbishment and extension to enable internal environmental conditions to meet national/international guidelines.

 

No irreparable loss or damage is caused to collections or objects on loan.

 

Undertake building refurbishment and extension to enable internal environmental conditions to meet national/international guidelines.

 

No irreparable loss or damage is caused to collections or objects on loan

Developing Collections.

The collections are developed to enable the Museum to document, illustrate and explore Southland’s unique natural and cultural heritage.

 

Collection is developed in accordance with reviewed policies - Collection and Management Policies and Acquisitions Strategy

100% of objects acquired entered into Vernon database and verified

 

100% records on Vernon database maintained

 

Project planned to  review, update and verify records on database

100% of objects acquired entered into Vernon database and verified

 

100% records on Vernon database maintained.

 

Review, update and verify 10% of records on database

100% of objects acquired entered into Vernon database and verified.

 

100% records on Vernon database maintained.

 

Review, update and verify 10% of records on database

 


3.3        The Experience

 

Objective

Goal

Target Levels of Performance

2015/16

Target Levels of Performance

2016/17

Target Levels of Performance 2017/18

To provide an inspiring, informed and rich programme of exhibitions, events and learning opportunities.

Development and implementation of an annual visitor experience programme.

Three semi-permanent exhibitions are delivered.

A minimum of 12 short-term exhibitions, including 8 in the community access gallery, are presented annually.

 

Three semi-permanent exhibitions are delivered.

A minimum of 12 short-term exhibitions, including 8 in the community access gallery, are presented annually.

 

Three semi-permanent exhibitions are delivered.

A minimum of 12 short-term exhibitions, including 8 in the community access gallery, are presented annually.

 

Develop and deliver inspiring education programmes for school audiences.

Over 25 education programmes delivered to 4000 school students, including curriculum-linked and exhibition-related programmes.

 

Over 25 education programmes delivered to 4000 school students, including curriculum-linked and exhibition-related programmes.

 

Over 25 education programmes delivered to 4000 school students, including curriculum-linked and exhibition-related programmes.

 

 

3.4        The Community

 

Objective

Goal

Target Levels of Performance

2015/16

Target Levels of Performance

2016/17

Target Levels of Performance

2017/18

To recognise the Museum and Art Gallery as a place where our culture and heritage is valued and promoted.

Maintain strong relationships with iwi/Maori over issues relating to the collections, exhibitions and tuatara management.

 

Iwi Liaison Komiti (representing the four Southland runanga) meet four times/year.

 

Iwi Liaison Komiti (representing the four Southland runanga) meet four times/year.

 

Iwi Liaison Komiti (representing the four Southland runanga) meet four times/year.

 

Promotion of the Southland Museum and Art Gallery as a quality venue to visit for residents and visitors. 

Annual visitor numbers exceed 200,000/annum

Annual visitor numbers exceed 200,000/annum

Annual visitor numbers exceed 200,000/annum

4.0        ACCOUNTING POLICIES

 

4.1       Reporting Entity

 

The Southland Museum and Art Gallery Trust Board is a Trust incorporated and domiciled in New Zealand.

 

The purpose of the Trust is to ensure prudent administration of the facilities and collections within that facility and to monitor the management contract, which is currently with the Invercargill City Council.

 

4.2        Statement of Compliance and Basis of Preparation

 

The Financial Statements have been prepared in accordance with Generally Accepted Accounting Practice in New Zealand (NZ GAAP) with the exception of the Exhibits and Collections.  The Trust has applied the Framework for Differential Reporting for entities adopting the New Zealand equivalents to International Financial Reporting Standards (NZ IFRS), and its interpretations as appropriate to public benefit entities that qualify for and apply differential reporting concessions.  The Trust is a reporting entity for the purposes of the Charities Act 2005 and its financial statements comply with that Act.

 

The Trust qualifies for Differential Reporting exemptions as it has no public accountability and it is not large as defined in the Framework for Differential Reporting.  All available reporting exemptions allowed under the Framework for Differential Reporting for Entities Applying New Zealand Equivalents to IFRS Reporting Regime have been adopted except NZ IAS 7, Cash Flow Statements.

 

The financial statements are presented in New Zealand Dollars (NZD).  The financial statements are prepared on the historical cost basis with the exception of certain items for which specific accounting policies are identified.

 

The accounting policies set out below have been applied consistently to all periods presented in these financial accounts.

 

4.3        Cash and Cash Equivalents

 

Cash and cash equivalents includes cash in hand, deposits held at call with banks, other short-term highly liquid investments with original maturities of three months or less, and bank overdrafts.

 

4.4       Trade and Other Payables

 

Trade and other payables are stated at cost.

 

4.5       Trade and Other Receivables

 

Trade and other receivables are stated at their cost less impairment losses.


 

4.6       Revenue

 

Revenue is measured at the fair value of consideration received.

 

The Trust receives grants from the Invercargill City Council and grants from other local organisations.  These grants are recognised as revenue upon entitlement as conditions pertaining to eligible expenditure have been fulfilled.

 

Interest income is recognised using the effective interest method.

 

4.7        Expenditure

 

All expenditure is recognised in the Statement of Financial Performance in the period in which it is incurred.

 

4.8        Goods and Services Tax

 

The Financial Statements have been prepared exclusive of Goods and Services Tax (GST) with the exception of receivables and payables which are stated with GST included.  Where GST is irrecoverable as an input tax then it is recognised as part of the related asset or expense.

 

4.9        Donated Services

 

The work of the museum is dependent on the voluntary service of many individuals and organisations.  Since these services are not normally purchased by the museum and because of the difficulty of determining their value with reliability, donated services are not recognised in these financial statements.

 

4.10      Statement of Cash Flows

 

Cash means cash balances on hand, held in bank accounts, demand deposits and other highly liquid investments in which the Trust invests as part of its
day-to-day cash management.

 

Operating activities include cash received from all income sources of the Trust and records the cash payments made for the supply of goods and services.

 

Investing activities are those activities relating to the acquisition and disposal of non‑current assets.

 

Financing activities comprise the change in equity and debt capital structure of the Trust.

 

4.11      Property, Plant and Equipment

 

4.11.1  Additions

 

The cost of an item of property, plant and equipment is recognised as an asset if, and only if, it is probable that future economic benefits or service potential associated with the item will flow to the Trust and the cost of the item can be measured reliably.


 

4.11.2   Valuation of Fixed Assets – Fit out

 

Under previous GAAP the Museum established a deemed cost for the Museum building and fit out at an amount that was not materially different to its fair value on initial recognition.  The Museum has elected to use that fair value measurement as deemed cost for NZ IFRS.

 

Purchases of fixed assets have been recorded at cost less accumulated depreciation.

 

4.11.3   Exhibits and Collections

 

The value of exhibits is not reflected in these Financial Statements.  However the direct purchase costs of fixed assets acquired during the year for upgrading assets contained within various galleries have been capitalised and are subject to the depreciation policy.

 

The Trust does not recognise contributions of works of art, historical treasures and similar assets if the donated items are added to collections that meet all the following conditions:

 

Ø  Are held for public exhibition, education, or research in the furtherance of public service rather than financial gain.

Ø  Are protected, kept unencumbered, cared for and preserved.

Ø  Are subject to an organisational policy that requires the proceeds from sales of the collection’s items to be used to acquire other items for the collections.

 

This policy is in accordance with a USA Financial Accounting Standards Board Statement – Statement of Financial Accounting Standard No 116.

 

The Southland Museum and Art Gallery Trust Board has decided to continue its policy of not attributing a monetary value to items gifted to the collection.  This treatment is contrary to NZ IAS 16 Property, Plant and Equipment, which requires that if an asset is acquired at no cost, or for a nominal cost, the cost is its fair value as at the date of acquisition.  The fair value of the asset received must be recognised in the Statement of Financial Performance.  NZ IAS 16 has not been followed because the Board considers that the collection does not have the characteristics of property, plant or equipment.

 

Collection items have substantial intangible characteristics in that they are unique with iconic status or are historic and irreplaceable or sacred to particular communities.  Without an active market no financial value can or should be ascribed.  Scientific collections have great research importance but little market value.  With good conservation the life of an object or specimen is indefinite.  Age usually increases the significance of an object rather than depreciating it.  The collection is not like manufacturing plant that is heavily used, wears out and is then replaced.

 

A number of leading museums in New Zealand and museums in the United Kingdom, United States of America and Canada do not capitalise their collections.

 

The collection is valued at $10,000,000 for insurance purposes.

 

4.12     Depreciation

 

Depreciation has been charged in the Financial Statements on the basis of the economic life rates recommended by the Inland Revenue Department as follows:

 

Buildings                                          2% CP

Fit-out                                      9 – 40% DV

 

4.13      Financial Instruments

 

The Trust is party to financial instruments as part of its normal operations.  These financial instruments include bank accounts, short-term deposits, debtors, creditors and loans.  All financial instruments are recognised in the Statement of Financial Position and all revenues and expenses in relation to financial instruments are recognised in the Statement of Financial Performance.

 

4.14      Changes in Accounting Policies

 

There are no changes in accounting policy during the period.  All accounting policies have been consistently applied throughout the period covered by these financial statements.

 

 

 

 


Council

16 September 2015

Description: sdclogo

 

Minutes of the Manapouri Community Development Area Subcommittee Meeting dated 12 May 2015

Record No:        R/15/8/15005

Author:                 Jenny Labruyere, Te Anau Area Officer

Approved by:       Jenny Labruyere, Te Anau Area Officer

 

  Decision                             Recommendation                        Information

 

  

 

Recommendation

Receives the minutes of the Manapouri Community Development Area Subcommittee meeting held 12 May 2015 as information.

 

 

Attachments

a         Minutes of Manapouri Community Development Area Subcommittee Meeting dated 12 May 2015 (separately enclosed)

 


Council

16 September 2015

Description: sdclogo

 

Minutes of the Lumsden Community Development Area Subcommittee Meeting dated 15 June 2015

Record No:        R/15/8/14985

Author:                 Rose Knowles, Lumsden Area Officer

Approved by:       Rose Knowles, Lumsden Area Officer

 

  Decision                             Recommendation                        Information

 

  

 

Recommendation

Receives the minutes of the Lumsden Community Development Area Subcommittee meeting held 15 June 2015 as information.

 

 

Attachments

a         Minutes of Lumsden Community Development Area Subcommittee Meeting dated 15 June 2015 (separately enclosed)

 


Council

16 September 2015

Description: sdclogo

 

Minutes of the Edendale-Wyndham Community Board Meeting dated 26 May 2015

Record No:        R/15/7/13156

Author:                 Maree Fyffe, Committee Advisor

Approved by:      

 

  Decision                             Recommendation                        Information

 

  

 

Recommendation

Receives the minutes of the Edendale-Wyndham Community Board meeting held
26 May 2015
as information.

 

 

Attachments

a         Minutes of Edendale-Wyndham Community Board Meeting dated 26 May 2015 (separately enclosed)

 


Council

16 September 2015

Description: sdclogo

 

Minutes of the Resource Management Committee Meeting dated 27 March 2015

Record No:        R/15/7/12718

Author:                 Debbie Webster, Committee Advisor

Approved by:       Debbie Webster, Committee Advisor

 

  Decision                             Recommendation                        Information

 

  

 

Recommendation

Receives the minutes of the Resource Management Committee meeting held 27 March 2015 as information.

 

 

Attachments

a         Minutes of Resource Management Committee Meeting dated 27 March 2015 (separately enclosed)

 


Council

16 September 2015

Description: sdclogo

 

Minutes of the Resource Management Committee Meeting dated 12 June 2015

Record No:        R/15/7/12721

Author:                 Debbie Webster, Committee Advisor

Approved by:       Debbie Webster, Committee Advisor

 

  Decision                             Recommendation                        Information

 

  

 

Recommendation

Receives the minutes of the Resource Management Committee meeting held 12 June 2015 as information.

 

 

Attachments

a         Minutes of Resource Management Committee Meeting dated 12 June 2015 (separately enclosed)

 


Council

16 September 2015

Description: sdclogo

 

Minutes of the Riverton/Aparima Community Board Meeting dated 8 June 2015

Record No:        R/15/7/12986

Author:                 Alyson Hamilton, Riverton Area Officer

Approved by:      

 

  Decision                             Recommendation                        Information

 

  

 

Recommendation

Receives the minutes of the Riverton/Aparima Community Board meeting held 8 June 2015 as information.

 

 

Attachments

a         Minutes of Riverton/Aparima Community Board Meeting dated 8 June 2015 (separately enclosed)

 


Council

16 September 2015

Description: sdclogo

 

Minutes of the Te Anau Community Board Meeting dated 10 June 2015

Record No:        R/15/7/12862

Author:                 Jenny Labruyere, Te Anau Area Officer

Approved by:       Jenny Labruyere, Te Anau Area Officer

 

  Decision                             Recommendation                        Information

 

  

 

Recommendation

Receives the minutes of the Te Anau Community Board meeting held 10 June 2015 as information.

 

 

Attachments

a         Minutes of Te Anau Community Board Meeting dated 10 June 2015 (separately enclosed)

 


Council

16 September 2015

Description: sdclogo

 

Minutes of the Woodlands Community Development Area Subcommittee Meeting dated 15 December 2014

Record No:        R/15/7/12706

Author:                 Debbie Webster, Committee Advisor

Approved by:       Debbie Webster, Committee Advisor

 

  Decision                             Recommendation                        Information

 

  

 

Recommendation

Receives the minutes of the Woodlands Community Development Area Subcommittee meeting held 15 December 2014 as information.

 

 

Attachments

a         Minutes of Woodlands Community Development Area Subcommittee Meeting dated 15 December 2014 (separately enclosed)

 


Council

16 September 2015

Description: sdclogo

 

Minutes of the Woodlands Community Development Area Subcommittee Meeting dated 2 March 2015

Record No:        R/15/7/12702

Author:                 Debbie Webster, Committee Advisor

Approved by:       Debbie Webster, Committee Advisor

 

  Decision                             Recommendation                        Information

 

  

 

Recommendation

Receives the minutes of the Woodlands Community Development Area Subcommittee meeting held 2 March 2015 as information.

 

 

Attachments

a         Minutes of Woodlands Community Development Area Subcommittee Meeting dated 2 March 2015 (separately enclosed)

 


Council

16 September 2015

Description: sdclogo

 

Minutes of the Policy Review Committee Meeting dated 28 January 2015

Record No:        R/15/9/16289

Author:                 Debbie Webster, Committee Advisor

Approved by:       Debbie Webster, Committee Advisor

 

  Decision                             Recommendation                        Information

 

  

 

Recommendation

That Council receives the minutes of the Policy Review Committee meeting held 28 January 2015 as information.

 

 

Attachments

a         Minutes of Policy Review Committee Meeting dated 28 January 2015 (separately enclosed)

 


Council

16 September 2015

Description: sdclogo

 

Minutes of the Activities Performance Audit Committee Meeting dated 28 January 2015

Record No:        R/15/8/14507

Author:                 Fiona Dunlop, Committee Advisor

Approved by:       Fiona Dunlop, Committee Advisor

 

  Decision                             Recommendation                        Information

 

  

 

Recommendation

That Council receives the minutes of the Activities Performance Audit Committee meeting held 28 January 2015 as information.

 

 

Attachments

a         Minutes of Activities Performance Audit Committee Meeting dated 28 January 2015 (separately enclosed)

 


Council

16 September 2015

Description: sdclogo

 

Minutes of the Activities Performance Audit Committee Meeting dated 18 February 2015

Record No:        R/15/8/14509

Author:                 Fiona Dunlop, Committee Advisor

Approved by:       Fiona Dunlop, Committee Advisor

 

  Decision                             Recommendation                        Information

 

  

 

Recommendation

That Council receives the minutes of the Activities Performance Audit Committee meeting held 18 February 2015 as information.

 

 

Attachments

a         Minutes of Activities Performance Audit Committee Meeting dated 18 February 2015 (separately enclosed)

 


Council

16 September 2015

Description: sdclogo

 

Minutes of the Activities Performance Audit Committee Meeting dated 18 March 2015

Record No:        R/15/8/14511

Author:                 Fiona Dunlop, Committee Advisor

Approved by:       Fiona Dunlop, Committee Advisor

 

  Decision                             Recommendation                        Information

 

  

 

Recommendation

That Council receives the minutes of the Activities Performance Audit Committee meeting held 18 March 2015 as information.

 

 

Attachments

a         Minutes of Activities Performance Audit Committee Meeting dated 18 March 2015 (separately enclosed)

 


Council

16 September 2015

Description: sdclogo

 

Minutes of the Activities Performance Audit Committee Meeting dated 22 April 2015

Record No:        R/15/8/14516

Author:                 Fiona Dunlop, Committee Advisor

Approved by:       Fiona Dunlop, Committee Advisor

 

  Decision                             Recommendation                        Information

 

  

 

Recommendation

That Council receives the minutes of the Activities Performance Audit Committee meeting held 22 April 2015 as information.

 

 

Attachments

a         Minutes of Activities Performance Audit Committee Meeting dated 22 April 2015 (separately enclosed)

 


Council

16 September 2015

Description: sdclogo

 

Minutes of the Activities Performance Audit Committee Meeting dated 3 June 2015

Record No:        R/15/8/14588

Author:                 Fiona Dunlop, Committee Advisor

Approved by:       Fiona Dunlop, Committee Advisor

 

  Decision                             Recommendation                        Information

 

  

 

Recommendation

That Council receives the minutes of the Activities Performance Audit Committee meeting held 3 June 2015 as information.

 

 

Attachments

a         Minutes of Activities Performance Audit Committee Meeting dated 3 June 2015 (separately enclosed)

 


Council

16 September 2015

Description: sdclogo

 

Minutes of the Activities Performance Audit Committee Meeting dated 24 June 2015

Record No:        R/15/8/14595

Author:                 Fiona Dunlop, Committee Advisor

Approved by:       Fiona Dunlop, Committee Advisor

 

  Decision                             Recommendation                        Information

 

  

 

Recommendation

That Council receives the minutes of the Activities Performance Audit Committee meeting held 24 June 2015 as information.

 

 

Attachments

a         Minutes of Activities Performance Audit Committee Meeting dated 24 June 2015 (separately enclosed)

 


Council

16 September 2015

Description: sdclogo

 

Minutes of the Riverton Harbour Subcommittee Meeting dated 21 April 2015

Record No:        R/15/8/14685

Author:                 Alyson Hamilton, Riverton Area Officer

Approved by:       Alyson Hamilton, Riverton Area Officer

 

  Decision                             Recommendation                        Information

 

  

 

Recommendation

Receives the minutes of the Riverton Harbour Subcommittee meeting held 21 April 2015 as information.

 

 

Attachments

a         Minutes of Riverton Harbour Subcommittee Meeting dated 21 April 2015 (separately enclosed)

 


Council

16 September 2015

Description: sdclogo

 

Minutes of the Balfour Community Development Area Subcommittee Meeting dated 27 May 2015

Record No:        R/15/8/15231

Author:                 Rose Knowles, Lumsden Area Officer

Approved by:       Rose Knowles, Lumsden Area Officer

 

  Decision                             Recommendation                        Information

 

  

 

Recommendation

Receives the minutes of the Balfour Community Development Area Subcommittee meeting held 27 May 2015 as information.

 

 

Attachments

a         Minutes of Balfour Community Development Area Subcommittee Meeting dated 27 May 2015 (separately enclosed)

 


Council

16 September 2015

Description: sdclogo

 

Minutes of the Riversdale Community Development Area Subcommittee Meeting dated 27 May 2015

Record No:        R/15/8/15232

Author:                 Rose Knowles, Lumsden Area Officer

Approved by:       Rose Knowles, Lumsden Area Officer

 

  Decision                             Recommendation                        Information

 

  

 

Recommendation

Receives the minutes of the Riversdale Community Development Area Subcommittee meeting held 27 May 2015 as information.

 

 

Attachments

a         Minutes of Riversdale Community Development Area Subcommittee Meeting dated 27 May 2015 (se